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1844 Nov. 2
Priour, Father J(ulien): New Iberia, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Priour has just received Blanc's letter of October 21. When he began to convalesce he asked Mrs. McVeigh to reply to Blanc's first two letters sent on from Mrs. Dubuclet's home where he took sick. He went to see any sick persons who asked for him. He is very happy to see a priest at St. Mary's. He promises to visit Franklin in spite of his health. On the eve of All Saints they forced him to appear before the grand jury of St. Martin. The bearer of this letter can tell Blanc about this new war that 5 or 6 of them have declared.

V-5-b - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {5}


1844 Nov. 3
(Czvitkovicz), C.SS.R., Father Alexander: St. Mary's, (Pennsylvania)
 to Bishop Anthony (Blanc): New Orleans, Louisiana

(Czvitkovicz) asks pardon for his delay in answering (Blanc)'s letter of August 20 concerning the German Catholics of Louisiana. The reason for his delay is that he is laboring to set up a colony of German Catholics in St. Mary's, Pennsylvania. He has had unusual success. There are already about 70 German Catholic families. But he has not forgotten the Germans of Louisiana and will come to their aid as soon as possible. The same spirit animates their Redemptorist superiors in Vienna to whom (Blanc) wrote and who have written to Czvitkovicz for information. For this purpose Czvitkovicz sent Father (Benedict) Bayer, (C.SS.R.) to Europe last June to beg for help. Czvitkovicz has a letter announcing the coming of Redemptorists and some secular priests of whom one has begun his novitiate at Baltimore. Czvitkovicz hopes for another in the next year.

V-5-b - A.L.S. - (Latin) - 3pp. - 4to. - {5}


1844 Nov. 4
Beauprez, Father P(eter) F(rancis): Pointe Coupee, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Beauprez received Blanc's letter of October 20 in which Blanc complains of his strong language in his last letter. Blanc says "But I believe it was on your responsibility that the objects were placed in the church." Beauprez believes that Blanc should not give an opinion merely on reports. Since the statutes of the diocesan synod is their rule, is not Father (Jean?) Martin obliged to share with Beauprez according to Statute 44? About (Francois) Bin(e)aud, Blanc believes that Beauprez is also obligated to him; Beauprez has told Blanc that T(erencine) Samson, married almost four months ago, did not have time, but why does Blanc believe that these young ladies did not have Beauprez's consent to take up a collection? The reason they did not continue was because they began to receive so little and Bin(e)aud also withdrew. This affair was settled two months ago; J(ulia) Labry offered the balance of $5.65 to Bin(e)aud who did not want to take it, telling her through Mrs. T(eren)ce Samson that it was Beauprez's affair. This money was deposited with the justice of the peace. To justify himself about the Propagateur, Beauprez could not pay all the expenses of the church with only the fees and pay his servant and feed his horse. The only thing to do would be to quit after what the president has just told him that the charter has expired but that the present trustees would keep him up to June 1. Beauprez's health is better but he was ill four and a half months this year. If the pastor of Iberville or Donaldson had done less, they would have had a replacement in order to recuperate. Did not Father (Ennemond) Dupuy have a replacement; the pastor of Donaldson had a half dozen. Beauprez hopes Blanc will replace him next year. N.B. Geauprez is sorry to see in Blanc's letter that he thinks Beauprez is too much attached to material things. At Baton Rouge Beauprez paid the $1000 Blanc advanced on the church and $500 interest to the Citi(zen's?) Bank. (P.S.) Jean Baptiste St. Cyr and Genevieve Chitz, his first cousin, ask for a dispensation in order to marry.

V-5-b - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {10}


1844 Nov. 4
D., J(osep)h: (New Orleans, Louisiana
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, (Louisiana)

After (Blanc's) kind letter to D. at Biloxi, he called at the bishop's house with confidence but alas he was no longer in the elegant dress that he had the first time he saw (Blanc). He was told that the Bishop was not in. The next day D. entered the hospital; he came out four days later and called again at the bishop's house. A large priest with an imposing face looked him over and said, "You don't stop bothering His Excellency, do you?" D. will never bother him again; he never wants to hear of a priest much less a prelate. D.'s table was always open to them in Portugal and Spain. If (Blanc) were in danger, D. would save him at the price of his own blood. P.S. Did some one from Biloxi write against him?

V-5-b - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 12mo. - {1}


1844 Nov. 4
Kimball, J. T.: Janesville, Wisconsin
 to (Orestes A. Brownson): Boston, Massachusetts

Mr. Orim Guernsey, having tried in several cities to obtain a copy of Brownson's Review, asks Brownson to forward to Guernsey a copy.

I-3-g - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {1}


1844 Nov. 4
Mégret, Father A(nthony) D(ésiré): Vermillonville, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Mégret received Blanc's letter several days ago. They propose to come to see Blanc the third week of this month and after receiving his blessing the young levite could be on his way. It would be of advantage for him to make his humanities studies in their seminary and to make his higher studies in France. He is confident that Blanc will not have a more solid and distinguished person in his diocese if he responds to the talents God has given him. Mégret proposes to take the young man to the seminary at Assumption. He hopes that Blanc will write either to him or the Superior that Blanc thinks it is right for Louis (Lucien) Arceneaux to take his humanities at their seminary before going to France. Mégret asks Blanc's advice about the divorce of two young people who wish to remarry. Also about the fees for a funeral Mégret held three leagues from his village. It was not in the Mouton family but in another more well-to-do. (On the address side of the letter in pencil): M. Sibright, 14 Roy.

V-5-b - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 8vo. - {3}


1844 Nov. 6
McLaughlin, Father Peter: Cleveland, Ohio
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He seeks to atone for past faults in letter-writing. The Whigs of Cleveland in a monster procession stopped and gave him a cheer on the occasion of the "releasement" of O'Connell. His discourse on the subject of O'Connell's release filled the church with many including protestants. Since Purcell's last letter all is well. He has not started yet a society for the German church because all is not yet quiet. The choir is improving but costs $4 a week. Certain decorations have been added over the altar table. He is desirous that Purcell send the ostensorium. He has heard from Father (Charles) McCallion who will not return until spring. Father (John) Lamy came and made his collection for Mt. Vernon of some $80, which he expended on church goods. Mr. John Doubleday, the only one of the family not a Catholic will visit Purcell on his way to St. Louis. He mentions a public conversion taking place on All Saints. He speaks of the effect the Bishop's visit had on the people and on himself. The matter between Mr. Howe and and himself is adjusted. Both Howe and McCaffrey with their families have gone away for good. They were detested by all.

II-4-i - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {6}


1844 Nov. 6
Richards, C. C. Harper, P. O. Jones, J. J.: Oxford, Georgia
 to O(restes) A. Brownson: (Boston, Massachusetts)

The above named committee of the Few Society of Emory College notifies Brownson that he has been unanimously elected to honorary membership in the society and requests that he enroll his name on a membership list of the association. The purposes of the Society are the attainment of knowledge and improvement in elocution.

I-3-g - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {1}


1844 Nov. 7
DeL'hoste, Father: Dreux, (France)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

How happy he would be to see his land sold this year. He has been hoping for this for 7 years. If De L'hoste were to die, Mrs. Destrem would have no means of living. A country pastor has few resources in France. He must keep a servant. For more than a year Mrs. Destrem has been in bed with rheumatism. He cannot meet his needs and hers on a salary of 800 francs and fees of 150; he has, with the consent of the Bishop of Chartres, taken charge of the education of the children of one of the Bishop's friends, Caillé de St. Père, examining magistrate at Dreux. From the picture Blanc gave De L'hoste of the financial situation in the United States, he is convinced that he will have to take a loss; he hopes Charles Daron will bring it to a close this year. Mrs. Destrem consents to any price for her share provided she gets thousand piastres. Since De L'hoste has a bill to pay to J. Zamora, he wants the income to pay his debt. Their lands have cost them almost 8000 piastres and 2000 additional because of the trickery of Mr. Barnett. Mrs. Destrem has signed nothing so if De L'hoste's portion is not enough for Zamora's debt he will pay the rest on Mrs. Destrem's death. Blanc is to do whatever he can to make Daron sell. (P.S.) De L'hoste does not understand what Blanc says about his negress to whom he gave some notes in payment for others. In selling his establishment with the furniture, linens, etc., he received some notes which she accepted, after consulting her lawyer, in exchange for De L'hoste's to facilitate his leaving New Orleans.

V-5-b - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {6}


1844 Nov. 7
Haskins, Father Geo(rge) F.: Boston, (Massachusetts)
 to Father J(ames) R(oosevelt) Bayley: New York, (New York)

Haskins asks Bayley to send him his books as soon as he can. Haskins is temporarily at the Bishop's house. He will probably not be stationed anywhere till after the arrival of Bishop (Benedict Joseph) Fenwick. Conversions are of daily occurrence though none as yet among Haskins' own relatives. The present political crisis is one for the Catholic Faith as well. The Whigs, if beat, will grow desperate. Already Daniel Webster has declared himself in favor of the Native American Party. Horrible stories are circulated about the Pope's intentions of subjugating this country and they are daily expecting a general persecution. (Orestes A.) Brownson has made his abjuration. His conversion greatly startles and amazes the Protestants.

II-2-n - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 8vo. - {5}


1844 Nov. 8
Baines, Emily:
 to Bishop Antoine Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

She has just received Blanc's letter of the 9th. She thanks him for his kind interest in her unfortunate family. She regrets she cannot place her daughters in the convent next year. She has written to New York to engage a lady Blanc is well acquainted with. Her daughters, Ann and Margaret, are pretty well advanced in French and English; their lamented father always procured the best professors. P.S. Blanc is to write her in care of John Holmes. (On the address side is written): Brilliant.

V-5-b - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 4to. - {3}


1844 Nov. 9
Fritsch, O.F.M. Father Franciscus: Munich, (Bavaria)
 to (Bishop John Baptist Purcell): (Cincinnati, Ohio)

Although God himself has entrusted their Franciscan brethern now going into the diocese of Cincinnati to (Purcell) Fritsch cannot refrain from also recommending them to (Purcell) and asking him to aid and counsel them. May God, the giver of all good things, grant that this plant grow into a great tree for the glory of the Church, especially in the diocese of Cincinnati, and as a solace for the Bishop.

II-4-c - A.L.S. - (Latin) - 1p. - 8vo. -


1844 Nov. 11
Duplay, Father: Lyons, (France)
 to (Anthony) Thèves: St. Cyprien, (France)

Duplay, Superior of the Lyons Seminary, Certifies that Teèves, a native of St. Cyprien Parish, has studied theology for two years in this house, with success.

V-5-b - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 8vo. - {1}


1844 Nov. 11
Dupuy, Father Enn(emond): Iberville, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Dupuy received Blanc's letter about the wooden beds from (St. Gabriel) College. He wrote immediately to Father (John) Boullier, (C.M.). Dupuy will have them sent to Donaldsonville before the end of the month. There are 24. As to the other business, Dupuy is thinking of going down to the city soon and talking with Blanc. By selling his goods Dupuy can give his successor the sum he owes to the (Father Paul de) St. Pierre estate. He will go or remain as Blanc says but remaining in uncertainty puts him in an embarrassing situation. He will welcome Father (Joseph) Richar(d)bole if he wishes to come to help him. Dupuy is quite well recovered now. He has not yet blessed the St. Raphael Chapel. The Boissac family and others of Blanc's acquaintance are all well; they ask why Blanc comes there so seldom.

V-5-b - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {8}


1844 Nov. 12
Dicharry, Félix:
Propaganda (College Rome, Italy)
 to Bishop Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Blanc will no doubt be amazed at not having received a letter if the one he wrote the day after he entered the College has not arrived. How can Dicharry express his gratitude for all Blanc's kindnesses. What happiness when, on returning from Rome, Dicharry can exercise the sacred ministry. When will they have a Creole clergy? In Paris, Mr. Madrolle(?) showed him a letter from Dominique Rouquette which greatly edified him. What an example for the Creoles who seek happiness far from God. Their studies began on November 5. He left Father (Bonaventure) Armengol with sadness, at Lyons. Armengol was very well.

V-5-b - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 12mo. - {4}


1844 Nov. 12
Morisse, Treasurer of the Civic Hospice: Havre, (France)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, (Louisiana)

At the request of Father Nicolas Fort Morisse informs Blanc that Fort arrived in Havre October 23 but in such a deplorable state that he could not notify Blanc himself. Today there is some hope of his recovery. If anyone (Blanc) knows is returning to France Morisse must give warning that it would be well not to come on the Rockingham for it is impossible to suffer more than Fort did on board that ship. Not only was he ill treated but several times was on the point of being thrown overboard by the First Mate. The captain remained entirely indifferent to the affairs of his boat.

V-5-b - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {2}


1844 Nov. 12
Pierz, Father Francois: Lacroix, (Michigan)
 to Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefevere: Detroit, Michigan

Pierz after sending 3 petitions to Lefevere without an answer send a fourth one for the needs of his mission. With the close of navigation his communications with Mackinac are nearly gone and he is without supplies or money. The week before All Saint's day he went to Mackinac hoping to get money and other necessities; but he got only 3 furnaces for his school, and had to get a kitchen stove on credit. Not buying any provisions, he secured a net and caught some fish which he ate with potatoes. His old cook, a savage, is going to leave because he is not able to supply her with tea. Pierz planned to stay 4 months at Lacroix, 2 months at Middletown, the end of the winter at Arbre Croche in the several filial missions. At Lacroix, Pierz had to teach school twice a day so that the teachers can go fishing to feed their families. At Middletown, there is no school since the teachers had fish to feed with their families. Besides this he went to Middletown and Arbre Croche to take care of the sick. Pierz says, Mrs.(Maria Anne) Fisher at Arbre Croche complains about the failure to pay her at the time fixed. Meanwhile, Miss Tanner has made her jealous by boasting that she is well paid every quarter, vacations included. Mrs. Fisher plans to write to the Bishop for an increase in her salary. Pierz gave Mrs. Fisher 3 months pay during her vacation in 1844 and wishes to do the same in 1845 if she agrees to be Pierz's interpreter. Mrs. Fisher will translate his catechism for a couple more months. But the the food he can give her family of four would be his chickens and fruits from his garden at Arbre Croche. He wants her longer, since she is a good teacher. After finishing his catechism, Pierz hopes to start a prayer book for the savages, since Baraga's prayer book contained an insufficient number of prayers. The two teachers of the schools of Grand Traverse are doing well; but Pierz does not know if he could help them against the winter. Pierz rode a horse from Lacroix to Arbre Croche; but he lost his horse and had to pay for it. For 2 months, he was without money. He received $600 from Lefevere but he had to pay 4 teachers and feed and pay two maids. He also spent $200 traveling from mission to mission. He did not get any ehlp from Europe and the savages. He only got 6 boxes of sugar last spring and 5 sacks of wheat. There was no income from funerals, masses, etc. like in the cities. Because of his age, he demands sustenance and because of the good functioning of the schools, they require many things. Pierz asks Lefevere about the future prospects and when he can get of the savages included in the agreement to live in his mission. Further there is a great number of Catholic children scattered about, without education, and with irresponsible parents, which he thinks should be gathered in an orphanage. He has already given the orders to cut trees to build an orphanage next spring at Lacroix and at Arbre Croche. He takes the entire responsibility of the enterprise. Such an institution will form good American citizens. Bishop (Frederick) Rese received so much money and did nothing for the savages. Pierz also asks Lefevere to send him another priest. He asks pardon for the freedom with which he speaks.

III-2-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 8vo. - {6}


1844 Nov. 13
Skolla, O.S.F., Father Otto (Charles): Mackinac, (Michigan)
 to Bishop P(eter) P(aul) Lefevere: Detroit, Michigan

Skolla thanks Lefevere for the letter containing the draught addressed to Messrs. Biddle and Drew for the sum of $100.00, which sum he received from the above mentioned firm. Skolla has not answered sooner because of the unexpected and urging jobs he had to do, and because he waited for the receipt of part of Mrs. (Sophie) Graverod's salary, the schoolteacher at St. Ignace. He has already written to her on account of it, but it has not yet arrived. Skolla thinks that she will write to Lefevere probably asking him for an increase of her salary, but he thinks that her salary is adequate. She cannot expect more than $100.00 which will be given to her when her term expires. Up to now she has received the $48.46 which Lefevere had sent last year for the first half of the year, and which has not yet fully expired. The rest, namely $52.00 she will receive at the end of her contract which will be on Dec. 1, 1844, the day she began to teach. About the people of Mackinac in general, they are a stubborn nation, with no submission, no charity, no sincerity, no zeal for the church. Water runs into the church and into the sacristy in different places; the stove is all rusty and the pipes are full of holes. On Sunday very few assist at Mass and on weekdays one rarely finds one, or at most two, persons but most of the time there is none and Skolla cannot say Mass without an assistant. But what grieves him most is that the schoolteacher who would have time enough to go because Mass begins at 8:00 and the school at 9:00, and who lives right under the same roof, and that for nothing, goes about once every 2 weeks on weekdays. Concerning the church singing, Skolla wants to introduce in Mackinac and in St. Igance, the songs of Baltimore instead of the Canadian songs. For the hymns and feastdays of Canada are greatly different from those of Baltimore, and therefore on the great feastdays the singers here can sing only the Sunday vespers. Dr. Baron, the doctor of the fort, a Catholic and a very agreeable man and Mr. Abbot are of the same opinion as Skolla. The doctor, who is also acquainted with ecclesiastical singing, proposed to select some Catholic soldiers from the fort for the singing and having chosen different voice they can build up to give modest but a pleasing concert. For the same reason he ordered several books for choral singing from Baltimore. (Augustine) Hamlin, who went away to Detroit to stay there, was the best singer. He knew the church songs well, but there are only 2 now who do not even read well, and one of them is Mr. Mayet, the man who was first married by a registrar, but again married by Skolla according to the rites of the Church with the Bishop's dispensation. But Skolla intends to get rid of this man in a quiet way because he is not quite recommendable. He is bold and tries even to harm the priests. Even Father (Francis) Pierz knows him sufficiently. The servant of Mr. Abbott comes several times on Sundays to serve at the altar during vespers and follows his own ceremonies as Skolla narrates. Some even insisted that the people should be incensed. That is all the respect he gets from this miserable world. He asks the Bishop's pardon for having delayed so long in answering and begs him to write a letter to the congregation which he can read to them in church reprimanding them to do their duty, especially concerning point 1, and concerning point 2, Skolla wants to have a better arrangement made with the Bishop's approval and authority.

III-2-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 8vo. - {6}


1844 Nov. 14
Cavelier, A. and Z.: New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Receipt for $60.25 for wine. Signed by L. Girard.

V-5-b - Receipt - (French) - 1p. - 16mo. - {2}


1844 Nov. 14
Smith, J. C.: Virginia
 to Orestes A. Brownson: (Boston, Massachusetts)

He is reading law under a practicing attorney, and finding it dry, wishes that Brownson would advise him what to read so as to make and fashion him like this "Philosopher Brownson." By so doing he would oblige a stranger who has the profoundest respect for his opinions and admiration for the independent expression of those opinions.

I-3-g - A. L. S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {1}


1844 Nov. 15
Foley, David J., and others,: Baltimore, (Maryland)
 to O(restes) A. Brownson: (Boston, Massachusetts)

The undersigned being members of a committee of the Young Catholic Friend's Society, delegated to procure a speaker at their anniversary celebration, request that Brownson accept their invitation to lecture on any subject of his choice since by his lecturing they could not better fulfill the wishes of the Society, or give to the citizens of Baltimore a more acceptable treat. The chief aim of the Society is the greater glory of God and the advancement of His Holy Religion. For his information they enclose a copy of their constitution.

I-3-g - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {2}


1844 Nov. 15
McCallion, Father Charles: New York, N. Y.
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Because of the snow he has given up the idea of begging in Upper Canada until the spring. Fearing likewise the roughness of the lake on a trip to Cleveland, he wrote Father McLaughlin to forward Purcell's letter to New York. He arrived in New York and is now at Father O'Neill's Two priests have written to Bishop (John) Hughes about him and Hughes was on the point of denouncing him when he arrived with Purcell's letter. Hughes will write to Purcell but has given him permission to say Mass, and a tacit permission to beg. He relates the Story of his previous visit. At that time Bishop Hughes was away visiting a part of his diocese and he obtained limited permissions from Bishop (John) McCloskey, to visit certain friends and beg in their parishes if they agreed. He left New York and on his way up to Hudson used this limited privilege. Some, however, took the occasion to attack him, but he insists that he is not guilty of violating his permissions, since the priests themselves introduced him to their congregations. If Bishop Hughes accuses him of any other crime he can satisfy Purcell after he hears the charge. He cannot dictate the answer but would like to know the charge.

II-4-i - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {5}


1844 Nov. 15
Masnou, C.M., Father J.: Assumption, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

Masnou received Blanc's letter of the 8th; he has examined the book in which a record is kept of the money the Seminary of (St. Vincent de Paul) has received from Blanc since February 1, 1844. February 12 they received from Father (Charles M.) Menard, $18; Father (Stephen) Rousselon paid Bishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.), $200; February 22 Rousselon gave the seminary, $100; February 23 Rousselon paid for a subscription to the Propagateur, $3.50; March 8 Rousselon paid Mr. Elder, $61.12; March 8 they received 3 dozen catechisms from Rousselon, $5; April 17, money from the Propagation of the Faith, $23.54; from Father (Adrien) Rouquette for board, $120; from Rousselon $100; May 18 from Sister Constance Giroir, $86; making a total of $717.16. To be subtracted from this is $29.55(?) the balance when Father (Bonaventure) Armengol, (C.M.) settled with Rousselon on December 16, 1854. Martin Byrnes' trip, $5; the trips of Father Felix Dicharry and Rouquette for their ordinations, $17; Mr. Hussey's trip to New Orleans $2.25; (Magi Armengol)'s trip to New Orleans, $9; so Blanc has given $654.64. If Blanc sends Father Viallier, (C.M.) their Procurator General, an order for 4000 francs on Mr. Choisselat according to Armengol's request, the seminary will have received since last February, $1454.64 to which is to be added $15.62 for freight from the things lately arrived from France. Masnou apologizes for asking for $200; he would not have done so if he had known how large Armengol's expenditures were; Blanc would do him a great service by paying Elder's account. Masnou is glad that (Louis Lucien) Arcenaux is returning to the seminary. Father (John) Timon, (C.M.) sent Mr. Collins to replace Mr. O'Reylly. (With this letter are folded two notes, one is Blanc's hand): From February 1 to April 23, 1844 the seminary received $954.64; from Mr. Choiselat $355; from the same in money given to Armengol, $63.40; for freight $15.62; on account to Messrs. Elder $63.25, a total of $1451.91. (The other note in Armengol's hand): The seminary account was fully settled February 1, 1844. Since then there has been paid (a total) of $793.69 from February 10 through May 15. (Blanc adds on this note): Last trip to France, November 5, $469.62; November 11 to Messrs. Elder, $63.25; June 1844, Masnou, $100; a total of $1426.49. Received from Armengol, $100.

V-5-b - A.L.S. and 2 notes - (French) - 5pp. - 4to.&32mo. - {17}


1844 Nov. 15
(Portier), Bishop Michael: Mobile, (Alabama)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

After examining the case about which Blanc consulted him, (Portier) thinks that the marriage is valid since the mistake is in the quality and not in the substance. If he were forced to give an opinion he would hold to his first judgment. Blanc should communicate with Rome; he would know before three months what to do.

V-5-b - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {1}


1844 Nov. 16
Luchezi, Arcangelo: Lucca, Itary
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He has received Purcell's letter after long and anxious waiting but finds that Purcell, too, cannot pay him until March. He should have no objection if Purcell paid the interest which will be $275 and which he cannot think of losing. A friend will supply him until March. He has lost his wife by consumption on November 2. He trusts that Purcell will be punctual in March as he needs the money and that he will let him know where in Florence he is to go to get the money. If Purcell has informed him of this before he would have planned differently. He asks Purcell to tell Joseph Mariano of his wife's death. He hopes Purcell will not delay because his situation with his two children is deplorable.

II-4-i - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {1}


1844 Nov. 16
Xavier, S.C., Sister M(ary) St. Joseph: (Emmitsburg, Maryland)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

They have at last arranged the affairs of the Novitiate. Sister Loretto, (S.C.) is Sister Servant and Mistress of Novices. She will make her visit to Mobile and then go to Donaldson to establish the novitiate (St. Vincent's Institute). Four Sisters (of Charity) have been given to her. Sister Mary Gonzaga (S.C.) who was Sister Servant at St. Joseph's Asylum in Philadelphia is excellent for teaching; she has a great facility with languages. Old Sister Savina, (S.C.) will teach French to the Sisters in their leisure hours, that is all she is able to do. Sister Pascal, (S.C.) will be the housekeeper. Sister Adelaide, (S.C.), a sister of Father (Joseph) Balfe, is for the school with Sister Gonzaga. Sister Théonilla will be for the other little works of the house. They have, so to speak, taken the blood from their veins for Donaldson. Their Reverend Superior will write to Blanc; he said the establishment should be in Blanc's name. One thing they ask is that there will not be, as there is at St. Joseph, a boarding school connected with the institute. It is their great difficulty here; it is a dangerous thing where there is a novitiate. They are sending Sister Clotilda, (S.C.) to replace Sister M(ary) Margaret, (S.C.) who has asked to leave the hospital. She could take charge of the free school; they are sending Sister M(ary) Gabriel, (S.C.) to assist in this school so there are three for this good work. Sister Margaret knows French and could perfect it there. Sister Isidore, (S.C.) is to replace Sister M(ary) Eugenia, (S.C.) whom Sister F(rancis) Regis (S.C.) cannot control. In Sister Xavier's eyes, the novitiate is the most important. (P.S.) Enclosed Blanc will find some ideas which could perhaps open a new way for more solid good. She knows Blanc could inaugurate them in New Orleans. They are trying to "keep the iron hot" in Baltimore and Philadelphia where they have asylums for girls.

- A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp.


 Enclosure: 

1844 Nov.
St. Joseph's: (Emmitsburg, Maryland)

It is believed that the Sisters of Charity do comparatively little good in their Orphan Asylums. The reason for this is that the children are sent when too young from the Institutions. Scarcely have they time to acquire the first rudiments of a plain English education. Being of little service to their employers they become discouraged and either throw themselves away for a livelihood or remain useless members of society. The remedy is to let there be two institutions for female orphans: the first, preparatory, in which they remain until ten or 12, the second, in which they will receive a plain English education and a through knowledge of their religion. The children would remain in the second institution until 18. By taking in work, this second institution will be enabled in a great measure to maintain itself. Should any orphans give evidence of extraordinary capacity, they may be sent to the Orpahn Asylum attached to the Motherhouse at St. Joseph's to fit them for governesses, teachers in public schools, etc.

- Note - (English) - 2pp.


V-5-b - A.L.S., Note - (French & English) - 6pp. - 4to. - {17}


1844 Nov. 17
Blanc, P.(?): Sury, (France)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Father (Anthony) Thèves' brother (having told him of Thèves' departure?) Blanc writes in haste to give news of the family. Cousin(?) Father Boué has told him of the Bishop's difficulties. Blanc's oldest son who was a soldier at the Cayenne garrison, died February 4, 1844. Victor is studying mathematics; Eugène is at the Brothers' school. Nothing new in Sury. However, they have enlarged their church, thanks to their pastor, Father Metton. They have taken over the little street beside Mr. Jordan's. Blanc and Antoine and their families are well. P. Blanc signs as Bishop Blanc's brother.

V-5-b - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {3}


1844 Nov. 17
Hobbs, Eliza W.: Daviess County, K(entuck)y
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

Some four years ago Bishop (Benedict Joseph) Flaget presented the Catholics of Daviess County a lot in Owensboro provided they would build a church there. The Catholic Ladies exerted themselves to accomplish this. The church has been reared tho is is far from complete. Bishop (Guy Ignatius) Chabrat contributed $50. They have been favored with a priest to whose support few are able to contribute. The extreme poverty induces Hobbs to acquaint Blanc with the case. The Ladies have done all they are able to do.

- A.L.S. - 2pp.


 On the same paper: 

(1844 Nov. 17)
Aud, Father A.A.: St. Stephen's, Owensboro, (Kentucky)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Mrs. Hobbs has said sufficient to elicit sympathy for their poor congregation. He expresses the gratitude of the Ladies for the presents (Blanc) has bestowed on them through Mr. Hobbs. It is only three months since he became pastor of this church and probably the former pastor will return, still he does not feel less solicitude.

- A.L.S. - 1p.


V-5-b - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 4to. - {5}


1844 Nov. 17
Skolla, O.S.F., Father Otto (Charles): Mackinac, (Michigan)
 to Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere): (Detroit, Michigan)

Skolla hopes that Lefevere has received his letters, sent 3 days ago, containing information about his congregation, church singing, etc. Skolla wants to dismiss Mr. Mayet from having charge of the church singing for he is a rebellious and treacherous man. Father (Francis) Pierz also knows him. Only the Bishop can curb him. When Lefevere wrote a letter to Skolla, pronouncing Mayet excommunicated on account of his civil marriage and giving him a public penance, immediately Mayet wanted to see the letter, mistrusting Skolla. A Catholic soldier from the Fort who has sung before in other churches and is well acquainted with music, has visited Skolla twice, wishing to sing in the church with some others of his company. They are waiting for permission from Lefevere. Enclosed is the receipt from Mrs. Sophie Graverod, the schoolteacher at St. Ignace, which he received Nov. 16. Skolla has given her up to date not only $48.46, but some time ago he had paid debts which she made in Mackinac amounting to $6.00, and the other day an advancement of $3.00 which he sent her. Therefore he has given her altogether $57.12. She still has $43.00 coming from her salary. She is a good teacher, modest and industrious, sollicitous about her pupils. Her husband has substituted for her several times, having been formerly a schoolteacher himself.

III-2-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 8vo. - {4}


1844 Nov. 18
Beysson(?), Father: St. Galmier, (France)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Anthony) Thèves is going to Blanc; Beysson has known him for more than 12 years and always under the most favorable circumstances. He has talents and virtues. The pastor of Ainay will send all the notes about this young man; Father Boué is the one who handled his call and means of transportation. Beysson would be surprised if Blanc ever has a complaint against his cousin's choice.

V-5-b - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {3}


1844 Nov. 18
Lafond, Father: St. Cyprien, (France)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Lafond is sad to see his friend Father (Anthony) Thèves go so far away, but he is pleased to see the sacrifice he is making for God. Blanc will find Thèves a good subject. Lafond has known him since childhood to be pious and to have distinguished himself in his studies.

V-5-b - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 8vo. - {2}


1844 Nov. 18
Read, Will(iam) Geo(rge): Balt(imore, Maryland)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

He has just been favored with Blanc's letter of the 8th concerning their cause before the Supreme Court. It was better to place the defence on the ground of religious liberty than on the right to control private property. Read cannot doubt the result before the Supreme Court. The objects of the "Native Americans" with whom the Whigs are connected, are directly at variance with the guaranties for religious liberty. Every emigrant naturalized strengthens the position of Catholics. Nobody can be blind to the strides the Methodists, Presbyterians, and others are making towards union of Church and State through their control of the system of public instruction. Read can hardly feel charity towards those who cooperate for the exclusion of foreigners for 21 years. Blanc is to pray for Read and for his noble boy who, whether in the sanctuary or the forum, he trusts will be a more glorious minister of God than Read.

V-5-b - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 4to. - {2}


1844 Nov. 18
(Quarter), Bishop William: Chicago, (Illinois)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

(Quarter) congratulates Blanc on his triumpant victory over the enemies of religion and the happy termination of his difficulties. (Quarter) has concluded to adopt the ordo published in New Orleans in his diocese which is under the special protection of the Immaculate Mother of God. He asks to have 12 ordos forwarded.

V-5-b - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {2}


1844 Nov. 19
Boué, Father: Lyons, France
 to Bishop Ant(oin)e Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Boué has just received Blanc's letter of October 14 containing the address of Blanc's brother. He is happy to learn that Blanc is almost at the end of the persecutions he has suffered for two years. Blanc had asked Boué to look up some good subjects for his diocese and to get in touch with Blanc's "chargé d'affaires" in Paris, Father (Hercule) Brassac. Tomorrow young, (Anthony Thèves) Tève of St. Cyprien of whom Boué spoke in his last letter will leave. Tève made his first studies at Verrières, then two years of theology at the Seminary of St. Irénée. Cardinal de Bonald has granted, upon request from Boué, an exeat for Blanc's diocese. Tève will be able to learn English while finishing his theology. Boué has advanced him 100 francs for the trip from Lyons to Paris and Le Havre. Boué has asked Brassac to see Blanc's attorney for funds for the trip. Blanc asked about the commission for Father (James) Lesne but forgot to say whether he had any news of Doctor Acher(?). Boué never sees his father without asking about him.

V-5-b - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {5}


1844 Nov. 19
Butler, Father Thomas R.: Hamilton, Ohio
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

The increasing soreness of his throat has disabled him so that he cannot preach. This, with the fact that the children old enough for confirmation have been put to work and the adult candidates are either sick or scattered about the county, has caused him to write Purcell and ask him to give him sufficient warning if he comes to Hamilton, so that all can be informed. He has received another letter from the railroad men asking that he visit them this week, and as Thursday will be "estimate day" he intends to go there and try to collect funds to meet the note due in January. If he cannot talk he will arrange for future visits. If Purcell intends to visit Hamilton he is to send word back by this same messenger and send a duplicate to Lebanon for him. He is anxious to get Father (Daniel) Hallinan. They agreed that Hallinan should come to live with him. Now he is himself sick and also Father (Henry D.) Juncker has also asked for Hallinan. He has felt the desire to join a religious community and will talk of this when he sees Purcell. If Purcell could send a German priest there for two weeks, he feels that much more good would be affected.

II-4-i - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {4}


1844 Nov. 19
Deluol, Father L(ewis) R(egis): Baltimore, (Maryland)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Deluol was at Emmittsburg when Blanc's letter of the 4th arrived in Baltimore. He wrote to (William George) Read to tell him that Blanc's case would be called between the 1st and the 15th of next month and to send him the expenses. He had sent him $7.42 the 7th of last March. What Deluol cannot understand is that, Blanc having received the submission of his trustees, they have not withdrawn their lawsuit. While Deluol was at St. Joseph, they were very busy with the foundation (of the Sisters of Charity) at Donaldsonville. Sister Lorretta, (S.C.) will be the Superior, Sister M(ary) Gonzaga, (S.C.) will be her assistant. Blanc knows the first, the second was brought up at the academy at St. Joseph and entered the novitiate 16 or 17 years ago. She will be the head of the school. She was head of an Asylum at Philadelphia and ran it very well. About the property, they are agreed that Blanc is to be the owner.

V-5-b - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {6}


1844 Nov. 19
Metton, Father: Sury, (France)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, Louisiana

Metton takes advantage of the departure of Father (Anthony) Thèves in order to recall himself to (Blanc) and to give him some news of the country always in (Blanc)'s affections. All the members of (Blanc)'s family are well, those of St. Etienne as well as Sury. Father Boué has probably told (Blanc) that the Cardinal Archbishop of Lyons has proposed Metton as pastor of St. Peter's at St. Chamond. The government opposed it; the nomination was refused on the pretext that Metton was a legitimist. Metton has enlarged his church; Mr. Jordan ceded the passage between the church and the chateau. Metton's assistant is still Father Mauviollon who has often regretted not following (Blanc)'s advice. Fathers(?) Mathevet and St. Cyr(?) are professors, one at St. Godard and the other at Verrières. Agatha, Metton's old cook, sends her respects. Thèves will probably bring (Blanc) a letter from the pastor of St. Golmier. Fortunately (Blanc) is seeing the end of his struggles. Thèves will give him the political news.

V-5-b - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 12mo. - {3}


1844 Nov. 19
Henni, John Martin, Bp. of Milwaukee: Milwaukee, Wisconsin
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He received a few days ago a copy of the synodal decrees from Vincennes in which the impediment of clandestinity was held to be in force in that diocese. Henni observes that if this is true in Vincennes and Indiana it was also true of the northern dioceses Detroit and Milwaukee, because Mackinac, Rapides des Peres, etc. were founded even earlier than Vincennes. He asks Purcell what his own opinion is on this matter and also the opinions expressed in the Councils attended by Purcell at Baltimore. He has given up his plan of visiting Europe this fall partly because he could not get ready in time and partly because he has been stopped as Purcell was stopped by letters from Munich - on the grounds that there were too many bishops and priests visiting Europe. His friends in Europe have promised to take care of his needs but if they do not he will not be stopped. He wonders when the new bishops will get their share from the Propagation. The Vienna allottment is fair though smaller. He has a Cathedral in which he conducts a German and an English service. He asks Purcell about a Father (John A.) Drew of Frankfort, Kentucky who wishes to be admitted to his diocese.

II-4-i - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {6}


1844 Nov. 20
Boullier, (C.M.), Father J(ohn): Donaldsonville, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Boullier would have replied to Blanc's letter of the 8th and 15th if a fever had not kept him in bed for a week. The house is almost ready; a window has been put in where the Sisters (of Charity) asked. Boullier wrote to Father (Ennemond) Dupuy for the bedsteads; the mattresses and covers are all ready. In Blanc's letter of the 15th he talked of subscription list but the letter did not contain one. Boullier had a letter from Father (John) Timon, (C.M.), brought by Father (Michael) Collins, (C.M.), the Irish priest who came to 'replace Father (John) O'Reilly, (C.M.). The Sisters will be very well supported. Boullier would like to talk about his church but that will be for the next letter he will try to write as soon as he is fully recovered.

V-5-b - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {6}


1844 Nov. 20
Gallwey, R.S.C., Madame J.: St. Michael's, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

They have been expecting a visit as their Mere Visitatrice has been there for almost three weeks. Mother was unable to succeed in her trip to the Indians, being assured by the Fathers that if she went there would be no possibility to return before Spring. On her journey from St. Louis she was accompanied by Madame C. Hardey who is rapidly approaching eternity. Madame Seligmann, who is in bad health, is going to Grand Coteau and Madame Eagan, an excellent English mistress and a fervent religious, is destined for St. Michael's. Their distributions will take place on December 10. They hope Blanc will come, accompanied by Fathers Rousselon and Maenhaut. At the approach of vacation, Madame calls their annual retreat to Blanc's attention. Mother (Maria) Cutts has consented to remain until the 10th but will leave for Grand Coteau immediately after.

V-5-b - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 4to. - {5}


1844 Nov. 20
Marchetti de Lucca, Father Serafino: Constantinople, (Turkey?)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Some years ago Ignazio Rosani, or Rosanich, left in Constantinople, his Armenian wife named Giovanna and a son Giorgio, and went to New Orleans as a ship's carpenter. Not having any answer to the letters she has written to her husband, she does not know whether he is dead or what happened to him. The woman is in dire straits; her conduct up to now has been irreprehensible but one can see what might happen. Since she is his parishioner, Marchetti asks for some news of Rosani.

V-5-b - A.L.S. - (Italian) - 2pp. - 4to. - {3}


(1844) (Nov. 20)
St. Marr, A(lphonse):
Seminary of St. Vincent de Paul (Assumption, Louisiana)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

St. Marr has at last arrived at the haven which Blanc has given him and his heart beats with hope that he will emerge one day as a defender of the faith. A retreat begins tomorrow. He abandons France and his mother for another country, for heaven.

V-5-b - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - folio - {1}


1844 Nov. 20
Skolla, O.S.F., Father O(tto): Mackinac, (Michigan)
 to Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere): (Detroit, Michigan)

Skolla received the Bishop's letter on Nov. 19 containing the law and dispensations of the Church concerning Lent. He also received the Directory for the coming year. Skolla apologizes for having delayed so long with his answer, and for the delay concerning the receipt from Mrs. (Sophie) Graverod. But the fault lay chiefly in the letter itself as it arrived much later than it should have, according to the date on it. Skolla went immediately after he received it, to the shop office of Messrs. Biddle and Drew showing them the draught; they did not have the money right away, but he received it 5 days leter. At the same time he wrote a note, sending it by Louison Martin containing an urgent request for a receipt from Mrs. (Sophie) Graverod. She had wanted to send the receipt long before but could not because of the unfavorable weather and because of the small number of the people to take it, for most of them have gone fishing. But last Saturday Skolla received the receipt and after he had arranged all his work at the presbytery and said his divine office and other obligatory prayers, he stayed up till midnight and the next morning he took the letter with the receipt to the post-office. That was the second letter to Lefevere, for he did not want to hold back any longer the first one. Skolla apologizes again for having annoyed the Bishop.

III-2-b - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 8vo. - {3}


1844 Nov. 21
Spalding, Father M(artin) J.: Louisville, Kentucky
 to Orestes A. Brownson: Boston, Massachusetts

Though personally unacquainted with Brownson, he writes to tell him that from an early period of the Brownson Quarterly Review he had no doubt that his mind was taking the direction (of conversion to Catholicism). Brownson has found not alone the priceless jewel of faith, but appreciates its full value. He was particularly struck with the logical accuracy of his doctrinal articles and with their independent fearlessness. He views Brownson's accession to the Catholic ranks as an era in Church history. He will do immense good in this country since he knows the American so well, and is so capable of disabusing of their errors. He will take the place in America of Edward Lucas, editor of the London Tablet, in England. The Catholics of America need such a Quarterly as Brownson's which is neither political, religious or literary entirely, but which has the religious element preponderating. Catholic American literature has not reached the position it should occupy, and badly needs such a Quarterly, in addition to the respectable monthly The U. S. Catholic Magazine of Baltimore.

I-3-g - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 8vo. - {5}


1844 Nov. 21
Billon, Father J(osep)h St. Mary's: (Charenton, Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Billon received Blanc's two last letters. He will reply to the first as soon as he can go to St. Martin. As to the subscriptions, Laclaire Fuselier will furnish the wood for the church; Widow Fuselier has subscribed 60 piastres and 100 if Henry Clay is elected; Grégoire Bodin, former administrator of the church, 50; Grew Humbert 20 and his daughter the same. LaFontaine may give 30; Mrs. Adrien Frère is making the linens and vestments; Mrs. Mossy, Laclaire's daughter, 50. There are almost as many cemeteries here as homes; but now that there is a parish cemetery there are still some who want to be buried in their own cemetery. About two weeks ago someone came to get him for a funeral at Franklin; they were going to make the burial a league from the church. Blanc is to send Billon his views on this subject. P.S. The postal authorities want this place to be called Charenton and claim that they have the right to keep all pieces addressed to St. Mary's.

V-5-b - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {12}


1844 Nov. 22
Brassac, Father H(ercu)le: Paris, (France)
 to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

These few lines will be brought by Father (Anthony) Théves who arrived today from Lyons and whom Father Boué sends to Blanc. Brassac regrets that Théves will not be accompanied by Father Placet whom the Bishop of Versailles does not wish to release as Blanc will see by the enclosed letter. Théves will leave from Havre on the Austerlitz.

- A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp.


 Enclosure: 

1844 Nov. 10
(Gros), John (Nicholas), Bishop of: Versailles, (France)
 to Father (Hercule) Brassac: Paris, (France)

(Gros) would be happy to reply favorably to the request Brassac has made in the name of Father Placet. Unfortunately (Gros) also is short of good priests. Being newly arrived (Gros) has not been able to study his vocation. Their people probably have an even greater need than New Orleans. If he can get a certain number of priests and Placet shows signs of an extraordinary vocation, (Gros) would not hesitate to give him later.

- A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp.


V-5-b - A.L.S. - (French) - 6pp. - 4to. 12mo. - {6}


1844 Nov. 22
Burlando, C.M., Father Francis: Cincinnati, Ohio
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Having asked and obtained Purcell's permission to absent himself from Brown County for his health he starts for Louisiana. Father (John) Timon, C.M., in granting this permission has assigned Father De Marchi to teach his classes and Father (Charles) Boglioli to act as superior. He is permitted to be absent until Easter but does not expect to be away that long. Should Purcell need priests during his absence Messers. (Timothy) Farrell, (James) Kearney and (James) Cahill might be soon ordained. If Purcell desires to write him his address will be Assenscios Seminary, La Fourche, La. He hopes for Purcell's prayers.

II-4-i - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {8}


1844 Nov. 22
(Smith, S.C.), Sister Regina: (New Orleans, Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Sister sends the enclosed (no enclosure) received last night from Father (John) Boullier, (C.M.) so that Blanc may see what he says about the bedsteads. Sister has bought the lime and sent it. Sister Miriam received a letter today from Mother, mailed the 14th. Sister supposes they will get more, the ice being once more broken.

V-5-b - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {3}


1844 Nov. 25
Masnou, C.M., Father J.: Assumption, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

The young seminarians Blanc sent have arrived; they are so happy, especially A(lphonse) St. Marr. All the seminarians behaved well during their retreat. They have received 2 dozen copies of Milner's "The End of Controversy". They had a letter from Felix and he is very happy. Magi (Armengol) asks Blanc to send this letter to Felix Dicharry. (On the back of the letter is written): John Flanagan, Jeremiah Moynihan, Cornelius Moynihan.

V-5-b - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {7}


1844 Nov. 26
(Chanche), Bishop John Joseph: Natchez, (Mississippi)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Chanche) wrote a letter to Father (Guillaume) Labbé some two weeks ago directed to Blanc's care. By a letter received from Labbé Saturday, (Chanche) believes his letter has not reached Labbé. (Chanche) is glad to see that Blanc will make his entrée in the Cathedral of St. Louis next Sunday. He hopes it will be a lasting peace after Blanc's numerous trials for some years past. It seems to (Chanche) that the (Association of the) Propagation is late with their distributions this year. (Chanche) understood from Bishop (John Baptist) Purcell that there was a misunderstanding between Lyons and Paris; the former being in favor of large supplies to the missions of the East and the latter for those in the West. Two years ago Blanc expressed a wish to visit Havana; (Chanche) would like to go there this winter. The archives which were kept in Natchez under the Spanish administration were removed, he is told, to Havana. If by consulting them (Chanche) could secure the property of the old graveyard, it would be worth the voyage. If Blanc were going, (Chanche) would accompany him starting about the middle of January. How is Bishop Odin; Blanc is to thank Father Rousselon for the wine.

V-5-b - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {6}


1844 Nov. 27
(Hecker), Isaac: N(ew) Y(ork, New York)
 to O(restes) A. Brownson: Chelsea, Mass(achusetts)

Because of the views he holds, and knowing of the views of those who surround him, his communion is much restricted, but they have no word of complaint to utter, they are all so deeply at peace. How wide are the aims of Protestant education, society and government from those of Catholic Christianity, and how sadly has piety, the arts, and society degenerated under Protestantism Its only redeeming feature is that it has preserved a few traces from that from which it has fallen. He cannot be a Catholic who sees not in society as it is, his work to do. In its last number, the N(orth) A(merican) Review had quite a liberal article on Ignatius Loyola, in which the writer came to the conclusion that the only way to do away with Catholicism is by living a deeper life than the Catholics. Dr. (Henry) Vethake is seeking the post of Surveyor of the Port of New York if Calhoun is retained in the next administration. Hecker has been requested by him to seek the support of Brownson, but he would be sorry should he be the medium of anything displeasing to him. He cannot dare hope to see Brownson before the summer vacation.

I-3-g - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 8vo. - {3}


1844 Nov. 28
Brassac, Father H(ercule): Paris, (France)
 to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

Brassac must reply to Blanc's letter of October 11 in which he learned of the end of the troubles at St. Louis Church. Brassac regrets that he could not send Blanc Father Placet but his bishop was inexorable. Brassac sent to LeHavre (Anthony) Théves, the seminarian about whom Father Boué spoke in his letters. Théves seems to be an excellent young man; he will arrive on the Austerlitz which leaves tomorrow or the day after. Brassac asked Mr. Choiselat for 800 francs for this trip; the expenses amount to 750 francs; Brassac is still indebted to Blanc for 50 francs. For more than a month Brassac has not heard anything said about (Father Matthew Bernard) And(uze?); Brassac believes he is still excluded. Bishop (Guy Ignatius) Chabrat is in Paris for treatment on his eyes. Brassac may decide to go to live near his father after Easter. Blanc has not said whether he received Brassac's July letter; he would not yet have had those of the first days of October. Brassac was very happy to hear of a religious establishment at Donaldson, (Sisters of Charity). Better late than never. It is unfortunate that a more central place in the diocese was not used. Brassac asked for one as early as 1823.

V-5-b - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {9}


1844 Nov. 28
Smith & Co., John Dillon: New York, New York
 to O(restes) A. Brownson: Boston, Massachusetts

Rev. Dr. (Charles C.) Pise has suggested to them that the interests of Religion would be promoted and the success of the (Brownson Quarterly) Review advanced by uniting their "Catholic Expositor with it. The sacrifice on their part would be great but they are willing to make it, feeling assured that the best interests of religion would be advanced by the proposed union. Their magazine has reached the seventh volume and has a circulation of one thousand. They feel they could add 600 cash paying subscribers to Brownson's list, among which would be about 150 from New York. The terms of sale could no doubt be arranged to their mutual satisfaction. They would be pleased to hear from Brownson at his earliest convenience.


Pise, Rev. Dr. Charles C.,: New York, New York
 to Rt. Rev. Bishop (John Hughes: New York, New York)

On his return home, he lost no time to lay the subject of Mr. Brownson's Review before the proprietors of the "Catholic Expositors", who have addressed the above letter to him. A good opportunity now offers itself; and it should be taken into immediate consideration.

I-3-g - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo - {5}


1844 Nov. 29
DeGoesbriand, Father Louis: Louisville, Ohio
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Since he left Purcell at Danville he has not learned anything relative to the things of which Purcell spoke. It is true that he received a letter from Father Louis Amadeus Rappe asking him to set out very soon but that letter was not regarded by DeGoesbriand as a command from Purcell. The object of this letter is to ask Purcell not to change him but to leave him in Louisville. He is disposed to obey, but the conditions resulting from this uncertainty have caused this decision. He sometimes thinks however that Father Rappe should be in Louisville where the French people would rejoice to have him. On his last visit to Mt. Eaton the parishoners had organized a confraternity of the Holy Heart of Mary. He has done nothing relative to the building of a church at Harrisburg and does not intend to commence before he has been definitely informed of Purcell's intention to continue him there. He saw Father (John J.) Doherty yesterday and he has had a dangerous illness and is not yet restored. He asks Purcell's prayers.

II-4-i - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - (French) - {7}


1844 Nov. 29
Leblond, Julie Perrault: Quebec, (Canada)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Leblanc(!): New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Being a friend of the Ursulines of Quebec, she knows that a few years ago Mother St. Etienne, (R.U.) asked her mother community for some subjects. Leblond is commissioned to write that if the Ursulines of New Orleans still have need of help, they could have it. This is a delicate matter as the Sisters who would offer themselves are contented and happy among their companions and they would like everything to remain in eternal silence if there is no longer need of help. Blanc is to state whether the expenses of their trip will be borne by the New Orleans Sisters or not. Upon news of Blanc's request, the Sisters will offer themselves and be approved or rejected by the Superiors.

V-5-b - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - folio - {3}


1844 Nov. 30
Billon, Father J(osep)h: On board the Lodi
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Billon has just found out about the tariff of St. Martin Church. He hastens to let Blanc know so that he draw up and approve one for St. Mary (Immaculate, Charenton). (Here Billon lists the fees for services at St. Martin). Laclaire Fuselier, Grew Humbert, Grégoire Bodin, Widow Fuselier could pay the expenses of the church without inconvenience. Several others, like Alexandre and Adrien Frère appear to be rich but have many debts. So Blanc can judge whether to approve the tariff in its entirety or to modify it. The patronal feast of Billon's parish is a week from tomorrow, The people are so busy with the retting just now; could it be moved to a more convenient time?

V-5-b - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {9}


1844 Nov. 30
Hutchins, W.H.: New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Hutchins is collecting a gallery of daguerreotype portraits of all the prominent men of the day. If Blanc will favor him with a sitting, he will be grateful.

V-5-b - Printed Form L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {1}


1844 Nov. 30
Lee, George: New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Miss Trepagnier:

Trepagnier's letter and others for delivery were on Lee's desk this morning. She is to be under no uneasiness because he employs another person in translating a line or two in French. Her letters to Sisters Ste. Félicité are generally handed by Mr. Casenave to his niece in the convent who no doubt hands them to Sister herself. The busy world has not time nor the necessity found in a nunnery to be prying and curious. Lee has reflected much on the business Trepagnier mentioned. "When nothing good can be done it is best to do nothing", Lee will rest on this point for a time. He has bought Trepagnier's writing desk and will keep it until she comes to the city. It is rosewood inlaid with pearl and cost only $18. (At the bottom of the letter is written in French): "He thought Jules opened the letter on seeing his writing".

V-5-b - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {3}


1844 Nov. 30
Nash, James P.: Galveston, (Texas)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

The steamboat being about to leave and Father (John) Brands, (C.M.) visiting the sick, Nash writes Blanc. He thanks him for giving money to his wife in need; she and her child arrived safe. Nash has given the $30 to Brands. Yesterday Nash learned that Bishop (John Mary Odin) just got in before the steamboat left; he sent Nash a verbal account of his arrival and said that he again has his old disease--chills and fever. (Odin) will come down next week; he looks very fatigued.

V-5-b - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 4to. - {3}