University of Notre Dame
Archives   


Calendar

1845 Apr. 1
(Hailandière), Bishop Cel(estin de la): Paris, (France)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Hailandière) is sending to Vincennes Father (Anthony) Carius with a good servant. They may need Blanc's help. (Hailandière) has just arrived at Rennes, he leaves for Rome next week. He wants to see Blanc soon.

V-5-c - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 8vo. - {2}


1845 Apr. 1
Lucas, Father P(eter): St. Martin, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Lucas sends $17, the collection made on Easter for the seminary.

V-5-c - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 12mo. - {1}


1845 Apr. 1
Montegut, E.: New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: (New Orleans), Louisiana

Montegut has learned that Blanc has authorized sending to the College of St. Vincent, (Cape Girardeau), Missouri a certain number of orphans. Montegut recommends Manuel Henriquez, aged 14, born at New Orleans.

V-5-c - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {3}


1845 Apr. 1
(Odin), Bishop John Mary: New York, (New York)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

He is leaving in a moment for Liverpool. Bishop (Francis Patrick) Kenrick is leaving with him. Kenrick decided all at once to make the trip. (Odin) saw Archbishop (Samuel Eccleston) at Washington; he is in very good health. Father (Joseph) Evrard, who is here, will write Blanc about the price of stained glass windows.

V-5-c - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {4}


1845 Apr. 1
Thomas, B.M.: St. Gabriel College, Vincennes, Indiana
 to Bishop Anthony Blanc: N(ew) Orleans, L(ouisian)a

The absence of Bishop (Célestin) de la Hailandiére compels Thomas to trouble Blanc. Miss Bernhard of Rennes came to this diocese to enter the Sisters of Providence at Terre Haute. Having exhibited symptoms of mental derangement she has been excluded. It was finally determined to send her back to New Orleans in order to find her way home and in the meantime to be lodged in a suitable asylum. The acting president of St. Gabriel's designs writing to her father that he may receive her at Havre. The young collegian of New Orleans, Adolph Maurel happens to be going in the same boat with her and will deliver this letter. If convenient Blanc could be a protection for her while in New Orleans and aid in expediting her return. Being the instrument in the absence of their bishop, in sending her away, Thomas desires no unpleasant retrospect. The Bishop introduced Thomas to Blanc when Blanc was lately in Vincennes.

V-5-c - A.L.S - 3pp. - 4to. - {6}


1845 Apr. 2
McLaughlin, Father Peter: Cleveland, Ohio
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He is pleased that Purcell likes his handwriting. He is also surprised that his voice has improved by practice. The criticism that Purcell made of his preaching, his leaving the altar when McLaughlin was preaching at Sandusky City, along with the same criticism by his fellow priests embittered his feelings so that he took advice about leaving the diocese. Also the lawyer Parks came to him and told him that he rudely and unjustly soured the minds of the people by his harshness. He changed his way and people who had been driven away came to the church once more. Mr. and Mrs. Wamelink are going to Europe and this will break up his scheme of housekeeping. He will go to Mr. John Grangle's to board. The Easter days have been days of joy with the circles of communicants. He has secured the lot for St. Peters church on Main Street, 108 by 212 for $2700. The Germans have agreed to help them. He has promised to help them build their own church in case they do not buy St. Mary's. They, however, will buy that church. From May 1, he will pay no more bills with pew rent until the new church is built. Hence is Purcell sends him another priest he will have to support himself.

P.S. No such marriage as the White concern has been recorded there. He knows of no Catholics of that name.

II-4-i - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 8vo. - {2}


1845 Apr. 3
McM(aster, B.J. Alphonsus): H(yed) P(ark), (New York)
 to Rev. Edgar P. Wadhams: Ticonderoga, N(ew) York

McMaster regrets his delay in answering Wadhams' letter but he has not been in a fit state of mind. He has not answered (Frederick) Oakley's letter of last October. He wrote to (John) Dalgairns only since Lent began. His mind has been unsettled regarding his duty to the Church of Rome. After much thought and a consultation with Bishop (John) McCloskey, McMaster has decided that he cannot remain where he is, but is not certain he can join the Church of Rome at this time. Wadhams, however, should take orders if he finds no personal obstruction. It is necessary that they get a strong position so that they can help their friends. McMaster may refuse his orders if offered to him. When he was in New York he partly convinced Seabury that the latter was wrong and vain in supporting Onderdonk. Onderdonk should be dropped and the way cleared for another election. (John)Forbes would do but not nearly as well as Seabury. McMaster hopes that all of Wadhams parishes will be prepared to send a lay delegate to vote for Seabury. He does not believe Williams would be suitable because he is not a celibate in any high sense. He cannot expect any letters from England because of his own negligence. All of Pusey's translations are good and some are excellent. Pusey is to continue with other Jesuit works. It is a pity that he alters expressions of invocations, Purgatory, etc. McMaster stopped writing at this point because Mr. Langdon's fine home where he had been staying burned down. He does not know what interruption in his duties this will make. He can say nothing of St. Bernards works. Kenrick's "Primacy" is said to be good, but McMaster has not read it. He thought (John) Newman wrote "S. Wilfrid" but it is evident that it is F.W. Faber, the author of Number 6. McMaster has just finished reading Faber's, "Sir Lancelot", and thinks he will review it for the Churchmen so that he can insert long extracts. It is not a third volume of Digby that is out, but a third number of a new edition is being published in London. McMaster has just seen some of the first numbers. Kneeland is studying theology, the most intelligent will have to strive to keep up with him. Kneeland will not join the ministry because he does not believe in married clergymen; Kneeland's wife has had another little girl. He sold his farm because he did not have time to tend it. McMaster thinks highly or Mr. Wheaton. Ap(ril) 7th. The Langdons will remain here until their house is rebuilt and, therefore, McMaster will be here for awhile. Since the first of Lent, McMaster has been living alone in an old store house a mile south of Hyde Park. He tells Wadhams he has an extra room which he wishes the latter would occupy. He sends his regards to (Clarence) Walworth, though he doubts the propriety of Walworth's attempt at compilation of prayers. McMaster believes Walworth should spend his time in private advantage in the way of study. In fact this is the only course left to any of them. McMaster does not believe in attempting too much until they have merged with Rome.

I-1-m - A.L.S. - 4ppp. - 8vo. - {4}


1845 Apr. 4
De L'hoste, Father: Dreux, (France)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

De L'hoste thanks (Blanc) for his letter of February 7. He thanks (Blanc) for this new kindness. If there is a priest like De L'hoste who had a heart like ice in the service of God, and who was for years an unworthy priest, he is to tell him to ask a lively faith from God and he will enjoy untold joys. Mrs. Destrem's's eight months of illness greatly edified De L'hoste. God called her on February 28. Mrs. Destrem made him her heir, but heir of what, if the lands in Louisiana have no value. For 7 years and 8 months he has contracted debts for Mrs Destrem which he cannot pay before a year and a half at least. He would like a portion of his lands given over to Mr. Zamora if he cannot be satisfied otherwise; perhaps he will agree that his debt is paid. However if he exacts more and wants Mrs. Destrem's land, they will have to be given to him. As for the negress with whom De L'hoste exchanged notes, he does not know how much she got from the sale of his house and furniture. The notes of his successor would not have to be endorsed by De L'hoste as he left Louisiana and he had no guarantee of the sale made. His conscience should be clear by giving Zamora his portion because: 1. He is giving double what he owes; 2. Zamora can sell them after 10 years at a high price; 3. Zamora is profiting by the bad times; 4. He gets almost 2000 piastres on 2 notes De L'hoste left with him. De L'hoste is counting on (Blanc); whatever (Blanc) decides will satisfy his conscience even if he does not get one cent out of his 10,000 piastres spent. (Blanc) knows the example given by Mr. Villemain; he will conclude that De L'hoste's presence in his family could do some good. De L'hoste has lost a mother and a friend; there remains for him the respect of his bishop. He asks pardon for the sorrows he caused (Blanc). (Blanc) is to write to tell him of the results obtained by Mr. Daron. (Blanc) is to deliver the letters enclosed. (P.S.) (Blanc) is to tell Daron about the last three pages of this letter but keep from him the first page which is confidential.

V-5-c - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {5}


1845 Apr. 5
Gallwey, R.S.H.J., Madame J.: St. Michael's, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Gallwey has just risen from her bed with fever, but as Father Petit leaves today, she writes a few lines. She hopes Blanc received her last as Father (A. Pierre) Ladavière, (S.J.) told her Blanc had not. Gallwey heard from Mother (Maria) Cutts, R.S.C.; she had just received permission from Madame (T.) Landry to make her last vows. Gallwey had her commence her retreat so that when Blanc comes for First Communion, she will be ready.

V-5-c - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {5}


1845 Apr. 5
Hocker, F.: Rennes, (France)
 to Ernest (St. Cyr?): (New Orleans, Louisiana?)

Hocker writes in haste in a letter of Delamotte who writes to Ernest by the same opportunity of some one taking letters for America. Hocker saw Ernest's father who read him part of Ernest's letter; he thanks Ernest for his remembrance of him. Hocker thought of withdrawing the letter Hocker will receive, since circumstances have changed; but he was told that the mail was gone. So he thought it would be better to put a few words in Delamotte's letter to explain. In the letter Ernest's father read to Hocker, Ernest promised to write.

V-5-a - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 16mo. - {2}


1845 Apr. 6
Delins, E.: N(ew) O(rleans, Louisiana)

Permission for her servant Mathilde to have her child baptized. (On the back): Joseph Ovide, slave of E. Delins, about 5 months. Hypolite Long-pré, Therésia Long-pré.

V-5-c - A. Note S. - (French) - 2pp. - 32mo. - {2}


1845 Apr. 7
Brunner, C.PP.S., Father Francis D.: Norwalk, Ohio
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He cites a marriage case of affinity in the direct line, asking for a dispensation or advice as to what should be done. He asks that each of the Precious Blood Fathers be licensed by the government to witness marriages. They are Fathers Anthony Meyer, John M. Wittmer, Peter Anthony Capeder, James Ringele, John Van den Brok. He asks prayers for all, especially one. He supposes that his petitions for faculties to bless the stone for the church at Tiffin and for the collection for the Sisters have come to Purcell. Mr. Schwarz has not been with him nor did they say anything to the priest who celebrated at Avon recently. In Cleveland a murmur has been heard that Father (Peter) McLaughlin said that the new church is to be built of stone, and that this task had been delegated to him. Mr. Dettmer wishes to speak with Purcell about that.

P.S. He asks Purcell if he will admit to his seminary for a few months some of their students. They are Xavier Obermuller Matthias Greusch, and perhaps Mr. McCartney. He thinks the sisters may open a summer school at St. Alphonsus'

II-4-i - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - (Latin) - {11}


1845 Apr. 7
(Chanche), Bishop John Joseph: Natchez, (Mississippi)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

This letter will be handed to Blanc by John Kohnke, an organ builder from Cincinnati. Kohnke is highly recommended by Bishop (John Baptist) Purcell.

V-5-c - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {3}


1845 Apr. 8
Choiselat Gallien, J.: Paris, (France)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

On March 20 he addressed a box to V(ictor) Marziou at Havre to be sent to New Orleans containing a chalice, an ostensorium, a ciborium, the last two asked for for Blanc by Father Boué of Lyons. Also the ciborium, the ostensorium, processional cross, censor, sprinkler and missal asked for by Blanc for St. Mary's of Attakapas. The total amount is 1660 francs. The box was sent on the American ship, Alfred, Captain Myers. Choiselat Gallien still has on hand for Blanc 6,837.25 francs. Details of the allocation for 1844 (are given on the third page of the letter. Expenditures include) 800 francs paid to Father (Hercule) Brassac on November 18, 1844; March 8, a draft by Boué for 400; March 15, a draft by Didier Petit for 3052.

V-5-c - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {7}


1845 Apr. 8
Pierrond, Arrélize: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Permission for her servant, Marie, to baptize her child. (On the back of this note): Marie, sl(ave) of Miss Pierrond, August 8, 1845. Marie Rose Aimie, born September 12; Eugene Antoine, free negro, Miss Aurélie Bird, April 8; Marie Rose born July 17, Julie Bonan(?), Pierre Degruse(?), Miss Marie Rose Bonseigneur, baptized April 8.

V-5-c - A. Note S. - (French) - 2pp. - 32mo. - {4}


1845 April 8
Sorin, C.S.C. Father Edward: Notre Dame, Indiana
 to Bishop Peter Paul Lefevere: of Detroit, Michigan.

(Withdrawn to Provincial Archives).

{2}


1845 Apr. 9
(Czackert) Chakert, C.SS.R., Father P(eter): Baltimore, (Maryland)
 to Bishop Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Mr. Straub, one of the trustees of the German congregation at Lafayette, (Louisiana) has sent Chakert an invitation to come again to them as they doubt whether Father (Francis M.) Masquelet will persevere with them as he intends to start a new church for the Germans of the third municipality. Chakert feels a partiality for New Orleans, for in the one year he spent there he had so many troubles and also Blanc's great affection for the (Redemptorists) made so much an impression on him that he never lost hope for an establishment in their diocese. Therefore, he has answered Straub that although the Superior would have great difficulty in sending a priest, he might try to correspond with their desires. People like those of Lafayette give a great deal of labor if they are to be thoroughly converted.

V-5-c - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 4to. - {5}


1845 Apr. 9
Brands, (C.M.), Father John: Galveston, Texas
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisiana)

Bishop (John Mary) Odin has no doubt told Blanc that a great number of German emigrants arrived for the Medina Colony accompanied by three priests. But there has been great trouble among them as Blanc will read in the enclosed letter. Also a man from that band arrived here and reported that the two clergymen are not pleased with Father (Pfanner) Phanner whom the Bishop had appointed pastor or superior and that they intended to return to New Orleans. Brands has no means of support for them; they do not understand a word of English and one is old and infirm. The Bishop has given Brands the power of vicar-general but does this authorize him to return their exeats to them? He found no scruple in returning it to Father Fortenot, who got scared of the country at first glance, because he had only one year's leave of absence. Should the report be true Brands asks Blanc's advice. Brands has put a letter for the Ursulines in this same envelope. He purchased a house for them. Whether the bargain is a good or a bad one will depend upon the effects which annexation will have on their country.

- A.L.S. - 3pp.


 Enclosure: 

1845 Mar. 4
Pfanner, Father: Lavaca, (Texas)
 to Bishop (John Mary Odin?): (Galveston, Texas?)

They have been at Lavaca for three weeks but will leave this week. The student Pfanner left to look after his baggage died in the first 3 weeks after which everything was open to the emigrants. So 8 trunks are missing and the others which arrived at Victoria, were with difficulty taken by the people Pfanner had given charge. A rascal who, without Pfanner's knowledge, joined the colony on the Rhine, acted like a mad animal. They want to return to Galveston. Perhaps there are still some of Pfanner's trunks at Galveston. (Odin) is to ask Mr. Moriss(?), his organist, who no doubt would send them with Mr. Tschoen, addressed to Mr. Evering(?) at Lavaca as well as the trunk of Joseph Eckert which is at Moris(?) Valin's, the locksmith.

- A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp.


V-5-c - A.L.S. - (English and French) - 5pp. - 4to. - {12}


1845 Apr. 9
(Kenrick), Bishop Peter Richard: St. Louis, (Missouri)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Blanc's letter of March 29 was given Kenrick by Father (Irenaeus) St. Cyr who has just arrived and (Kenrick) hastens to thank Blanc for all his kindnesses to him and St. Cyr while they were at Blanc's house. (Kenrick) does not know what to think about Father (Joseph) Richardbole; he always regarded him as a zealous and pious priest. Bishop (Andrew Byrne) had made some allusions which (Kenrick) thought unjust. He passed them on to Father (John) Timon upon whom they seemed to make no more impression than on (Kenrick). Since his return, he has received a letter from Sister Eulalie (Kelly) with the signature of another Sister which seems to be a copy of the one Blanc received; Timon received one of the same nature. (Kenrick) believes that these Sisters are not to be believed; they seem to wish to persecute a man to whom they owe a lot. As for the investigation asked for by Richardbole, this could take place only in Arkansas and before Byrne. (Kenrick) has written to Father (John) Boullier, (C.M.) to tell him that he has sent the box. He sends the money for the Sisters (of Charity) at Donaldsonville. Blanc is to accept it as a token of the interest (Kenrick) has in Blanc's establishing of a novitiate in the West and South. (On the back of the letter): Sister M. Paulina.

V-5-c - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {9}


1845 Apr. 10
Brands, (C.M.), Father J(ohn): Galveston, (Texas)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Brands wrote to the Ursulines that he had spoken with the captain of the "New York" about taking care of the cash they were to send him but as J. Groesbeeck is returning to New York they would do better in confiding their commissions to him.

V-5-c - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {3}


1845 Apr. 10
Machebeuf, Father (Joseph P.): Paris, France
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Purcell will no doubt blame him for not writing oftener, but he has been busy writing to nuns, priests, seminarians etc., trying to get a colony for Cincinnati. It is now perfectly certain that the Ursulines will go to Brown County, (Ohio), but notwithstanding all his letters and journeys he could not get them ready before this time. But for this delay he would have been in Sandusky by Easter. Purcell has no idea of the trouble he had in giving the nuns the little information they asked. He hopes to sail with them April 21 or May 1. He has just received a letter from Tulle. The Bishop has given his permission twice and retracted it twice, and now he insists on keeping the two best nuns for Beaulieu. Machebeuf is going there the next day and hopes to get the two nuns. Two priests from there also promised to go to Cincinnati but he will not let them go. On the 5th six sisters of Notre Dame sailed from Anvers. Father (Patrick M.) O'Mealy and a seminarian at the nun's request and Machebeuf's advice went to allow the nuns the Holy Sacrifice on shipboard. He is glad that Purcell did not wish the Franciscan. He had written to discourage him, besides the two at Tulle and the one from Avignon, who are uncertain. One of his friends from Clermont is coming with him. A seminarian sent by Father Combes from Bordeaux, he has sent to Havre to sail by way of New Orleans with Bishop (Richard P. Miles) of Nashville. Machebeuf has to wait until the nuns are ready. He saw Bishop Celestine De La Haillanidiere. He had been authorized by Bishop (Michael) O'Connor to get seminarians for Pittsburg. Machebeuf has three seminarians for Pittsburgh. He hopes to keep one, the best scholar, for Cincinnati. He asks that the priest from Clermont be given him for Lower Sandusky, as that congregation is so much increased. He has procured certain vestments etc. The nuns will pay their own expenses and Purcell will have only four priests or seminarians on his account. He and the priest from Clermont will pay their passage. He has made an appeal to the Royal family, and was introduced to the queen. The King has promised something.

P.S. He asks Purcell to excuse his bad writing.

II-4-i - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 8vo. - {12}


1845 Apr. 11
Dumartrait, A(drien): St. Martinville, (Louisiana)
 to Father (Giles F.) Martin: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Dumartrait received Martin's letter. He wishes that it would have told him that his health was better than when he left; he hopes God will hear the prayers of his parishoners. He has good doctors and they hope that he can realize his plan to visit the capital of France and his native country. Dumartrait saw Alfred Bienvenu who is busy collecting the accounts due Martin. Dumartrait gave him a certificate of deposit for $150. The election of trustees took place last Monday; they are Valery Martin, Zep(her) in Broussard, Zenon Rourke, B(aptis)te Derbes, Valliere D'auterive, Nicolas Couvrier(?), and Dumartrait. Only Joseph Allegre was not reelected. He did not appear so Couvrier of Bayou Torte had one more vote. The trustees had voted that the treasurer offer the pews for sale to pay off the debts on the new church; they are waiting for his appointment. Father (Peter) Lucas does all he can to make up for Martin's absence. Dumartrait's son will bring this.

V-5-c - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {10}


1845 Apr. 11
Whelan, Father David.: Richmond, Virginia
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He cannot let pass the opportunity to send Purcell a letter by Capt. and Mrs. Duke on their way west. He trusts that his constant occupations which have not diminished since his last letter may hold him excused for not answering Purcell sooner. He is still at the college with his brother, but he thinks that the Bishop (Vincent Whelan) will discontinue the college because of the little success that has attended his efforts and the impossibility of giving a course as will properly fit his seminarians for their work. He mentions this in confidence. He expects to go to Petersburg, Va., a place of much scandal by ecclesiastics. The expected change deprives him of all hope of his contémplated visit to Cincinnati. The boys and girls will not have the opportunity to visit with him, nor will he of embracing Purcell and meeting Father Wood. The bishop has sent a priest to take care of Parkersburgh, Va., a houng man who began his studies with the bishop and was recently ordained. Catholicity is not making so much progress in Virginia as in Cincinnati. Speaks of the need of more men like Orestes A. Brownson. He is pleased at the progress of Purcell's cathedral. He mentions his friends to whom he sends his regards. They expect to have Father (John) McElroy with them for two or three weeks to give a retreat to Richmond and Petersburg. He will try to write to Father Wood.

II-4-i - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {7}


1845 Apr. 12
Duroux, Father Vicer Geeneral, for Bertrand, Jean Baptist P.S., Bp. Tulle: Tulle, France
 to Pauline Laurier, Sister Stanisla:
of the Monastery of St. Ursula ofBeaulieu, France.

Having seen the motives which she has exposed for going to found a monastery for her order in the diocese of Cincinnati he has approved and authorized her to leave the cloister of the monastery of Beaulieu. In order to facilitate her plans he authorizes her also to visit the other houses of her order and all other religious houses of the diocese, and invites those superiors or superioresses to give her the aid she needs.

II-4-i - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - (French) - {2}


1845 Apr. 12
Dutillet, Ch(arles?): Plaquemines, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

Dutillet planned to come to thank Blanc before leaving New Orleans, for the favors to his unfortunate patron, Gilbert Leonard, in the sickness which took him from them but he had to leave without seeing Blanc. He will never forget Blanc's kindness to one who was a true friend and father to Dutillet.

V-5-c - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {2}


1845 Apr. 12
Jordan, Father Paul: West Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop An(thony) le(!) Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

Jordan has just been invited to a new meeting of the trustees which he attended to make a few remonstrances which are very necessary. Jordan told them that it was not their resolutions which were at the bottom of their affair but whether their election was legal: 1. Because of the unsuitable place; 2. Because of the unfitness of the voters; 3. Because of the ineligible members elected. That there must be a new election to replace those who had just resigned because of the disorder and scandal. That the acts were not signed by the old president and that the new one, Trasimont Landry had offered himself. That they had not given him official notice of the meeting. They threatened to take the key of the church, since it belonged to them but he reminded them of the example of Baton Rouge. They decided to have him give an account of the small subscription made among the ladies for the altar. Several of the more insolent ones threatened to take some articles from the little fair some young people had given for the Church. It was once held in the sacristy at the back but since it is now separated from the nave by a floor, he no longer permits it. "Because it touches the Holy Roman Church" say the Protestants, Kirklain and Dr. Wons, etc. A great many fathers of families come to advise Jordan to remain calm, that they will speak for him. While this is consoling, he knows that he cannot compromise his conscience nor abandon the faithful. He has decided, if Blanc has no place for him, to ask for his exeat and look for another place.

V-5-c - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {5}


1845 Apr. 12
Lamirault(?): New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Marie (Dedune?: New Orleans, Louisiana)

A receipt for 18 piastres, 5 escalins for payment in full.

V-5-c - A. Receipt S. - (French) - 1p. - 16mo. - {1}


1845 Apr. 12
Lorretta, (S.C.), Sister St. Vincent's: Donaldson, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

Everyone has been sick since last Wednesday except Sister Savina. They were obliged to call on their neighbors to nurse them, Miss Zouade and Mrs. G. Father (John Boullier, C.M.) Boullia and their extra confessor called in Doctor Martin who said their diet was the cause. They missed Appolene very much. Sister Theonella nursed them but when she got sick Lorretta got up. Sister Adelaide and she are up today. Sister (Mary) G(onzaga?) and Theonella will get up tomorrow. As soon as the Lord got Sister Cleophas and Appolene away, He made them all sick. Blanc is to ask Sister F(rancis) Regis if she wants a Sister as Lorretta can let her have one. Sister Adelaide and Sister M(ary) Austin and the candidate will be as much as she has room for.

V-5-c - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 4to. - {13}


1845 Apr. 13
Boullier, (C.M.) Father J(ohn): Donaldsonville, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisiana)

Their little mission is going very well. Father (L.) Dufour preaches every evening; everyone is delighted. There are very few for First Communion this year but if Blanc comes Sunday he could give them Confirmation after Dufour's closing discourse.

V-5-c - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {2}


1845 Apr. 13
(Kenrick), Bishop Peter Richard: St. Louis, (Missouri)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

The young man who hands Blanc this letter visits New Orleans on a painful occasion the particulars of which (Kenrick) has already communicated to Father (Stephen) Rousselon on the advice of Father (John) Timon. (Kenrick) gives the introduction to one of their most exemplary young Catholics who at the request of his afflicted parent, has undertaken a very difficult task.

V-5-c - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 4to. - {3}


1845 Apr. 14
Alger, F(rancis): Boston, (Massachusetts)
 to (Orestes A. Brownson: Boston, Massachusetts)

If Brownson will return the manuscript he could not read, he will rewrite it. He sends some testimonials which he thinks may be of some assistance to him and which Tichnor intends to print in a circular sheet. If Brownson will pardon him, he intends to be considered in this instance as the Editor, and to pay his contributor the usual rate per page. Geo. B. Emerson sent him a manuscript which he considered too good for a newspaper, which perhaps Emerson would be willing to let Brownson have and let Brownson add to it what he chooses. He agrees with him entirely in relation to Parker. It seems to him as though Brownson should pay a deserved compliment to Unitarianism since, in his first speech in Dr. Channing's church he stated that it was this simple and rational faith which had redeemed him from infidelity. Perhaps he would still have remained an unbeliever if Unitarianism had not opened a way to the entire and perfect rest of soul he has found in the Catholic Church. Brownson did, through R. C. Waterston's and Alger's influence, what no other Unitarian ever did, and what he doubts will ever be again affected: actually preach a sermon in Park Street Church, the head of orthodox exclusiveness in Boston.

I-3-h - A.L.S. - 9pp. - 8vo. - {3}


1845 Apr. 15
(Blanc, Bishop Anthony: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

No. 1. A list of building materials totaling $502.31, from May, (1844?) to October, (1844?) paid for the bishop.

V-5-c - List - (French) - 2pp. - folio - {0}


1845 Apr. 15
Blanc, Anthony, Bp. of New Orleans,: New Orleans, Louisiana
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

This afternoon Sister Regina with Miss Palmer and because he had gone out it was not until he had returned from a meeting of the trustees of St. Patrick's that he could read Purcell's letter which he returns. Miss Palmer having said she was leaving on the morrow he has just time to write an answer. Purcell's word was sufficient for both cases. He hopes that the Lord eill put an end to further scandal. W. H. Mc(?) has been there a few days bringing a few lines from Bishop Chanche at Natchez where he stopped. In New Orleans as usual he stopped at Kennedy's or Stringer's. Yesterday Blanc had a letter from Bishop ODin, C.M. from Philadelphia on April 1, and he was to have sailed that day with Bishop (Francis Patrick) Kenrick. There is nothing new in New Orleans save that he is badly in need of laborers for the city and country parishes. St. Patrick's has been bought by one who intends that the congregation buy it back without profit to him. Blanc does not know the end of this. Mr. T.T.M. is a great way towards possessing the edifice or having it in the hands of the trustees. The present owner is greatly opposed to this. Blanc cannot fully approve of this position but he does not approve of the church coming under that man's immediate control.

II-4-i - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {6}


1845 Apr. 15
Brassac, Father H(ercu)le: Paris, (France)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

These few lines will be brought by (Dr.) P. L. Née, former resident of Attakapas where he practiced medicine. For several years he has lived in Paris and is leaving for New Orleans where his affairs call him. Brassac will be at Paris for several months longer.

V-5-c - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {2}


1845 Apr. 15
Edetvallée, Jr.: St. Pelagia Prison, (France)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Edetvallée, in business in New Orleans for three years, married to Heloise Vesque, lived at Mr. Perineaud's, a dyer, successor to Mr. Martinau(?), his partner. He left June 21, last year, to come to France to get a cylinder for watering silk. He hastened to make his purchases and to make arrangements with his creditors but he was put in jail on the complaint of his creditors and sentenced to a year in prison dating from January 7, 1845. So he has been in prison for 7 months. He asks Blanc to testify that he led an honorable life in New Orleans. He could surmount everything if his wife had replied to the 7 letters he has written her. Blanc could relieve him if he could call his wife and tell her of his predicament. One of his relatives told him that his wife was living with his partner; he cannot believe it. He asks Blanc to ask Father (Stephen) Rousselon to help in finding out the truth. Their chaplain knows that he is sending this with a letter enclosed (no enclosure).

V-5-c - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {5}


1845 Apr. 15
Henni, John M., Bp. of Milwaukee: Milwaukee, Wisconsin
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He wrote two months ago to Father Edward Purcell to learn the exact amount of money he owes Bishop Purcell. Also he would like to know the exact price for the vestments and other articles. He would like to know because he is in hopes that the Association of the Propagation will not forget him this time. If he had more means and priests things might be arranged there of no small advantage to our holy religion. He could give parishes to at least three priests. He asks Purcell if he knows where he can get either priests or seminarians about to be ordained. He has applications from a distance but he does not like to trust them. He thinks the climate of Wisconsin most healthy. He asks if Purcell will redeem his promise to come and see him, and suggests that Father Edward Purcell come if he needs relaxation.

P.S. He has received lately the crozier brought from France by Father (Samuel) Mazzuchelli. It is a beautiful one, but he does not know the price of it. Purcell will probably know and can put it to his account.

II-4-i - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {4}


1845 Apr. 15
McFarland, W(illia)m: Kendall, O(hio)
 to Francis P. McFarland: West Farms, Westchester, N(ew) Y(ork)

He has received Francis's letter. He is in good health. The legislature has chartered a good number of banks and the railroad will apparently go ahead. The frost has taken the peaches, some think the apples too. He has not heard from Wapakonetta but the folks seem well. Josiah is at Tiffin and talks of going into practice. They have an Advent preacher telling them all about the Pope being antichrist. The Dutch Catholics of Cincinnati have just begun their third church. This is the best spring they have had in Logan country for ten years and the farmers are making good use of it. Prices are low. The post masters will have to stop franking letters July 1.

I-1-a - A.L.S. - 1p. - 4to. - {1}


1845 Apr. 15
Praz, R.S.C., Madame A.: Grand Coteau, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Mother Superior has asked her to write as her hasty departure does not allow her time. Father (James Oliver Vandeveld(e, S.J.) is waiting for her at St. Louis to go to Sugar Creek so she must leave in a few days. As a companion she is taking Madame St. Cyr who will be installed as superior at St. Charles. They can make this sacrifice since Madame Seeligmann, whose health is restored, can replace St. Cyr. Mother will try to bring back an English teacher. Everything is going well; they have about 40 pupils, 12 orphans. Catechism for the negroes is going better than ever. Their treasury is not too empty and they have no debts. Their vacation will be during July and they hope Blanc can come for the distribution of prizes. She recommends their house to Blanc's prayers especially during the 6 or 7 weeks absence of their Superior.

V-5-c - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {6}


1845 Apr. 15
Rappe, Father Louis Amadeus: Toledo, Ohio
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He explains his dealy in answering the letter he received a month ago from Purcell by his desire to give an account of Father Joseph P. Machebeuf's mission, which he has just visited. He spent 10 days at Sandusky City helping them to make their Easter duty. The people there are praying for the safe return of their beloved pastor. He will find his flock much increased. He has received two new members into the church there, one Feyes(?) a convert from Episcopalianism and the other a lady, Croxton, whose conversion was brought about by the things she had heard about Catholicism. He expects more converts from her family. He visited Lower Sandusky and found another triumph for the faith. The attacks of a protestant minister excited Dr. Ralsom, a member a member of no church, to demand that the minister prove his charges, chiefly that the Catholics bible had through out the second commandment. The minister failed. Rappe has requested the Mother Superior, Mother Louis de Gonzague, to visit Toledo and Maumee to select the best site for her establishment of the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur. The Ursulines of Boulogne do not seem destined for Rappe's places. He acknowledges Purcell's gift towards the church at Providence. He will draw the sum within a few days according to Purcell's intentions.

II-4-i - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 8vo. - {11}


1845 Apr. 15
St. Martin, E.: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

A receipt for 8 piastres for the hire of his servant.

V-5-c - A. Receipt S. - (French) - 1p. - 32mo. - {0}


1845 Apr. 16
Francais, Father (N.): St. Vincent de Paul (New Orleans, Louisiana)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

For the third and last time Francais asks for his exeat. If Blanc does not permit him to go, he must leave without papers. He is tired and ill; he has worked for almost 11 years in the diocese. Father Rasch is here who could replace Father (Francis M.) Masquelet at Lefayette, and Masquelet could come to take Francais' place. Blanc says that Rasch does not know English but there are three priests at St. Patrick's who could take care of anything until those arrive whom Blanc is expecting for Lafayette. Francais begs Blanc to consent to his going.

V-5-c - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {3}


1845 Apr. 16
Jordan, Father Paul: West Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

Although Jordan is worn out and has a fever, some are asking that the pews be sold and others prevent it. Lately some one came to ask him to have a religious service for a poor father of a family. When they brought the body, they assured him that he was a Protestant and what they had said proved that they would bury him in the new cemetery with the Catholics as they were authorized by the new president of the trustees, Trasimont Landry. Jordan has just had a visit with Father (Joseph N.) Brogard who advised him to inform Blanc. Brogard said he knew positively that those at West (Baton Rouge) were not inclined to keep Jordan and that he must buy back the horse he had just sold, or another, because he had decided to stay. Jordan knows that they will not keep a priest who fulfills his duty faithfully. But if Jordan must make someone approach the sacraments before marrying, he thinks all priests should do so.

V-5-c - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {4}


1845 Apr. 16
(Kenrick), Bishop Peter Richard: St. Louis, (Missouri)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Blanc knows that Father (James) Fontbonne has agreed to replace Father (Nicolas) Francais. (Kenrick) sees him go with regret.

V-5-c - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 3to. - {3}


1845 Apr. 16
McCaffrey, Father James: Marietta, Ohio
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He acknowledges Purcell two letters and the Holy Oils. Young Mr. Sherlock said that Purcell was still anxious to learn about the graveyard at Meigs Creek. Despite the opposition of Reilly and Waters he has blessed the lot near the church and Mr. McCune has been buried in the new lot. Mr. Reilly is the only one to be buried in the old graveyard since. They boast that Purcell will give them the deed for the old graveyard, and that they will retain it despite Mr. Sherlock or any other man. McCaffrey wishes that they be made to transfer their dead to the new graveyard like the rest. The Reilly's except the old man and son attend the sacraments. Waters was arrested three days in succession for selling liquors. The church is filled each Sunday and on the last Sunday 60 approached the sacraments. He will fulfil Purcell's request and invite Father (Timothy) Farrell to come and visit him. He has been told that his health has already much improved. (The rest of the letter has been torn off.)

II-4-i - A.L. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {3}


1845 Apr. 16
O'Connor, Michael, Bp. of Pittsburgh: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He sends these lines by Mr. Shook a young German whom he is sending to Kentucky seminary. He has learned that Purcell was put to more inconvenience than he had expected in taking care of his seminarians and he has thrown himself at Father (Martin J.) Spalding of Kentucky for a few more students. A lady named Hanna Flinn married by Purcell on Mar. 30, asks for a marriage certificate. Her husband is Thomas Featherstone. A stone cutter and marbel merchant desires to know whether Purcell would advise him to settle in Cincinnati. Purcell has heard that the Sisters of Charity have left Pittsburgh, from Sister Josephine. O'Connor regards it as outrageous on the part of the Sisters of Emmitsburg, (Md.) He supposes that Father (Lewis R.) Deloul desired to give the people a hint about what he expects for his Sisters and decided to try it on him as one few cared for. If such be their system he is happy to be through with them forever. He asks Purcell if he knows why Bishop (Francis Partrick) Kenrick went to Rome. Being such a stay-at-home he must have had a good reason. Purcell has seen by the papers the account of the great fire which caused so much damage. He believes the damage has been exaggerated. The Catholics did not suffer most. The section of the town that burned was the Nativist section; all the offices of the Nativist organization having been burned, as well as the merchants of the third Presbyterian, the most bitter congregation in town. Mr. Yiernan's death leaves his daughter independent ($20,000). If she perseveres, that will leave the convent of the Sisters of Mercy independent. They will feel obliged for a good subject from Purcell's city, though Sister Josephine will be before his eyes.

II-4-i - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 8vo. - {8}


1845 Apr. 16
Patterson, J.: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

A receipt for $12.40 for meat furnished Marie (Dedune?) for the bishop's house.

V-5-c - A. Receipt S. - (French) - 1p. - 32mo. - {1}


1845 Apr. 17
Lucas, Father P(eter): St. Martinville, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisiana)

On the 15th Lucas received Blanc's letter dated March 26. He does not believe the parish has suffered since Father (Giles F.?) Martin left as, since he was almost always ill, Lucas did almost everything. Church is well attended and all is quiet. Almost a year ago Martin made his will which he gave to Lucas. It is in the bottom of his trunk which is always packed ready to go. Martin told Lucas that Blanc was his universal heir and that Father (Julien) Priour was his executor. Martin owes Lucas some, Mr. Lebesque $100 or so, and $15 elsewhere. Lucas sends his respects to Martin.

P.S. Lucas would like to know whether Blanc received the 17 piastres he sent with Mr. Monhaut; it was the Easter collection for the seminary.

V-5-c - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {5}


1845 Apr. 18
Thomas, B.M.: Vincennes, (Indiana)
 to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc: N(ew) Orleans, L(ouisian)a

A month ago Thomas sent a letter but presumes it was not delivered. In the absence of their Bishop, he writes to Blanc. Miss Bernhard, of the respectable French family and well educated, came from Rennes to join the Sisters of Providence at Terre Haute. Having exhibited symptoms of mental derangement, she was excluded. Since then she has been wandering about. Thomas had her finally declared insane. They have no asylum there. They have decided to send her to France, and while waiting, to an asylum in New Orleans. Some here imagine that the consul at New Orleans would make the necessary provision. Their bishop has always felt the greatest interest in this lady. If Father (Joseph Billon?) Bellin should be in New Orleans on his way from Mobile before Blanc answers, he will give every satisfaction in regard to this matter. (P.S.) Late letters from Bishop (Celestin de la Hailandière) inform them of his safe arrival in France, and permit them to look for his early return.

V-5-c - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 4to. - {5}


1845 Apr. 19
Marivault, Father Theophile (C.S.C.) Pr(etre) de N(otre) D(ame) de S(ain)te C(roix): Pokagon (Cass Co., Michigan)
 to Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere): (Detroit, Michigan)

Father Marivault regrets the fact that he had not spoken to the Bishop at Bertrand, Michigan. A few weeks later he was sent to Pokagon to make a permanent home among his dear Indians. The American superior, Father Edward Sorin, of his congregation (Congregation of Holy Cross) sent him two Sisters (of Holy Cross); the one a young Irish Sister who occupies herself with the school and the sacristy; the other with nursing the sick and teaching sewing to the children. Marivault is particularly concerned with the task of using all means to reunite all the Pottawattomies at Pokagon. This he believes to be very important both from a spiritual and temporal point of view. There is so much disorder in the other villages; it appears that the Indians fear that if they come to Pokagon they will be sent to the Mississippi. He believes that a letter from the Bishop on this subject will make an impression. He thinks that Brother Joseph will tell Lefevere of the difficulty he has to get the Indians at Pokegan to work. He has no vase for holy oils and what holy oil he has is old. He is sure that the Bishop will aid them. He needs two or three altar stones and a chalice. He asks the Bishop about requirements for the gaining of indulgences and about marriages not solemnized. (There is a note here in the margin— "impediments of clandestinity.") He asks whether the decree of the Council of Trent (Tridentine decree) held, or the decree based on the answer from Rome to Lefevere three years ago. Ought they to regard such marriages null before that time. Marivault then states a definite case of two Catholics married seven years ago by a Protestant minister, who separated some time after and then wish to remarry. The difficulty arises whether such marriages are null only since the answer from Rome, or have they always been. The decision is pressing.

III-2-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 12mo. - {6}


1845 Apr. 20
Healy, Thomas C.: New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Healy is going to spend a few weeks at Woodville, Mi(ssissippi) and in the vicinity of Bayou Sara. If Blanc would be so good as to send him some letters to some of his acquaintances, they might be of essential service to him. P.S. Any letters directed to T.C. Healy, artist, at Woodville, will reach him.

V-5-c - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {1}


(1845) (Apr. 20)
Jouanneault, Father V(ictor): (New Orleans, Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: Donaldsonville, L(ouisian)a

On receipt of Blanc's last letter last Sunday, Jouanneault set about carrying out his wishes. Arriving today and not being able to see Blanc, he went to see Father (Stephen) Rousselon who advised him to go to Donaldson to see Blanc. Considering this too expensive, Jouanneault took a room in town to await the steps Blanc would take. He can do no more good in that place; his honor made him leave the place immediately. His keys are in the hands of a friend and nothing has yet been sold. One word from Blanc and Jouanneault will dispose of everything. He thinks of renting his house for the summer; he will not dispose of the church except in the last extremity. He does not intend to leave for Europe. If Blanc rejects him he must save something from the shipwreck to subsist. He thinks he can still be useful to religion. If Blanc abandons him he will have to seek some means to procure the necessities of life outside faculties which Blanc has just forbidden him to exercise. That is why he did not dare to stay at the bishop's house and took a room far away. Blanc can address his letter to Rousselon and Jouanneault will get it from him.

V-5-c - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {2}


1845 Apr. 21
Priour, Father J(ulian): New Iberia, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Priour acknowledges the receipt of Blanc's two letters. He is ashamed of not answering sooner and today he did what Blanc asked in his last letter about Father (John ?) Martin. In going about Fausse Pointe, Priour was able to get to St. Martin the 21st and see Mr. Dumartrait and do what Blanc wanted. He hurried to go there today -- he knew they were going to have a trustee's meeting. Blanc can expect a letter this week with all the information for Martin's accounts. Priour thinks it would be well to send the collector, the account book in Mr. Lebesque's trunk. (P.S.) Priour has just seen Doctor Smith and Mrs. St. Marc Darby. They beg Blanc to come to them; his presence is absolutely necessary.

V-5-c - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {7}


1845 Apr. 22
Calot, A.: New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

A receipted bill for $5.45 for window glass for the bishop's house, from September 30, 1844 to March 22, 1845.

V-5-c - Receipt S. - (French) - 2pp. - 8vo. - {1}


1845 Apr. 22
Lucas, Father P(eter): St. Martinville, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

Yesterday the new trustees had a meeting at which Lucas was not present either as assistant or as pastor par interim. They called him in to ask if he wanted to be paid a straight $500 and besides they would give him what Father (Giles F.?) Martin gives him a year. Lucas replied that he was pastor only to do the work, that he would hold to the arrangement thing. If they had not wanted to take away the horse which was bought for him and which he uses all the time Lucas would never have spoken of this bill. They say Lucas loves money but they had better say he does not want to be a public dependent. They have spread calumnies saying no one wanted to go to confession because he was too young; that the parish would be lost if Blanc did not send another priest. Lucas never wanted Martin's pastorship. Since he has been a priest he has had no opposition from the laity, only from priests.

V-5-c - A.L. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {3}


1845 Apr. 24
Brands, (C.M.), Father John: Galveston, (Texas)
 to Father E(tienne) Rousselon: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Brands asks Rousselon to send on the two letters, one to Bishop (John) Odin, (C.M.) and one to Holland. The only news Brands has is that the Ursulines have the finest house in Galveston and everyone is anxiously waiting for them to take possession.

V-5-c - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {3}


1845 Apr. 25
Tanner, Martha Ann: Mackinac, (Michigan)
 to Bishop P(eter) P(aul) Lefevere,: (Detroit, Michigan)

Miss Tanner received Lefevere's letter of April 18 with a draft for $60 and hastens to send the required report. School was resumed the first of last November with 25 to 41 scholars throughout the winter, some having withdrawn because of her request for firewood for the schoolroom. On the back of this letter Miss Tanner gives a list of the pupils, their ages and race.

III-2-h - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {1}


1845 Apr. 25
(Louisiana), New Orleans:
Commercial Bank of New Orleans Water Works Department
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Receipt for $20 for a supply of water from January 1 to December 31, 1845 for 8 persons. Signed by S.E. Percy, Secretary, and W(illia)m Wright, collector. On the back of the receipt are the rules for users of water.

V-5-c - Receipt S. - (English & French) - 2pp. - 16mo. - {3}


1845 Apr. 26
Billon, Father J(osep)h: Charenton, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Billon takes advantage of Mrs. Laclair's going to New Orleans to get the Holy Oils. St. Mary's Church has no case for them so he cannot send any bottles. He will pay Blanc for some. Billion would like to know whether he can request a fee from those who have gravestones and enclosures in the cemetery.

V-5-c - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {3}


1845 Apr. 26
Brands, (C.M.), Father John: Galveston, (Texas)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Brands has Blanc's favor of the 14th. In obedience to Blanc's request this will be accomplished with the exeat of Father A. Roech. With regard to Mr. S. Reminger, Brands has information from Mr. Moritz, their organist, with whom Roech is well acquainted, that he is an excellent young man of respectable parents but a little too fond of wine, for which Father Pfanner had to reprimand him. Brands sent a letter to each of the two clergymen at Castroville requesting them to persevere, to edify their congregation by their zeal and piety. Brands has just now received from the recorder's office, the deed of the property which the Ursulines have purchased and has expended $16 for the freight of the drafts and recorder's fees, which they are to pay to Blanc.

V-5-c - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {7}


1845 Apr. 26
Jouanneault, Father V(ictor): New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To think that (Blanc) believes he must banish him from his diocese grieves Jouanneault a thousand times more than the loss of a thousand piastres and he would like to become worthy of (Blanc)'s confidence at the price of all he holds most dear which is certainly his church. He has not given up the slender hope of being received again. He does not deny having abused (Blanc)'s good will three times. He knows that in adopting a temporal life he would expose his soul to almost certain ruin. Affairs at Thibodauxville, at Covington, and at (New Orleans) would scarcely allow him to withdraw immediately. Before his ministry was completely paralysed at Covington, before (Blanc)'s interdict, Jouanneault enjoyed great consideration at least among the Americans but now (Blanc)'s measures have made everyone believe in his guilt. He admits being imprudent. Demonstrations of a perfectly natural affection were made to look suspicious. The presbytery at Covington is so tied up with the church that he hardly sees how one could be acquired without the other. It cost him $14; the church alone cost only 600. The presbytery is larger than the church and is completely finished. It would cost about $120 to finish the church inside. He may have some things in his trunk which were not given to him personally but he took them in exchange for things belonging to him which he did not take such as pews, curtains, etc. He appeals from (Blanc)'s sentence pronounced at Donaldsonville to a sentence given here; from justice to pardon. If he must go, he asks permission to say Mass until he does. He will go to see (Blanc) tomorrow after (Blanc) has had time to consider these lines which are a feeble expression of his heart.

V-5-c - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {2}


1845 Apr. 27
Xavier, (S.C.), Sister M.: St. Joseph's, (Emmitsburg, Maryland)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

They received Blanc's letter of March 31 but they cannot grant his request. They have hardly enough Sisters to furnish their Academy here. Those whom they receive are generally with little education. It is difficult to teach them English. (P.S.) Regards to their Sisters (of Charity).

V-5-c - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {2}


1845 Apr. 29
Brassac, Father H(ercul)e: Paris, (France)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, Louis(ia)na

Brassac thanks Blanc for his two last letters of March 5 and 10 containing the forms and duplicates of a draft for 6480.80 francs drawn on Viel and Durand by the firm of Eymer Blanchard(?) to Brassac's order. This draft has been accepted and will, he hopes, be paid when due. The last letter also contained details of his affair with Mr. Ducros and the transactions which Brassac's attorney, D.(?) Seghers thought he ought to make in his interests; Blanc is to thank Seghers for his zeal. Brassac is not figuring the first costs of protest, in letter 23, which Blanc paid. Blanc is to give Brassac the note at the end so that he can repay Blanc in case the remittance made by Brand and Landry is not sufficient. Brassac made his sacrifice long ago. In Blanc's troubles with the trustees of St. Louis, Brassac is consoled to see that God gives him health and courage. Father (Angelo) Mascaroni left here on the 23rd, almost entirely recovered, to go to Italy. Father (James Ignatius) Mullon is to arrive from Rome any day. This good man sees nothing like the United States and anathematizes all nations of the world as unworthy to see the sun. He wrote from Rome a furious letter about the Pope and papal authorities, etc. Brassac told him that if one is a cross-patch like he is, one ought to stay in his own corner.

V-5-c - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {8}


1845 Apr. 29
Machebeuf, Father Joseph P.: Havre, France
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

In his last letter he was telling Purcell that he was going to Tulle, however, the bishop of that diocese would not let the two Ursulines, whose obedience he had changed go, not even one of the two priests. Disappointed and grieved he set out for Paris and lest the bishop change his mind about the other eight he took with him to Paris where they stayed one day while they consecrated themselves to Our Lady at Notre Dame des Victoires. He came to Havre Friday with Father (Peter) Prendeprat of Clermont the priest he is asking for Lower Sandusky. The seminarians from St. Flour have come also. Though they are intended for Cincinnati he regards them as more useful than Mr. Montier, the one recommended by Father Combes. Montier has sailed by way of New Orleans with the vicar general of Nashville and a seminarian for Vincennes. He suggests that Purcell send Montier to Pittsburgh and take the others for Cincinnati. Mr. De la Croix who went over with Father Patrick O'Mealy is very good, and pious. Father (Lewis) Hostel, the vicar general of Nashville can tell Purcell more about him. The Ursulines from Boulogne are expected that night and they will probably sail May 1 or 2. Mr. Marzion has obtained a reduction of 15 francs a person. They will be 15 in number and with the eight with Father O'Mealy will make 23 for this year. He has the sacred vessels, vestments etc. about which he will tell him when he gets to Cincinnati. He asks a letter to be sent to New York in care of Father Lafont giving further instructions about proceeding to Cincinnati. He sends his regards to his friends in Cincinnati. He has been told that Father (Claude) Gacon will be chaplain to the nuns. No better choice could have been made.

P.S. He hopes that Purcell will promise Father Prendeprat to no other place than Lower Sandusky. Apr. 30: All arrangements have been made for their passage. The Captain has agreed to 450 for the passage.

II-4-i - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 8vo. - {9}


1845 Apr. 29
McLaughlin, Father Peter: Cleveland, Ohio
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevre) of Detroit and Father Cullen have asked him to preach at the dedication of the church at Ann Arbor (Michigan), and he asks Purcell's earliest decision. Captain John McGinty has offered him a splendid parlor and Mr. John Crangle offered him $100 which he will not accept. Bigotry rages in Cleveland, Rev. Mr. Canfield making certain public utterances. A lawyer will soon enter the church and be married to a Miss Mulvany of Pittsburgh. He asks about the retreat and if he may go to the Falls.

II-4-i - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {5}


1845 Apr. 29
Timon, Father J(ohn): St. Louis, (Missouri)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Timon feels how just Blanc's remarks are about the multiplication of different orders or societies, etc. It was his intention to dissuade Father (Joseph) Giustiniani, (C.M.) from it. Timon will cooperate in any representations to Father (Louis) Deluol but as he will have to go East before long he thinks it better to treat viva voce on the subject. Timon recommends to Blanc's prayers Father (James) Ricini who died March 20 and Father James Cercos who died March 28.

V-5-c - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {5}


1845 Apr. 30
Beauprez, Father P(eter) F(rancis): Pointe Coupée, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Three weeks ago they had an election of trustees. There were 140 or more voters. The Conservatives won over the Reform party. The new trustees are J(ohn) Laurans and Ch(arle)s Poydras for Fausse Riviere, Marcellin Sicard and J(ohn) B(aptist) Bergeron for L'ile and Valery Ledoux and G(usta)ve Delamare. They met last Sunday. Sicard was absent; Ledoux is no longer president. They decided to reduce the pastor's salary and the sacristan's and the fees by 20 per cent. Beauprez's salary is $800, the sacristan's $350, a reduction of 12 per cent. The church has never been in a more prosperous state; without debts and $1600 in the treasury, without counting the 6,000 due the church; $2000 by Ch(arle)s Morgan with $200 interest. The church made $9000 in three years; it spent about $1800 a year. Everyone is asking for a reduction of fees; he has heard that the trustees will make only a slight reduction. Fees amount to about $150. He hopes, with Blanc's permission, to be able to leave the parish unless there is a change. There is a triumvirate to be feared among the trustees: Poydras Delamare, and Ledoux. Blanc is to tell Beauprez how he should act and also to resolve the question of fees for burials (shich are quoted here). Father (Jean) Martin came while Beauprez was in New Orleans and performed a marriage. Does Martin have jurisdiction in Beauprez's parish? Blanc will recall the incident between Father Boué and Father (Hercule) Brassac. The oldest are the first to infringe. (P.S.) Beauprez is indisposed from time to time; he will see next June.

V-5-c - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {12}


1845 Apr. 30
M(arie) du Coeur de Jesus, (C.S.C.), S(ister), Mistress of Novices: Bertrant, (Michigan)
 to Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefevere: Detroit, Michigan

The writer has for a long time wished to converse with Bishop (Lefevere) but pressure of circumstances has prevented her doing so until now. She would have openly spoken to the Bishop when he came to Bertrand in January (1845) but God impenetrable did not permit it. For two years she has not been able to communicate her troubles and temptations. She desires to found a new Convent under the direction of Bishop Lefevere. This desire has not prevented her from doing all that the good God has wished of her as a member of the community. It had always been her wish to embrace a calling for foreign missions but she has never had any contact with a community devoted to that type of work. After passing some time in the convent, the Father General (Basil Moreau) proposed that she was ready to pronounce her vows. She was 18 years old at the time. She felt that she could not be better prepared for her mission and the date for her departure to America was settled the day after. During her sojourn in America her one desire has been to found a Convent not of herself but under the Bishop's direction. For six months or a year she has not opened her soul to her director for she felt he would laugh at the idea. The first time that she did speak of it to Father (Edward) Sorin he thought that the object of our community would not be the same here as in France so he changed the aim entirely. Father Sorin counselled her not to think of these things and for a long time she followed this advice until now when she is no longer able to because of her intense interior suffering. She knows that this is a sign that God demands another thing of her and if her superior would permit her to accomplish it (found a new Convent) her soul would recapture its liberty and joy in the service of God. Her confessor has not judged it proper for her to write (Bishop Lefevere) about all this because he felt that the Convent at Bertrand needed her and that her going away would be an injustice to the community of which she was one of the first members. She thinks otherwise and feels that her soul will find its peace after the Bishop's decision. She assures the Bishop that he will find in her a person devoted to the glory of God should God inspire him to promote her desire. On the contrary, should the Bishop find that these are but temptations and illusions, she is ready to accept this as coming from God. She is writing without the permission of Father Sorin. She ends by saying that she feels that though she has written without giving all the details, these are sufficient for one with his wisdom.

III-2-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 8vo. - {4}


1845 Apr. 30
O'Connor, Michael, Bp. of Pittsburgh: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He writes to make a request based upon an offer made by Purcell. Once or twice Purcell has spoken to him of going into partnership on a petit seminaire. He now seems to have an opportunity. He has a farm of 350 acres about 40 miles from Pittsburgh in a healthy country. There is a good house and church on it and it is under the care of Father M. Gallagher who was in Cincinnati for some time. He has formed the project of establishing a brotherhood of laymen,who from the produce on the farm could care for the education of the inmates. The Sisters of Mercy are living in the house until a separate house be built for them and the "brothers" live in a house not far from the church. He has not been sanguine in his hopes but Father Gallagher has been working ahead. He needs priests and suggests that Purcell receive his share of the partnership for seeing about a priest. Father Gallagher has suggested Father (Joseph) O'Mealy. Bishop O'Connor believes that the foundations of an institution useful for both dioceses will be laid. He hopes that Father O'Mealy can come and suggests that he can give Purcell a substitute if necessary.

II-4-i - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {6}