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1846 Feb. 2
Brands, C.M., Father John: Galveston, Texas
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Brands asks Blanc to see to that box mentioned in the enclosed letter (no enclosure). Brands wishes the articles to remain in Blanc's care until their custom house has been surrendered to the United States which will not take place until the 16th when the state legislature is to assemble.

V-5-e - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {2}


1846 Feb. 2
Ladavière, S.J., Father A. P(ierre): St. Michael, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Blanc) has recalled exactly what was in the note that went astray: $4.50 for the subscription to the Propagateur for Mr. Mericy(?), $6.20 for the Christmas collection, 50 for 2 Catholic Almanacs and $30 for the subscription of Father(?) Martin. It is hardly worth waiting 10 days for these 4 lines. They are in the best of health possible in a convent.

V-5-e - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {3}


1846 Feb. 2
(Smith, S.C.), Sister Regina:
Charity Hospital (New Orleans, Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Sister received a few lines from Sister Lor(r)etta, (S.C.) requesting her to inform Blanc that the kitchen is not yet done and the carpenters want 400 feet more of weatherboarding. She also has a letter from Mother who writes as follows: She has answered the Bishop about Sister Abraham, (S.C.); it is out of their power for a day school; they have now about 12 or 15 applications for new establishments and they must strengthen and support those already formed. Sister Regina does not think that she will get a Sister in Sister Euphrasia (S.C.)'s place before next fall.

V-5-e - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 4to. - {4}


1846 Feb. 4
Byrne, Father Michael A.: Cleveland, Ohio
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

For the past ten days he has been suffering from a fever and while the sickness has gone he can hardly hold a pen. The day after Father (Peter) McLaughlin received Purcell's letter he seemed very well and consulting with Byrne promised to go to Cincinnati. But since he has been acting like one possessed. Surrounded by a clan of his own and led by a miserable pedler, John Rooney, he has tried to throw the whole place into turmoil. Sunday he talked as though religion was going to wreck in Cleveland. He disbanded the choir and preached and cried alternately. He announced that the next day he would preach his farewell sermon. The church was hung in mourning and the solemn farce which Purcell has probably noticed in Cleveland papers was enacted. Byrne objected and McLaughlin became so bitter that he had himself removed to the home of Mr. Wamsworth where he will remain until he gets strong. He told the congregation that he was in debt $600., but Byrne does not think so. The excitement was for the purpose of raising the money. Byrne thinks that he will leave Friday but will not go to Cincinnati. McLaughlin speaks of Bishop Henni's. Most of the people wish he were gone. They thought the debt was incurred in paying for the lot, but they find that the last installment was borrowed. He raised a petition but with forged names. Father (Joseph P.) Machebeuf arrived from Sandusky this morning. He has great influence with McLaughlin and succeeded in bringing him to a better course. He will remain in the country until the petition to the bishop is answered. The matter has become a city political matter since his apology for dabling in politics. The Palin Dealer (Democaratic) seems triumphant and the Whigs want him retained to save their reputation. Father Machebeuf leaves tomorrow. P.S. McLaughlin asked to see Byrne's letter from Purcell. Byrne told him that his letter contained the same matter as his and refused. McLaughlin has tried to turn the people against Byrne. but has not succeeded. He reopens the letter to say that Machebeuf and McLaughlin have been to see him and that apparently McLaughlin has forgotten all. But his hatred for Capt. and Mrs. McKintz knows no bounds.

II-4-j - A.L.S. - 5pp. - 8vo. - {4}


1846 Feb. 4
(Portier), Bishop Michael: Mobile, (Alabama)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

The letter (Portier) wrote will explain the prompt return of Sister Abraham, (S.C.). (Portier) has remarked before that Blanc sends to Mobile those he wants to get rid of. Sisters (Francis) Regis, (S.C.), Lor(r)etta, (S.C.) and Regina (Smith, S.C.) are the cause of Sister Abraham's dismissal. They have judged her unworthy to be a Sister of Charity and have thought she would suit the (Sisters of the) Visitation. It is unfortunate that Blanc has served as a screen.

V-5-e - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {7}


1846 Feb. 4
Lelievre, J.F.: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Receipted bill for $1.50 for 10 packs of grained paper(?).

V-5-e - A. Receipt S. - (French) - 2pp. - 12mo. - {0}


1846 Feb. (4)
Rauth, O.F.M., Father P. Lucal:
Minister General of No. Tyrol Oenipotenti, Italy
 to (Bishop John Baptist Purcell): of Cincinnati, Ohio

Purcell's letter to his predecessor as Minister General of the Franciscans of northern Tyrol has been handed over to him. He is pleased that Father William Unterthimer is carrying on the work of pastor in Cincinnati, but he is sorry that he has quarreled with Father Lewis Huber of the Bavarian province. Since already in September of the past year Father Alexander Martin has left for Cincinnati to be subject to Father Untertheimer. Perhaps they and even Father Huber will live together in peace, however, in such a way that Father Huber shall have no authority over the other two. In all other matters they are to be subject to the bishop. If Father Huber does not like this arrangement Purcell should get another to aid Father Huber, probably from Bavaria and assign the other two somewhere else in the diocese near Cincinnati. However he would not want to appear to drive out Father Huber lest he seem to be expelled to Bavaria by the two other Franciscans.

II-4-j - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - (Latin) - {6}


1846 Feb. 5
(McLaughlin), Father Peter: Cleveland, Ohio
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He leaves Purcell unwillingly and as for Natchez, which he hates, Purcell need not expect him to go there. He wants to go to Bishop (John Martin) Henni if Purcell does not interdict that. He blames the curle and needless interference of a third person for the grief and affliction of Cleveland. Purcell can see by the paper he has sent the result of his decision. He will await Purcell's final decision. He has a petition signed by all but four. These have been visited by Father (Michael) Byrne. McLaughlin says he has nursed his enemy. It has seemed better to him not to send the petition. However, he wants to know if he is to be sent back. Father Byrne says that his letter said for McLaughlin to go "peremptorily". Purcell has asked him to pledge himself against all denunciatory and personal allusions. He would do this were he not "afraid of making innocence guilt". He says he has no enmities. He denies that anyone has asked for a strange confessor or that he has hindered anyone from choosing their confessor. He speaks of Father Dillon his predecessor dying a martyr. Denies other charges.

II-4-j - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {4}


1846 Feb. 7,
(Brownson, Jr.) Orestes A.: Cincinnati, Ohio
 to O(restes) A. Brownson: Boston, Mass(achusetts)

He has had a long conversation with Father (John A.) Elet (S.J.), who desires him to write to his father, as he is afraid Orestes, Jr. has given his father some uneasiness. He will obey his father's wishes in all things, but he asks that either he be permitted to go with his brother John to Worcester, or have his brother come out there as he is lonesome and to think of remaining there, shut up, without a friend, is not very pleasant. He still prefers, by far, going into some trade in Chelsea or Boston to studying. P.S. to his mother: He is well and thanks her for the sum she sent him, using it to have his teeth fixed. He is glad the children succeed so well and hopes to see her soon. P.S. He does not feel like writing, but does so because he considers it a duty.

I-3-h - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {1}


1846 Feb. 7
Cantwell, P.: Charleston, S(outh) C(arolina)
 to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

The opportunity afforded by the departure for New Orleans of the son of B. Reilly of this diocese, induces Cantwell to say that the $25 sent per Barele(?) and Mansoni for the U.S. Miscellany was paid per James Chapman, a merchant of this city. This sum with the $12 transmitted by Mr. Hogan pays Blanc's subscription up to January 1, 1846.

V-5-e - A.L.S. - 1p. - 4to. - {4}


1846 Feb. 8
Brownson, Mrs. R(elief): Ballston, N(ew) Y(ork)
 to O(restes) A. Brownson: Boston, Mass(achusetts)

She asks why does Brownson accuse her of not owning one of his brightest children; she loves all her grandchildren and asks him to be so good as to explain. She is pleased to hear that Esther, his wife, is in better health. She has considerable on her mind at this time and she tries to do the best she can in every case.

I-3-h - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {1}


1846 Feb. 8
(Hailandière), Bishop Cel(estin de la): Vincennes, (Indiana)
 to Bishop Anth(ony) Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

(Hailandière) asks Blanc to let another collector come, Father Mich(ael) Clarke, pastor of Lafayette; he will explain their needs. If Blanc cannot authorize it, he is at least to let Clarke collect what Catholics will give him. (Hailandière) has recently received Blanc's letter of January 21.

V-5-e - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {2}


1846 Feb. 8
(Hailandière), Bishop Cel(estin de la): Vincennes, (Indiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

It was Father (Auguste) Martin who said he wished to go to New Orleans and having at hand two letters in which (Blanc) offered to employ Martin and invited him to come down, Hailandière thought (Blanc) was attracting him to New Orleans. Martin has written that he would soon go to New Orleans but with the intention of going to France and on his return to join some American diocese; he did not know which. (Hailandière) rejoices to see (Blanc)'s diocese so well supplied with priests and his seminary promising an abundance of new ones. Ten months of absence has changed (Hailandière)'s diocese so that he hardly recognizes it.

V-5-e - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {3}


1846 Feb. 8
Ladavière, S.J., Father A. P(ierre): St. Michael, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Some time ago Mr. Delpuech of Donaldson wrote Ladavière that on (Blanc)'s last trip he had seen Delpuech's nephew and said that he could come to spend some time at St. Michael to prepare to enter the seminary. Ladavière asks (Blanc) to tell him if Delpuech should send the nephew. Father (John) Boullier, (C.M.) speaks very favorably of the boy. Does (Blanc) remember a box containing a portrait and some letters, being sent to Louisiana from Canada or confided by Father (Louis) Boué(?) to someone? Dr. Hache of Opelousas claims this box and has asked Father (J. Francis) Abbadie to write Ladaviére about it. If (Blanc) has it he is to give it to Father (Joseph) Soller, (S.J.) who will give it to Abbadie who will see that Hache gets it. Nothing new at St. Michael; catechism is going well. Ladavière sends the respects of the Ladies of the Sacred Heart and of Father (J.M.) Lefranc.

V-5-e - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - rto. - {8}


1846 Feb. 8
Wood, Father James Frederick: Lexington, Kentucky
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He arrived there Tuesday evening with the lady entrusted to his care. They go to Frankfort Tuesday morning, where he called on Col. Brown who was gratified to receive a letter from his daughter and expressed himself pleased that she was with the sisters. Col. Brown showed them the State House etc. Father Edward Purcell had told him to enquire about the Quarries near Frankfort. Wood speaks in detail of the capitol. Yesterday he called on Mr. James K. Duke who was embarrassed when he knew the purpose of Wood's call, although he must have known as soon as he saw him. He explained his failure to pay because of the actions of a Wm. M. Walker who was to have handled his affairs. He speaks of an agreement with John P. Gaines of Richwood whereby enough will be gotten together to pay the debt and interest for March 1. He was to deposit this in Covington. Wood suggests that Purcell inquire at the Covington banks. To make the arrangements friendly Wood based his plea on Purcell's want of funds since building the cathedral. On Wood's return to Lexington he met Mr. Duke returning and gave Basil Purcell's gift. Major Hanly is in town and Wood will go to his place to say Mass the next day. Father (John) Joyce and Abraham McMahon have received him well. He sends his regards to Father Collins and Purcell and says that if all ladies were as easy to care for as Mrs. Bonner's sisters, men would not decline taking charge of them.

II-4-j - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {5}


1846 Feb. 9
Lorretta, (S.C.), Sister M(ary):
St. Vincent's House (Donaldsonville, Louisiana)
 to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Sister received Blanc's letter this morning, the lumber on Friday. She is sorry for poor Sister A(braham Hoey, S.C.?). Mother (of the Sisters of Charity) is going to pay great attention to the Missions. Sister Lorretta wishes Sister (Francis) Regis, (S.C.) would be candid and give information of those Sisters who do not keep the rules, particularly obedience. If it is Mary Ann Manitou that used to be at the Asylum, it seems her vocation has come too suddenly. She has been very worldly; she ought to have at least one year's trial. Sister Lorretta is afraid to take the other; Germans are a hard people to manage particularly when advanced in life. There are now three received in New Orleans, one in St. Louis. The three here are doing very well. The little room to spare had best be kept for useful members; widows are troublesome. The carpenters will finish this week; she does not know if plasterers can be found. Sister M(ary) Margaret, (S.C.) is working a piece for Captain Streck for his kindness to the Sisters in taking them up and down gratis. Both Sisters are doing their best in the schools. Sister Lorretta sent Mother an account of the money spent since their arrival besides all the donations, cows, pigs, chickens, pigeons, sugar, flour, meat, furniture which amounted to a good deal. Mother appears pleased notwithstanding Father T's opposition. Father (Louis) Deluol, wrote how pleased he was to hear of their progress.

V-5-e - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {9}


1846 Feb. 9
Lucas, Father P(eter): New Iberia, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

Last week Lucas made a retreat at Grand-Coteau where he received Blanc's last letter. Lucas regrets that after 10 months he does not have all the patience possible. Father (Louis) Dufour's letter and Blanc's filled him with so much chagrin that if Lucas said anything offensive it was involuntarily. For a long time they have talked of a petition; if there is one it is in spite of Lucas. Lucas called on Father (Anthony Désiré) Mégret and instead of making any demands on him in the unhappy state he found Mégret in, he talked as cheerfully as he could and gave him 40 Mass stipends. On the 12th Lucas is to have a big service; he invited Dufour since the family wanted him. Lucas has neither hate nor anger and it seems to him that these men will come back to him more quickly than they left. He asks Blanc's pardon if he saddened him without realizing it. P.S. Perhaps Blanc did not notice the request Lucas made for a dispensation for Louis Verret and Honorine Verret

V-5-e - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {5}


1846 Feb. 9
Mazza, G.A.: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

A receipted bill for $30.

V-5-e - A. Receipt - (Italian) - 2pp. - 32mo. - {0}


1846 Feb. 10
(Kenrick), Bishop Peter Richard: St. Louis, (Missouri)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Having found it advisable to make inquiries regarding church property in this diocese at Havana (Kenrick) has given the letter to Father (John) Timon to be posted by him after obtaining Blanc's consent to the arrangement in it in order to meet the expenses. This is, to draw on Blanc for the amount. If Blanc has any objection Timon will not post the letter. P.S. The person directed to draw on Blanc is José Maria Morales of Havana; the amount cannot be very great.

V-5-e - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 4to. - {3}


1846 Feb. 10
Lopez, Father Benito: Havana, (Cuba)
 to Bishop Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

The bearer of this letter is Pedro de Alcantara Jimenes, a cleric in first tonsure. Having obtained a benefice in the Diocese of Santiago Jimenes came to be ordained but found the Archbishop ill. He decided to go to New Orleans and consign himself to Blanc. Blanc may remember Lopez when he was in New Orleans in 1837 in the presbytery with the late Father (Louis) Moni.

V-5-e - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {3}


1846 Feb. 11
Mégret, Father A(nthony) D(ésiré): Abbeville, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

In the meeting of the trustees of which the last was the 2nd of this month, it was resolved that the cemetery be divided into squares, that paths be made, and all given over to the care of Mégret. On the 4th he had three paths ploughed, making six squares. People seemed satisfied with the order he had established. On the 5th, about 30 Protestants came to find him in the cemetery; their spokesman insulted him, calling him a Jesuit. This same Protestant hit Megret in the face. Another, whom Mégret had pardoned 2 years ago, drew a pistol. But an angelic hand, that of Jarussin(?) Bernard deflected the shot. Grey, the one who had hit him, for 20 years cashier at the bank, justice of the peace, clerk of court, compromised his honor by spreading the word that Mégret had molested the tombs. He called a meeting at the courthouse on Sunday, the 8th. They decided to write to Blanc to ask for another pastor. One Catholic, Joseph Berandt, came to Mégret's defence. Mégret is glad about the delay of the Sisters; in this sad circumstance they would have judged the parish more unfavorably than it deserves. P.S. As he finished this letter he received one from the trustees and people, dated the 10th, saying that all was restored to order, that the trustees had called a meeting of all the people for next Sunday. They urged Mégret to come to talk with them before the meeting. He will go next Wednesday. He will take measures that Protestants will no longer be buried in the Catholic cemetery. Perhaps it would be good, to make them see their crime, for Blanc to interdict the church and cemetery. Father (Lawrence) Peyretti was struck, also Father (Peter Francis) B(e)aupre(z?) and Mégret; he would not like to see the majority punished for a long time because of a few guilty ones.

V-5-e - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {6}


1846 Feb. 12
McCloskey, Bishop John: New York, (New York)
 to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

McCloskey received Blanc's letter of the 2nd relative to the affairs of Father (Ildefonsus) Medrano. He had not the remotest suspicion that what he communicated would have to appear as testimony before a court of justice and coming back in a column of a newspaper. He would not have spoken so freely of Mr. Hernandez. Yet he does not discover he has actually incriminated either party. The only expression he would wish to erase is his fear that Hernandez would end his days in a madhouse. With regard to the claims of the nephew-in-law, McCloskey knows nothing of them. Had it not been for the first arrest made by this Mr. Bernard, Medrano, Hernandez, his wife and children would now be in Europe. McCloskey would advise Blanc's clergy not to credit all Medrano tells.

V-5-e - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 4to. - {4}


1846 Feb. 12
Machebeuf, Father (Joseph) P.: Sandusky City, Ohio
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Father P(eter) McLaughlin had expressed in a previous letter his intention of going to Cincinnati. The Cleveland papers give an account of his farewell address to his congregation. Machebeuf found Father (Michael) Byrne seriously sick. Because of some dissatisfaction about money matters and the repeated visits of the female in question, McLaughlin did not visit Vyrne. McLaughlin denies having seen the woman over twice but Byrne says that he had seen her going into his house over twenty times. McLaughlin later wrote that the woman is married and that she and her husband came to his house to practice on Church music. The German student with Machebeuf will go to Bishop (John) Henni of Milwaukee if Purcell cannot receive him in his seminary. Machebeuf is happy to hear of Purcell's intention of sending him an assistant priest.

II-4-j - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {5}


1846 Feb. 14
(Chanche), Bishop John Joseph: Natchez, (Mississippi)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Father (William) Blenkinsop is away and will not return before Lent; then (Chanche) will be able to go down. Archbishop (Samuel Eccleston) sent (Chanche) the enclosed letter for Bishop (John Mary) Odin. Is it not surprising that the has not yet returned nor written? (Chanche) wrote Mr. Barrett about some flag stones; he fears Barrett has relapsed; Blanc is to ask. Blanc has no doubt received the Archbishop's circular. When (Chanche) and Blanc meet they will fix the time of starting and the route.

V-5-e - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 4to. - {5}


(1846) Feb. 14
Dufour, Father L(ouis): St. Martinville, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Some days ago a number of men came to Father (A.D. Mégret)'s house to ask the reason for certain work he had done in the cemetery. Two of these men assaulted him, one struck him and another fired a shot. These are old enemies, Protestants, one a brother of the Greygues from here. There were nearly 40. Dufour advised Maigret to go to see Blanc but he did not seem to be of the same opinion; he has been wandering on the outskirts of his parish for three weeks without any public services. Dufour attended a sick call at Cote Gelée because they could not find Maigret. Father (Peter) Lucas spent a week in the Franklin parishes. Dufour told Lucas that Blanc thought Dufour should offer him half of the stipends for the two burials and Lucas took the sum. All is restored outwardly as Blanc wished. Lucas is coming tomorrow to dine with Maigret. (P.S.) Dufour sends this by Mrs. Briant. Maigret came again today; he neither could nor wished to receive advice. He seems to have decided, for the present, to retire from the ministry and to go to one of his house between Lafayette and Pont-Perry.

V-5-e - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {5}


1846 Feb. 16,
Baraga, (Father) Frederick: Lapointe, (Wisconsin)
 to (Bishop Peter Paul Lefevere: Detroit, Michigan)

Baraga arrived in Lapointe on Feb. 11, and will leave immediately (Fev. 16) for Fond du Lac where he will stay 8 or 10 days. He intends to go back to L'Anse about March 15. Father (Otto) Skolla is doing very well in Lapointe. The congregation likes him very much, though they miss Baraga. He has a good interpreter for all his sermons and confessions and Baraga is happy to see the Indians go to confession without difficulty. Skolla has made fine progress in studying French and the Indian language. Baraga has written to Bishop (John Martin) Henni asking him to admit Father Skolla into his diocese and he also asks Bishop Lefevere to grant Skolla his resignation from the Michigan diocese. Baraga mentions again the money which the Bishop is to bring on his next visit. He has contracted another debt with the Company and asks the Bishop to pay to Agent Dudgeon $600. and to bring him only $290. in hard money.

III-2-h - A.L.S. - French - 1p. {3}


1846 Feb. 16
Lamirault: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

A receipt for $44,60 from Marie (Dedune) in payment of account up to date.

V-5-e - A. Receipt S. - (French) - 1p. - 32mo. - {1}


1846 Feb. 16
McLaughlin, Father Peter: Strongsville, Ohio
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

When he settles in some place he will pay for the chalice, as he did not know whether Purcell would charge him, or how much. He thanks Purcell for his exeat and will try to be worthy of it.

II-4-j - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {2}


1846 Feb. 16
Sorin, (C.S.C.), Father E(dward F.): Notre Dame, (Indiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Sorin received (Blanc)'s letter of January 9; he will gladly admit to the Brother's novitiate the man (Blanc) admit to the Brother's novitiate the man (Blanc) presents. Sorin is sending a copy (no enclosure) of the Constitution of the Brothers of St. Joseph. How happy Sorin would be to give (Blanc) 3 or 4 Brothers as (Blanc) has desired so many times! Sorin leaves for France next week, if (Blanc) has any business, Sorin will be at the Motherhouse of Holy Cross at Mans all the month of May. P.S. Father (Stephen Theodore) Badin has been here since July.

V-5-e - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {3}


1846 Feb. 17
Martin, Father Aug(uste): Vincennes, (Indiana)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Father (L.A.) Chassé who is to call on Blanc before going to Mobile will perhaps have told Blanc that Martin is definitely leaving Vincennes. He will go in four weeks, wishing to spend at least a fortnight with Blanc before leaving for France. He wants to return in the fall to some mission. Father (Maurice) De St. Palais is expected daily to return from Europe where he has been the last year. If he comes to New Orleans before Martin does, he is to leave with Blanc all he was to bring from France for Martin.

V-5-e - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {3}


1846 Feb. 18
Brogard, Father J(oseph) N.: Baton-Rouge, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Brogard received (Blanc)'s letter of the 14th; he learns with pleasure of Blanc's intention to visit them. (Blanc) will do better to address Father (Victor) Jamey directly at Pierre Grandgé's who lives beside the church, Bruly Landing. He fears Mr. Hickey would be crowded. Brogard will notify Grandgé who often boards Father (Paul?) Jordan. The nights are still too long to confirm in the two parishes in one day. They could not begin before 10 o'clock because of the country people.

V-5-e - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {5}


1846 Feb. 19
Multi Milites:
Army of Occupation Corpus Christi, (Texas)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

A great part of the Army of Occupation, say two to three, are Roman Catholics. They are compelled to attend sermons of a minister of the Presbyterian denomination whose chief aim is to vilify the Catholic Church. They thought it their duty to lay this grievance before Blanc.

V-5-e - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 4to. - {2}


1846 Feb. 19
Mégret, Father (Anthony) D(ésiré): Vermillionville, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

After receiving a letter from the trustees and good Catholics, mentioned in his postscript, Mégret expected nothing further. The president of the trustees has been to see him twice since, at Abbeville. Yesterday he went to Lafayette and was called on by men of his parish. While awaiting Blanc's orders, Mégret retired to the Sisters' house and will not go back to the presbytery until it is in a fitting state for him and his assistant, the church is repaired as Blanc wishes and the cemetery is in order. Next Sunday everything arranged between them will be published and put into execution. Meanwhile Mégret is at Abbeville. They expect to have the church interdicted as well as the cemetery. When all is in order and the end gained, Mégret will go back to the presbytery. Mégret hopes Blanc will give him the support he needs.

V-5-e - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {2}


1846 Feb. 20
(Bourget), Bishop Ig(natius): Montreal, Canada
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

Is it true that Joseph Seguin, age 66, died in New Orleans last December?

V-5-e - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {2}


1846 Feb. 21
Chanche, John Joseph, Bp. of Natchez: Natchez, Mississippi
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He has received an application from Father (Peter) McLaughlin asking admission into his diocese. Since he has Purcell's permission, Chanche says he may come. However, asks about a condition set by McLaughlin that he intends to live neither alone nor outside the bishop's house. Chanche needs but one priest there in Natchez but needs one he can send on missions among the negroes on the Plantations, a most meritorious work. If Purcell consents to his coming and he will place himself in his hands, he will receive him. He has received the Archbishop's circular. What a batch of bishops they are going to make! What a dreadful state the Jesuits have left the Bishop of Louisville Bishop (John) Odin has not returned, not being expected until the end of the month.

II-4-j - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {7}


1846 Feb. 21
(McCloskey, Bishop John) Coadj. of N.Y.: New York, (New York)
 to (Orestes A. Brownson: Boston, Massachusetts)

He is sadly puzzled to account for Brownson's failure to lecture last evening after the tickets had been sold, the Tabernacle engaged, notices given. However, the storm postponed the scheduled appearance. Brownson was duly announced in the Freeman's Journal and the Truthteller. He asks him if it would be convenient for him to lecture in March.

I-3-h - Signature cut out - 1p. - 8vo. - {1}


1846 Feb. 21
McLaughlin, Father Peter: Steamboat, Northern Queen
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Asks if Purcell will write to him by dropping a note that he can get in passing Cincinnati. Purcell has forbidden him to remain in the diocese. He does not question the authority of the bishop. He pledges himself: 1. To correct his manner of speaking. 2. Never to use the confessional to insult with reprimands. 3. To be careful about contracting debts even nominal sums. (Purcell adds here that these are not the only faults.) He tries then to explain the situation. He denies the charges made by Father (Michael) Byrne before the people of Cleveland. He claims that Father Byrne admitted uttering lies against him and promised not to speak any more against McLaughlin either to the bishop of priests or people. This was done before certain people who cannot understand his later actions. He wishes to say Mass the next Sunday and Pittsburgh is nearest to Wellsville.

II-4-j - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {2}


1846 Feb. 22
Théveau, Paul: New York, (New York)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

His long trips to Niagara, Canada, Rochester etc. having prevented his return to Louisiana in November as he had announced, Théveau is now in New York where once again he must go into the business of participles to earn his daily bread. For almost six weeks he gave lessons in the city but a more advantageous offer seems to present itself. He could enter a Catholic College to study English of which he would have an urgent need if he wishes to earn the title of Louisiana lawyer. He has a reference from Mr. Gaillardet, editor of the Courrier des Etats Unis, his fellow countryman. Théveau consulted Father (Annet) Lafont who told him that he should have the backing of a clergyman. Theveau thought Blanc would not refuse to give an opinion on the time he spent in New Orleans. Blanc has heard Theveau speak of his little plans for marriage at Pittsburgh. Also, that after several steps, he gave up altogether. He now reveals a very painful secret. When he had asked her family for Miss Simpson and talked of it to Conklins, the lawyer whom he was with, in order to please the Misses Denny, nieces of Mrs. Duplessis, Conklins arranged a meeting with Mr. Jackson a businessman returning from New York, who was to bring Simpson and her cousins. They took a room at Carrolton. There Mr. Hatche's dagger pierced the heart of Jackson, father of a family, who died in the arms of a courtesan. And this half-converted Protestant was there!

V-5-e - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {9}


(1846?) Feb. 23
Dufour, Father L(ouis): St. Martinville, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Dufour received Blanc's last letter; it was full of consolations and advice. All the difficulties at Pont Br(e)aux are settled; by general consent the chapel was turned over to Blanc's name. Dufour has also made another contract to buy more land around the chapel with a new store suitable for a house for 450 piastres. The front faces on the road to Mr. Chevalier's and the other side borders on Bayou Teche. By moving the church on one corner, the house on another, the priest could have a place away from the troubles with trustees. He wishes Blanc would hurry as soon as possible to send a priest here. For a long time Dufour has had the desire to retire from public life. His father left him enough to live on and on his last trip his mother of 94 begged him to devote some years to her. His conscience will allow him to leave when he has established two good priests, one at Pont Brau, the other here. When Dufour was with Blanc, Father (Stephen) Rousselon on three different occasions, told him that he did not approve of Dufour's kind of ministry. Dufour consulted Father (John) Timon who told him not to pay any attention to that sort of thing. That is what made Dufour propose to Blanc to let him go outside of New Orleans when he was on retreat, he took Father (A. Pierre) Ladaviere, S.J. for his director. If Blanc wants to wait for Father (Julien) Priour's return, or right now, Dufour is ready to set the limits. Pont Braux needs to be a parish more than New Iberia, which could be extended to St. Mary's whose center would be better at Franklin. Father (Peter) Lucas told him the day of the funerals that his fees amounted to 2700 p(iastres?) while here they amount to 2175. (Adrien) Dumartrait says he is ready to put in writing what Dufour pointed out to Blanc.

V-5-e - A.L.S. - (French) - 6pp. - 4to. - {9}


1846 Feb. 23
Walsh, William, Bp. of Halifax: Halifax, Nova Scotia
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He received Purcell's letter and would have answered by return post but he was waiting for information. The clergy enquired among the friends of the poor Irishwoman. He never received the "Ages of the Faith", or the "Anglo-Saxon Church", which Purcell sent him, but when in Europe he dined with Kenelm Digby. Lingard has published a new edition of the latter. The Father O' Brien to whom Purcell alludes did cause disturbances through the agency of the Repeal Association. While Walsh was in Rome there was a series of disgraceful acts, and from Ireland, O'Brien has been causing trouble by letters written to the most immoral scoundrel in the community. Hearing that O'Brien intends to seek a location in the United States Walsh hopes that no Bishop in the U.S. will receive him. Curiously he had a desire to attend the Provincial Council (1846) before he received Purcell's letter, since they have no metropolitan for Halifax and the neighboring diocese. However, he does not know how the Bishops of the Council would look upon his appearance there, nor did he know the place of the council. He confesses that he would esteem it a great pleasure to attend. He knows the Bishops Kenrick, Barron and Purcell but no others. Purcell will please write and tell him the date of the council and the best way to get there. Religion in the diocese progresses. He has had 10 additional clergymen and last week sent one to the long neglected island of Bermuda. Added note Friday Feb. 27: The post for the U.S. leaves tonight and he is sorry to say that the priest who is investigating the Boyles found a blacksmith named Boyle who says he has no relativfes in the U.S. There are also Protestant Boyles. There is also a Christopher Boyle in Co. Lunenburg, at Sherbrooke. They will continue the inquiries.

II-4-j - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 8vo. - {6}


1846 Feb. 24
(Eccleston), Samuel, Abp. of Baltimore: Baltimore, Maryland
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He honors the reasons which prompt Purcell's reluctant acceptance of the invitation to preach the opening sermon of the Provincial Council (1846). He understands that Purcell would prefer, from feelings of delicacy that Father (Edward) Purcell be not appointed to the new diocese in Ohio or to be the new coadjutor to Purcell. The council has always left such points to the discretion of the bishop concerned and he sees no reason for an ungracious exception. He asks what Purcell will think of not dividing Ohio but appointing Father W. as coadjutor to attend such parts as Purcell finds it inconvenient to visit. This is the plan followed by Bishop (John) Hughes in soliciting the appointment of Bishop (John) McCloskey, who will probably be appointed bishop of Albany. By this understanding the titular bishop received relief and the other is prepared for work alone.

II-4-j - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {8}


1846 Feb. 25
(McCloskey), Bishop John: New York, (New York)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

(McCloskey) has Blanc's letter with the pleasing intelligence of Father (Ildefonsus) Medrano's acquittal. (McCloskey) suspected that Burnand's suit was got up to extort money. Medrano said to many that his niece was rich and when urged by Burnand to give him the remainder of her fortune, he always contrived to put him off by promises. Medrano's priestly functions in New Orleans must rest with Blanc. The "exeat" was given at a time that (McCloskey) neither foresaw nor anticipated the departure for New Orleans. After Medrano's arrest on the eve of his departure for Liverpool, (McCloskey) did not allow him to resume his duties as pastor. Medrano's whole character and history are full of mystery; the sooner he can be induced to leave the country the better. The imputation upon the character of Mrs. Hernandez is wholly unjust. (McCloskey) feels bound to say that the she has endeavored to be a faithful wife although she has indulged in bitter reproaches against Bishop (John Joseph) Hughes and (McCloskey). Hernandes sailed from New Orleans for Havana about February 4.

V-5-e - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 4to. - {5}


1846 Feb. 26
Fisset(?), J(?). B.: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

A receipt for $2.80 paid by Marie (Dedune); signed by J(?). Martin.

V-5-e - Receipt S. - (French) - 1p. - 32mo. - {2}


1846 Feb. 27
Gallwey, R.S.H.J., Madame J.: St. Michael's, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Their building and other affairs have kept Sister from answering Blanc's letter. At last they have found a superintendent, a gentleman highly recommended. She would be pleased if Blanc could see the plans. Father (A. Pierre) Ladavière, (S.J.) is greatly pleased with the arrangements. Health is restored but their children enter slowly; they have but 51. Madame Verret, (R.S.H.J.) still lingers; Madame Miller, (R.S.H.J.) complains again. If Blanc comes they may be able to decide on First Communion. Sister would like it before Blanc leaves for Europe. They look for Madame (Maria) Cutts (R.S.H.J.) after the feast of St. Joseph.

V-5-e - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 4to. - {5}


1846 Feb. 27
Hall, (S.C.), Sister M(ary) Etienne: (Emmitsburg, Maryland)
 to Bishop Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

Sister learns from Sister Regina (Smith, S.C.) that Blanc has not received her letter relative to Natchitoches. Their Superior lives in Baltimore and has to be consulted; Blanc should have a decision about the last of this month. Could they grant Sisters (of Charity) for a pay school they would be most happy but having lost so many Sisters in the last few years and others having left the Community and for nine months being compelled to refuse admittance to postulants while they were building, has scarcely left enough for their Academy and household duties. At least 30 Sisters are unable to take the lightest duty at home, they cannot be thought of for the mission. Sister would suggest that Blanc apply to some other religious order. They will be happy to see Blanc in May when he comes on to the Council.

V-5-e - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {4}


1846 Feb. 27
McLaughlin, Father Peter: Steamboat, North Queen
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

By a singular coincidence he writes the second letter from the same vessel now ice bound, or ice hindered near Steubenville. At Pittsburgh he sent a note by Exchange to Fathers Dean and Father Joseph O'Mealy and Bishop (Michael) O'Connor took care of him and is very grateful for their kindnesses at a time the most wretched in his life. They urged him to celebrate Sunday but he spent until Ash Wednesday in prayer before celebrating. The bishop suggested that he remain with him for a time for advice. The advice was: 1. That he could have a parish like the one he lost in Pittsburgh, or 2. Go to Bishop John Martin Henni in Milwaukee, and 3. If he did not like it at Milwaukee he could return to Pittsburgh. McLaughlin told him that Purcell had suggested Natchez but that he feared Natchez because of the heat and his weakness. The bishop told him that he must remain in some place until formally invited by a bishop. McLaughlin told how he intended to stay in Cleveland but had been forced to flee by Purcell's letters to Father (Michael) Byrne. He is sure that Purcell has not authorized Byrne to make certain references publicly. He asks that the fruits of his labors be saved. It was at Father Byrne's suggestion that he attempted to get a petition signed by everyone. He excuses his practice of speaking well of some people and endeavors to explain why he kept away from Father Byrne five days while he was sick, and the charge concerning squandering. He admits certain faults, but promises to correct them.

II-4-j - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 4to. - {6}


1846 Feb. 28
Byrne, Father (Michael) A.: Cleveland, Ohio
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Last Sunday Week, Father (Peter) McLaughlin departed from Cleveland and stayed a few days in Strongsville. From that place Byrne does not know where he has gone. Before he left he seemed like a fury and endeavored to do all he could to raise up hatred against Purcell and against Byrne, even threatening Byrne with assassination. Byrne can stand this but not the idea that the people might suspect him too. After wringing every dollar he could he sold everything he could and stripped the church of vestments and vessels, which he had maintained belonged not to him but to the congregation. He wrote to McLaughlin at Steubenville telling him Purcell's message and asking him to send back the vestments etc., but received no answer. He fears that McLaughlin's recent conduct has destroyed all the good he accomplished. Services Sunday were attended by Protestants, mostly through curiosity, but he has adopted the policy of never mentioning McLaughlin's name. Scandals have arisen among the followers of McLaughlin. They threatened to follow him and he hopes that they will. McLaughlin had also run him into debt without informing him, because of an agreement to pay half of the expenses while they lived together. Father (Maurice) Howard has arrived and seems a very pious person and there seems no reason for not getting along with him. He has no relatives near him and does not believe that a priest should have them near him. They live at the "American House". There is talk of building a priests house and he suggests that it be so built as to be a wing of the future house. He spoke to the congregation of building a school and received unanimous approval. A building can be built for two or three hundred dollars. No good can be done in Cleveland until a school be established. The priests do not see the children. The German have been sending their children to heretical Sunday schools to learn English. He speaks of the great joy of having a school. He has been collecting the names of the children and forming catechism classes. As to the Germans he fears that they have been badly treated. Even when they did go to church and their conduct was not in accordance with Chesterfield principles they were shown the door. He has endeavored to treat them with civility. He thinks that Father Howard has written. They ask permission to say Mass in their rooms in inclement weather.

II-4-j - A.L.S. - 8pp. - 8vo. - {5}