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1847 Sept. 1
Kenrick, Francis Patrick, Bp. Phil.: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Says a certain Foley (?) though accused of swearing constantly denies it. Kenrick does not doubt that he speaks rashly but knows nothing unclean about him. He does not know what happens at Rome. He congratulates Purcell on his release from part of his burden in the erection of the see of Cleveland. He has heard of no metropolitan see. He has sufficient of church buildings from which he has given to the Sisters of Notre Dame but he has only a foundation laid for a church. He hopes that either Purcell or Father Edward Purcell will visit him. P.S. If "Massip. Gallus" brings himself forward Kenrick holds him to be a very bad man.

II-4-j - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - (Latin) - {4}


1847 Sep. 1
(Koller, Peter Felix: Berne, Switzerland)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc?: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Koller, a deacon of the canton of Berne in the diocese of Basel, humbly states that he had for some years placed himself under the discipline of the missionary Father Francis de Sales Brunner,(C.PP.S.), residing in the diocese of Coira, and this priest being called(?) for the missions in America at Norwalk, the writer followed him, armed with dimissorials from his bishop. There he received minor orders and the subdiaconate in the Church of St. Alphonse on August 2, 1844, from Bishop John Baptist Purcell, Bishop of Cincinnati in the United states of America and the diaconate on the 16th of the same month from the same Bishop. Because of illness, he returned to his native country with the authorization of that bishop and with the permission of the above testimonials for the orders received although they were requested by the said superior. Back in Switzerland he entered, for a year, the seminary at Lucerne under the discipline of the Jesuits but not being able to prove his ecclesiastical state, Koller was forced by the Protestant government of Berne to serve in the army where he could not recite the divine office without being exposed to the most vile insults. Therefore he asks that the Bishop arrange with Purcell so that he may send the writer the handful of testimonials with the greatest possible speed.

V-5-h - D. - (Italian) - 1p. - 4to. - {3}


1847 Sep. 1
Le Memorial Catholique: Paris, (France)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: (Lyons, France?)

A receipt for 12 francs for a subscription to the Memorial, P.(?) Lebrun(?), editor.

V-5-h - Receipt S. - (French) - 1p. - 32mo. - {2}


1847 Sep. 1
Mothon, A.: Lyons, (France)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: (Lyons, France)

A receipted bill for 227.25 (francs) for books, (which are listed).

V-5-h - Bill S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {1}


1847 Sep. 1

Pelagaud, J.B., and Company Lyons, (France)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: (Lyons, France)

A receipted bill for 551.85 (francs) for books (which are listed) H.(?) Delorme signs.

V-5-h - Bill - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {2}


1847 Sep. 2
(Blanc), Antoine: St. Etienne, (France)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

He has scarcely written for several years but he is not indifferent as Blanc said in his letter to Augustine, brought them by Father (Stephen) Rousselon. Rousselon visited them in July. He spent a day with Antoine's oldest and on the 30th visited Sury. Antoine has not been well since March 20; however he continued his work as road inspector(?) up to July 16 when he got his month's vacation. But it was not long enough to cure him and he does not have the courage to resume his work which is quite hard for a man of 58. His wife and three daughters are well. One wants to come near Blanc but dreads the crossing. He will not speak of his brothers who no doubt give Blanc news of their families, nor of politics. The price of grain has gone down. Blanc has probably heard of the extraordinary rise of the Loire last October18; damage was incalculable. Antoine received Blanc's picture; they hope to see him next year.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 8vo. - {2}


1847 Sep. 2

Camus, Miss, and Company Lyons, (France)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: (Lyons, France)

A receipted bill for 53.50 (francs) for a violet cape and three pairs of gloves. Camus is the successor of Widow Lesne.

V-5-h - Bill - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {2}


1847 Sep. 2
Martin, Bishop Aug(uste Marie): Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Father (Simon) Rominger arrived this morning; he hopes much from the pure air here. Martin thanks (Blanc) for furnishing him an occasion to perform a work of mercy for their suffering confrere. He hopes Rominger can return to his post perfectly cured. They have no sickness. Martin's health has been miserable for 10 or 12 days; he is better now.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 12mo. - {2}


1847 Sep. 3
Bazin, J(ohn Stephen), Bishop of Vin(cennes): Mobile, (Alabama)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

Bazin has just received the brief from Rome so his fate is decided. After consulting with Bishop Portier, Bazin thinks it is better to be consecrated at Vincennes. Surrounded as Blanc is by the dead he could hardly leave and the Bishops of Natchez and Galveston whom Bazin has invited, would not dare to come to his unfortunate city. Bazin will leave Mobile on October 4 and will go to Vincennes to be consecrated on October 24. P.S. To reassure Bishop (Celestin) De la Hailandière, Bazin has sent him his bulls and all the powers conferred by Rome.

VI-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {2}


1847 Sept. 3
Bazin, John Stephen, Bp. -elect Vincennes: Mobile, Alabama
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He received the day before his brief from Rome with the faculties. He sends the brief to Purcell and tells him that now and in the future he has all the powers within his diocese that Rome has conferred on him. He asks Purcell to name a vicar general for him. The yellow fever so ravages New Orleans that Bishop (Anthony) Blanc cannot leave the city, and no other Bishop can come to Mobile without danger. He has therefore decided to be consecrated at Vincennes. He cannot leave Mobile before Oct. 4, and cannot have the consecration before Oct.24. He invites Purcell to preach the sermon at the consecration. Bishop (Michael) Portier will accompany him. He asks if he should invite the neighboring bishops of St. Louis and Chicago. He asks Purcell to advise him as soon as possible, and he recommends to himself the prayers of Purcell and the clergy and faithful.

II-4-j - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - (French) - {6}


1847 Sep. 3
Lapeyne(?): Paris, (France)

A receipted bill for 145.30 (francs) from the Hotel des Missions Etrangères for Father (Stephen) Rousselon, Father (Joseph Michael Paret?) Paré, Father Chambon, and the (Sisters?). (In the papers of Bishop Anthony Blanc).

V-5-h - A. Bills S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. & 12mo. - {4}


1847 Sep. 3
McGerry, C.M., Father Jo(h)n F.: Donaldsonville, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

This week McGerry received a letter from Father (John) Timon, (C.M.) recalling him to St. Louis. He had had hopes of doing some good yet in Louisiana. He feels for Blanc's present trial with so many priests afflicted by sickness. They have many sick here also and Father (John) Boullier, (C.M.) is not very strong. P.S. The gentlemen at the Seminary are all well; the Sisters also and doing very well.

V-5-h- - A.L.S. - 1p. - folio - {3}


1847 Sep. 3
(Portier), Bishop Michael: Mobile, (Alabama)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Portier) takes advantage of Father (Cyril) Delacroix's going to send the news which Bazin received yesterday from Archbishop Eccleston. Bishop (John Stephen) Bazin's bulls arrived and are being sent today to Vincennes. The consecration will take place in the cathedral of the new bishop on October 24. The briefs have arrived in America for the erection of the sees of Galveston; Cleveland, Bishop Rappe; Buffalo, Bishop Timon; and Albany, Bishop McCloskey. The see of Hartford is transferred to New Providence. (Portier) will leave October 3 to accompany the Bishop-elect. Their city is very healthy in spite of the doctors predicting an epidemic. (P.S.) If Blanc and the rector were in Mobile they would celebrate tomorrow the anniversary of their arrival in America, 30 years ago.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {8}


1847 Sept. 3
Wood, Father James F.:
Mr. St. Mary's College Emmitsburg, Maryland
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Wood describes at length the rowdyisms of the village boys at a wedding. He received a most cordial welcome at the College from Father (John) McCaffrey. He visited the Sisterhood and delivered the letters and money that was committed to his care. He remarks that Father (William) Elder, Father (Aloysius) Leitner, and Father (John) Aikin are at the college. Wood supposes he may spend a week or so in the mountains. He asks to be remembered to Father Collins and the Editor of the Telegraph, and assures them that he will be home as soon as conveniently possible. Fast travelling might prove injurious to an invalid whose health is not thoroughly regained.

II-4-j - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {6}


1847 Sep. 4
Cretin, Father J(osep)h: Dubuque, (Iowa)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: New Orleans, Lo(uisia)na

The bearer of this letter is one of their Irish Catholics who is going to New Orleans to embark for California. Rousselon is to give him what instruction he can to carry out his plan. Cretin has been advised that a box has been sent from Lyons addressed to him, containing a statue, monstrance, etc. These articles are for the priest from Lyons now stationed at Keokuk, Iowa. Rousselon is to address this box to Father (J.M.) Villars. Three weeks ago Cretin received a letter from Bishop (Anthony) Blanc concerning someone named Maréchal; Cretin does not know whether he has arrived or not. Note: If Father (Napoleon Joseph) Perché wanted to come to New York and edit a French religious newspaper, he would have many subscribers. Many Frenchmen have to rely on the secular press of the United States and often find many scandals there.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {5}


1847 Sep. 4
Favier, André: Lyons, (France)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: (Lyons, France)

A receipted bill for 77 f(rancs) for regilding a chalice, for containers for the Holy Oils, etc.

V-5-h - Bill S. - (French) - 1p. - 8vo. - {1}


1847 Sept. 4
Kenrick, Peter Richard, Bp. St. Louis: St. Louis, Missouri
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Returning from the visitation of the parishes of his diocese he has learned tha Father Herman G. Aelen, S.J. was rightly denounced for his crime. He adds that there is no doubt as to the nature and truth of the crime.

P.S. (In English) The bulls for Buffalo (N.Y.) have arrived and he hopes that Father (John) Timon will be fairly caught this time.

II-4-j - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - (Latin) - {6}


1847 Sep. 4
Monteilhet fils et Granjond: Lyons, (France)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: (Lyons, France)

A receipted bill for 50 (francs) for cards for All Souls' day, etc.

V-5-h - Receipt - (French) - 1p. - 12mo. - {2}


(18)47 Sep. 5
(Blanc), Augustine: St. Etienne, (France)
 to (Bishop Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Augustine (address Blanc as her) uncle. Having already made the sacrifice of country and family, his charitable heart cannot be indifferent to them. Father (Stephen) Rousselon told them about (Blanc) and the country and promised to have him give them some months next year. One of (Blanc)'s nieces is kept from going to America by the fear of seasickness, another by the love of her family. As (Blanc) said in his last letter that one does not come there except for God's work and since she is not in good health, she cannot think of it. In a few days they are going to Sury for the vintage. (Blanc) can imagine what a pleasure it is to go to his little area and see all their childhood friends. They go every year for a month; they think the native air will make her better.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 12mo. - {2}


1847 Sep. 6
Boullier, (C.M.), Father J(ohn): Donaldsonville, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Boullier thanks (Blanc) for the box sent by the Streck; he received it yesterday with (Blanc)'s letter. The chalice is a gift of old Terrio; he died yesterday as a true Christian. Boullier talked to Father(?) Julian (Priour?), author of the first piece sent to the Courier de la Louisiane; he will not send any more of that kind. Boullier also talked to Messrs. Marciaq and Heury who wrote subsequent pieces. They say they are committed too far ahead to stop immediately but will stop this deplorable controversy. Fathers (J.M.) Masnou, (C.M.) and (John) Llebaria, (C.M.) came from the seminary to assist at Terrio's funeral. They discussed the transfer of the seminary to Donaldsonville. They no longer are thinking of New Orleans either because of sickness or because the Superior General does not approve it. Father (John) Timon. (C.M.) wrote lately that he would be delighted if it could be done. Narcisse Landry wants it very much and it is hoped that the sale of the seminary land would bring the money necessary to build the seminary there. According to an act of the legislature the trustees of the parish are authorized to cede 7 arpents of church land for an institution of this kind as well as for a hospital. They could build the seminary and rent the rest of the land if necessary. (Blanc) is to let Boullier know if he approves. It would be more advantageous for the Sisters of Charity for Mass and instructions and also for the (Vincentians). Since (Blanc) wishes it, they will take charge of the chapel at New River now in their parish. Not a month ago, Father (J.) McGerry, (C.M.) said Mass in the neighborhood and from there went to the home of Vincent Civique(?) where he baptized, heard confessions, etc. He is to go back next October. If Timon accepts the bishopric of Buffalo perhaps (Blanc) will have fewer changes among them. Father (Blaise) Raho, (C.M.) is leaving (Blanc)'s diocese and going to Philadelphia. (Blanc) might be much hampered with almost all of his priests ill or convalescent. They also have some ill here. If (Blanc) thinks Boullier can be of help and if he wants him to come down to do all he can for the sick, (Blanc) is to use him.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {15}


1847 Sep. 6
Gallwey, R.S.H.J., Madame J.:
St. Michael, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

As soon as she received Blanc's last favor she put the whole house in prayer; Blanc's wants, those of his priests, the Sisters of Charity, and the suffering were included. They hope Father (J.M.) Lefranc has escaped. A boy, 11 years old, the son of Mr. Valois who used to tune the organs and who is dead, has a mother in the last stage of consumption. She desires to place the child in the Seminary. Of course Blanc cannot leave the city; would he approve of Father (John Baptist Léon) Maisounabe, (S.J.) as their extraordinary confessor? Father (A. Pierre) Ladavière, (S.J.) has had two attacks of fever. Yellow fever proved fatal to Madam Duporter; she had lost her daughter at Pointe Coupée three days previously. All continues to go well at Natchitoches except Sister Leconte, (R.S.H.J.) who it appears has arrived at the climax. Her conduct here was such that she would have done serious injury to the other Sisters. At Grand Coteau it was even worse. As a last resource Madame (Maria) Cutts, (R.S.H.J.) sent her to Natchitoches where it is impossible she can remain. It is painful to see religious who have passed so many years in religion, abuse so many graces; also it is to be regretted that many were admitted so easily.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 4to. - {8}


1847 Sep. 7
(Czackert) Chakert, C.SS.R., Father Peter: Baltimore, (Maryland)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, (Louisiana)

At last the time has come for him to exchange Baltimore for New Orleans. He intends to start September 9. He has to go through Pittsburgh to take Father (Nicholas) Petes(c)h, (C.SS.R.) and a lay brother, who will be his companions. He fears for Petesh as he is not habituated to the climate. If possible he will leave him somewhere above New Orleans. Chakert is sorry to start so late but temporal affairs and the appointments for the different stations took such a length of time. He fears (Blanc) may receive him rather cooly, having permitted the best time to pass when he could do good. The rumor of yellow fever was very terrifying but it was not the cause of the delay.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {2}


1847 Sep. 7
Follain, P.: (Assumption, Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

He wants to express his gratitude for (Blanc)'s kindness. He is entering a world he scarcely knows. He has no friends or acquaintances except (Blanc) and the Superior of the Seminary. Where will he go on leaving the seminary? What can he do? He has two francs and six sous in French money. Cannot (Blanc) help him? He has committed faults but he is not depraved. He likes to teach and could have a class in Latin or French, anything except mathematics. If he could enter a college or good boarding school he could teach while learning. It is impossible for him to decide to give up the idea of the ecclesiastical state.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {1}


1847 Sep. 8
Abbadie, (S.J.), Father J. F(rancis):
St. Charles College (Grand Coteau, Louisiana)
 to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

It was impossible to send Father (Joseph) Soller, (S.J.) as soon as Blanc asked because of the return (of the students). He left with the Superior, in going through St. Michael, Blanc's request and the subsequent modification. The Superior has just written to have Soller leave immediately. Father (Theodore) de Leeuw, (S.J.) is going to take over the office(?) again and Abbadie will be the bursar. He will also replace Soller at the convent and Father (Hippolite) Gache, (S.J.) will be the extraordinary confessor. Abbadie is invited to give the veil to Mathilde Doremus whose brother, a day student at the College, gives great promise. All their students have not yet returned. They have only about 60; Abbadie counts on the same number as last year. Those from St. Martin and St. Mary are the late ones. They fear the sickness and there is none here.

V-t-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {5}


1847 Sep. 8
Baraga, (Father) Frederick: Copperharbor, (Michigan)
 to (Bishop Peter Paul Lefevere: Detroit, Michigan)

Baraga is afraid that the Bishop is displeased with him because of the quantity and quality of his money orders of this year. But if the Bishop has patience every thing will be alright. Some of the money orders will not be payable until 1848 when the Bishop will have the money coming to Baraga. Today he was obliged to write out an order for $74— which will not be payable until April 1848, or even later when the Bishop receives the money for the Indian schools. Baraga is today in Copperharbor, on his return to L'Anse.

III-2-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 8vo. - {1}


1847 Sep. 8
Blanc: St. Etienne, (France)
 to (Bishop Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

He received through Father (Stephen) Rousselon (Blanc)'s letter and photograph. Rousselon stayed only a short time at St. Etienne; Blanc hardly had time to have him for supper. He saw him again on the platform when he arrived with his brother; that is when Rousselon said he would leave for Lyons about the 12th. It gave them great pleasure to see and hear him. But they are looking forward to seeing their dear brother which Rousselon almost affirmed might be during 1847. Rousselon will tell (Blanc) that all the family are well except Blanc's (wife?) whose facial neuralgia gives her great pain. Blanc's children are well, Antoine (Blanc) has a little girl. (P.S.) He says nothing about their brothers; they must write as he did. Antoine will no doubt tell (Blanc) that he has headaches which make him suffer much.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 4to. - {3}


1847 Sep. 8
(Harrison, R.U.), Sister de St. Pierre: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Sister Marguerite de St. Pierre makes her vows as an Ursuline.

V-5-h - A.D.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {0}


1847 Sept. 8
McCaffrey, Father James: Marietta, Ohio
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He informs Purcell that Mr. P. Shirlock of Meigscreek has agreed to take back his land and also to let Purcell have the church lot and the old burying lot, on the conditions mentioned by Purcell, Viz. by paying $50 to Shirlock as soon as Purcell redeeds to him the remaining fraction of land described in the deed. As McCaffrey has already prepared Shirlock for death, he thinks the sooner this matter would be settled the better. Mrs. B. Kelly requests McCaffrey to inform Purcell that she is disappointed in not hearing from Purcell as there was another half year's interest due on Purcell's note on the 19th of July last. She wishes Purcell to send $25.50 as soon as convenient. She will expect the principal and interest at the expiration of this half year, January, 1848 as she is failing in health and wishes to have all her means to dispose of at her death.

II-4-j - A.L.S. - - 8vo. - 1p. {3}


1847 Sept. 8
Rappe, Amadeus, Bp. Elect of Cleveland: Tiffin, Ohio
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Rappe was ahdnded Purcell's letter as Maumee on his way to Lower Sandusky. He started for Tiffin at once where he will remain for the next car. Rappe's intention is to go down to Sandusky if Purcell doesn't come.

II-4-j - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {6}


1847 Sep. 8
Sautois, S.J., Father F(lorian) J.: Grand Coteau, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Yesterday Sautois performed the marriage of Charles Miller and Clarisse Smith related in the third and second degree. Fever prevented Sautois from writing sooner as it did also for the marriage of Pierre Cyrille Richard and Azélie Martin and that of Pierre Ducré Richard and Formose Mesche. The students are beginning to return slowly; they fear the sicknesses at Grand Coteau which, however, are less than in other places.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {7}


1847 Sep. 9
Maisounabe S.J., Father (John Baptist Léon):
St. Michael (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans L(ouisian)a

According to Blanc's advice, Maisounabe visited Jefferson College; the land measures 3 arpents by 29. In selling some houses and part of the land, they sold the road leading to the courtyard. The little college which was not repaired after the fire does not seem usable. The main part is fine but the principal dormitory is in bad shape. Steps have been taken for the repair of the roof at a cost of $300. The president's house they say is in good shape. Since it is still occupied by the former president, Maisounabe did not ask to see it. After long hesitation, Maisounabe has decided to buy Jefferson. If they could have it for $15,000 it would be fine. Maisounabe told Blanc in a preceeding letter that Mr. Cantrelle is working hard to get it at that price. Maisounabe would go to $20,000 if the beds, libraries and physics and chemistry equipment were included. He would not go over $25,000. He does not think they (the Jesuits) should appear in this deal and Blanc's intervention would probably raise the price too. Blanc would know best. Perhaps they could make a first payment of $2,000 cash. Maisounabe would be willing to place his name on the contract together with Father (J.) Francis Abbadie, (S.J.) and Father Joseph Soller, (S.J.) but what weight would they have with the sellers? Maisounabe has just arrived in America and Abbadie and Soller have just applied for citizenship and must wait two years. Blanc's name could be used as it was for Spring Hill. He asks Blanc what banker would take his letter of exchange for 5,000 francs from France. He has had no news of Soller's going; Abbadie would have had him go as soon as possible. If there is no church already established in New Orleans which they could have, could they not buy in the French part near the American part, enough land to establish a residence and build a church? They would prefer a church where there are no fees but if that is not possible they could use the dispensation accorded by Rome for their missions. Maisounabe also has another plan, that of a day college; they would begin by teaching the elementary things and gradually going up as they did in New York. If any Protestant churches are for sale it would be a double satisfaction to acquire them.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {7}


1847 Sept. 9
Thom, D(avid): Bolstreet Chapel, Liverpool, Eng.
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Although a protestant he derived so much pleasure from reading Purcell's speeches in the controversy with Campbell that he writes to him. He mentions his brother Robert Thom, a British Consyl in China who was author of several works, one a translation of AESOP'S FABLES into Chinese is in the library of Lane seminary hear Cincinnati. Others were CHINESE TALES, later translated into German, and CHINESE SPEECHES. He wishes to present to the library of any Catholic Institution that Purcell will designate copies of his brothers work, mentioning St. Joseph's College at Bardstown and St. Mary's at Marion, Kentucky. He has presented copies to Maynooth and others Catholic colleges. His brother was friendly with the (Vincentians) Lazarists at Canton. Along with these works of his brother he sends Purcell two works of his own: DIALOGUES, and THREE GRAND EXHIBITIONS OF MAN'S ENMITY TO GOD. He mentions at length the review of the latter in the current periodicals. Since his brother's death Mr. Meadows has dedicated a book to his memory, also professor Julien's work will be dedicated to his memory. He mentions also the eulogies of his brother that have appeared. He will be glad to receive an acknowledgement of these directly or through Samuel Lewisden (?) of Cincinnati who presents this letter.

II-4-j - A.L.S. - 7pp. - 8vo. - {2}


1847 Sep. 9
Martin, Father Aug(uste Marie): B(aton) R(ouge, Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

The convalescence of Father (Simon) Rominger is slow; the hoarseness remains and he has difficulty speaking. He hopes to say Mass next Sunday. Martin is sorry that (Blanc) did not accept his offer to help during the sickness. Yesterday's Advocate announced the yellow fever had taken victims at Bayou Sara; some were also stricken at Plaquemine and Pointe Coupée. Here two are ill, Mrs. B. Favrot and Ch(arles?) Guédry whose brother Louis (Guédry) died three weeks ago. The arrival of the wounded from Vera Cruz has spread panic throughout the town. If (Blanc) does not want Martin's services at New Orleans, he is not to hesitate to send him those who are convalescing.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 12mo. - {5}


1847 Sep. 10
Beaumont: Lyons, (France)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: (Lyons, France)

A receipted bill for 376 (francs) for a chalice and for gold and silver plating. Beaumont is the successor of Mr. Pasquier.

V-5-h - Bill - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {2}


1847 Sep. 10
Castel, Père et Fils: Lyons, (France)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: (Lyons, France)

A receipted bill for a mold for hosts, etc.

V-5-h - Receipt - (French) - 1p. - 8vo. - {1}


1847 Sep. 10
Fuselier, Iphigénie:
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

She has realized the project of erecting a chapel in her house. It will truly merit this name when it is blessed and consecrated. They have had the happiness of having Father Louis for 24 hours. The trip was very tiring; he is very weak and can neither eat nor sleep. But Blanc knows how long is the convalescence from that dangerous sickness. They are happy that Louis has accepted their invitation to spend some time with them. They need an altar stone; will Blanc send them one as he promised. Father (J.E. Blin?) Blain also needs a smaller one. She also reminds Blanc of his offer to lend her a chalice until she can get one from France. Blain will officiate but it would be convenient if Blanc could send her faculties for all the priests who come to her house to celebrate Mass. Her daughter, Mrs. Mossy, and her sister send their respects as do Fuselier and her husband. P.S. The captain of the Vesta who will bring this letter will bring any articles Blanc may give him.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {4}


1847 Sept. 10
Miles, Richard Pius, Bp. of Nashville: Nashville, Tennessee
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Miles requests the presence of Purcell at the dedication of his church which he hopes will be ready on the last Sunday of October. Miles will expect Purcell to preach the dedication sermon if Purcell accepts. The organ intended for Miles'church is being built in Cincinnati. He hopes that it will be ready. Miles asks when they will have any intelligence from Rome about their Provincial Council of (1846). He asks to be remembered to Mrs. Henry.

II-4-j - A.L.S. - 1p. - 16mo. - {3}


1847 Sept. 10
Rappe, (Louis) Amadeus Bishop-elect of Cleveland: Toledo, Ohio
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Rappe makes haste to comply with Purcell's request for knowing the time of his consecration. He hopes to be ready to commence his retreat on the first Sunday of October and to be consecrated on the Second Sunday of the same month in Purcell's cathedral and by Purcell. Rappe will invite Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevre) of Detroit to be an assistant. He counts on Purcell to invite one or two other bishops for the same purpose. He wishes the Catholic Telegraph to invite to the consecration his friends of the clergy. Rappe feels troubled about the adventures of Father (Maurice) Howard. He asks Purcell to request Howard to take some means of removing his family from his house. Father (Louis) DeGoesbriand is well and sends his respects. The good Sisters (of Notre Dame) hope for a school for the coming year.

II-4-j - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {7}


1847 Sep. 11
Dubuis, Father (Claude Marie): Castroville, (Texas)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Because of the warm welcome given them when they spent some time with Blanc, Dubuis is emboldened to send him these letters for Europe. Because they are important and urgent there was fear of them being intercepted. The Ceutereck family with whom Dubuis is living will repay all expenses incurred for they will be in New Orleans on the 15th or 20th of October. Several members of this very honorable and Christian family will spend some time there. During the time Dubuis has been here they have been very helpful especially during the typhoid fever with which he and his colleague were stricken. Father (Matthew) Chazelle died on September 1.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {3}


1847 Sept. 11,
Crsioli, F( ) Cardinal Prefect: Rome, (Papal States)
 to Bishop (John Baptist Purćell): Cincinnati, (Ohio)

From the appeal submitted to the Sacred Congregatio of Bishop and Regulars by the deacon Peter Felix Koller, a copy of which is annexxed (not present now) (Purcell) will easily see what he says and what he asks. Therefore the Sacred Congregation wishes (Purcell) to send the testimonial letters of ordination as soon as possible. No. 14101. The Archbishop of Damascus(?) signs as secretary.

II-4-g - L.S. - (Latin) - 1p. - 8vo. - {2}


1847 Sep. 11
(Chanche), Bishop John Joseph: Natchez, (Mississippi)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Chanche) received Blanc's letter of the 4th enclosing some intentions which he will fulfill. Blanc had better keep those intentions until he has enough to pay for a cask of claret and send it. He is glad definitive news has come from Rome. He is pleased with all the nominations. The only one who may have trouble is the future Bishop of Vincennes; he trusts that his prudence will settle the difficulties of that diocese. (Chanche) is glad he is to be consecrated in Vincennes; it would be impossible to have it done in Mobile before November. (Chanche) received a letter from Bishop (John Stephen) Bazin informing him of the new determination. It is consoling to learn that the priests attacked by the yellow fever are all convalescent. Thus far Natchez has been free of any sickness but word arrived yesterday that it was in Vicksburg. Father (William A.) Blenkinsop has been sick for nearly a month; he does not yet leave his room. (Chanche) wishes he had been with Blanc to celebrate the anniversary of Blanc's landing in America; maybe they will celebrate the 50th together.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {4}


1847 Sept. 11
Reynolds, Ignatius, Bp. of Charleston: Paroquet Springs, Kentucky
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

A certain embarrassment prevented Reynolds from writing Purcell. He visited Cincinnati purposely to talk to Purcell but had no opportunity. He acknowledges Purcell's kindness in the past, but is moved to grief by the consideration of late events. Reynolds charges Purcell with treating him with coldness and discourtesy by not writing to him when the Ursulines were in correspondence with Purcell upon the subject of their removal to Purcell's diocese. This discourtesy was manifested by Purcell's seeking information from others who had less opportunity of knowing the Ursulines than Reynolds. The discourtesy was aggravated when Purcell sent his brother (Father Edward Purcell) for the Ursulines and by his brother's refusal to hear a brief history of the conduct of the Ursulines in Charleston. Reynolds hesitates now to give such a history, as the injury done to his diocese by the conduct of the Ursulines cannot be repaired for years. Reynolds asks Purcell to consider how he would have felt if Reynolds acted with such unkindness toward him. There is no resentment on Reynolds' part, but only candour and kindness. Another evidence of unkind feeling is the silence of the Telegraph as to Reynolds' officiating in Purcell's Cathedral on the 15th of August. Reynolds expects no "puff" from anyone but it is the custom for Catholic papers to mention the fact of one Bishop's visiting another. Purcell's brother made unkind remarks when Father (Julian) DeLaune mentioned the absence of Reynolds' name. Reynolds asks if the Ursulines poisoned Purcell's brother against him. The Ursulines have annoyed and ill-treated Reynolds in many ways. They appealed to Protestant laymen against him.

II-4-j - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 8vo. - {7}


1847 Sep. 11
Dupuy, Father Enn(emond): Iberville, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Dupuy asks Blanc's power of attorney to buy the two lots in question. They are mortgaged in favor of two minors of whom Judge Dutton is the guardian. They will not be of age until 1852. Dupuy will do his best to get them for $800. They need the signature of the governor who is not in town at present. Dupuy would also like to have an orphan to serve Mass. Dupuy sympathises with Blanc's troubles. These discussions have caused resentment here in Dupuy's parish. He regrets to see that the first judgement of the individual was not too right. Unfortunately he is not the only one of the same kind among them. All will pass quickly and Blanc's patience will be victorious. P.S. The yellow fever is at Plaquemine and at Bayou Goula. Fear is great here.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {3}


1847 Sept. 11
(Lally, Major F.T.?): Jalapa, (Vera Cruz, Mexico)
 to (Orestes A. Brownson: Boston, Massachusetts)

What Brownson has said about the rumors in relation to Capt. (Samuel H.) Walker are no doubt true. It appears Col. (J.M.) Wynkoop heard (Lally) was in great danger, and three days after (Lally's) arrival at Jalapa, he came down with 300 men, Walker's company included. The men were drunk when they came to town and remained so until they left. Several robberies were committed, the worst being in Guatapec(?) where there was no resistance, almost every house being robbed. They even robbed the Church, destroying what they could not use. The same thing was done at San Miguel. He has promised to pay the Church for its losses under Gen. (Winfield) Scott's proclamation.

I-3-h - A.L. (Incomplete) - p. - 8vo. - {5}


1847 Sep. 11
Tumoine, Father H(yacinthe): Lafayette, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Tumoine has already spoken in his preceding letters about changing him. He writes again today for the same thing. In his last letter Blanc wrote that Tumoine no doubt would not want to be placed alone at the beginning of his ministry. No, he would not feel capable of running a parish but he fears that the principles of the seminary, to be developed under a good pastor, are being lost entirely. Although Blanc reprimanded him for saying that he had heard it said what a great misfortune it was for a seminarian to be sent under a pastor, he believes that it is all too true. They do not have the prestige of those who studied in France, but though their professors do not have this colossal reputation Tumoine believes their studies were just as well directed, and he has noticed that their parishes are just as well administered as elsewhere. Tumoine has not yet seen a register. By order of the pastor, he has performed marriages of which he should send a copy to the recorder; he believes he is running the risk of transgressing the law of Louisiana. He will not perform any more unless the License is made out in his name. He asks Blanc to take him out of this embarrassing situation.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 12mo. - {2}


1847 Sep. 12
Furlong, Nicholas and Edward J. Higgins: Campte, Red River, L(ouisian)a
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

They inform Blanc of a Slanderous publication contained in the Natchitoches Chronicle of the 4th, the proceedings of a partial committee composed principally of persons who claim to belong but are not in regular communion with the Church. Furlong and Higgins cannot find the slightest cause of complaint against their parish priest, Father (Joseph) Giusti(ni)ani, (C.M.) or his curate Father (Louis) Parodi, (C.M.). They beg Blanc not to withdraw that priest in whom they have every confidence. They know that no member of the Church dying without conforming to the rules of their religion will be allowed into any of the Catholic churches in their native Ireland or receive the rights of burial from any priests.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {5}


1847 Sep. 12
Duc, Widow: Lyons, (France)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Duc is a widow with two children. She asks whether Blanc knows her husband's two uncles, Joseph Duc, and Benaud Duc, sons of Pierre Antoine Duc, a lawyer at St. Marcellin. If he does, he is to tell them that the widow of their nephew, Joseph Victor Antoine Augustin Duc, is very poor and asks their aid. She has two small children, always ill. Father Boué, a former missionary in America gave her hope that Blanc might know them.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {6}


1847 Sep. 13
McFarland, J(ohn) A.: Tiffin, (Ohio)
 to Father F(rancis) P. McFarland: Watertown, N(ew) York

He has received Francis's letter of Aug. 24 and is pleased that he, Josiah, and their mother are well. He has also received the books. He received only the first volume of the "Sisters of Charity." He has been reading some of them. Father (Joseph) McNamee is apparently remaining at Providence. He has sent for his library and his brother is selling other personal property. For the present Father (John J. Doherty) Daugherty will attend them occasionally. He was there yesterday and is a good preacher. On last Thursday they had a visit from Bishop (John Baptist) Purcell and the new Bishop (Amadeus) Rappe, a Frenchman now stationed at Toledo. He is a tall slender somewhat bald, man of about 50 who speaks tolerable English. He wants to unite the English and German parishes. This could have been done by Father McNamee if he had not been so ungentle, locking the doors and taking up the collection himself. There has been more sickness this summer in Tiffin, but the crops have been good. There is a good deal traveling on the railroad but not as much as one writer said. The stockholders have not received a cent. Another railroad is planned from Tiffin to Columbus. Josiah said there was much sickness around section 10 and that $40 a day and roast beef was common to the pill peddlers. He hopes that Francis will find some business to bring him to Tiffin, where he will have to stay another year. He sends $3 besides the $10 he already sent.

I-1-a - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 4to. - {5}


1847 Sep. 13
Martin, Father Aug(uste): Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

He has just read to Father (Simon) Rominger all that concerns him in (Blanc's) letter. Rominger asks Martin to tell (Blanc) that he is not in a condition to take up his work now, that yesterday after saying Mass for the first time he found that he was still ill. His hoarseness makes it difficult to talk much with the sick. He intends to leave Baton Rouge on the 23rd, to spend three days at St. Charles and from there return to his post. Martin refused to give him any advice on what to do. Martin will give the 10 intentions to Rominger. It is time Martins was fixing the time of the retreat he plans to have this winter and to ask a preacher. He counts on (Blanc)'s advice. If (Blanc) could send him the issue of the Cath(olic) Adv(ocate) containing Bishop (Celestin) De la H(ailandière)'s farewell letter, Martin would read it with great interest.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 12mo. - {3}


1847 Sep. 13
Louis, Father J.: Attakapas, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Louis received Blanc's letter day before yesterday asking him to return to New Orleans. He knows the need for priests is great and he would not have left it his health and doctor's order had not forced him to. Since last Thursday when he arrived here, he has spent more than half of each day in bed. Yesterday he went in a carriage to St. Mary's Church to pay a visit to the pastor and to hear High Mass. He will not stay here a day longer than necessary for his health. Blanc knows that Louis arrived in New Orleans in the middle of September to work for souls, knowing there was an epidemic of yellow fever. The Fusellier and Moissi(?) family send respects.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {3}


1847 Sept. 13
Portier, Michael, Bp. of Mobile: Mobile, Alabama
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

The bishop-elect of Vincennes is to be consecrated in his cathedral on the 24th of October. Father (John Stephen) Bazin was going to invite Purcell to be an assistant, but Portier requested the Pleasure of performing this duty for many reasons. 1. Portier must hear Purcell in Vincennes on the 24th of October; 2. They might talk with discretion about the future coadjutor of Kentucky; 3. Portier will offer his assistance for the finishing of the Bishop of Cleveland. Portier does not see why these reasons should not claim Purcell's hearty attention. New Orleans was ravaged by yellow fever and ship fever. Thirteen Catholic priests have paid their tribute. They have a few cases of pestilence in Mobile but the deaths are limited to four or six a week. Portier sends his compliments to Purcell's brother, Fathers Collins and Wood. P.S. He reminds Purcell that the Sunday of the 24th is the anniversary of the consecration of Purcell's cathedral. He suggests that they commemorate it by the consecration of a spiritual temple.

II-4-j - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {7}


1847 Sep. 15
Margaret, (S.C.), Sister M(ary): B(aton) Rouge, (Louisiana)
 to (Bishop Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

They cannot get the house they expected to get. She supposes Father (Auguste) Martin has already informed (Blanc). Some of the Sisters (of Charity) were out at Mrs. Hickey's a few weeks since; she said that they would give them a lot to build on and that she would beg Mr. Conrad, a neighbor, to help them build the house. Mr. Hickey did not make any promise. Perhaps the next time (Blanc) comes the old gentleman will open his heart and make (Blanc) a present of the lot. Sister received a letter from Mother saying that they would send a Sister to teach music the moment they can. Last week a young lady from Vincennes came and wished to board with them. Sister told her the house was too small and she might board in town and come to day school. She did not think her brother would consent unless she boarded with the Sisters. There is one spare bed. As (Blanc) said, they could take a few and it would be as well to take her. She pays $216 a year where she is now. Lately they have received some of Mrs. Fisher's scholars and more are to come. All is as usual here; the priest said Mass Sunday for the first time. Father Martin is well; he seemed pleased with his congregation. Sister forgot in her last letter to thank (Blanc) for the piano. They found their cow.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {7}


1847 Sep. 15
Gally, Justine: Neuilly, (France)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

She sends Blanc, by Mr. Beauvallet, a copy of the letter she has just received from her nephew Hippolyte Gally which informed her of the will made by her daughter Sophie Gally who died at New Orleans and of which Blanc has taken charge as executor. She has written several letters which have remained unanswered, no doubt because of the ill health of her brother. Gally's brother Louis, deceased, had given her a pension of 600 francs which is done away with as Blanc will see. Her brother had said that he had made a will and that her pension would be kept up for her. It seems that the 300 francs allowance for her daughter went for expenses or other legacies. Gally has been advised not to send a power of attorney as broad as they ask without appraisal by Blanc.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 12mo. - {4}


1847 Sep. 16
(Portier), Bishop Michael: Mobile, (Alabama)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Portier) is sending back the little abbé who, if he is not fully recovered is anyway more steady on his feet. If Blanc has any convalescents, he is to send them to (Portier). (Portier) will leave October 4 for Vincennes with the Bishop-elect (John Stephen Bazin) so they will see (Blanc) in passing. They have had only about 5 cases of yellow fever a week. (Springhill) College is beginning well; 30 students are already back and 15 others are to follow. His new establishment of Priests is well assured. (On the address side of the letter: Kindness of) Father (James) Fontbonne.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {4}


1847 Sep. 16
Cartouche: St. Joseph, (Emmitsburg, Maryland)
 to Bishop Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Blanc will see that she has again returned to her dear valley. Her mother and father and all the family wanted her to return to the south but she will stay here another year. Her dear brother Thomas Elder was here last Sunday. He told her about her cousin Frank Snowden who died some time ago. She believes that her mother, father, and Titite(?) are at home now. Matilda's health is much better. No doubt Julia Clannon(?) has already paid Blanc several visits. She hopes that Sister Gabrielle, (S.C.) is better; she is very sad that Sister (Mary) Delphine (Zeigler, S.C.) is dead. She has heard that Sister Regina (Smith, S.C.)'s health is not good. How many postulants do they have at Donaldsonville? They are expecting a visit from Father (Louis Regis) Deluol next month. She is so happy that her father and mother let her stay. Blanc is not to forget to pray for her father's conversion. Mother Etienne, Sisters Maria Louise, Raphael, Marie Clara, and the girls from New Orleans send regards.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {9}


1847 Sep. 17
Chevailler(?), Charles: Nacogdoches, (Texas)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Mr. Timm (Father John Timon, C.M.?) in 1841 gave Chevailler a draft on Blanc for 100 piastres to be used in building a chapel. Seeing there were no means Chevailler withdrew(?) the draft in 1843. Now circumstances are changed. The Bishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.) of this diocese has sent two young priests so the 100 piastres will be needed for the chapel. Chevailler is going to advance it and draw on Blanc. Chevailler is the person from whom Blanc bought a (words undecipherable) at Baton Rouge in 1832. Father (Hector) Figari, (C.M.), the pastor, told him some time ago that he would do well to write to Blanc about families with good recommendations who would like to come to Texas. Chevailler needs two servants; if any present themselves to Blanc, Chevailler would employ them. He has asked(?) Fathers (Claude M.?) Chambodut and (Anthony) Chanrion to ask Blanc to send them a bell for their chapel.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {7}


1847 Sep. 18
Boué Father: Lyons, (France)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Boué has not answered (Blanc)'s last letter because he knows that (Blanc) corresponds with Father (Stephen) Rousselon and has frequent news from Lyons. Boué is sorry Rousselon is bringing so few subjects; he came very late. He could only go once to the Seminary before vacation. When Bishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.) came to Lyons he spent several weeks at the seminary, talking with the seminarians. Boué advised Rousselon to go to Puys; the Cardinal would have given him a letter, but Rousselon did not want to. There is a superabundance of subjects there. Every year a great number of new priests must wait in the homes of their parents until there is a vacancy. However Blanc has, in compensation, good reinforcement in the Jesuits. There is nothing like communities for the success of a mission, both men and women. Boué is wrapped up in his ministry and in the restoration of his old church. But he still has time to attend any business for (Blanc).

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {4}


1847 Sep. 18
Masnou, C.M., Father J.(M.): Assumption Seminary, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Masnou received Blanc's letter through (Charles) Sanson; the two gentlemen arrived safely at the Seminary. Classes resumed about a week ago. Masnou is satisfied with the exact observance of the rules. Sanson is enthusiastic about English; Mr. Follain is also applying himself well; he showed Masnou a letter Blanc had sent him. Father (John) Timon, (C.M.) sent them Mr. (J.C.) Fitman, (C.M.) an English teacher; he is very capable. Father (Louis) Parodi, (C.M.) has just arrived from Natchitoches. Father (Thaddée) Amat, (C.M.) has sent young (John) Budd of the Barrens at Masnou's request. He has made some progress but his talent needs developing. They are all well but have many sick in their parish.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {8}


1847 Sep. 18
Caretta, Father J.: St. Bernard, (Louisiana)
 to Father E(tienne) Rousselon: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Caretta asks for two dispensations from relationship: Pierre Philogene Jorda and Marie Louise Amelie Ducros; Denis Victor Jorda and Marie Rosa Ducros.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 12mo. - {5}


1847 Sep. 18
Timon, C.M., J(ohn), Bishop-elect of Buffalo: St. Louis, (Missouri)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

On the 6th, most unexpectedly, the bulls naming Timon Bishop of Buffalo reached St. Louis. Most difficulties he had met with in his administration had passed and much peace and good seemed before him. He began his retreat little disposed to accept but reflexion and everyone he consulted assured him that he ought to accept. On the 16th he decided to prepare. After 20 years of having received and expended a great deal of money, he will start for his diocese without a cent. He does not grieve at this; he hopes to ever keep his vows of poverty. Timon's father is now 86. If Timon could get Masses from (Blanc)'s diocese, he would have no scruple of applying the alms for his use. Fathers Maenhaut, Mascaroni, and Rousselon gave him some while Timon was with (Blanc). He would not ask this favor if (Blanc) disapproves; if he does, he is to burn the note to the two first named. If masses are sent the alms can be sent to Bishop Kenrick of St. Louis who will hand the amount to Timon's father. Timon thanks (Blanc) for the very many kindnesses he has received from him.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {1}


1847 Sep. 18
Parant, Father Ant(hony): Quebec, (Canada)
 to O(restes) A. Brownson:

He sends him by the Honorable R. E. Caron three dollars for the Rev. Bourret's subscription to the Review beginning in July. It is to be addressed to Anne de la Pocatiere where he is now the Vicar. Rev. Harper of the College of Nicolet wishes the Review since its beginning, and he inquires as to the number of years that must be paid for.

I-3-h - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 16to. - {1}


1847 Sept. 20
Borgess, Father Otho H.: Zanesville, Ohio
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

As Borgess does not know whether Purcell received his letter, he he is obliged to state again the difficulties that arose by Buchler, one of the trustees, who wants to rule the entire church, even so far as to tell what should be sung. Borgess was ridiculed for thinking that he should rule the church which the congregation had built. As the congregation had elected the trustees, men without Christian principles had been elected. Borgess asks permission to elect some others to assist in temporal affairs. Purcell's authority is needed as the party spirit has grown so great that they do not submit to Borgess' pastoral admonitions. Borgess asks Purcell to state how much he would allow him for salary.

II-4-j - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {2}


1847 Sep. 20
Graveraet, Sohpie: Mackinac, (Michigan)
 to Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefev(e)re,: (Detroit, Michigan)

Mrs. Graveraet's husband wishes to move from Point St. Ignace with their family but has not yet fully decided to do so. He can get into no business there and her salary, which both think too small, is all they have to depend on. She would like to remain and asks that her wages be increased to $12 a month. If Lefevere sees fit to do so, she will agree to remain.

III-2-h - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {1}


1847 Sep. 20
Martin, Father Aug(uste): Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Father (Simon) Rominger seems to have decided to leave on Wednesday for St. Charles where he will spend a day before returning to New Orleans. Martin would have liked (to have him go) a week ago. Rominger believes he is still sick, and incapable of resuming his duties for which, it is evident, he has a great repugnance. The sickness began here a week ago. Two deaths have affected Martin painfully. One that of young Lemoine, 18, who was to make his First Communion. The other that of one of the best students at Vincennes Seminary, (Thomas?) Monaghan, brother of Mother St. Antoine of the convent. After three years of pleas from his step(?) father William of New Orleans, the boy finally yielded and left the seminary where he had spent 5 years. Arriving here two weeks ago with his young sister, Malvina (Monaghan) he was at Mrs. Bill's boarding house. On December 12 he took the fever and died. Sister Mary Margaret, (S.C.) who had had Malvina at Vincennes, took her on Friday and yesterday the child became ill. Martin will take advantage of Rominger's being here to go to Plains once more. He will return tomorrow.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 12mo. - {9}


1847 Sep. 21
(Odin), Bishop J(ohn) M(ary): Galveston (Texas)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

He has just received (Blanc)'s letter of the 7th. Just before that he received one from Castroville which plunged him into sadness. Father (Matthew) Chazelle died September 1. His devotion endeared him to everyone and (Odin) had placed great hopes in his zeal. (Odin) wrote to Father (Peter) Ogé and told him he would say the 15 masses. They will gladly take the 800 intentions left by Father (Anthony) Resch. The letter (Blanc) forwarded for the Archbishop contained the bulls for the erection of the see of Galveston. Their church is going up rapidly. In three weeks the masons will be finished and the carpenters will begin. These contracts being fulfilled they will have to stop for lack of money. (Odin) has used all his 1846 allocation and has quite a debt. The bad turn in the affairs of Mr. Merle and the lack of punctuality on the part of Cardinal Fransoni has caused him sad embarrassment. Father (John) Timon, (C.M.) promised to contract for a loan at St. Louis but since his last letter, (Odin) can no longer count on it. It is perhaps for the best as Mr. Choiselat has informed him that the allocation for Texas for 1847 will be 25,000 francs, hardly enough to support the missionaries already in the country. (Odin) pays more than 250 piastres for each, a year. (Odin) must make a collection outside the country. He would have put off building the church at Galveston but he is bound by contracts. If Blanc will permit, (Odin) will send Father (John) Lynch, (C.M.) to spend some time at New Orleans; by appealing to his compatriots, he could perhaps collect some. Father (Charles) Padey is still at St. Louis; (Odin) will pay (Blanc) for the charges on his box. Timon has not told (Odin) about his appointment to Buffalo; (Odin) thinks he will accept. What is to become of Bishop (Andrew) Byrne? (Odin) thinks they should have left him where he is; it is too bad to abandon Arkansas. Their Sisters (Ursulines) are well; their school lost nothing by separating(?). Mother Ste. Gertrude, (R.U.) still wants to return to New Orleans; she will start out around the first of November. She is already relieved of classes and no longer works with the novices. (Odin) is glad that all Blanc's priests stricken with yellow fever are recovering.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {14}


1847 Sep. 22
Clo(tilda, S.C.), Sister: Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)
 to Sister Mary Lor(r)etta: Donaldsonville, L(ouisian)a

Sister Mary Margaret, (S.C.) was taken ill last evening with the yellow fever. Father (Auguste) Martin came about 11 last night; he says she is a little better. He has gone out to get a good nurse for her. Sister will not permit Clo(tilda) or Sister Reine, (S.C.) to enter the room. Sister Rosina, (S.C.) knows nothing about sickness. Two Miss Monaghans and their brother came from Vincennes a short time since. The eldest one put her brother and sister in a boarding house and went on to New Orleans. The brother took the yellow fever and died. Sister M. Margaret visited him and last Friday she brought his sister home with her and she became ill on Sunday. The other sister came from New Orleans and has been with them since. Sister M. Margaret's fever is increasing. (The letter is redirected to) Bishop A(nthony) Blanc from Donaldsonville, September 27.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 4to. - {7}


1847 Sep. 22
Vachette: Paris, (France)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: (Paris, France)

A receipted bill for 79 francs for gold and silver plating.

V-5-h - Bill S. - (French) - 1p. - 32mo. - {1}


1847 Sept. 23
De La Hailandiere, Celestine Bishop of Vincennes: Vincennes, Indiana
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

De La Hailandiere requests Purcell to grant permission to Rev. Conrad Schneiderjans to collect money in his city for the erection of a German church in Vincennes. De La Hailandiere hopes Purcell will not refuse this favor. He thinks Schneiderjans will prove to be an incompetent beggar.

II-4-j - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {3}


1847 Sep. 23
Macchi, Cardinal V(incent): Rome, (Italy)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Vincent Camilleri, the husband, and Agatha (Camilleri), knows as the Spaniard, both of Cospicua on the Island of Malta, after various sea voyages before 1838, arrived in America and there he died. There were three witnesses in Malta. One stated that in 1838 at Constantinople and Alexandria he had heard that Camilleri had died in America. The second witness reported that Vincent, according to the report of an English sailor, had died at New Orleans of dysentery. The third witness testified that he had heard from a Pappo Caterini, who sold fruit. He knew that Vincent died for he had been sick at his house and died in some hospital. The witness had heard from Caterini that he had read some letters from his widow in which she asked for some testimony on the reported death of her husband but he had given her no response. At length an outside witness said that Camilleri had died 15 years ago from the plague raging in those regions. Wherefore Agatha, wishing to marry again and being able to learn nothing expect the aforesaid, besought this court to tell her what to do. It will not be amiss to investigate the sea voyages and to ask Pappo whether Camilleri was detained at his house from any disease or whether he undertook any trip thereafter, in order that some certain news can be ascertained. (Blanc) is to inform Macchi on what is to be presumed about Camilleri's death.

V-5-h - L.S. - (Latin) - 3pp. - 4to. - {4}


1847 Sep. 23
Martin, Father Aug(uste): B(aton) R(ouge, Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Father (Simon) Rominger left yesterday, planning to spend a day in St. Charles and then return to his post. The epidemic which is diminishing in New Orleans is reaching here. The young sister of Th(omas?) Monaghan whom Sister M(ary) Margaret, (S.C.) had taught at Vincennes and whom Sister took after the death of her brother, was taken ill on Sunday. Yesterday they came to get Martin for Sister herself. The doctor said there is nothing to be alarmed about. Mr. Shepper's son Alfred Shepper has been very ill. Martin wanted to go to seek out the disease at (Blanc)'s; it came to find him here. He would prefer Lent to Advent but it will be well to write in good time to the Provincial or to Father Perché. Martin is pleased with his mission at Plains. Tuesday he received into the Church a father of a family and baptized his three children. Another is taking instructions. Martin cannot do anything seriously at Jackson until after the epidemic. He must spend several days to try to reorganize the congregation in a more stable manner.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 12mo. - {7}


1847 Sept. 24
Carrell, S.J., Father George A.:
(St. Xavier College), Cincinnati, O.
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Carrell informs Purcell that the contractor who has the work of his free school and the addition to the church would like to have the brick which is in the vault containing the remains of the late Bishop (Edward) Fenwick. As the removal of the remains depends on Purcell, Carrell lays the matter before him.

II-4-j - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {4}


1847 Sep. 24
Cretin, Father J(osep)h: Dubuque, (Iowa)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

In the absence of Father (Stephen) Rousselon, Cretin is addressing to (Blanc) several boxes which he could take only as far as New York. He is sending $30 to defray the customs charges. He has already sent a letter to (Blanc) from New York for Mr. Keenan, a business man of Chartre Street. He wanted to give him the money but he could not find him again in New York. Cretin saw Rousselon in Lyons August 5; he said he planned to leave at the end of September. Cretin came back with five subjects. It is little for the needs of the diocese but perhaps too much for their means. Bishop (Mathias) Loras is away; Cretin does not know when he will return to Dubuque. He has many troubles.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {4}


1847 Sept. 24
Vandevelde, S.J., Father J(ames):
St. Louis University, St. Louis, Mo.
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He is sorry that he did not wait to see Purcell in Cincinnati, and had he known that Purcell had received a letter from Archbishop Peter Richard Kenrick he would have waited. Vandevelde was very much surprised that Kenrick wrote that in Father (H.G.) Aelen's case there was no doubt of his guilt. When Vandevelde took Aelen to Cincinnati he was sure that nothing had been proved against him and Bishop Kenrick had promised that in consequence of the removal he would leave the whole affair to Vandevelde. Vandevelde relates that the charge was made by a woman of very doubtful character and that the manner of her accusation indicated a doubt as to whether Aelen was the person in question. Vandevelde was little satisfied with this and determined to have the matter cleared and dismiss him from the Jesuits if he were really guilty. They proposed to have the woman examined and make her renew her charges in Father Aelen's presence. Father (T. Joseph) Vanassche was present when the proposal was made. The bishop declined the next day and upon the promise that Aelen would be changed to Cincinnati he left the matter to Vandevelde, mentioning, however, that Aelen's levity and imprudence had given rise to suspicion. Vandevelde withdrew Aelen's faculties and notified Father (John) Elet of the fact. Aelen asked to be sent to the Blackfeet Mission or elsewhere to make amends for the scandal he has given. Further there are facts in favor of Father Aelen which Vandevelde does not wish to mention. Only Vandevelde, Vanassche and Father (George) Carrell, members of his council have been consulted. However the day after Aelen arrived in Cincinnati the Bishop told him what he had learned from the Archbishop. Aelen then asked to be dismissed or removed. Vandvelde will dismiss him if he is guilty. The Archbishop is absent, but Bandevelde will ask for an explanation when he returns. He asks Purcell what more he could do. He wonders if Kenrick had found new facts. If so, he had promised to communicate with him and to let him handle the case. As Provincial of the Jesuits he feels obliged to defend as well as correct his subjects. He is sorry that Father (Leonard) Nota had had difficulties with the seminarians. He told Father (John) Blox, (S.J.) to see Purcell and arrange the time and matter of teaching. Father Nota has a warm imagination but is correct in philosophy and theology. Vandevelde received a letter from Father (John) Elet, (S.J.), who is not, he hopes half way to Havre.

II-4-j - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 4to. - {12}


1847 Sep. 25
Borella, Francesco: Bergamo, (Italy)
 to Bishop Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(The handwriting of his letter makes it very difficult to read so that the following is a very uncertain calendar): …Father Charles Mariani where he will proceed to exercise his ministry in the missions of Louisiana… page of the 17th ultimo … parish of St. Martinville … his brother Father Marcel (Borella) …Mariani … a copy of the biography of his brother …published in the Italian newspaper L'Amico Cattolico and a copy … to (Adrien?) Dumartrait….

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (Italian) - 2pp. - 4to. - {5}


1847 Sep. 25
Terret, (André): Lyons, (France)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Ten years ago the Councils asked all the Bishops and other superiors of missions to celebrate a Mass on November 3 each year for the repose of the souls of all deceased associates and benefactors of the Association of the Propagation of the Faith. Since then the number of missions has grown so that they solicit the same favor from all. If Blanc is among the heads of missions who have already granted this favor, they ask him to regard it as perpetual and if their request comes for the first time they ask him to grant it. Terret signs as Vice-president.

V-5-h - Printed L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {2}


1847 Sep. 25
Migne, L.: Petit-Montrouge, (France)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: (Paris, France)

A receipted bill for 722.05 f(rancs) for books. Signed by Bichard(?) for Migne.

V-5-h - Bill - (French) - 1p. - 8vo. - {2}


1847 Sept. 25
Rappe, (Louis) A(madeus) Bishop of Cleveland: Toledo, Ohio
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He has received Purcell's of Sept. 14, and is anxious to send the very words of the bull itself to Baltimore and the definition of the limits of his diocese. On reading the terms of the bull it seems evident that the limit between the two dioceses is the line at degree 40. According to that Father (John) Lamy belongs to the new diocese and can continue his functions under Rappe as he had worked under Purcell. Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefevre accepted his invitation and will be at Cincinnati on the third. Sunday of October. He is sure that Purcell has written to Bishop (Michael) O'Connor of Pittsburgh to act as second assistant. He asks Purcell to secure another prelate so that he can take the place of the one or the other in case either should be prevented from coming by some unforseen accident. He asks so much because of his confidence in Purcell. He believes he has asked Purcell to be the consecrator, and if not he begs that honor now. He asks Purcell to write to Bishop (William) Tyler and tell him that he grants Father (Joseph) MacNamee his exeat on condition that the debt on the church at Tiffin is paid. He does not mention the Maumee church - there is no use. He hopes to be with Purcell in a few days. Father (Louis) DeGoesbriand is around Defiance preparing children for first communion. The Sisters of Notre Dame are well and ask to be remembered to Purcell.

II-4-j - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - (Mostly French) - {12}


1847 Sep. 26
(Blin, R.U.), Sister de St. Arsène: Galveston, (Texas)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

Sister has learned of Blanc's troubles, which fortunately have passed. The same letter told that Father (Stephen) R(ousselon) is expected on All Saints. R(ousselon) will help Blanc in his troubles; he is so devoted Everything is very quiet at Galveston. People live on a very scant income; she hears no singing or music at night. Sister supposes that their Bishop keeps Blanc informed of temporal and spiritual affairs. It seems that all the blessings of their beginnings have stopped since Sister Ste. Gertrude, (R.U.)'s sojourn. Their classes were numerous; they are deserted. The little gifts of welcome are no longer. Providence has wished to pour a little gall on the easy start of St. Arsène's direction; she is resigned. Bishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.) is always kind to them; it is too bad that he is so short of money.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 12mo. - {5}


1847 Sep. 26
Goddyn, Father J.: Ardoye, Belgium

Charles Louis De (Preiter) De Preitere was born April 24, 1819, the son of William Francis(?) and Mary Theresa Van De Waelter. The witnesses of his baptism were John Conc(e)lle(?) and Genevieve Driessens. Father F.S.(?) Callens, assistant. Goddyn attests below this to the irreproachable habits of De Preiter.

V-5-h - A.D.S. - (Latin) - 1p. - 8vo. - {1}


1847 Sept. 26
Reynolds, (Ignatius), Bp. Charleston: Louisville, Kentucky
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He acknowledges Purcell's letter of the 4th. 1st. Reynolds did reflect calmly on the Ursuline matter and still considers Purcell guilty of discourtesy in not writing to him. 2nd. Reynolds admits the Ursulines did much good work, but injured religion in the diocese by disrespectful treatment of their Bishop and by their influence turned many people against the Bishop, The Ursulines left the diocese with more money than they brought into it. The Bishop gave about $18,000 for their establishment and loaned $862.50 which Reynolds claims for his poor diocese. 3rd. Regarding Purcell's sermon in Baltimore, Reynolds said he thought it was too enthusiastic and lacked oneness. He admits Purcell is a brilliant speaker. 4th. Reynolds is satisfied that Father (Edward) Purcell had no unkind feeling. 5th. Reynolds never doubted Purcell's kind intentions, but merely referred to the general custom of making a fellow preach wherever he goes. 6th. He is sorry that he startled Purcell's people by saying that the Blessed Virgin was the first woman who entered Heaven. 7th. He admits he was imprudent in saying what he said about foreigners being bishops.

II-4-j - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 8vo. - {6}


1847 Sept. 27
Reynolds, Ignatius, Bp. of Charleston: Louisville, Kentucky
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Reynolds encloses a letter to Father (Edward) Purcell which he asks Purcell to read. Reynolds feels rather pained about Purcell's brother saying he was wanting in courtesy while Purcell was his guest. Purcell was not Reynolds' guest in Charleston. What Reynolds said about foreigners was not intended for Purcell but prompted by things said at the Provincial Council of 1846, and Reynolds thinks Purcell was wrong in repeating what he said about foreigners or about Purcell's brother. His remarks were said in a private and confidential conversation.

II-4-j - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {5}


1847 Sep. 27
Blin, Father J.E.: St. Mary's (Charenton, Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, Louisiana

Today a young man came who wishes to marry immediately and he is a first cousin of the person he wishes to marry. (Blanc) will not receive this before the wedding as it is to take place tomorrow. The young man says he is offered a position in New Orleans which he will perhaps lose if he delays. Tomorrow Blin is to bless the chapel which Mrs. LaClère has set up in her house, with (Blanc)'s authorization. Its opening will be marked by the abjuration of a young Protestant lady, tutor at the home of Mr. Fuseiller. Father (James) Lesne having proposed some convincing arguments, she prayed to Mary and had a change of heart. This is the second conversion in this same house since May. A slave was converted during his illness and died an edifying death. (Blanc) has a good pastor there, in Mary! In spite of the Protestants, Patterson sees its modest chapel going up; not at the entrance to the cemetery as first planned but on a lot especially bought for it. Another arpent is destined for the Catholic cemetery. The Catholic rights in the mixed cemetery will be used for the burial of slaves.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 8vo. - {5}


1847 Sept. 27
Carriere, S.S., Father (Joseph): Issy, France
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

For a long time he has intended to write to Purcell but has been prevented by various causes. Young Hallinan continues to satisfy them and seems himself satisfied. Carriere provides for his instruction according to Purcell's directions, paying for his board, medicine and tuition, etc. Further a printer at Namur has given him a bill for Purcell. All this he has payed from the money brought to him by Corbeau of St. Antoine. The young Mr. Knox has arrived also and it seems he ought to realize all the hopes that Purcell has caused them to receive on his account. He has spent the vacation in England. He did not like the voyage, nevertheless it seemed impossible to restrain him. There is no danger for him there but it is possible that Dr. (John Henry) Newman wishes to keep him there for an establishment he is forming in England,— which would not be for Knox's best spiritual interests. At present Carriere finds him with a youth from Cambridge, also a convert, named Suffield. They await another who should be employed at the college or seminary of Durham, and who would spend some time with them. The Fathers are very much preoccupied with what is going on at Rome. One does not know whether the Holy Father will be carried beyond what he has planned. Carrier thinks that these affairs have so occupied him that he could not occupy himself with the affairs of the Provincial Council (of 1846). But from what the Nuncio has told them the American affairs are settled at least as regards the episcopates of Vincennes, Louisville and for the new dioceses. For the rest it appears that Rome has taken up the delicate question of the relations of the bishops to the religious congregations. Purcell has probably heard of the disaster that has happened to the Suplicans at Montreal as the result of the Typhus brought over the Irish refugees. Besides five of their priests, three other priests and ten sisters have died, and many others have been sick. They hope that God will not wish to make that house a victim of its devotion to those good Catholics. He has been happy to learn the good that has been done in Purcell's diocese by the jubilee. Perhaps the poor church of Mexico will participate in it if it is to become a part of the United States. That church of old so flourishing he has seen come to the new born church of the United States for ordination. He speaks of Bishop (Richard Vincent) Whelan. Since his brother is not with them they do not hear of him any more.

II-4-j - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - (French) - {8}


1847 Sept. 27
Fitzpatrick, (John B.), Bp. Boston: Boston, Massachusetts
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He acknowledges Purcell's two letters. He spoke to Father (Charles) McCallion in relation to the claim of Sheehy. McCallion's answer is that Sheehy has given as security for the payment of his debt notes amounting to $564. These notes were drawn in favor of McCallion by a gentleman who bought from him a piece of land that belonged to his brother. McCallion says the gentleman is one of the wealthiest in the country and that Sheehy is sure of his money. The balance, which is small, McCallion will be able to make up in a short time. A brother of Father McCallion has come to Boston, has already commenced the study of theology and wishes to be received in the diocese of Boston. But as his papers are not satisfactory, Fitzpatrick will not receive him unless Purcell sends a favorable account of him. Purcell will see by the next number of Brownson's Review that the article in the Dublin Quarterly has not been allowed to pass unnoticed. Mr. Ward, the Oxford Convert, is author of the paper in defense of developments. Fitzpatrick thinks Ward will have a tough job to make out a reply to (Orestes A.) Brownson. Brownson's courage and ammunition are still far from being exhausted, and the developmentisty will have many a hard broadside to stand yet. Fitzpatrick thinks these gentlemen have not come into the fold by the right and proper doorl their faith is an historical one in practice, not based on the Divine authority of the church. These gentlemen have followed the wrong principle in reading the Fathers, the principle of private judgment. They have read as Protestants read the Bible. They have fancied that an undue distance is discernible between the faith of the present day and that of the church in the first ages; that in early times the le aders of the church were ignorant of many things which are now doctrines of Catholic faith. For a long time this discovery kept them in the ranks of open heresy but their superior sagacity enabled them to find a solution, the system of developments. By this means they get into the Church imagining that they brought to her a means of defense of which her Doctors had hither to been ignorant. But their difficulty was a phantom one founded on their false conception of the scope of the Holy Father— a dangerous error which they must abandon. The fate of the various decrees adopted at the last Provincial Council (1846) of Baltimore was a problem at the time but has since ceased to be one. Fitzpatrick is satisfied with what has appeared. But on other matters he is not satisfied. He recalls that in relation to the decree concerning mixed marriages Purcell suggested that the opinion of the minority should be set down. This was done by one vote; but Fitzpatrick finds that individuals by private letters are combatting the recommendations of the Council. He wishes this could be stopped since it defeats the very object of the synod. Fitzpatrick ordained, some few days ago, Father R. C. Shaw. (Part of the letter is cut off here).

II-4-j - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {5}


1847 Sep. 27
Letaille, Ch(ar)les: Paris, (France)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: (Paris, France)

A bill for 113.10 francs for pictures. Marked paid by G. Massola.

V-5-h - Bill - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {2}


1847 Sep. 27
Gaume Frères: Paris, (France)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: (Paris, France)

A bill for books (which are listed) to be sent by rail to (Victor) Marziou and Company at Havre. The total is 495.70 f(rancs). One copy is marked paid.

V-5-h - Bill S. - (French) - 2 copies 6pp. - 4to. - {2}


1847 Sep. 28
Fau, Father: St. Pierre des Ports, (France)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Seeing that their diocese has more priests than it needs for many are without a place, Fau wishes to go to (Blanc)'s diocese. He is forty years old has been a priest for 15 years.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {1}


1847 Sept. 28
Rappe, (Louis) A(madeus) Bishop-elect of Cleveland: Toledo, Ohio
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Rappe asks if it is possible that he fixed the 10th of October for his consecration. Rappe wishes very much to be consecrated on the third Sunday of October as Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefevre promised to come on such a day. Rappe will be at Lower Sandusky next Sunday and will set out for Cincinnati on Thursday of the same week. If the ceremony is postponed, Rappe will visit the Convent of Fayetteville before the consecration. If it is fixed for the second Sunday, Rappe will commence his retreat on the Thursday previous. Rappe asks Purcell to be patient with him and to pray for him.

II-4-j - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {5}


1847 Sep. 29
Dubuis, Father (Claude Marie): Castroville, (Texas)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Five families leaving Castroville to settle in the United States, would be grateful if Blanc would advise them. They are excellent families and Dubuis is sorry to lose them. He is assured by the thought that Blanc will help them in advising them where they will find religious benefits, whether Ohio is preferable to Wisconsin, where in New Orleans Mr. Ceutereck can live while he waits for his family and associates.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 8vo. - {2}


1847 Sep. 29
(Brownson, Orestes A.): Boston, Mass(achusetts)
 to (William G. Ward: Ware, England)

He was highly gratified to receive his letter telling him who was his friendly enemy in the "Dublin" (Review) and the brief account of the reasons which led (John H.) Newman to adopt his Theory of Development. Brownson assures him that he would not have entered into controversy on the subject of the Development, had he not thought it his duty; and that the theory was unsound and exceedingly dangerous. But it is a mistake, Brownson says, to suppose that he has attacked Newman's theory on the grounds that he "has devised his theory in a wanton sort of way, as a sort of intellectual exercise." Such an idea never entered Brownson's head. He has never questioned the sincerity of either Newman or his friends. Rather, he has looked upon Newman with great respect; and has believed that he devised the theory, not as a Catholic, but as an Anglican — and that he would abandon it in proportion as he becomes acquainted with the Catholic faith. He objects to the assumption that his idea of the primitive Church teaching is infallible. Between that view and the present teaching he seems to find a "discordance." But this is false. The Church teaches today what she taught as a primitive society. If she didn't she would be acknowledging her fallibility. He disbelieves, too, that, if he proves his case to Newman, the latter will be thrown back into his former state of confusion. This is an injustice to Newman, as he said he was a Protestant when the Essay was written — and that he would retract what was necessary to be retracted.

I-3-h - A.L, incomplete, no signature - 5pp. - 8vo. - {3}


1847 Sep. 30
Blin, Father J.E.: St. Mary's (Charenton, Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, Louisiana

Edouard Provost, son of Godefroy and Anne Lebranc; and Palmyre Andrée (Provost), daughter of Lucile Provost and Goffrault André ask for a dispensation from second degree relationship. Blin's rectory is nearing completion but slowly. Their subscription is totally insufficient. Mr. LaClère was not mistaken when he did not want to undertake the work for 1500 piastres. It makes Blin's heart bleed to see the church in such a deplorable state. The harvests are magnificent. The cemetery is in almost irreparable disorder. The small collection from the pews has been made. He received the enormous sum of 200 piastres allowed him as assistant, chanter, and sacristan at New Iberia. Can he refuse authorization for baptisms performed for friends which would have a fee perhaps greater than all the baptisms in a year? A confrere of his has gone to Blin's church at Pat(t)erson for a funeral and Mass. He has asked in vain for the amounts procured in his parish. These observations are made out of necessity.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {7}


1847 Sep. 30
Dowley, (C.M.), Father P(hilip): St. Vincent's, Castleknock, (Ireland)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

In acknowledging (Blanc)'s letter of the 7th of last month, enclosing the bill of expenses of Mr. O'Connor, Dowley sends his profound and grateful respect for the kind value (Blanc) has set upon his efforts to serve the cause of (Blanc)'s mission. The passage expenses of Irish candidates for New Orleans are so excessively high that many of them would press too heavily on the limited resources of an American mission. He will be on the lookout for 2 or 3 students who can defray their own passage and outfit. The engagement of educating them gratuitously in (Blanc)'s seminary is ample encouragement. Dowley asks (Blanc) to thank the Ursulines for their reception of his travellers to Galveston. He also thanks (Blanc) for all they received from his hands during their short stay. They themselves have spoken of it by letter to Dowley. They, the Bishop of Texas, and the community into which they have been admitted, seem to have been delighted with each other.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 16mo. - {4}


1847 Sep. 30
Knox, T. Francis: Brighton, (England)
 to (Orestes A.) Brownson: (Boston, Massachusetts)

He would have written sooner but that he wanted to wait until his future plans were determined. He spent six pleasant weeks in France the went home to England. He has received many letters from (John H.) Newman at Rome urging him to join him there. Newman thinks it of great importance that, if Knox is to become an Oratorian, he should be educated among them. So Knox has resolved to join the Oratorians at once, and tomorrow he expects to start for Rome. He is going to Rome, not to study, but to see things. He will begin his novitiate wherever they shall establish themselves. The recent appointment of Bishop (Nicholas) Wiseman to the London district might make that point their destination. He met Brownson's friend Welch in England. He had made his acquaintance at St. Sulpice. Many good works of translation are being done in this community, he adds. A most interesting life of M. Olier, founder of the Sulpicians, has been done by one of that community. In reading it he came across an interesting point about which they once conversed. He then gives a quotation which points out that the Virgin Mary is the channel of all grace; and though this belief was not generally held by the early Fathers of the Church, yet it was taught, in the way of simple affirmation as a point held by all, by many later saints and doctors of the Church. He hopes that he will hear from Brownson, or any of his Boston friends. He will write later about his place of abode, when settled.

I-3-h - A.L.S. - 8pp. - 8vo. - {5}


1847 Sep. 30
Maisounabe, S.J., Father (John Baptist Léon): St. Michael, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Since (Blanc) has asked him to give the clergy retreat, Maisounabe will do his best not to betray his confidence in him. He thanks (Blanc) for his assurance of interest in them (Jesuits); their Superiors in Europe are very grateful. About their residence in New Orleans and a dayschool, he will wait for (Blanc) to explain it. Although Maisounabe wished Father (Joseph) Soller, (S.J.) to be useful at New Orleans, if his presence is unwelcome he asks (Blanc) to let him know. It was only with trembling that Maisounabe decided on the acquisition of Jefferson (College). The uncertainty of their establishment at New Orleans has added to his fears, the letter from Europe which (Blanc) sent by Father (John) Lefranc brought discouraging news. If (Blanc) has taken steps which have involved him, Maisounabe will not withdraw. But as he hopes things are not so advanced, he asks (Blanc) to disregard his letter of September 9. He thanks (Blanc) for his advice on his draft for 5000 francs; he will apply elsewhere. When he spoke of 2000 piastres cash he supposed he could count on that at the moment of letting the contract; he would prefer to have that clause left out. Lefranc left yesterday evening for Baton Rouge. If the pastor is not ill he plans to return soon to St. Michael. Lefranc's zeal is edifying. Maisounabe will remain at St. Michael until (Blanc) lets him know that he can return to New Orleans without danger.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {5}


1847 Sep. 30
Martin, Father Aug(uste): Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Sister M(ary) Margaret, (S.C.) was at the point of death; for two days she has been out of danger. Sister Clotilda, (S.C.) fell ill day before yesterday, Sister Reine, (S.C.) this morning. The young sister of Mother St. Antoine is also out of danger as is Alfred Shepper. 10 or 12 cases of yellow fever ended in death, all in the hands of American doctors. Father (John) Lefranc arrived this morning; he is grateful to (Blanc) for sending him.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 12mo. - {7}


1847 Sep. 30
Martin, Father J(ea)n: St. James, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

About two years ago Martin put into the Orphan Asylum near the Ursuline Convent a child whose widowed father seemed to have abandoned. This man remarried at Cincinnati and died last May. The widow Marie Josephine Dujardin wrote for news about her stepson whom she wishes to have come to her at Cincinnati to give him a good education. Martin would like to know if the boy is still at the asylum and asks Blanc to tell him to go to Cincinnati by the first steamboat; Martin will send him. P.S. Father (John Lefranc) Lefrank sang High Mass yesterday and was to leave in the evening for B(aton) R(ou)ge. The provincial of the Jesuits preached. There are no outsiders left but the pastor of Donal(d)sonville whom Father (A. Pierre) Ladaviere is to accompany this morning to lead the subscription for the hospital. Mr. Piller, Sr. is ill; he complains of his head.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 8vo. - {5}


1847 Sep. 30
Megret, Father A(nthony) D(esire): Vermilionville, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

In his last letter, Megret told Blanc that his next would be pleasing to him. Yesterday, he saw the glory of God. In three days he will try to acquaint Blanc with what has happened: that he sold nothing, that he borrowed only the $400 from Father (John Francis) Abbadie; (S.J.), that his outside enemies are confounded, that his inside enemies are known, that he is no longer in a hurry to leave Vermilionville, that he will resume his functions at the Sisters' as confessor and director.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {2}


1847 Sep. 30
Mouret, Father Cr.: Detroit, Michigan
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

He offers his services in case Blanc needs priests. He was deacon at Blanc's Pontifical Mass on Pentecost on Blanc's return from the Council last year. He has been here for two years and replaced Father (Etienne) Chartier who was appointed pastor of St. Anne and who remained only two months, coming from New Orleans. Mouret does not want Bishop Lefevere to know of his resolve. Mouret is absolutely free as a missionary. Father Chazelle brought him from France with Father (Louis Boué in 1842; he remained, as they did, in Canada about 3 years. Both died there about 2 years ago. Mouret was born in 1800 and ordained February 22, 1823. He will leave immediately for New Orleans if he can be of any help. He asked Father Louis of Monroe to support his request.

- A.L.S. -


 On the same paper: 

(1847)
Gillet, (C.SS.R.), Father Louis: (Monroe, Michigan)
 to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

At the request of Mouret, Gillet adds a few words. He has known Mouret for the two years he has been at the Cathedral of Detroit as assistant pastor; his zeal and devotion recommend him. Gillet, who knew Blanc, would have many things to tell him. Now as he leaves Monroe and possibly the Order, while waiting for his dispensation from Rome, exhausted by the troubles he experienced in the South where he devoted himself for 14 years, he will remain with Bishop Lefevere while awaiting the reply from Rome.

- A.L.S. -


V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {5}


1847 Sep. 30
Tumoine, Father H(yacinthe): Lafayette, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Monday on arriving from Abbeville Tumoine was sent for by Sister St. Paul (Aucoin, O. Carm.) who said that the pastor had told her that he would come tomorrow afternoon to hear their confessions and those of the children. Sister said that she and also Sister (Marie?) du Carmel, (O. Carm.) and Sister Marguerite, (O. Carm.) did not want to go to Father (Anthony Désiré) M(égret) and that the children also wished to go to Tumoine. Tuesday morning Sister St. Paul brought them to the church, where Tumoine said Mass and heard their confessions. At 10 o'clock the pastor went to the convent where Sister told him they had been to confession to Tumoine. M(égret) said Mass and preached on obedience, that they should be led by him, their pastor, that Sister St. Paul should tell them so. The Confiteor having been said by Sister Elizabeth, (O. Carm.) there were eight for Communion. Mégret consumed the hosts that Tumoine had consecrated the Friday before when he came for Mass on account of the two sick ones, Mrs. Long and Sister Marguerite. Mégret said the hosts were too old and that he had not known they were to receive Communion. After Mass he told Sister St. Paul that he was the pastor and that he knew who was the cause of all the confusion. This is what three Sisters told Tumoine and asked him what to do. Tumoine will wait for Blanc's orders. Tumoine asks to be changed; it is impossible to serve where he is almost always irritated. Mégret wishes to do here as he did in France. Tumoine believes that Father (Napoleon Joseph) Perché knows something; at least Mother Thérèse (Chevrel, O. Carm.) and Mother St. Augustin, (O. Carm.) could talk to Blanc. Mégret threatened Sister St. Paul with a refusal of absolution if she did not agree to something which was against her conscience. Tumoine has tried to dispel the sensation caused among the children by telling them that they are entirely free to choose their confessor. Blanc can see that Tumoine's position is untenable.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {9}


1847 Sep. 30
Zeller, Father F.:
On board the Eudora
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, Louisiana

Zeller could not respond as soon as he wished to (Blanc)'s invitation in his letter of July 30. The construction of a stone church, matters whose achievement was understood by no one else, joined to the difficulties of his position, brought on an illness of several weeks. He left St. Louis on St. Michael's Day. He is goint to St. Michael to await instructions.

V-5-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {1}