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1848 Jan. to 1851 Oct.
Brownson, Orestes A.:

Drafts for:

Continuation of "Admonitions to Protestants," Brownson's Quarterly Review, V. (Jan., April and July, 1848), 1-20, 137-163, 305-327; reprinted in an altered form as "A Letter to Protestants" in Works, V. 241-330. In addition to the published letters there are also drafts for two unpublished letters, one attempting to prove the existence of God, the other attempting to establish the fact of creation.

Draft, probably for "Thornwell's Answer to Dr. Lynch," Brownson's Quarterly Review, V, (April, July and Oct. 1846), 198-222, 273-305, 417-452; reprinted in Works, VI, 427-519.

"Literary Notices ana Criticisms: A Review of The Primacy of the Apostolic See Vindicated, by Francis Patrick Kenrick (1848)," Brownson's Quarterly Review, V (July 1848), 412.

Grantley Manor, Or Popular Literature," Brownson's Quarterly Review, V (Oct. 1848), 482-506; reprinted in Works, XIX, 244-268.

"Shandy McGuire: or Irish Liberty," Brownson's Quarterly Review, VI (Jan. 1849), 58-90; reprinted in Works, XVI, 144-177.

"The Republic of the United States," Brownson's Quarterly Review, VI (April 1849), 176-195; reprinted in Works, XVI, 82-102.

"Channing on Social Reform," Brownson's Quarterly Review, VI (April and Oct. 1849), 209-239, 438-475; reprinted in Works, X, 137-206.

"Bushnellism: or Orthodoxy and Heresy Identical," Brownson's Quarterly Review, VI (Oct. 1849), 495-517; reprinted in Works, VII, 1-22.

"Conversations of an Old Man and His Young Friends," Brownson's Quarterly Review, VII (1850), 87-104, 228-243, 379-393, 516-528; reprinted in Works, X, 267-327.

"Morrell's Philosophy of Religion," Brownson's Quarterly Review, VII (April 1850), 159-190; reprinted in Works, III, 18-50.

"The Christian Examiner's Defence," Brownson's Quarterly Review, VII (July 1850), 298-330; reprinted in Works, VII 197-229.

"Bushnell on the Trinity," Brownson's Quarterly Review, VIII (Jan. 1851), 1-29; reprinted in Works, VII, 22-49.

"Bushnell on the Mystery of Redemption," Brownson's Quarterly Review, VIII (July 1851), 318-361; reprinted in Works, VII, 75-116.

"Newman on the True Basis of Theology," Brownson's Quarterly Review, VIII (Oct. 1851), 417-452; reprinted in Works, III, 117-150.

"The Edinburgh Review on Ultramontane Doubts," Brownson's Quarterly Review, VIII (Oct. 1851), 527-556; reprinted in Works, X, 328-356.

"Saint-Bonnet on Social Restoration," Brownson's Quarterly Review, VIII (Oct. 1851). 452-492; reprinted in Works, XIV, 197-235.

I-4-l - A. Drafts - {0}


(1848?) (Jan.)
Follain, P.: (New Orleans, Louisiana?)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Follain made a retreat at Spring Hill and put his affairs in order. Today although he goes through New Orleans, he cannot see Rousselon and this is a great privation for him. His gratitude will always be very deep. Rousselon is to tell the Bishop of his gratitude toward him because of his kindness.

V-5-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {1}



employed in ministering to the minfortunes of the sufferers, a most excellent preparation for the mitre perhaps now on its way from Rome. Boston is in need of at least four additional churches. The Catholic population is 35,000. Catholic schools are still more wanting. It is true that the Sisters of Charity have a school for females; but ten are necessary. The youth are suffering much for want of religious training.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {7}


1848 Jan. 1
Arceneaux, Louis L(ucien): St. Vincent de Paul Seminary Assumption, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Arceneaux wishes Blanc a happy new Year and hopes he will not be so often disappointed in his seminarians.

V-5-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {1}


1848 Jan. 1
Rogalle, Father J(ohn): Iberville, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Before writing Blanc, Rogalle wished to learn what chance of success he had in this parish. He is doing well and hopes to escape the effects of the climate as he is used to Africa. There is much work in so extensive a parish but the attendance at services is small. The pastor (Father Ennemond Dupuy?) is in good health; they get along in perfect harmony.

V-5-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {3}


1848 Jan. 2
Ullathorne, Bishop W(illiam) B(ernard): Clifton, (England)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Ullathorne commends the bearer of this note, Mrs. Ren(n)ingham, a widow, who is proceeding to New Orleans in the hope of finding some occupation. Her friends give high testimonials of their esteem.

V-5-i - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 16mo. - {2}


1848 Jan. 3
(Bazin), Bishop John Stephen: Vincennes, (Indiana)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

(Bazin) has been requested by Judge Larr, Judge Ellis, and John Ross to forward the enclosed (no enclosure) as a token of esteem.

V-5-i - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {4}


1848 Jan. 3
Martin, Father Aug(uste): Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

A year has already gone by in the post assigned to Martin by Blanc. Father (J.P.) Bellier told Martin that Blanc had left him free to stay with Martin some time longer; Martin has asked him to go to Plains and Jackson. He is there now. Bellier plans to leave about the middle of the month for Alexandria. Bellier overstepped instructions in bringing a boy from the asylum. The Irish orphan is good and intelligent but sickly. Martin will do what he can for him. Nothing has been decided yet about the change of housing for the Sisters (of Charity) pending word from the owner of the house on Church Street. Martin intended to write today to Father (J.B. Léon) Maisounabe, (S.J.) about his college but he must leave for the upper country at noon. (P.S.) The Sisters are well and Martin also. Dr. Dussant is very ill. Paul Choppin has left the Henderson house and is looking for a plantation to buy with his brother from St. James. His father Anthony seemed much pleased down below. Widow Sherburne is spreading out little by little.

V-5-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {8}


1848 Jan. 4
Ménard, Father Ch(arle)s M.: Thibodaux, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian a

Ménard received Blanc's letter of December 31. Father (Hyacinthe) Tumoine has been there for 5 days. Ménard thanks Blanc for sending him someone he knows and esteems. Ménard informed Mrs. Scudday of the offer Blanc made. She wants a person about 35, a widow without children or unmarried, who knows how to sew well. Ménard thinks another qualification would be a more than ordinary religious education as the house is visited by a great number of Protestants. The salary should be set before coming to see if Mr. Scudday agrees. They are busy with preparations for the building of the new church. They have decided to work on the church as the subscriptions come in and to have only two trustees on the building committee. P.S. The trustees of St. Mary's have asked him to help them out of their difficulty. He will go there next Monday.

V-5-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {3}


1848 Jan. 4
(Odin,) Bishop J(ohn) M(ary): Galveston, (Texas)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Odin) thought he could leave today for New Orleans but Father (John) Lynch, (C.M.) had another attack of fever last night. Lynch would like to leave with (Odin) so he will delay until next Monday when The Globe leaves. The Sisters (Ursulines) will finish their retreat Sunday morning. P.S. If Lynch is not well enough, (Odin) will leave next Monday without him.

V-5-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {3}


1848 Jan. 4
Tumoine, Father H(yacinthe): Thibodaux, (Louisiana)
 to Father (Stephen Rousselon: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Tumoine received (Rousselon)'s letter of October 15 and he hastens to obey the bishop's orders. He gave his place as soon as he could to Father (Simon) Rominger who seemed glad of his new position. Tumoine could not get to Thibodaux for Christmas because of the difficulty of navigation as (Rousselon) will hear from Sister St. Paul, (Aucoin, O. Carm.). He found Father (Charles M.) Ménard in very good health. Tumoine congratulates (Rousselon) on his return and sends his thanks to the bishop for delivering him from Lafayette.

V-5-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {4}


1848 Jan. 4
Van Campenhoudt, (C.SS.R.), Father Edward: Pittsburg, Pen(nsylvania)
 to Bishop P(eter) P(aul) Lefevere,: Detroit, Michigan

The kindnesses shown to Van Campenhoudt by Lefevere during his seminary days will remain always in his memory. Since God has willed otherwise that that he work under Lefevere, he will remember him and his followers in prayers. Although he has been indisposed, as a result, he thinks, of the change of climate, he is happy in the state to which God called him. However one thing troubles him greatly and so he appeals to Lefevere who is the only one who can help him. Van Campenhoudt keeps recalling the time when he was in charge of the house and when by his bad will and negligence he gave Lefevere a very inaccurate account of the affairs and expenses of the house. This thought not without reason, troubles him greatly. Therefore he writes to humbly beg forgiveness and to assure Lefevere that he will willingly do anything he can to repair his negligence.

III-2-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 8vo. - {1}


1848 Jan. 4
Whelan, Father David: Petersburg, Virginia
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

David received a letter from his brother (Bishop Richard Vincent Whelan) which leave it discretionary with himself to remain until after Easter. Even after the reception of this letter David was under the impression that he had better remain; but there was an occurrence a few days ago that induced David to change his mind and determine to leave at the close of this month. Purcell may expect him in Cincinnati about March 1st. The occurrence was an aggravated repetition of an annoyance that David encountered on many occasions. David will write to Boston tomorrow to see about the money his friends promised him. He will make them a visit if he received an encouraging answer.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {3}


1848 Jan. 5
(Bazin), Bishop John Stephen: Vincennes, (Indiana)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

(Bazin) sees by Blanc's letter that Bishop (Celestin) Dela Hailandière has transferred to Blanc's mind the imaginings that torment his. Hailandière wrote (Bazin) such a hard letter that (Bazin) was sick for two days. Hailandière complained to Father (Maurice) De St. Palais, (Bazin)'s vicar-general, that all the other bishops have invited him to their houses except (Bazin). Hailandière's plan was to live at Vincennes. He had a country house built and it was well known in Vincennes that it was for his retreat. Some of the clergy threaten to leave the diocese if it happens. Hailandière would not happy there, the least change (Bazin) made would afflict him. Also (Bazin) would be restricted in administration. Hailandière is very suspicious and wants his own way. It is general knowledge that Blanc made a fine address to General Taillor (Zachary Taylor). Since Hailandière left (Bazin) has been going over his large correspondence; it shows his obstinacy. If Blanc doubts (Bazin) he can talk to any priest who has been at Vincennes or to Bishop Portier. Now all is peaceful; if Hailandière ever returns there will be a revolution. (Bazin) has not replied to his letter. When he showed it to Hailandière's nephew, (Father Ernest Audran), he said all his uncle's troubles come from his suspicions. P.S. If Father Bertin is still at Blanc's he is to be told that the affairs of St. Gabriel's (College, Vincennes, Indiana) are all settled and that Father (John Baptist) Chassé will write him in detail.

V-5-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {8}


1848 Jan. 5
McMaster, J(ames) Alphons: New York, New York
 to (Orestes A. Brownson: Boston, Massachusetts)

On returning from Europe in 1846, he read Brownson's first article on Newman's Essay and felt surprised (John H.) Newman had fallen into such gross naturalism, since he had appeared from his previous writings to be conscious of the evils of such error — he, however, saw some mistakes in Brownson's article, but was glad to see a warning given against naturalsim since there was so much of it. He did not care to read Newman's Essay until after reading Brownson's second article when he did read it. He concludes that Brownson had mounted the hobby of anti-development, and like Bonnetty at Paris, and the Belgian Jesuit of imagination exalte who stands behind the editor of the "Journal Historique and Litteraire" at Tiege, in his crusade against the University of Louvain, he had entered into a private rather than a Catholic affair. If American Catholics had enough intellectual candor to like what is good, and distinguish what is not so, he would not care to change the issue; but what has lost its prestige has lost its value, and since the Review can do a great deal of good, he is going to exert himself in its favor, but begs of Brownson to let the topic alone, the same as did Ward of the Dublin(Review), when McMaster cautioned him that he had no right to speak for Newman. The question really at issue and which has been published by a Papal rescript in all languages after passing through the hands of censors, theologians, etc, and amid a fury of opposition from the Sorbonists and Bossnetites and Jansenists is: that dogmas hidden and unknown to the early Church — though involved really in others explicitly then held and taught, have hitherto, and may yet, beyond our present thought, be brought to light by the Holy Spirit, and by the decision of the Holy See be defined as 'de fide.' And once again the question of the beatification of the person who caused all the trouble was moved at Rome, and the most learned of the modern popes, Benedict XIV, was much edified by his writings. He asks that Brownson say nothing about this letter and let the matter drop and not discuss it until Brownson comes to New York when they will go over it together. (P.S.) Brownson's January number arrived and what he least likes is in the parts which he most likes. He suggests that Fournierism would be a good subject for Brownson's lectures in New York. The reason why Fournierism cannot succeed is the extent and depth of the nature of man, no habitually left out of sight or evaded, even by Catholic writers. He feels quite penitent about the main part of this letter after reading Brownson's present number, but being a habitudinarian, sends it anyway.

I-3-i - A.L.S. - 8pp. - 12mo. - {2}


1848 Jan. 5
Spalding, Father M.J.: Louisville, Ky.
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Spalding writes Purcell to ask advice on what course to take in reference to the Sons of Temperance. Does Purcell regard this association as a secret society and hence condemned by the Church? This subject was discussed at the late Provincial Council (1846), but Spalding does not know whether any action was taken. Bishop (Guy) Chabrat said that the Bishops were unwilling to decide anything in reference to this and similar societies. Spalding's course has been to dissuade Catholics from joining the Society. But the question has been brought up whether a Son of Temperance who would be unwilling to abandon the Society, should be denied absolution and communion. A certain intelligent Catholic who was denied absolution on this ground writes Spalding that the Society is not a secret one and that the secret is merely a pass-word for a particular division. Spalding thinks there should be uniform discipline on such matters and for this reason asks for Purcell's opinion and practice. Father (Peter) Hartlaub is still in Louisville and appears to be heart-broken and tryly repentant. Bishop (John Martin) Henni confirms what Purcell said about him. Hartlaub does not say Mass or appear in public. Spalding will write Henni again concerning him. Mr. Wade, a convert of Purcell's will receive Communion tomorrow.

II-4-j - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {7}


1848 Jan. 6
Léveque, Father J(oseph) A.: West Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Léveque received Rousselon's letter during the rolling season and Rousselon knows how busy that time is. He is grateful for the time Rousselon gave to his request. He cannot come down until the end of January or in February as their levee has failed in two places and they are threatened with a crevasse.

V-5-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - folio - {1}


1848 Jan. 6
Margaret, (S.C.), Sister M(ary):
St. Mary's School Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Father (Auguste) Martin has at last obtained Mr. (S.) Henderson's consent to sell his house. The terms are $7000 for the house and lots. There will be six years to pay. It is certainly the best house in town for a school. They will pay the interest at 6%. They have 32 pay scholars and 8 free. Sister has heard that Bishop (John Stephen) Bazin is with Blanc; she will never forget his kindness to her. All the Sisters are well.

V-5-i - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {4}


1848 Jan. 7
(Blanc), Ant(hony), Bp. New Orleans: New Orleans, Louisiana
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He writes a few words in haste. Mr. Sylvester Rosecrans is there awaiting a boat. The cost of the passage and of certain necessary small purchases for Rosecrans have amounted to $120 which Blanc advanced. Blanc was reimbursed by Mr. J. Roes, S.J. of St. Xavier's College, Purcell will pay the money to the college. They were very much satisfied with Rosecrans. Bishop (Celestine) DeLa Haillandiere has been with them for a month. Blanc thinks he intends to spend the winter, as he is not well. Also Father (Augustus) Bertin, visitor of the Eudists and Father L. Bellier and companions. Bishop (John) Odin will set out from Galveston next Monday to visit him. Bishop (John J.) Chanche will also be here one day or another. They will seem like a council for Blanc hopes that Bishop (Michael Portier) of Mobile will come during the interval. Mr. Roes awaits this letter.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {12}


1848 Jan. 8
Walsh, William, Bp. of Halifax: Halifax, Nova Scotia
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Walsh made the inquiries Purcell desired and obtained some information. There was such an individual as Purcell mentions in Halifax a few years ago. He married a rich widow who had a daughter of 18. He left them and went to Carbineau where he practiced as a doctor. He attempted to get married, his wife being alive in Halifax. The priest refused to officiate and the doctor decamped. His wife published a "Hue and Cry" against him in the Acadian Recorder. The wife followed him into the United States but he finally eluded her. Walsh knows nothing of the doctor's temperance habits. Walsh received this account from a trustworthy person. Walsh expresses delight over his recent visit to the States.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 8vo. - {3}


1848 Jan. 9
Vandevelde, S.J., Father James: St. Louis, Missouri
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Vandevelde is ashamed of himself for not having sent Purcell his best wishes for the new year. He begs Purcell's indulgence and wishes that the new year may be one of uninterrupted peace and prosperity, teeming with temporal and spiritual blessings. The preceding year, owing to the unfortunate affair of Father (Herman) A(elen) has been rather unpropitious to Vandevelde. Father A. has been permitted to plead his own cause before the Jesuit Superior. Vandevelde has not the least hopes that he will be readmitted. Vandevelde has no jurisdiction left over Father A. and whatever faculties he may need he must obtain from Purcell. Vandevelde has not heard from Father John Elet since he left Paris for Rome, nor from his companion Mr. Hunt of St. Louis. Vandevelde has been informed of the safe arrival in Rome of Father (Thomas) Mulledy. He is uneasy about Father Elet, but it may be due to the slowness of the French mails. Vandevelde will probably leave for Louisiana in the beginning of the next month.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {6}


1848 Jan. 10
Estany, C.M., Father E(udald): San Antonio, (Texas)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Rotchford and Peters from New Orleans will give Blanc $8 for the subscription of Bishop (John) England's Works. Blanc is to let the Bishop of Charleston know. (On the address side of the letter in Blanc's hand): Mrs. Lease(?); Cornelius Ryan, De Vogala.

V-5-i - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {5}


1848 Jan. 10
Mina, Father Ve. M(odest)e St. John Baptist: (Bonnet Carré, Louisiana)
 to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Alexis Emile Webre wishes to marry Marie Azelina Webre and asks for a dispensation.

V-5-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {3}


1848 Jan. 11
Matthews, Father W.: Washington, D.C.
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

This letter will be handed to Purcell by Mr. Isaac Jones, a respectable citizen of this place who goes to Cincinnati for medical aid. His wife accompanies him. Matthews recommends them to Purcell's kind attention.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {2}


1848 Jan. 12
Baraga, (Father) Frederick: L'Anse, (Michigan)
 to Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefevere: Detroit, (Michigan)

Baraga received the Bishop's letter of Oct. 5 on Dec. 24 (1841), the day after his arrival at Fond du Lac. Baraga is sorry not to have marked on his money orders the day on which they were payable, according to his arrangements with his creditors. He thought it was sufficient to inform the Bishop about the time. Baraga has already drawn some money from the $300.- which the government has been accustomed to pay for the schools every spring. He asks the Bishop to let him have all of the $300. But as this sum will not be sufficient to cover all his money orders, he wants him to take the balance out of that money which will arrive from Europe, as gifts from his friends. What the Bishop had asked Baraga about the Circular from Washington, has been arranged this summer in Lapointe. Mr. (William Almy) Richmond asked Baraga to give him two copies of each publication of his books in the Chippewa language for the War department, and Baraga brought them to Richmond's office in Lapointe. Baraga hopes that the Bishop has received his "Answers" to the questions asked by the government in regard to the Indians. He had entrusted them to Captain (Calvin) Ripley, to give them to Mr. (Peter B.) Barbeau in Sault (Ste. Marie) to be sent by him to the Bishop. Baraga informs him also that he has received a short notice from Mr. (John R.) Livingston, that a large box of his Indian books was on the schooner Merchant, which left Sault (Ste. Marie) about June 8, (1847) and has never been seen or heard of since. This loss will decrease his edition considerably. While writing this letter, Baraga received the Ordo, and the Almanac from the manuscript of his "Answers". P.S. Concerning the Almanac of 1848, Baraga criticizes the article about the mission at L'Anse and compares it with the one of 1847. It is shorter but otherwise it has not been changed. He objects to the words "three years ago" when it should have been changed to "four years ago". Further it said in 1847 that the church is attended by 33 families, whose number is continually increasing. But if the mission is continually increasing, the number 33 should be changed in 1848. In fact there are 42 families now and there will still be more in 1849. Also the "common field" is extending as the mission is increasing. Baraga realizes that it is all his fault since he had not sent a new report of his mission to the Bishop. 2nd P.S. His school has increased more this year than ever before. He has also several in school who pay a little and whom he prepares for baptism. If the Bishop wants a report about the school, he should send Baraga some formulas or a plan on which he could make such a report.

III-2-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 8vo - {2}


1848 Jan. 14
McElroy, S.J., Father John: St. Mary's, Boston, Mass.
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Unfortunate as the Bishop of Louisville has been in the choice of coadjustors, he could never be expected to fall into a much greater one, if Purcell's conjecture be true. McElroy's age is not the only guarantee against that awful responsibility. Bishop (William Walsh) of Halifax has not yet got as far as Boston. He is a most estimable prelate. The important resolution which has been effected in the minds of the decendants of the Puritans in having invited Bishop (John) Hughes to their celebration indicates a great improvement in public sentiment favorable to Catholicity. Purcell must have had a most distressing time during the recent visitation by the freshet. Father (James Frederick) Wood has been favorably employed in ministering to the misfortunes of the sufferers, a most excellent preparation for the mitre perhaps now on its way from Rome. Boston is in need of at least four additional churches. The Catholic population is 35,000. Catholic schools are still more wanting. It is true that the Sisters of Charity have a school for females; but ten are necessary. The youth are suffering much for want of religious training.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {7}


1848 Jan. 14
(Portier), Bishop Michael: Mobile, (Alabama)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans. (Louisiana)

He does not know if he can get to New Orleans next week. They are having election of managers of the Cathedral Building Society and then comes the work of a new subscription to put a roof on their building. The granite has arrived and must be paid for. If Blanc comes (Portier) will do his best for him in his modest home. (Portier) blessed the new church of St. Vincent near the orphan asylum. He sends regards to Bishop (Celestin) de la Hélandière.

V-5-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {3}


1848 Jan. 14
(Purcell), Bishop J(ohn) B(aptist): Cincinnati, (Ohio)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Has Blanc seen or heard of a young man named (Sylvester Horton) Rosecrans who left 5 or 6 weeks ago on his way to New Orleans and thence via Marseilles or Havre for the Propaganda, Rome. (Purcell) has a sister who has been acting foolishly as long as he can remember; the same that was at St. Michael's. Contrary to protest, she married a stranger here, soon after her arrival from Ireland. He was evidently an imposter, pretending to be a doctor. He was a drunkard and probably a bigamist. As he is in a cell of the insane in Blanc's Charity Hospital, Blanc probably is aware of the sequel of his biography. When (Purcell) heard of his intention to go to New Orleans he thought it possible he, or his "wife" might call on Blanc for money. Blanc's address to General (Zachary) Taylor has won golden opinion from all up this way. (Purcell) is glad Natchez has had so successful a fair for the orphans. Sister Martha, (S.C.) understands those things. Is Bishop (Celestin de la Hailandière) at Blanc's? No news yet respecting Louisville. (Purcell) is afraid they will take Father (James Frederick) Wood from him. He sends respects to Fathers Rousselon and Delacroix and Sister Regina.

V-5-i - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {6}


(18)48 Jan. 15
Malavergne, Father J.J.:
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Bishop (Anthony) Blanc tells him not to write any more but Malavergne cannot remain in this position. The priests to whom he has appealed have not helped him. He is pushed to make a public appeal to Blanc in order to call on the public to judge him. He wishes to prove that he is a priest, a suspended priest without reason, in spite of the condemnation of the court of Bordeaux. If he were not to enjoy the rights of a priest, if the Bishop of Bordeaux had not written with this understanding, Malavergne would have nothing further to say. But he has a favorable letter from the Bishop of Bordeaux because he considered the civil judges, if not unjust, at least rash(?) in their condemnation, and Blanc received him. Why does Blanc now want to repulse him forever? Is it because of his course for the ladies or the Sisters' school? There is nothing he would not do to ascend the altar again. His conscience forces him to turn aside the threatening scandal. He will begin by publishing this letter, preceded by the two he wrote to the Bishop. Must he go to see Father (Napoleon Joseph) Perché and receive his bitter reproaches? He asks Rousselon's aid.

V-5-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 12mo. - {3}


(18)48 Jan. 15
Slade, W.:

Presented as a valid claim against the estate of R.M. Ainsworth, subject to the liability of the surviving partner.

- A. Note S. -


 On the other side of the above: 

1846 Dec. 4
Duhring, Henry: Philadelphia, (Pennsylvania)
 to Ainsworth and Willock:

A bill for $39.21 for thread, fringe, etc.

- Bill -


 On the same paper: 

1847 Sep. 18
Willock, John G.: Lancaster, (Pennsylvania)(?)

Willock, surviving partner, certifies that the above bill is correct.

- A. Note S. -


V-5-i - A. Note S., Bill - 2pp. - 4to. - {3}


1848 Jan. 16
(Bazin), Bishop John Stephen: Vincennes, (Indiana)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

The bearer of this letter is a girl whom Bishop (Celestin de La) Hailandière brought from France on his last trip. She is dissatisfied at Vincennes and wishes to rejoin him. In a few days (Bazin) will send some copies of the prospectus of their seminary-college, St. Gabriel. This establishment was to be sold by the sheriff on January 8 for debts. (Bazin) called a meeting; all agreed that for the sake of religion, (Bazin) should take the college in his name. After prayers to God and tears shed at the tomb of St. (Bishop) Gabriel (Simon) Bruté, (Bazin) took over the college and the greatest part of the debts, $10,759. He has paid part of it and has 10 years to pay the rest. He united the college and seminary into one; Blanc will find more details in their prospectus. Since their fees are very low, perhaps Blanc could send them some boys from New Orleans. They intend to put St. Gabriel on a footing with the little seminaries of France. Marie, who brings this letter, is a fine young woman, an excellent cook and maid, only a little sensitive. Blanc is to present (Bazin)'s respects to his predecessor. (Bazin) cannot write Hailandière without referring to the harsh and unjust letter he wrote to (Bazin). At present everyone seems content. (Bazin) has appointed Father (L.) Ducoudray, a first cousin to Hailandière, as steward of the seminary. He was to go to spend the winter with Blanc, but not finding a boat he was so pleased with Vincennes that he gladly accepted the position. From his last letter Blanc may have believed that (Bazin) had something against Hailandière; he has not. He complains about him but does not blame him. He made others unhappy while trying to do good.

V-5-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {5}


1848 Jan. 16
Brown, M(ary) Alida:
Convent of the Visitation Georgetown, (D.C.)
 to Father (Francis P.) McFarland: Watertown, New York

She acknowledges McFarland's letter and has permission to write him as he requested. Although she has found peace and happiness there have been enough crosses. The superiors give her some encouragement about her vocation. She has a class in school and the children are low and keep her humble. She has heard from her family and they seem to hope she will not remain. Miss Binsse has written to her and says she has been to the fair in Brownsville. They sing the office and much of their time is spent in spiritual exercises. She will receive the white veil after two months. McFarland is the only one who encouraged her to come there.

I-1-a - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 4to. - {1}


1848 Jan. 16
(Chanche), Bishop John Joseph: Natchez, (Mississippi)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Chanche) introduces Madame Ablarnowicz(?) and her husband. As a celebrated vocalist she has just charmed the city of Natchez as she charmed the United States and Europe before. She and her husband are good Catholics. Indisposition prevented (Chanche) from being with Blanc before; he will leave Natchez on the Concordia on Thursday. But perhaps he will put his visit off till next week unless he receives a letter from Blanc informing him of the arrival of Bishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.).

V-5-i - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 4to. - {3}


1848 Jan. 17
Cartouche: (Emmitsburg, Maryland)
 to (Bishop Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

She is not unhappy but she cannot help feeling sad when she thinks that in six months she will have to bid farewell to her friends. She hopes to spend the 17th with (Blanc) next year. Constant is to be married this month to Carmelite Dorsey of Kentucky. He and Matilda have gone to K(entucky). She was not always a Catholic but was receiving instructions last year. They are to live in Louisiana; Carmelite and Matilda have always been great friends. Cartouche will have to become acquainted with two sisters and nieces, Carmelite and Julia, and Lala's little ones, Laura Elise and Constance. It has been five years since Cartouche was last at home. Sister Etienne (Hall, S.C.) has been ill for 2 or 3 weeks. February 2 will be Cartouche's seventeenth birthday. She heard that Titive had taken the veil. Cartouche had to leave for a moment as Sister Raphael wanted the society girls. Mother Etienne, Sisters Maria Louise, Mary Clara and Raphael send love. Cartouche sends love to Father Ladavière Zaza often thinks of him.

V-5-i - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 12mo. - {3}


1848 Jan. 17
Gallwey, R.S.H.J., Madame J.: St. Michael's, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: N(ew) Orleans, (Louisiana)

In the disorder, Sister let the time pass without offering their good wishes for his feast. In reparation they offered their Communion for him this morning. Father (A. Pierre) Ladaviere goes to New Orleans tonight and she sends this letter. They are overwhelmed with work; a week from today they hope to journey into the "promised land". She regrets to hear of the indisposition of the Sisters. They will be truly glad to see Blanc and his benediction on their new house will not fail to portend good. The retreat was all that could be desired. Blanc is to present their respects to Father (John Baptist Léon) Maisounabe, (S.J.) and say they must put their good resolutions into practice.

V-5-i - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {3}


1848 Jan. 17
Martin, Father Aug(uste): Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Today the contract is to be made for the sale of the Henderson property. The seller having neglected to pay several mortgages on it, the notary, Judge Texier(?) was forced to ask that the signing be put off until tomorrow. Martin notifies (Blanc) so that he can meet the bill. Mr. (S.) Henderson has agreed to the lowering of the interest. Martin will write more by the Courrier Thursday.

V-5-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {3}


1848 Jan. 18
Bazin, Bishop John Stephen: Vincennes, (Indiana)
 to Father Napoleon J(oseph) Perché: New Orleans, Louisiana

Although Bazin has not yet met Perché, he asks him to put the prospectus of their college in his paper for two months and to have it translated into French. The bill is to be presented to C.J. Mansoni(?). Bazin bought this college to avoid the scandal of bankruptcy. It was to be sold by the sheriff on January 8. They have an excellent faculty, their prices are very moderate. He hopes the boys from Louisiana who are now fathers of families will remember the former president of Spring Hill, who directed their studies for nine years and who would also like to direct those of St. Gabriel College. They will follow the plan of the little seminaries in France. P.S. Mansoni is their agent in New Orleans.

V-5-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {4}


(18)48 Jan. 19
Martin, Father Aug(uste): Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

As Martin informed Blanc last Monday, the signing of the contract took place yesterday between Blanc, represented by Martin, and S. Henderson for the purchase of the property on Main Street. Yesterday also he signed six notes for $1000 each, dated the 17th. Since there is a mortgage of $3125 on all of Henderson's property, it was stipulated that the three last notes would not be negotiable until the mortgage is paid. The property is insured for $5000 at 1 percent. Henderson gave Martin the enclosed transfer (no enclosure). It is understood that the Sisters (of Charity) will pay this insurance interest annually. For greater convenience all the notes are payable at the Bank of Louisiana at New Orleans. Yesterday Martin notified Miss Faverot of the Sisters' leaving her house. Henderson began moving Monday; the house will be vacant Saturday and the next week the Sisters will move in. Martin will send Blanc a copy of the bill of sale at the first opportunity. It is now up to Martin and the Sisters to make this establishment prosper.

V-5-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {4}


1848 Jan. 20
Cadolini, Cardinal Ignatius John, Abp. of Ferrara: Rome, Italy
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

One of the Cardinal's Dominican priests, Dominic Bradijdij, has asked him to send a letter of his to Purcell, addressed to his brother Charles who went out there some time ago and intends to remain there. Bradijdij asked the Cardinal to include a letter of his own to Purcell to the end that Purcell may be so kind as to summon Charles and address a few paternal words to him so that they may know that there is someone to look after him and that he may conduct himself as a true Christian. Who is there that could refuse such requests? The Cardinal is sure that Purcell will pardon the liberty he has taken.

P.S. He asks Purcell to accept the cordial sentiments of his personal esteem

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - (Italian with French P.S.) - {2}


1848 Jan. 21
Miles, Richard Pius, Bp. Nashville: Nashville, Tenn.
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Purcell's letter of the 4th was handed Miles by Mr. McGreely. When the original of the Madonna arrives Miles will have some copies made; they will probably cost between three and four dollars. Miles is of the same opinion as Purcell with regard to making prayers for protestant legislators. Miles also refused to take turns with the different protestant preachers of the city. The picture has just arrived. Miles will have four or five copies made.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {2}


1848 Jan. 21
Raphael, (S.C.), Sister M.: (Emmitsburg, Maryland)
 to Bishop Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

As their Mother is ill, she has asked Sister Raphael to acknowledge Blanc's letter of the early part of the month. At present there is such a press for Sister (of Charity) that it is impossible to provide a subject for Baton Rouge. Their school has increased considerably within the last 6 months; they have 100 boarders. They were sorry to hear of the Sisters' sickness from Sister Regina's letter. New Orleans has been the passport to heaven for a great many of their Sisters. Mother, Sisters M. Paul, M. Clara and L. Winchester all send regards.

V-5-i - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {3}


1848 Jan. 22
Brownson, O(restes) A.: Boston, Massachusetts
 to Father (Jeremiah W.) Cummings: (New York, New York)

McMasters and Dr. Manahan told him that more than one lecture is desired; since he has given up his intention of visiting the western part of the state, the matter is left in Cumming's hands as to whether one will be enough. The subject he has chosen is: The necessity, means and prospects of the political and social regeneration of Europe, which can be covered in one lecture, or divided into three: first: distinguishing between the assertion of the necessity of reform in Europe, and the assertion of the modern doctrine of progress, and to show that the reform has become necessary, not in consequence of the progress of European society, but of the changes which have taken place in the former political order; second: that the reform cannot be effected without the agency of a divinely constituted power, the Church; third: that in the policy of Pius the Ninth there is an indication that the work has already commenced. The intimation in the Journal that Fourierism in the Church might realize some of its benefits is wrong; it is fundamentally opposed to the Church.

I-3-i - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {2}


1848 Jan. 22
Signay, Joseph, Abp. of Quebec: Quebec, Canada
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

A woman named Eliza, wife of William Lee of Quebec, has sent him a note from Cincinnati dated Jan. 7, by which Purcell demanded that he lend the husband of the wife five pounds payable at sight or on order. He cannot refuse Purcell's request and he sends the receipt to Purcell asking him to place the same sum at the credit of Rev. Antoine at M. Fithian in Philadelphia. The distress of the poorer classes in Quebec is very great, following the deplorable state of business which has impeded the building of ships and has left many carpenters out of work and others forced to work at small salaries because of the number of unemployed. Further they expect the spring to renew the scenes of misery and sickness of the worst kind among the emigrants who will come in the spring from Ireland. (He encloses the note signed by Lee acknowledging the receipt of the $20 from the Archbishop at the request of Purcell, dated the same day. The note is in English.)

II-4-k - L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {4}


1848 Jan. 23
Hughes, Bishop John: New York, (New York)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Hughes introduces Miss Eleanora Dugan of this city lately but now of New Orleans. She and her sisters are exemplary persons.

V-5-i - A.L.S. - 1p. - 16mo. - {2}


1848 Jan. 23
Whelan, Father David: Petersburg, Virginia
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

As the time of David's departure draws near, he feels regret that the few devoted Catholics here should be deprived of the privileges they lately enjoyed; however, he feels that God's greater honor and glory will be promoted by the change. David will leave Petersburg on the 30th, arrive in Baltimore on the following Saturday and proceed on to Boston where he hopes to obtain some aid. Purcell may expect him in Cincinnati on the 8th of March.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {2}


1848 Jan. 23
Zeller, Father F.: Pont Breaux, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

By the letter he has, Blanc will see that Zeller depends on Father (Louis) Dufour for the settlement of affairs at Pont Breaux. It is through his agent that Zeller is to receive Blanc's decision. Zeller was greatly surprised by Blanc's letter of the 11th to see that the settlement was far off. If Blanc wishes to make the division the people at Pont Breaux need the authority of a pastor. Zeller spends his days, not in exercising his ministry but in supervising workmen. Balnc will be able to judge Zeller's state of mind by the letter he believes Dufour has sent to Blanc. If Blanc wishes to have Dufour as pastor of Pont Breaux Zeller can always give him whatever this entitles him to. P.S. He was going to ask permission to bless the new cemetery but now this will be as Blanc orders.

V-5-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {3}


1848 Jan. 24
(Blanc), Ant(hony), Bp. of New Orleans: New Orleans, Louisiana
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Someone asked him if Purcell has arrived yet, and this has given him the belief that Purcell had an intention to come. He is sorry that he is mistaken because there are already six bishops there. Bishop (Celestine) DeLa Haillandiere has been there for six weeks, and Bishop (John) Odin for eight days (although he will remain a month). Bishop (John Joseph) Chanche is expected this morning and Bishop (Michael) Portier during the week, but that is not certain since he is occupied with his cathedral. Bishop Odin's cathedral is finished exteriorly and he is paying the Franciscan to get the means for the interior. He tells Purcell also of the case of a certain Dr. O'Callaghan who is in the hospital there, suffering from an unbalanced mind. At times he is sane and his friends have urged him to return to his wife. However, he had confided to one of the Sisters that he cannot return because the lady cannot be his wife, since he has already left a wife in Boston. His story is that after much unpleasantness from his wife he left her when she spoke against his mother. He went to Ireland and on his way back married a lady about whom Purcell knows. He does not know how he fell into this iniquity. He is penitent and does the menial tasks about the house even though not obliged to do so. Only one or two of the Sisters know his story and his friends are urging him to go to his wife, and she being in good faith thinks that she should take him back. He is of the opinion that Purcell should obtain or try to obtain information direct from Boston. If the existence of the first marriage is certain the man cannot return to the second woman and it is important to keep him from going back to her as it may happen if his friends continue to urge him. Blanc remarks on the frightful way in which these double marriages are multiplying. He does not say they separate there but many come there already twice married or already married who present themselves for marriage without saying anything about the previous marriage. In the last three weeks he has had three cases where the husband has disappeared seven or eight years before and who tired of awaiting them, have married again. Their hospital is full of sick. There were 857 yesterday morning not counting the insane. Six of the Sisters of Charity have had the typhoid. One is dead, one is convalescent, four are confined to their beds. Those not in bed are crushed with work. He has interrupted this letter to read Purcell's of Jan. 14, which has just arrived. Purcell has already received word of the so called Dr. and has received the news of Mr. Rosecrans by Roes a scholastic at St. Xavier's. (Bishop Celestine De La Haillandiere) has not good health and Blanc does not see how it can be otherwise, considering the man's character. He is preoccupied with himself and thinks that everyone else is likewise, although no one thinks of him. Blanc complains of him more than he blames him every time, and although one knows him, one is not always at ease with him. Speaking of the affairs of Louisville, the old coadjutor wishes one candidate and the titular wishes another. The venerable (Bishop Benedict Joseph Flaget) has sent three names. Father James Frederick Wood, is the third, Father Martin J. Spalding the first whom he desires and Father John McElroy. At Paris the coadjutor has said that he demanded Spalding. He calls Purcell's a complimenter. The French papers have not breathed a word of what Purcell's speaks of. The editor of the Picayon, has come to torment him to torment him to have it. Purcell has remarked the substitution of the word admiration for moderation. Blanc desires not to preside at such ceremonies. The crowd was such that it would be indecent to permit it in a Catholic church(at his address to General Zachary Taylor).

P.S. He asks Purcell to pay the postage on these letters.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - (French) - {15}


1848 Jan. 24
(Brunner), C.PP.S., Father Francis D.: Tiffin, Ohio
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He expresses the good wishes of the season and asks a continuance of Purcell's good will towards the Precious Blood Fathers. He has delayed writing longer than he intended until he could speak with Bishop (Louis Amadeus) Rappe of the new Diocese of Cleveland. Rappe wants him and his congregation to remain in the new diocese. Brunner is willing to do this provided that Purcell consents and that Brunner be able to aid Purcell any time Purcell wishes. As to the congregations in Minster and St. John's he will be happy to continue their care, according to Purcell's wishes. He himself will visit it very soon. Father John Wittmer C.PP.S. has written from St. Johns asking what he is to do as regards the request by the congregation of the Blessed Virgin's chapel between St. Rose and St. Henry that he attend there, as well as the request of the congregation of St. Rose that he say Mass in their church some Sundays. Brunner replied that it would be best for Purcell to leave all this to the will of the missionary and now he asks Purcell that Wittmer be permitted to write what he desires to do.

P.S. He asks prayers of Purcell.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - (Latin) - {7}


1848 Jan. 24
Stokes, Father J(oseph): Utica, New York
 to O(restes) A. Brownson: (Boston, Massachusetts)

Having learned from their mutual friend, Dr. Manchan, that Brownson is to lecture in Buffalo, he invites him to lecture to his many friends in Utica at a time that would suit him.

I-3-i - A.L.S. - 1p. - 16to. - {1}


1848 Jan. 24
Spalding, Father M(artin) J(ohn): Louisville, Kentucky
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Spalding has availed himself of Purcell's reasons against the Sons of Temperance to persuade the individual from continuing in the Society. With what success he is unable to say. Father (John) McGill has discontinued his editorial connections with the Advocate, for which they will make new arrangements for the coming year. It is a difficult matter to sustain the Newspapers. Spalding thinks it would be better if they could have two or three good ones in the whole Union - -; if they could have one like the Tablet, free-spoken, fearless, with a full time editor. The Bishop (Benedict Joseph Flaget) is very feeble; yet he says Mass almost every morning. He is anxiously awaiting the arrival of his Coadjutor. Spalding expects an answer from Rome towards the end of February if any action has been taken. Whoever may be the new Bishop, Spalding hopes that Purcell will use his influence with him to obtain for Spalding a favor of which he will tell more later. With regard to Purcell's saying prayers before the Columbus legislature, Spalding suggests that the apostolical tale of making ourselves "all to all" applies only when there is a prospect of doing good by saving souls.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {5}


1848 Jan. 24
Paret, Father J(oseph) M(ichael): Natchez, (Mississippi)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

If Paret had learned a little more English he would relate the thousand and one adventures of his travel on the Mississippi from New Orleans to Natchez but the Bishop of this city will tell (Blanc). After five days and after seeing all that is remarkable in Vicksburg, Warrenton, Grand Gulfe, Port Gibson, Greensburg, and Rodney, he will not abuse (Blanc)'s complaisance. He sends respects to Father Rousselon to whom he will write soon. (On the back in Blanc's hand): Peter Henryson, Peter Hanly, Honor Nonan.

V-5-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {4}


1848 Jan. 24
Zéler, Father F.: P(ont) B(reaux, Louisiana)
 to Father L(ouis) Dufour: St. Martinville, (Louisiana)

From day to day Zéler has been waiting to receive, through Dufour's agent, the reply of the bishopric to the letters Dufour has sent there. Instead he has received a letter from the Bishop which makes him conclude that affairs are far from settled concerning P(ont) B(reaux). At St. Martin, expenses have gone beyond the subscription; he has abandoned the plan for a new building. Dufour stopped at Landry's; (Zéler also speaks here of) his nephew Jules Hardy. The Bishop in his letter believes that Zéler made a stupid blunder in coming to P(ont) B(reaux).

V-5-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {4}


1848 Jan. 24
Thorpe, Elizabeth: Vicksburg, Mississippi
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Wishing to return to Louisiana because of her health, she asks (Blanc) to obtain a situation as a teacher for her. It may be that Mr. Soniat of Carrollton is desirous of a lady to instruct his children. (Blanc) can address her in care of Father Montgomery.

V-5-i - A.L.S. - 1p. - 4to. - {2}


1848 Jan. 25
McClellan, Father William: New York, (New York)
 to Bishop Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

The other day McClellan received a letter directed to Father Felix Varela which he enclosed to him in St. Augustine, Florida. He opened it, judging it to be an enquiry to be attended to here. He subjoins the extract from the baptism and marriage records of Transfiguration Church: "February 12, 1839, the marriage between Charles Millan, 20, and Anne Jane Duross, 19; witnesses Mary O'Neill and Catharine Hart. On the same day Charles, son of Israel Millan and Harriet Millan was baptized: witness Michael J. Kenny.

V-5-i - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {9}


1848 Jan. 26
Wiltz, Alumie(?): St. Joseph College (Emmitsburg, Maryland)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

She is very sorry to have given (Blanc) so much trouble and thanks him for bothering with her. She does not merit it because of her bad conduct; she has taken a firm resolution to behave in the future.

V-5-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {1}


1848 Jan. 26
Ménard, Father Ch(arle)s M.: Thibodaux, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Ménard received Blanc's letter dated January 15. The arrangements for Father (Hyacinth) Tumoine as assistant are exactly as they both wish. Only he has arranged with Tumoine as he did with Father (Anthony) Thèves and Father (John) Flanagan that he will never lack Mass intentions unless he lacks them himself. Black's words about Ménard's devotion to the Houma church hurt him. He thinks Father (Henry Boutelou de) St. Aubin said this in trying to put the blame on other shoulders. But the work was stopped before St. Aubin left. Ménard was always opposed to what St. Aubin wanted to build. Ménard fought the opposition of Mrs. Thibodaux and family who wished to have the church in their cemetery. Mr. Barron told Ménard that he would furnish $1000. St. Aubin said this was only on his account. The church at Houma could only be a mitigation for the priests of St. Joseph Church as far as sick calls, missions, etc., and the fees, like Terrebonne, would not amount to $50 or $60; Thèves can tell this. St. Aubin has always held rancor toward Ménard. In a visit to Houma Ménard found that the church is not under cover, that an attachment had been placed on the shingling. The walls are very weak; Ménard will do all he can. In his opinion the crisis of March regarding payments will be very difficult to alleviate. The cross has been placed on the bell tower of the chapel at Brulé Abbadie; Ménard hopes it will be ready toward Lent. In a visit to the vicinity of St. Mary's cemetery, two of the trustees told Ménard that they would soon have a meeting to put everything in his hands. Ménard will follow the model sent two years ago. They can begin to dig February 15. The whole parish would like Blanc to lay the foundation stone on February 20 or 27. Ménard asks for a dispensation for Hyacinthe Aucoin and Marguerite Boudraux, married for 25 or 30 years before a judge. Marguerite married two brothers.

V-5-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {12}


1848 Jan. 27
Hart, Father Martin: Ballycastle near Killala, Ireland
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

The sympathy shown to the Irish in their distress by the Americans and the numbers saved from starvation, emboldens him to address (Blanc). Hart is pastor of the union of Doonfeen(e)y and Kilbride. The inhabitants heretofore lived on potatoes and fishing, both of which have proved a total failure for three years. Last year he registered 1000 deaths by starvation and dysentery. Scarcely getting any revenue, his curate left him with a parish 15 miles by 6 and a population of 800 families. Many proselyting agents take advantage and endeavor to change his parishioners from their old creed by giving money and bread. He appeals to (Blanc) to make his situation known and he is certain the many Irish laborers would respond to his call. P.S. For the truth of the above he refers (Blanc) to his Bishop Doctor Feeny.

V-5-i - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 4to. - {1}


1848 Jan. 27
Blin, Father J.E.: (Charenton, Louisiana)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Blin has just learned that some articles sent from his country and addressed to the bishop's house are due soon; (he lists them). Also Rousselon is to send him one or two dozen catechisms. Their church is progressing; the presbytery is inhabited and Patterson will soon have a chapel with two arpents of land. He recently asked a man for money for bricks, for he must eat, but he was refused. So he must see the grocer again until Providence furnishes him with a carriage and mule to seek further.

V-5-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 12mo. - {3}


1848 Jan. 27
Brenan, Father Henry: Kilglass, Ireland
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Brenan sends the annexed detail of the forlorn parish of Kilglass of which he is pastor, hoping that Blanc will appeal through the clergy of the diocese. Perhaps Blanc could also get the letter published in some of the newspapers. The Established Church, liberally supplied with funds, takes advantage of the poverty of the famine stricken Irish. (This letter is written on the same paper as the printed circular appealing for help and giving details of the parish and its need).

V-5-i - A.L.S., Printed Circular - 4pp. - 4to. - {2}


1848 Jan. 28
Bonniot, Father J(ames) M(ary): St. Michael, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Blanc's many duties have made him forget to send Bonniot the notice to return to New Orleans where the cholera is present. This is a good opportunity to resume his ministry. It was when the epidemic broke out at St. Louis in 1833 that Bonniot began to understand the cares of the apostolic ministry and now it is just that after 15 years Blanc should destine him to a new mission. Bonniot had spoken of the cholera to Mr. Rousse who was to bring a pious souvenir from one of Blanc's Belgian friends. Bonniot describes a meeting with the deceased Father (Auguste) Jeanjean on a New Orleans street in which Jeanjean told him to pray, then disappeared and Bonniot woke up. The next day Bonniot heard of the cholera in the city. A man living near Jefferson College, (Convent, Louisiana) recalled that he had fired a shot the first time Bonniot had said Mass there. This man was grieved at the present emptiness of the College. Bonniot visited this superb building; (Gabriel?) Julien, the caretaker, seemed to take great satisfaction in Bonniot's visit; Julien has three little boys to whom Bonniot gave pictures. Julien seemed to say confidentially that Blanc could have the college for 14,000 piastres or even less and that for 20 or 25,000 Blanc could have everything, including the president's and professors' houses, for a seminary, but not for the J(esuits?). To have so fine an establishment for so low a price seems providential when the Ladies of the Sacred Heart have twice spent 60,000 piastres to build theirs. Bonniot said nothing of this to the Fathers; he talked only of the beauty of the College. At this Father (John Francis) Ab(b)adie, (S.J.) gave Bonniot the title of administrator which especially amused Bonniot. The two priests have tried hard to make Bonniot a Jesuit. Since nothing has made Bonniot presume that Blanc's intentions have changed, Bonniot will come to New Orleans next Saturday.

V-5-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {7}


1848 Jan. 29
Menet, S. J., Father J(ohn) B(aptist): Sault Ste. Marie, (Michigan)
 to Bishop P(eter) P(aul) Lefev(e)re,: Detroit, Michigan

They have been living in the new house, although the rooms above are not yet finished since the beginning of winter. Menet intends to fence in the field down to (Reverend Abel) Bingham's pasture. He would like to have an abstract of the deed of sale for the property of the church to determine the extent of its boundaries because of the lack of one fence. As to the church itself they have beautified it for the Jubilee and the work is to be finished by February 1. The total will be about 40 piastres. The old presbytery will become part of the church next spring with a lean-to to serve as a sacristy and a warming place for the people and also as a school if the circumstances warrant it. Menet has been a schoolmaster for several days. Several, for the most part Protestant, have asked Menet at different times to teach them French. All is public, at the village school, and free. He believes that this will have a good effect and he himself would also acquire some confidence in speaking English. Did not Bingham send his two daughters! What an idea, if you please, in the mind of a Baptist minister! He sees with pleasure the confidence of their separated brothers, they come quite often to the church and would like to understand what is said there and what is sung there. Since spring they have had a singer from the church at Montreal. He hopes that she will form a choir which could sing in French, Assichinabek, and perhaps also English. How would it be if they had sisters there. Menet has written to Lefevere but has not yet received an answer on this subject. Maybe this reinforcement could come from France; for there they also gave him some hope. He awaits a more positive opening either from Paris or from Missouri. If there is some possibility of realizing this project, he will write to Lefevere. They need at Sault Ste. Marie, the Daughters of Mary to augment the change which began to take place since the retreat, the principal work of which fell upon Father (Joseph) Hanipaux, (S.J.), whom Menet aided as he could. What a joy for the poor Assichinabek to have an "Indian" priest, as they call Father Hanipaux who is very proud of the name. The wound caused at the Sault by causes which Lefevere knows even better the Menet, is doubtless too deepseated to be healed in a short time. Last year at this time they had three dances in a day. Up to now there have been only three at which Catholics were present, and a number have promised for 2,3,4, or 5 years to give up drink, etc. The alms box put in the church during the ju(bilee) netted $16.17, Father (Nicholas) Point, (S.J.) will settle with Lefevere. Menet learned today that the Methodist minister Brockwe (Reverend William H. Brockway) was to leave shortly not to return, because of lack of work. He lost his place as chaplain at the fort (Brady). The inhabitants sent to Washington a demand for their titles which they desire to be assured for the future. Menet asks Lefevere to give him his orders on this subjects. If Lefevere can help them again this year, he will render them a great service.

III-2-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 8vo. - {5}