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(18)48 Dec. 1
Blin, Father J.E.: Charenton, (Louisiana)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Blin at last has received his merchandise. St. Marc Darby is to give Rousselon 50 piastres to reimburse him. He also owes 3 piastres for the cathedraticum which he will pay as soon as possible. He will be responsible for a number of the Annals if Rousselon knows how to get it to him safely. The Bishop has no doubt told the results of his visit here. Blin has been told of the success of the subscription for the church at Franklin. They gave a ball whose expenses surpassed the receipts. But the pastor was not consulted. Some seem to believe that Blin would not want a confrere at Franklin. He desires it with all his heart. Perhaps another would be more fortunate there. The Bishop's intention is to give Blin an assistant who would be destined for this post. But he does not see how he could provide the necessary expenditure for a confrere.

V-5-j - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 12mo. - {3}


1848 Dec. 2
(Blanc), Ant(hony), Bp. New Orleans: New Orleans, Louisiana
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He had the pleasure of receiving Purcell's answer to his last and two others in the form of introductions. That by Mr. Wisna arrived while Blanc was at Galveston. Blanc arrived here the day before yesterday and went immediately to see Mr. Wisna who was so weak as to be unable to come to see him. He found that Wisna had been gone because of his sickness three days from the hotel. No one knew where he had gone but some said he spoke of going by the "Crescent City" to Havana. Blanc does not find his name listed among the passengers published that morning. If Blanc can find his lodging place he will go to see him. Father Ch(arles?) Brasseur has set out for Mexico. He spent eight or ten days in New Orleans. He presented himself to Blanc the day after his arrival. He first presented himself to Father (Edward) D'Hauw to say Mass and he told him to first present himself to Blanc. Blanc gave him a celebret for 15 days. Brasseur should have been offended by Blanc's coldness. He frequented the house of Father D'hauw. He left at the depot a set of episcopal vestments saying that they had been given to him for some poor bishop in the country he visited. Blanc did not let him know, that he understood for he did not think that a good thing to do. Blanc says that if Brasseur does not go to arrange an intrigue, Blanc thinks that he goes to Mexico to get information again about the Californias and to plague the Propaganda with his memoirs. Brasseur told Blanc that Rome had been ignorant last Frebruary of the death of the Archbishop of Mexico and that he himself and given them the news. Blanc told him that that was unbelievable and a young ecclesiastic arriving secretly from Mexico told him that Rome had informed itself about the Archbishop's death. Bishop (John) Timon is there and goes with him to Galveston to attend the consecration of Bishop (John) Odin's cathedral. A Father Smith from Glasgow arrived at New Orleans to beg but he has found there are so many beggars already going about the city that he did not dare begin. He said he would go Monday. There are three or four collectors from other places as well as two or three of their own working in the city. As to his receiving one of the two French priests, Blanc excuses Purcell's intention but says that he is embarrassed now with French priests who do not know English. He would have no post to which he could assign him. He is forced now to take only those seminarians who have learned English in making their studies or if Irish who have learned French while making their studies. Purcell has demanded that Blanc visit him. Blanc observes that it has been a long time since Purcell visited him. He asks that Purcell give the speech of January 8. He will have for his audience the President elect (Zachary Taylor). He asks that Purcell write that he can come. If he cannot come and Father (Edward) Purcell can come, tell him to prepare the speech of the 8th. He writes in haste to profit by a courrier.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - (French) - {10}


1848 Dec. 2
Reynolds, Bishop I(gnatius) A.: Savannah, Georgia
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Blanc)'s letter of November 14 reached him yesterday on his return from the south of the state. Dr. (John) England's works are now in press; he hopes the first five volumes will be out by May. The total cost will be $7500. He thanks (Blanc) for his efforts. He will draw $56 in a few weeks.

V-5-j - A.L.S. - 1p. - 4to. - {2}


1848 Dec. 4
Brownson, Mrs. R(elief): Ballston, (New York)
 to Orestes A. Brownson: Boston, Massachusetts

She waited until Therian was well before shw wrote this letter. She is well now and thinks they shall get through the winter comfortably if they live and are as well as they are now. Daniel and Fowler were there; nothing from Orin. Daphne and family are well; George H. is there and is expected to stay the whole summer; Orestes lay sick for two months, couldn't talk for three weeks.

I-3-i - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {1}


(18)48 Dec. 4
Martin, Father Aug(uste): Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)
 to Father (Stephen Rousselon: New Orleans, Louisiana)

He has just received the statues which he has not yet unwrapped. He also received a letter from Father (Joseph Michael) Paret telling of his appointment as pastor of St. Charles. If he is still with Rousselon, Martin sends best wishes in his new post. Martin would like some stipends; he has 4 piastres in all for December. He will write the Bishop by the next mail.

V-5-j - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {2}


1848 Dec. 4
(Mudd, S.C.), Sister M(ary) Austin: (Donaldsonville, Louisiana)
 to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

She would not have any objection to Mary A(nn) Hogan's admission. That pride and spirit of independence as a school girl may make place for the more profound humility. Sister only wishes there were someone here more experienced to receive her. The French lady not entering as a postulant, Mother would have objections to their giving lodgings to a secular. They will procure lodgings for her at Mrs. Zoraide's or Mrs. Gontran's. Their novice, Sister Ambrosia. (S.C.) will make her vows next Friday. Their little band now consists of five novices, one postulant. Sister Marie, (S.C.) is well and happy. The Lord has laid his hand heavy on Austin. Her self love is so great that she cannot bear the probable exposure to which her present situation renders her liable.

V-5-j - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 4to. - {6}


1848 Dec. 5
Masnou, C.M., Father J.(M.): Assumption, (Louisiana)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: New Orleans, Louisiana

Masnou received Rousselon's letter through Mr. Jordain who arrived last Sunday. Mr. Henessy, Irish seminarian, is very pious and studious. Mr. Jobert, Mr. Pifferi's companion is a little too light but Masnou hopes he will do well. Father (John Francis) Llebaria, (C.M.) said that he was on the way to the Bishop's house when he met Father Morisot who said Rousselon was not there. Father (Mariano) Maller, (C.M.) their Visitor, is at the seminary. Next Monday they plan to go down to New Orleans together.

V-5-j - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {7}


1848 Dec. 7,8,9
Butler, Secretary, Father Thomas R.: Notes of the Synod of the Diocese of Cincinnati.

The Bishop (John Baptist Purcell) assembled the parochial clergy at the Cathedral on Dec. 7, the retreat preventing full ceremonial. The Bishop opened with an address on the nature and advantages of the synod and the manner of conducting it. Fathers Edward T. Collins and Edward Purcell were named procurators, Fathers Henry D. Juncker and Josue M. Young promoters of the clergy, and Father Thomas R. Butler Secretary. The acts were: 1. Thanks to Bishop (Richard Vincent) Whelan for conducting the retreat. 2. A document signed by 37 deprecating the actions of Father Louis Huber. 3. Absentees. 4. The death of Father Martin Pobst. 5. Mass to be offered for his soul. 6. Bishop called attention question of providing for permanent support of a theological seminary. 7. Submission of plans for buildings etc. to prevent wasteful expenditures. 8. The manner of providing for schools. 9. Choice of committees to discuss problems. 10. Requesting priests to furnish lists of church property. 11. Also lists of marriages, births, deaths. 12. Requiring them to get safes of iron etc. to prevent sacrilegious outrages. 31. To report doubtful cases of jurisdiction. 14. Application for dispensations in disparitas Cultus and primus gradus affinitatis. 15. Examination of power of dispensing simple vows.

Second session. Things discussed: 1. Simple vows. 2. Support of a seminary. 3. Father (Joseph)Ferneding requests prohibition of Sunday dancing etc. 4. School question, public and parochial. 5. Limits of Jurisdiction. 6. Reservation of the Blessed Sacrament. 7. Processions - Father (William) Untertheiner expresses German opposition to such. 9. Use of Latin in public singing. 10. Confessionals. 11. Use of the Catechism of the diocese. 12. First communion at age of 11 or 12. 13. Catholics belonging to secret societies are not to be admitted to the Sacraments. (Document ends here - may not be complete.)

II-4-k - D. - 4pp. - 8vo. - {11}


(18)48 Dec. 7
Martin, Father Aug(uste): Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

It was only Monday that Martin learned from Father Paret that Blanc had returned from Galveston. Martin went to Jackson. Mr. Cranan who lives a mile and a helf from Thompson's creek and whose house is truly Christian, will gladly receive a priest Blanc would send to spend a short time, preferably one who knows English. Then if the creek permits, he could go to say Mass at Mrs. Glisson The Catholics of this small place wish that the Sisters of Charity would take charge of their house for the insane, thinking they would not come unless a priest was given them. They could not support a pastor but would contribute. If Blanc decides to send the priest of whom he spoke, he could come to Baton Rouge first and Martin could assist him. Blanc has no doubt heard of last Monday's event in which Dr. Skillman(?) of Ouachita, seeking to avenge the honor of his sister, was stabbed to death by her seducer, Dr. Bird. There are two emissaries here now of the Baptist Cambell who "ducked" several young scatterbrains in the watering trough at Spanish Town, The poor Methodist preacher who was simple enough to lend his meeting house, wished to hold a public dispute with the Cam(p)bellites. The result was that the door of the church was closed against the intruders who installed themselves in the Court House. Reverend Greenshaw announced in the papers that the annual conference of the ministers of his denomination would be held here soon. 80 ministers are expected; it will be a true "love feast".

V-5-j - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {8}


1848 Dec. 7
(Odin), Bishop J(ohn) M(ary): Galveston, (Texas)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

(Odin) wanted to write at Bishop (Anthony) Blanc's departure but he did not have time. How happy he was at the arrival of Blanc, the Bishop of Buffalo, and Fathers Perché and D'hauw. But Rousselon was missing; he hopes he will come in the spring. They will have told Rousselon about the ceremony. It was a fine day for (Odin) and the whole town. Last Sunday their new church was almost filled. He thanks Rousselon for getting his two boxes out of customs. He is too financially embarrassed to pay right now. Father Perché's visit was a great help to the Sisters. (Odin) sends greetings to Blanc and to Bishop Timon if he is still at New Orleans. P.S. Mr. Choiselat is to send a box for (Odin). If Rousselon finds anything in them which would be suitable for some of his churches, he is to sell them to help pay the customs charges.

V-5-j - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {4}


(1848) Dec. 7
Stearns, Sarah F.: Newark, N(ew) J(ersey)
 to O(restes) A. Brownson: Chelsea, Mass(achusetts)

The writer received a letter from Brownson's publisher in Boston requesting the amount for Brownson's Review for 1848. She had written Brownson a letter from Springfield saying she could not consider herself a subscriber. So far this year Sarah Stearns has received two numbers through Brownson's kindness. Sarah Stearns wishes Brownson knew a Benedictine monk who lives in a basement in Newark. The monk regretted not being able to have an interview with Brownson. The monk rejoices in thoroughness of Brownson's Catholicity over that of (John Adam) Moehler and spoke very enthusiastically of (R. W.) Pugin, the English convert. Though a German by birth, the monk prefers the English statement. Soon Brownson will have a chance to indoctrinate Mrs. (George) Ripley in "Boston Theology" in its practical bearings on the well-being of our country.

I-3-i - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {2}


1848 Dec. 7
Peacock, Geo(rge) S.: Lavaca, (Texas)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

He encloses a bill of lading (no enclosure) for one barrel of pecans shipped on the Adeline at the request of Mr. McDonnough, addressed to Madame (Maria) Cutts, (R.S.C.J.), Superior at Grand Coteau.

V-5-j - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {3}


1848 Dec. 9
Brunemann, Father J(oseph): Newark, Ohio
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He is forced by circumstances to bother Purcell again. In Jersey Settlement, the faithful have agreed to erect a church and are prepared to pay the expenses. However, on the land set aside for the church a certain Mr. Cush has been using and he refuses to give it up until he is shown a written permission from Purcell to build the church. Brunemann asks Purcell to send such a written order in the next letter and directed to Mr. Michael Hughes who will come to get it the next Thursday. He wishes to thank Purcell for the image he sent him. He would like to return a similar favor. However, he is less anxious about temporal things desiring only that the needs of his church be taken care of.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - (Latin) - {2}


1848 Dec. 10
Lecomte. A. and Henry Hertzog: Natchitoches, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

They wrote on November 25 about a schism which has existed for some time between their pastor. Father (Joseph) Giustiniani and the trustees of St. Francis Church. The church has been closed. Not seeing an end to these difficulties they send a resolution taken by a good number of the Catholics. They intend to make up a subscription to build a chapel which would become the property of the Bishop of New Orleans or to the bishop of the new diocese, should there be a division. They ask Blanc to express his wish on this subject.

V-5-j - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {3}


1848 Dec. 10
Noguès, P(eter) C(heri): Cincinnati, (Ohio)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Father (Cyril) Delacroix wrote before vacation that (Blanc) would leave Noguès another year at St. Xavier College. Noguès is glad. His progress in Latin and Greek is slow and he often thinks he will not know enough to become a priest. He wants (Blanc) to know what he really is. He would be glad if (Blanc) granted him the favor Roes(Rousselon?) gave him hope of a year ago.

V-5-j - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {2}


1848 Dec. 11
O'Reilly, Father Bernard: Buffalo, (New York)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

A Father (J.?) Mullen, with a dimissorial from (Blanc) and just now from Ireland is waiting here for the return of the Bishop in the expectation of being received by him. O'Reilly asks whether Mullen gave every satisfaction while employed by (Blanc). O'Reilly has some recollection of hearing Father (Edward D'hauw?) Dow hint something injurious of Mullen who left for Ireland about the time O'Reilly passed through New Orleans, something about retaining collections made for the new church, to the amount of $4000. Should Bishop (John) Timon not have left before the receipt of this letter (Blanc) is to tell him that all is well here.

V-5-j - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {4}


1848 Dec. 11
Henry, J(ea)n: Plaquemine, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

Henry received Blanc's letter of the 5th. He understands the seriousness of the step he has decided to take and also that on Blanc's part it deserves serious thought. Blanc is to be the judge; Henry will obey. He has a school to worry about. Father Perché can tell Blanc of Henry's present and past. He would like to make a little retreat but an absence even of several days would be harmful to his school. He is speaking of the supposition that Blanc may decide that his vocation is not from God. He would need more than a few days to prepare to receive Holy Communion. He hopes Blanc will not designate Donaldsonville because three months ago when he stopped at a hotel there some friends of Theodule Landry, whom Henry had opposed as a candidate for Congress, wished to avenge the defeat of their friend. He has thought about his decision for 10 years.

V-5-j - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {2}


1848 Dec. 11
(Purcell), Bishop J(ohn) B(aptist): Cin(cinnati, Ohio)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Will (Blanc) let Father (P.) O'Mealy beg in New Orleans for a destitute church in Dayton? (Purcell) will, if he has not in giving (Blanc) Father (Cyril) Delacroix, Father (James Ignatius?) Mullon, etc., done so already, return the compliment. So Chicago and Vincennes will send their Bishops next spring to Baltimore. All these appointments are good but they show that there is a power controlling their ecclesiastical destinies here and in Rome. They have just closed a very interesting pastoral retreat preached by Bishop (Richard Whelan) of Richmond.

V-5-j - A.L.S. - 1p. - 4to. - {5}


1848 Dec. 12
Brands C.M., Father John: Galveston, (Texas)
 to Father (Mariano Maller, C.M.):

Brands has received (Maller)'s second favor and congratulates him on the selection of his new counsellor. Brands has communicated the letter to the (Vincentians) from whom he has the news dated the 5th. Brother Pala, (C.M.) has been ill on account of the severe cold weather. Brands has had no news for a long time from the Bishop, neither has he written to N(ew) O(rleans). A great number of German emigrants arrive here; they seem generally wealthy and well educated, a great many are Catholic. But they have no clergyman except two whom Brands has been obliged to deprive of their powers; the one is a drunkard, the other is under bail for alleged manslaughter. Brands is anxious for the Bishop's return. The two priests have removed with their party to the Rio Frio and, as Father Calvo writes Brands, are continuing to exercise the functions of the priesthood. Father James Miller of Emmitsburg has arrived here and Brands has sent him on a mission to Brazoria. Miller expects many Catholic emigrants from Maryland. Father (James) Rolando, (C.M.) is acclimatizing; it seems he is not pleased with the country. He must understand that every thing here is yet embryo and will remain so yet for years to come; they are not in the U(nited) S(tates). Brands has had 12 First Communions which is more than there ever have been in Galveston. Last year the Bishop was proud to confirm 8 persons; what will he think now? Brands has requested Fathers (Eudald) Estany, (C.M.) and (Michael) Calvo, (C.M.) to send the statistics of their missions for 1845 which Brands will send together with the mission at Galveston and Houston. Brands thinks Houston ought to be an appendage of their house at Galveston without which their mission will be entirely insignificant, not being important enough to give employment to a community however small. Next Monday they will have an election for the officers of their future state and for members of Congress to take their seats when the United States will allow them to do so. Until that time the Republic of Texas will continue as before.

V-5-j - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {9}


1848 Dec. 13

Marziou, V(ictor) and Company Havre, (France)
 to Father E(tienne) Rousselon: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

They enclose a notice (no enclosure) of a box of books sent by M. Migne and a box sent by Gaumes Brothers put on board the American ship Lyons, Captain Caines.

V-5-j - L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {4}


1848 Dec. 14
Tiblier Freres: New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

A bill of $35.75 for goods for Father (Joseph Michael) Paret.

V-5-j - A. Bill - (French) - 1p. - 12mo. - {2}


1848 Dec. 15
McCaffrey, Father John:
Mt. St. Mary's College, (Emmitsburg, Maryland)
 to O(restes) A. Brownson: (Boston, Massachusetts)

He thanks Brownson for his most acceptable letters in keeping up a pleasant and profitable acquaintance. He has urged Miles to keep his promise to Brownson. In his first effort as a dramatic poet, (George H.) Miles has beaten all competitors with his "Mohammed", receiving the $1000 prize, but will not give up his profession as a lawyer. His literary laurels may draw business to his office. Brownson must knock under to him as a political prophet: he won on the bet with his brother that Pennsylvania would give (General Zachory) Taylor 5000 more votes than Cass. He found all the clergy from Boston to Emmittsburg wrong in the politics except Fr. McElroy, who was wrong for four years before, but he himself is never wrong. He predicts that if the Whigs forget that General Taylor elected the party and not the party him, they will share the same fate of the old Federalist party. If they attempt to restore the bank or raise the tariff, they will fall from power and the president must rule them with an iron will. The people at large have no objection to the veto rule and it will sustain itself. Neither the iron nor any other business interest ruled the vote in Pennsylvania; the Dutch blood warmed to the old hew and the Quakers voted for Taylor as the representative of a pacific policy, and the shameful injustice and blundering of the present government in regard to Mexico called for a rebuke. The nationality of the Irish is irritable and easily hurt; their devotion to their religion and clergy deserves all praise. The purity of their women is deservedly proverbial, and an Irish woman, when truly refined, cultured and religious, is the most glorious being in human form. Bishops Hughes and O'Connor and perhaps Bishop Purcell, he thinks, will join Brownson in an effort to save their countrymen from demagogues and their own folly. Perhaps Americans, too, have their peculiar follies, except that they have not that rankling sense of oppression and injustice. However, he suspects that when Brownson denounces democracy and traces its origin to the devil, he will raise a hornet's nest in earnest. He has read Brownson's views on Socialism and it appears to him that he was never a confirmed Socialist or Fournierist—he was merely struggling upwards looking for better things and into whose mind God inspired some willingness to receive the light of Heaven. Brownson has already satisfied the Logician that the fundamental principle of Fournierism is anti-Christian, but the popular mind needs exposure of the parts as well as of the whole. The ablest opponents of pagan errors were often converted pagans. It seems to him that the cry for social reform shows the utter inability of political institutions to make man happy, it shows what Brownson once felt—a yearning after the Church. He speaks not of the leaders of the movement, but of the crowd, who know their misery and want a remedy. What a commentary on socialism that the closer men are crowded together the more corrupt they become unless the Salt of the Earth is among them to prevent putrefaction. He would like to see Brownson handle the thesis: "no morality without the infallible Church", since modern infidelity is worse than any of the old pagan infidelity; the former confronts the truth of God and denies it, the latter has lost it in the natural progress of man's corruption and degradation. Infanticide, common among the Greeks, Romans and Chinese, is becoming common among Americans. Madame Restell escapes any real punishment, but they have found it necessary to hang such a woman in England. Charity is not a Protestant virtue. What but the Church can save the world from the lowest depths of paganism? Channings and Parkers are poor successors to Socrates and Plato; yet among the old heathens the people believed, while the philosophers doubted and disputed. Deity, immortality, future rewards were convictions with the people. Our whole mercantile system is one of fraud—lawyers, merchants, doctors, politicians, governments, jurors—men's consciences must be regulated either by a God-established Church or a godless world. He is considered a thorough Brownsonian, yet he has noticed that those who find Brownson ultra, grow less cautious and timid in upholding the truth by reading the "Review". He finds fault with Brownson's phrases, but not with his views. He thinks Brownson's phrase: "The Church abhors mixed marriages", is too strong and he finds it glorious sport to criticize the critic and review the reviewer. He asks to be remembered to the Bishop and the warm-hearted and hospitable clergy whose kindness he will never forget. A not too abstruse metaphysical article would be of interest to some of Brownson's readers, since a true science of philosophy is all-important and Brownson can command the respectful attention even of Protestants to such discussion.

I-3-i - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 8vo. - {3}


1848 Dec. 15
Fenwick, S.J., Father George:
Holy Cross College, Worcester, Massachusetts
 to O(restes) A. Brownson: Boston, Mass(achusetts)

Quarterly report of the proficiency, standing, and conduct of William Brownson.

I-3-i - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {2}


(18)48 Dec. 16
(Hogan), Mary Ann: New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

She thanks Blanc for the note. Since she saw him, she has reflected seriously on the importance of the state of life she was so soon to enter and she finds she does not have the dispositions for a religious house. When she made application there was a misunderstanding with her family which threw her upon her own resources. She does not possess a single dollar to supply the necessary clothing. She relinquishes for the present the idea of becoming a Sister. She has the offer of a position as teacher in a family up the river which she thinks of accepting. Mrs. Hall wishes to be remembered to Blanc.

V-5-j - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 4to. - {2}


1848 Dec. 16
Spalding, M(artin) J.,Bp. Louisville: Louisville, Kentucky
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Spalding thanks Purcell for his kindness and hospitality to him while on a visit to Cincinnati. He expresses the wish that the relations of the two dioceses may continue to be most friendly and intimate. Spalding will ever feel disposed to reciprocate the kindness. The affair of Covington and Newport need in no wise disturb these relations. Though Bishop (Benedict Joseph) Flaget is anxious to receive those parts, Spalding will not act without Purcell's consent. Had not Purcell spontaneously offered to give them back if Rome consented, Spalding would have hesitated to ask for them. Father (Maurice) de St. Palais has received his bulls and is preparing for consecration.

II-4-k - A. L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {7}


1848 Dec. 16
Murphy, John: Baltimore, (Maryland)
 to O(restes) A. Brownson: (Boston, Massachusetts)

He has concluded to discontinue the magazine, which decision he did not make until that day. He has announced that the paid-up subscribers could have their money refunded or could have any of the other Catholic periodicals, and that he will receive subscriptions for the "Review". He does not know how many copies he shall want, but somewhere about 10 or 20. He will take two dollars per copy for a small number since he does not want to make money on it but merely wishes to supply his friends.

I-3-i - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {1}


1848 Dec. 17
(Proust), Father Marie Eutrope: Trappist of Gethsemany, Kentucky on board the Washington.
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He has been charged at Havre with two packages for the superior of a community in Purcell's diocese. He hopes that they will reach Purcell. He addresses this letter by two Trappist brethern who go to Cincinnati on the advice of the captain of the boat to claim their effects. He is happy on this occasion to offer as homage to Purcell a history of the Trappists and a life of one of their brothers who died recently in the odor of sanctity. He wishes to recommend to Purcell's charity his small community which is to establish itself near him. They do so at their own expense, for the land, the journey and the installation. If Purcell cannot give financial aid, Frere Eutrope asks that he recommend them to the Association of the Propagation. They dare to hope that living so near them he will honor their solitude with his presence.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - (French) - {4}


1848 Dec. 17
(Purcell), Bishop J(ohn) B(aptist): Cin(cinnati, Ohio)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Had he known that New Orleans was so overrun with questors, he would never have consented to Father (P.) O'Mealy's coming on such an errand. He asks (Blanc) to tell O'Mealy to come home right away. (Purcell) thanks (Blanc) for his kind attention to his letter about Geo(rge W.) Wisner;he hopes Blanc has found him and prepared him for eternity. He hears that Bishop (Edward) Barron has gone to share (Blanc's) hospitality, perhaps to be indebted to Louisiana for a grave. Father Brasseur will find himself at home in Mexico; (Purcell) would not wonder if he were made Archbishop of Mexico, things are so out of joint just now. The remembrance of Bishop (Simon) Gabriel) Bruté's question about the flag that was waved in the pulpit once, on January 8th, would make (Purcell) afraid to attempt a victory sermon in Blanc's Cathedral. But seriously he knows no one better to appear on that occasion. Bishop (Richard) Whelan preached a grand retreat here for the clergy, and the faithful. Bishop Spalding delivered one sermon to the people. Masons, carpenters, quarry men are hard at work getting out materials for the new seminary. Here is a volume of poetry which Father (Adrien) Rouquette, whose brother is here, has found time to write. They have lately sent (Blanc) a Sardinian doctor of medicine, a bigamist, Dr. Brayda. Cardinal Cadolini of Ferrara has frequently written to (Purcell) about him for Brayda's brother is a Dominican in Ferrara. (Purcell) gave Brayda the price of a dress for his supposed wife to enable her to come to church and get a benediction, for it was a preacher who married them, but it was so much lost as far as this world goes.

V-5-j - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {9}


1848 Dec. 18
Miles, George H.: Baltimore, (Maryland)
 to O(restes) A. Brownson: Boston, (Massachusetts)

He has received a letter from his godfather, Father John McCaffrey, reminding him of his promise made to Brownson in the summer. When Brownson asked for an account of the Mountain he mistook it as chiefly a compliment of the president; and when Brownson asked him to contribute to to the "Quarterly" he thought Brownson was conferring a privilege, not asking a favor. He went to Cape May for his health, and in the fall he plunged into the Taylor campaign. Now he is willing to work for Brownson; and is his manuscripts are acceptable he will consider that the greatest compliment ever paid him. He asks Brownson to answer this letter and to give him a subject, with one or two hints. He will get right at it. He hopes to make some poor amends to Catholicity by his pen, to make up for the injury of his own example.

I-3-i - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {2}


1848 Dec. 18
Purcell, Father William: Camolin, Co. Wexford, Ireland
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He acknowledges Purcell's letter of the 27th of October. He lost no time in communicating to the Widow Archbold the information relative to the necessity of her having transmitted without delay the power of attorney to Mr. George H. Hilton and of the almost final adjustment by law of her claims to the Legacy bequethed by her husband. She brought the legal document to Father William Purcell yesterday which he now sends to Bishop Purcell for his kindness. The noise of politics is no longer heard in this unhappy land; but ruin and desolation are everywhere visible. The farmers and laborers are fleeing to all parts of America and the British Colonies. It is shocking to think that they should give such horrid scandal in other lands. It is due to their long period of serfdom and ignorance. Although Ireland is to some extent emancipated, the people still have many of the fices of slaves. William Purcell trusts that the fugitive assassins and infidels from Europe will not succeed in disturbing the peace and order of the United States. He remembers Bishop Purcell in his Mass.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {2}


1848 Dec. 18
Randall, Daniel A.: Donaldson, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Near half a century's residence in the midst of the people of Ascension, whose confidence he enjoys. emboldens Randall to address Blanc. The news that they are to be deprived of their pastor, Father John Boullier has plunged them into the deepest distress. Although Randall is not of his flock, he solicits Blanc's influence with Boullier's Superior to countermand the mandate. 12 or 15 years' residence has endeared Boullier not only to his flock but to all denominations. Also Boullier is the founder of an Asylum for the distressed and afflicted. His favorite project is marching rapidly toward completion.

V-5-j - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 4to. - {3}


1848 Dec. 19
Farrini, E.: (New Orleans, Louisiana)
 to Father (Joseph Michael) Paret: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

A receipted bill for groceries.

V-5-j - Aill S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {1}


1848 Dec. 19
Raho, C.M., Father B(laise): Natchez (Mississippi)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

He has just received (Blanc)'s favor of the 16th. The congregation of Natchez is thankful for his interest in their regard and the welfare of the Cathedral. The gloom of the embarrassed affairs of this church is already cleared. After Raho's return from New Orleans, the collections continued. With the $449 mentioned in (Blanc)'s letter, they have $2400. The Fair began this morning. The Protestants are as generous as the Catholics. He hopes it will bring $800. Raho received a letter from Bishop (John Joseph) Chanche dated Paris, November 3. He had not received Raho's letters of October 16 and 23. (Blanc) is to place the amount mentioned in his letter in the bank to be drawn on Raho's order. The Captain of the Magnolia would do the favor but he stops on a very short time at this landing. The report is that cholera has appeared in New Orleans.

V-5-j - A.L.S. - 1p. - 4to. - {3}


1848 Dec. 19
Ste. Athanasie, D.W., Sister: St. Laurent, (France)
 to (Father Stephen Rousselon?: New Orleans Louisiana)

Sister has been assigned a different station which she notified (Rousselon) of through Mr. Gilet. From Rochelle she went to St. Laurent where she has been for 7 months. During this time the death of her mother occurred. She was fourth mistress in their novitiate. In October, 1841 she was sent near St. Malo where she remained for six years. Her superiors left her in charge of her sisters and the number almost doubled from the time of her arrival. In 1841 she was sent to Orleans. There she had 15 Sisters and many children in the boarding school. Before a year she was recalled to St. Laurent as first mistress of novices. She directs 120 persons. A letter of encouragement would help. A merchant of Havre, Fréderic Dumont, who has a sister who is a novice, would take care of the letters. She must give long instructions which she does not have time to prepare. She counts on (Rousselon) remembering her at Mass and asks him not to deprive her of news.

V-5-j - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 12mo. - {3}


1848 Dec. 20
Drouelle, (C.S.C.), Father G.:
 to (Male Orphan Asylum?: New Orleans Louisiana)

The Brothers of St. Joseph of the University of N(otre) D(ame) du Lac. Indiana, whose motherhouse is in LeMans will furnish for the orphan's asylum: A director at a salary of 150 piastres, a cook at 125, a wardrobe and dormitory keeper at 125, and two English Brothers for teaching at 125. The administration will be responsible for traveling expenses. The Brothers are to have their board and a little chapel. The Director will be responsible to a member designated by the corporation; as to moral direction he will be responsible only to the Bishop. The care of the sick is to be confided to a woman at least 35 or 40. Trade school Brothers will be introduced according to the particular arrangements of this chapter. The corporation may transfer those orphans over 14 who could work in the orphanage connected with the University of Notre Dame to learn a trade provided a sum of 50 piastres is paid on entering and agreement made that they would remain until 21. The establishment would give them a common education and two sets of clothing at their legal departure. The above propositions cannot be considered as a contract until ratified by the official council of Notre Dame du Lac.

V-5-j - Copy - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {3}


(18)48 Dec. 20
Laurentia, (S.C.), Sister M.: Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Sister was delighted to receive Blanc's letter. She has not forgotten the retreat not Blanc's kindness to her. Srs. Ro(s?)ina, (S.C.) and M(ary) Ambrose. (S.C.) are going down to New Orleans tomorrow; they will see Blanc. She is sure Blanc will not go north without making them a visit.

V-5-j - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {3}


1848 Dec. 21
Juncker, Father H(enry) D.: Dayton, Ohio
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Here is a man from Fribourg (Ohio) from Father (Martin) Pobst, who asks Juncker to tell Purcell of the desires of the people of that place. Purcell knows of the small log church 1 miles from Fribourg. The Catholics in and around Fribourg, except a few living near the old church, desire to build a brick church in the village itself. Already $1000 is available, and if Purcell approves they will cut the woods and prepare to make the bricks next spring. The individual also says that they will double their subscriptions if Purcell will give his consent, and that Fribourg is the center for all the Catholics.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - (French) - {4}


1848 Dec. 21

Marziou, V(ictor) and Company Havre, (France)
 to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

They enclose (no enclosure) a notice of shipment of a package sent by Poussiclyne(?) Rusano destined for Bishop (John Baptist) Purcell at Cincinnati. It is sent on the Lorena, Captain Conway.

V-5-j - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {4}


1848 Dec. 21
Rasch, Ay. and others: New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

They address Blanc as President of the New Orleans Catholic Association for the Relief of Male Orphans. They, the members of the executive board suggest that it would be greatly advantageous to secure the services of two religious Sisters in the infirmary of the asylum. If Blanc coincides with this opinion he is to make the necessary arrangements to carry the same into effect. (Signed also by) Man(ue)l Blasco and P.G. Collins.

V-5-j - L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {4}


1848 Dec. 21
De St. Palais, Father Maurice: Vincennes, Indiana
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

If De St. Palais did not inform Purcell of his appointment to the see of Vincennes sooner, it was because he needed a few days reflection. Having decided to accept the nomination, he requests Purcell to act as assistant Bishop and preacher on the day of his consecration. The interest Purcell has taken in the welfare of his diocese during the vacancy of the See gives De St. Palais hope that Purcell will condescend to his wishes. The Archbishop of St. Louis, (Peter Richard Kenrick) is to perform the ceremony which is to take place at Vincennes on Jan. 14, the feast of the Holy Name of Jesus. Bishop (Martin John) Spalding will be there, and De St. Palais will be surrounded by his three nearest neighbors. When De St. Palais applied for advice Purcell willingly gave it. De St. Palais hopes Purcell will continue to act towards him like a father; he asks for prayers now.

P.S. Purcell is to answer by telegraph because the high waters delay the mail.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {4}


1848 Dec. 21
(St. Palais), Bishop Maurice (de): Vincennes, (Indiana)
 to Father (Stephen Rousselon: New Orleans, Louisiana)

He asks that (Rousselon) send him about 40 ordos. Bishop Blanc, who has a small sum belonging to Vincennes, will pay for them.

V-5-j - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {1}


1848 Dec. 21
Spalding, M(artin) J., Bp. Louisville: Louisville, Kentucky
Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Spalding is surprised at the tone of Purcell's last letter received by Brother Hilarion. The notice in the Advocate of which Purcell complains was written by the editor, Father Peter Lavialle during Spalding's absence. Spalding knew nothing whatever of it. Purcell will notice that it savors of the Gallican style. Purcell pays Spalding a poor compliment if he was disposed to apply this newspaper squib as a test of his sincerity. Father Lavialle assures Spalding most positively that he had no intention to insinuate anything disrespectful to the Telegraph or to Purcell; he merely meant to give a good humored hint regarding what he deemed an embellishment. Spalding had nothing whatever to do with the article.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {5}


1848 Dec. 22
Lecomte, A. and Henry Hertzog: Natchitoches, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

They have received (Blanc)'s letter of the 15th and they regret that Father (Joseph) Giustiniani, (C.M.) had left the city at the very moment that (Blanc) was to receive a letter from the trustees of their church. They no doubt wrote about the schism. Getting the facts from both sides, (Blanc) can come to a conclusion on this question. They will submit to his judgment. They ask him to send them a copy of the letter received from the trustees as well as his reply. He is also to tell Giustiniani how to proceed. They will not proceed with the building of a chapel until they have exhausted all means of arriving at an honorable conclusion in these difficulties.

V-5-j - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {4}


1848 Dec. 23
(Hughes), Bishop John: New York, (New York)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: N(ew) O(rleans, Louisiana)

This will be presented by E.A. Watrous, a young man of excellent character and respectable family of this state. He is a stranger in New Orleans and though not a Catholic. (Hughes) thinks highly of him. Any attention will be highly appreciated.

V-5-j - A.L.S. - 1p. - 16mo. - {2}


1848 Dec. 24
Brown, Sister Mary De Sales (Mary Alida): Phil(adelphia, Pennsylvania)
 to Father (Francis P. McFarland: Watertown, New York)

She realizes that (McFarland) is not accepting her note as an answer to his long letter. She is busy and when not busy in not often well enough to write. She made her profession four months ago. In November she had a visit from 3 sisters and a brother. She regrets that they are still not Catholics. She does not feel the joy this Christmas she felt back in Georgetown. She is pleased that he has an assistant. Father (Joseph) Balfe is their chaplain and Father (Thaddeus) Amat, C.M. is their confessor, provided by Bishop (Francis Patrick) Kenrick. Conditions in their convent are more encourageing than they were. They pay $2,500 rent, too much. She has heard from Mrs. Binsse. She asks to hear from him.

I-1-a - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 8vo. - {4}


1848 Dec. 24
Figari, C.M., Father H(ector): Cloutierville, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Figari asks for a dispensation for Adolphe Prudhomme and Marie Octavie Metoyer. Blanc will get the news from Father Giustiniani. Here things are in statu quo.

V-5-j - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {3}


1848 Dec. 25
Brunner, C.PP.S., (Father Francis D.): Thompson, Seneca County, Ohio
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He extends to Purcell his wishes for the new year. The people of Minster desire Father Andreas Herbsreit, whom Brunner had sent as an assistant to Father John Wittmer, then gravely indisposed, to accompany them to Cincinnati to finish the collection, but they do not want Father Matthias Kreusch. Brunner wants to withdraw Herbsreit so that he can complete some necessary studies in theology. He has none other than Kreusch and he fears that the faithful of Minster will cause trouble if he sends him. He asks Purcell to help him by sending these people another priest to accompany them during the collection for the next two months, or otherwise to settle the trouble. He also asks that Purcell send him a word on this at Minster. He has heard that Purcell intends to give the Precious Blood Fathers missions at Wappakonetta and Friburg. However, they cannot accept these because they are too few and to withdraw the younger men from studies would be to lose them. He has been near death but now is recovering, and desires to use the rest of his life to instructing his brethern and directing them in the spirit of Christ. Three Sisters of the Precious Blood have a school in Minster. The faithful there want to know how much they should grant these sisters. Brunner does not know and would not dare to say. He asks Purcell to find occasion to write to them on this matter. He asks Purcell's prayers.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - (Latin) - {10}


1848 Dec. 25
Randall, Tho(ma)s L.: Donaldsonville, (Louisiana)
Bishop Anthony Blanc: (New Orleans), Louisiana

He has learned with regret that their pastor. Father (John) Boullier, (C.M.) is to be removed from their parish. Boullier has so endeared himself by his untiring zeal and kindness that his removal would be a severe blow to religion. Randall hopes that Blanc will adopt measures to sucure his permanent services.

V-5-j - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {2}


1848 Dec. 25
Randall, W(?) C.: Donaldsonville, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop Anthony Blanc: (New Orleans), Louisiana

Belonging to the Catholic community of Ascension, while forwarding a petition from the citizens of the parish, Randall addresses Blanc personally in behalf of their beloved Father (John) Boullie(r), (C.M.) whose removal is contemplated by the Superior of his order. The accompanying petition was open only two days. It was to be carried to every planter's house but fearing that the Superior might be in the city sooner than expected, they determined on forwarding it at once. Otherwise six hundred signatures could have been obtained. He relies on Blanc's persuasive interference. (The enclosed petition is signed by) 176 residents.

V-5-j - A.L.S., Petition S. - 4pp. - 4to. & folio - {3}


1848 Dec. 27
Cutts, R.S.C.J., Madame M(aria): Grand Coteau, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

They pray for Blanc every day. The number of novices is increasing; there are 15. This will facilitate the foundation at New Iberia as Mother General is to send a little colony in the spring to begin this. She has had no reply as yet about Thibodeau. Blanc will see that next year promises even more for the Religious of the Sacred Heart.

V-5-j - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {2}


1848 Dec. 27
Martelle, A.: Grand Coteau, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

They wish him health and happiness in the coming year from his little flock at Grand Coteau. Their number continues to augment; they are now 83. Martelle writes as secretary for the group.

V-5-j - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {1}


1848 Dec(?) 27
Mégret, Father A(nthony) D(ésiré): Vermillionville, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Mégret received Blanc's letter of the 7th. The Abbot of La Grande Trappe drew on Mégret for $132. This draft was not mentioned by the firm of Didier or Odier of New Orleans; it was 3 years ago. Mégret accepted it and placed this sum in the hands of F. Gautier, a merchant of his town who did his exchanging at that time. The misfortune is that there is no appeal as in less than three months Gautier lost his fortune, leaving $8000 in debts and finally lost his mind. Mégret is without funds just now having been obliged to give $100 to save a poor family who had only a few animals as resources. He has also spent small sums for the presbytery and to complete the fence at the church according to the wish of Valerian Martin. He fears it will be April before he can give Blanc this $132. The arrival of 44 Trappists on the way to Kentucky is proof that they do not believe an establishment here is impossible. If Father Eutrope (Proust, O.C.S.O.) had ventured half way on Attakapas, Mégret in less than a month would have furnished all the means to establish them there. Mégret has asked Sister Elizabeth to bring Blanc a barrel of sugar from his crop. Valerian Martin promised it would be good. Mégret hopes his first present in 7 years will be acceptable.

V-5-j - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {6}


1848 Dec. 27
Raho, C.M., Father B(laise): Natchez, Mississippi)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Raho received (Blanc)'s favor of the 23rd with the certificate for $450. In a few days the $3250 will be realized. They have $2881.20 in the bank. The Fair cleared $622. They have about $350 to collect. Raho received a letter from Bishop (John Joseph) Chanche dated Paris, November 30. It seems he is not satisfied with the arrangement Raho made. He still wants to go along with the law and bring suit. But his real friends advise him not to. Lawyers' opinion is that he will lose and then instead of 17,000 the Bishop will pay 20,000. The Bishop has been deceived by those he thought his best friends in Natchez. However he says if it is absolutely necessary he will agree.

V-5-j - A.L.S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {2}


1848 Dec. 27
Young, Father Josue M.: Lancaster, Ohio
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Seven or eight years ago, Martin Davy contracted a marriage before a civil magistrate with Rebecca Beals, who, he says, and others say was never baptized. When their first child was born, the priest (Young) having power to dispense in dispar. cult. for marriages already contracted, asked and obtained their mutual consent before witnesses, and pronounced them married. They separated about five years ago. Davy had obtained a divorce in the civil courts; and now he proposes to marry and settle down. Since Davy is determined to have recourse to episcopal authority let Purcell's authority settle him so that he may be persuaded to do right.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {2}


1848 Dec. 28
Blanc, Anthony,Bp. of New Orleans: New Orleans, Louisiana
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Blanc received Purcell's letter concerning Father O'Mealy. Since O'Mealy left a week ago, he will have told Purcell the circumstances under which he thought it best to leave. There were six beggars in the City among whom were three Bishops, Buffalo, Glasgow, and Natchez, through Father B. Raho, C.M., his representative. Dr. Smith left three days after his arrival. Bishop (John) Timon obtained very little. The Church of Natchez being in the greatest need, they did all they could to help it out. It was providential for Father O'Mealy to have left when he did for Cholera broke out in the city. The clergy of St. Patrick's are overdone by fatigue; this morning Father Adrian Rouquette volunteered to assist them. Blanc was not in when Father (John) Lamy came to see him. Last Saturday they received 20 recruits from France, five priests, the others scholastics or lay brothers. They are intended for Mobile and Louisiana, — some French, some German, and some English. Blanc was not prepared to hear of Father (James) Vandevelde's appointment for Chicago. The enclosed was addressed to the bishop of Louisiana and was found in Blanc's box; but it was intended for the Episcopal bishop (Leonidas Polk). Blanc asks Purcell not to let it be known that he kept it.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {11}


(1848) Dec. 28
(Chevrel, O. Carm.), Sister Ste. Thérèse: (New Orleans, Louisiana)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Sister reminds Rousselon that Thursday, the 30th, they will give out the prizes. If she did not fear to upset the general custom they would not give them this year as the children have never been so lazy and ill disposed. It is quite the contrary at Vermillion. Sister St. Paul (Aucoin, O. Carm.) and Mrs. Long praise the children, their little distribution was a solemn occasion and the parents were delighted. The Bishop found a place as a teacher for Mrs. Long's niece. Perhaps if he knew of a good place she might change her mind. Three of her daughters are here. 2 at the convent down there. The niece who arrives tomorrow, and the mother, make 7. It is impossible to lodge them all at Vermillion. However, it was the separation of her children that made her leave here. Today this good lady is in bed with a migraine headache but tomorrow if she can talk to the Bishop, Sister will be obliged. If Rousselon does not go to Vermillion until after classes resume on January 15 it will be impossible for the Sisters (of Mount Carmel) to make their retreat. If they made their retreat with Father (Anthony Désiré) Mégret, Rousselon could advise them later. Sister St. Paul says the house which Mégret sold them is very bad. Mégret has set payment due in January. Ste. Thérèse has not signed the deed; she must notify him that she will not accept it. She sends Rousselon the deed. Rousselon is to see if he wants to write, or to see the house. St. Paul may have been misinformed. The lack of an English teacher is going to do the greatest harm to their young establishment.

V-5-j - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {6}


1848 Dec. 28
Praz, R.S.C.J., Madame A.: St. Michael, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

The little family of Sacred Heart send their respects and thanks. If they only had the power to console Blanc in the terrible plague with which God may perhaps strike their people! The Community retreat was given by Father (Vital?) Gilles, (S.J.); it ended Christmas eve. Praz has received orders from Mother (Maria) Cutts, (R.S.C.J.) to send Madame Ory, (R.S.C.J.) and a Sister to Natchitoches; they left yesterday.

V-5-j - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {4}


1848 Dec. 29
Glajeux, Berard des,: Paris, (France)
 to Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefevere: Detroit, (Michigan)

The year 1848 has had a regrettable influence on the collections of the Association of the Propagation of the Faith so that it is impossible to regulate the allocations for the current year from estimated amounts and the Councils have decided to await the collection of funds before disposing of them. Therefore they send to Lefevere's diocese a first payment of 4800 francs. Glajeux asks Lefevere's prayers that the times will become more calm and happy in their country. This letter is signed by Glajeux as president. Written on the same paper, a note signed by Choiselat Gallien as treasurer tells Lefevere that he will find enclosed a draft for 4800 francs.

III-2-h - L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 8vo. - {3}


1848 Dec. 29
Rogalle, Father J.: Pointe Coupée, (Louisiana)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

On receipt of the little package Rousselon sent on the 26th, Rogalle immediately looked up the two baptismal certificates which he encloses (no enclosure). He takes this opportunity to send New Year's greetings.

V-5-j - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {1}


1848 Dec. 30
Quiblier, Father: Norwood, London, (England)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Last month Quiblier sent a prospectus from the convent of Our Lady of Norwood. Bishop (John Joseph Chanche) is continuing his journeys on the continent; Quiblier does not know whether he is having great success. He misjudged Rome; he found everything peaceful. Lyons has resumed work and commerce a little. France is better but not cured. Quiblier's temporary stay here has not been fruitless. He has had a visit from Father (Louis?) Dufour. They talked of New Orleans, the Bishop, and Rousselon. If Quiblier crossed the ocean he would go to Rousselon; but it is only a dream. He is too glad to have achieved peace and withdrawal from difficulties.

V-5-j - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 16mo. - {3}


1848 Dec. 30
Spalding, M(artin) J(ohn),Bp. Louisville: Louisville, Kentucky
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Spalding is tryly happy that the impression made upon him by Purcell's last letter was unfounded. Nothing would pain him more than a misunderstanding. He believes that Purcell is mistaken in his surmise as to other hands secretly at work in this business. He is quite sure that none of the Jesuits had anything to do with it. The Editor of the Advocate is alone responsible; but he had no bad design whatever in the notice; he merely wished to set right a small matter in which he believed the Editor of the Telegraph had been misinformed.

P.S. Spalding wishes Purcell and all his clergy a happy new year. In regard to the Covington affair, it is not Spaldings intention to take any action at present. Father Kuhr sends notice that he will attend no sick calls beyond the three miles. It is impossible for Spalding to station a priest there. Father Kuhr is Purcell's subject and if there be anything amiss about his practising medicine and his general conduct, it does not become Spalding to interfere.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {7}


1848 Dec. 31
Abbadie, S.J., Father J(ohn) F(rancis): St. Michael, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc: N(ew) Orleans, (Louisiana)

Yesterday he had a reply from Mr. Welham who consents to giving the roadway if Abbadie gives him a watch for which Father Ladavière paid $70. Abbadie told him he would write to Blanc and if Blanc consented they would sign the deed. Abbadie has been asked to buy a little house near Mrs. Jacob's. What does Blanc think? P.S. Abbadie encloses a letter for Father (Joseph) Soller, (S.J.), asking Blanc to send August with it so he may have it at once. Abbadie is notifying him to get some articles which are on board the Mary Foley. He is enclosing two notes for $10 to be given to Soller with the letter. If he can cash them he is to keep them; if not he is to return them.

V-5-j - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {4}