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1849 Jan.
Prescott, M.R.E.: Alexandria, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Pen and paper are insufficient to make up for the disappointment of not seeing Blanc when Prescott was in the city. Prescott was a stranger and knew not on whom to call. Prescott asks a favor for a free coloured person of virtue and respectability. She has a daughter about 12 whom she wishes to place at the convent. She is not able to give more than $100 per annum. Her name is Clara Layssody. She has been sewing for Prescott's family for two years. Prescott was anxious to visit the convent and St. Augustine Church but it was difficult to find places. They visited St. Patric(k)'s and heard Father Mullen preach. They left before the sermon was completed as Mrs. Robertson, a cousin who accompanied Prescott became ill because of the density of the crowd. Father (John Peter) Bellier is busy with his little improvements. He is very popular, beloved, and respected. They are making an effort to build a comfortable house for Bellier. Blanc's last visit here will be long remembered. Prescott would like to know where she could find silver crucifixes and gold medals of the Immaculate Conception.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 4to. - {4}


1849 Jan. 1
Calhoun,:
Richard, and Co(mpany) New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Sale at auction for account of George Pardow: Pew No. 25 in St. Patrick's Church; act before H.B. Cenas, n(otary) p(ublic), dated August 25, 1842 to Charles O'Hara. Said pew was adjudicated to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc for $440. Pardow adds that on January 10 he received $430, the full amount of the above less $10 discount.

V-5-k - D.S. - 1p. - 4to. - {5}


(18)49 Jan. 2
Bellier, Father J(ohn) P(eter): Alexandria, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Bellier thanks Blanc for his 3 letters. He arrived at Alexandria last year in January. Since then the church lot has been fenced; 82 feet reserved for a Catholic cemetery. old Mr. Biossat lies there; a fence separates 80 feet destined for a garden; (there is) a stable for the horse and carriage, a corn crib and courtyard; a temporary kitchen, court and chicken house, woodyard; a sacristy behind the church. Bellier has put into these works everything he received. He now has the strict necessities. He has asked Father (Joseph) Giustiniani, (C.M.) to tell Blanc that he can offer Father (Louis) Ducoudray only a small room but he can offer quiet, time to read, reflect pray, say his breviary, with the use of the horse and the only obligation that of replacing Bellier at the altar on Sunday for High Mass and Vespers. For this he proposes $100 a year to be used as he wishes. It is what was authorized for an organist and since he must replace him he offers it to Ducoudray. The sermons and music are the two great helps Bellier needs. He tried replacing the organist with a woman but this was not successful. Bellier would like a week to arrange a room a little more worthy of the cousin of a bishop. At all events he will regard his coming as a veritable act of Providence. The congregations hold their own: Holoway-Prairie Creole 15 miles away, the first week of the month; Plaisance the second week; Calcasieu, 30 some miles, the third; and the fourth at Alexandria. He has not yet gone to Monroe because of the bad roads. A letter from Father Bertin states that he regarded the project as defective. Another letter from one of his sisters in France by which it appears that the old Father Superior has put everything in the hands of Father Gaudaire; he is a capable man. Nothing from Vincennes. At Christmas the collection was $4.50. This is all as Mr. Ross is leaving. His greetings to Fathers Rousselon, D'Hauw, Duquenay, Perché Solaire, etc.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - folio - {7}


1849 Jan. 2
Caussat, Fran(cois) and others: Assumption, (Lafourche, Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans), Louisiana

The people of Assumption parish ask (Blanc) to give them back Father (John F. Llebaria. C.M.) Labaria. In taking him away he deprives them of all consolation, particularly the sick. Since he left all the families regret it and hope that soon (Blanc) will answer their request. 84 sign with Caussat.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 8vo. - {3}


1849 Jan. 2
Dufour, Father L(ouis): Paris, (France)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Dufour has reread (Blanc)'s letter; a new prize for him is that it was written from St. Martin. When Dufour had completed his family business and returned to Paris, seeing all the disturbance, he finally left for England. But the climate gave him a perpetual cold, he returned here. He has recovered his old agility and gaiety. But his heart is in the missions, especially the last in Louisiana. He has not the means to live independently and he is not inclined to ecclesiastical honors and dignities. He is trying to make a definite decision. He has a natural inclination toward the creoles of Louisiana. He must have elbow room for the exercise of the ministry. Even Father Rousselon changed his opinion of him. If Dufour comes back this time it is for always. (Blanc) is to reply in all sincerity; Dufour will make a decision. Poor France, it is all the wisest say.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {1}


1849 Jan. 2
(Rappe, Louis) A(madeus), Bp. Cleveland: Cleveland, Ohio
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He was about to write to Rome to ask for division of the two dioceses according to the line drawn up by Purcell in his latest letter but the trouble in Rome has determined him to delay his petition until they know where the Holy Father will find himself. Since it is certain that Rome will approve their common demand, he asks whether it would be ill-timed to visit the congregations where he has not yet been, for example Allen County. He intends to do this if the Telegraph will publish the line of demarcation. He will set out Monday or Tuesday for a new visit to Van Wert County. From there he will go to Allen County if Purcell thinks this proper. This letter commenced before Christmas he has been able to finish only this morning. He will be gone nearly six weeks and on his return will write to Rome. Purcell's wish in regard to the visit of certain localities will be make known to him by the Telegraph. Father (Louis) DeBoesbriand is on the missions. Father (M) Caron is busy with his seminarians. Both are well.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - (French) - {6}


1849 Jan. 3
Kindekens, Father P(eter): Detroit, (Michigan)
 to Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere: Detroit, Michigan)

Having been assigned to St. Anne's Church and finding residence there vexing because of the continual arguments, Kindekens asks (Lefevere) to permit him to leave there as soon as possible and to transfer to another mission.

III-2-h - A.L.S. - (Latin) - 1p. - 8vo. - {2}


1849 Jan. 4
Abbadie, S.J., Father J(ohn) F(rancis): St. Michael, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc: N(ew) Orleans, (Louisiana)

He had hoped to receive today the reply to his questions of last Sunday. In case his letter was not received here is what he asked: 1. Someone wishes to buy one or two of the little houses back of the church. Can he sell them? 2. Mr. Pieron is going to cultivate part of their land. Instead of letting him build could Abbadie move the house where Mrs. Jacob is now? 3. Mr. Welham will cede the roadway provided they give him a watch which Father Ladavière left. Abbadie asks Blanc to reply and also to indicate whether he approves of the attached account. (On the same paper is the) account of St. Michael with Blanc up to January, 1851. All was arranged between Blanc and Father (John Baptist Léon) Maisounabe, (S.J.) provided they pay the convent $1000 for the church land. (Amounts are given for payments to painters, carpenters, etc.) Are things to remain the same as under Abbadie's predecessors, giving a fixed salary of $600 and giving the Bishop the rest or was it agreed between Blanc and Maisounabe that the pastor would give Blanc $500 a year and keep the rest?

V-5-k - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 4to. - {6}


1849 Jan. 4
Henry, J(ea)n: Plaquemine, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

Blanc's letter of December 16 was received this morning so he could not comply with the intent of the letter. He asks Blanc to let him know his latest decision. Blanc's letter was two days later then the last one from Father (Napoleon Joseph) Perché, dated the 14th. Henry needs to attach himself to something stable; he needs to give himself to God.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {2}


1849 Jan. 4
Wederstrandt, John Blake: St. Francisville, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

Father (John M.) Delcros, (C.M.) informed him yesterday that he had received a letter from Blanc in which he alluded to one written to Wederstrandt whose answer had not reached Blanc. It was not through his neglect that Blanc did not receive a reply to his favor of December 5. 1848. He reiterates the information in relation to Mr. McKnight: "a man of that name lived 8 or 9 years ago in this parish; he married a widow named Ball with several children. After she married McKnight she had a daughter, now about 12 who lives with her half-brother, Dr. William Ball, a druggist in Bayou Sara. McKnight left his widow almost destitute. William and Imma Ball have supported her and the child since. The mother died last year. If McKnight had any property it must be in Ireland or some other place; he was a laborer here. His death was caused by his stepson who killed him when McKnight in a fit of drunkenness threatened to kill his wife. H. McMahon of Livonia is a relative of McKnight." Wederstrandt thanks Blanc for sending Delcros to them. Delcros is staying this week at Wederstrandt's father's where he says Mass every morning. Next week he goes to Jackson. He is much liked by all. So far they have escaped the cholera. Wederstrandt hopes soon to give some favorable news from Delcors' moves toward getting their chapel started.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 4to. - {7}


1849 Jan. 5
Fay(?), Father C.: Montreal, (Canada)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

It was only today that Fay could get the information to reply. They read in the papers that the cholera has made great ravages in (Blanc)'s diocese. They regretted very much the loss of Father Gardette. Fay saw J(ea)n B(aptis)te Plessis Belair, husband of Antoinette Bedford; he lives in a neighboring parish at the home of his brother. He regrets being separated from his wife. If he knew that she wanted to return here he would go after her, or if she returned herself he would receive her with open arms. She would be well received in Montreal by her uncles, her Aunt Saucier, or her sister in Bytown. Fay does not believe her marriage is null as she gave (Blanc) to understand. She married at 21; her husband was 42; but she was brought up with him and knew he was a good Christian. She once said that she married only to please her Aunt Saucier. Saucier said she had not forced her at all. Having nothing to do in her house, Antoinette thinks too much about herself and misbehaves. She has made the acquaintance of Mr. Benoit. Her husband is 63, she is 41, but he is in perfect health.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {6}


1849 Jan. 5
Grandeler, Father (Christopher): Danville and Nashville, Ohio
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He answers Purcell's of Dec. 1. He sees from the letter that Purcell is aroused against him. As to the woman with him in Cincinnati she is the lady who was his cook while he was a cure in Europe and has come in all honor to America in the same capacity. He knows that in Cincinnati his having her with him easily gave rise to evil interpretations and that Purcell justly reports the reflections that were brought to him. Purcell can look again at his last German testimonial from the dean of his district to see what his conduct had been as cure. His sacerdotal honor is concerned there for which he is aroused, and for which he would not accept $200 of annual rent. He assures Purcell of the sincerity of his conversion. As to the astonishment of the Germans at Newark, that he seemed to hold Protestants in the same esteem as Catholics, his speech has not been understood. He regards himself rather as St. John on the Jordan speaking to all who come to him. Because he spoke of the true devotion of non-Catholics who came to hear the word of God, he believed he made Purcell a holy atonement but Purcell feels hurt by it. He perceives that he and Purcell will never agree and he therefore gives back to Purcell whatever powers he has given him. He has never been punished by his ecclesiastical authority and does not wish to be in his old age, He will live an honest priest firmly attached to the Holy Father saying the Holy Mass in his own house.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - (French) - {4}


(18)49 Jan. 5
Landry, R.S.C.J. Madame T(elcide): Natchitoches,(Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans Louisiana)

Sister received the letters (Blanc) sent and she gave them to Father (Joseph) Giustiniani, (C.M.). She would have replied sooner expect for the death of Madame Dutour, R.S.C.J.) who died the first of the year. Their little house continues to go well. Giustiniani is devoted to them and everyone seems satisfied. Mother has sent them Madame Ory (R.S.C.J.) and Sister Lavergne but they have only two American teachers. They pray that peace will be restored to their church.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {6}


1849 Jan. 7
Barron, Bishop Edward: Mobile, Ala(bama)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Barron trusts that the Almighty will spare (Blanc) all his priests under the present epidemic. Here cases of the cholera have been extremely few. There was a report that some cases had found their way to Spring Hill but this was not true. Bishop (Michael) Portier left yesterday to see a sick person at Tuscaloosa. He expects to be back about the 16th. Since Barron has been in Mobile the weather has been rainy. Father J.M. Portier, who is in Havana, is declared to be in the second stage of consumption. Barron expects an important letter addressed to (Blanc)'s care and asks him to address him at Mobile. He asks to be remembered to Fathers Rousselon, Mascaroni, Sanson, etc.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {3}


1849 Jan. 7
(Byrne), Bishop Andrew: Little Rock, (Arkansas)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Within the last week, (Byrne) has refused to marry a couple who probably will attempt to deceive one of Blanc's clergymen. The parties are John Gracie and Mrs. Joseph who has been only a few months divorced from her husband. The husband now lives in Philadelphia. (On the back of the letter in another hand): Boot-maker W(illia)m Hogan married to Helene Murphy. Father Weelher knows S(iste)r(?) Murphy of St. Louis.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {5}


1849 Jan. 7
(Odin), Bishop J(ohn) M(ary): Galveston, (Texas)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Not knowing the address of Father (F. Charles Boutelou de) St. Aubin, (Odin) asks Rousselon to address the enclosed letter to him. Mrs. Giraud who brings this letter, is asked to give him 35 cents for postage. If Rousselon sees Mr. Méridier he is to send direct to Rousselon the numbers of the Propagation for the priests of Texas. Sister St. Stanislas (Truchet, R.U.) was a little indisposed at the beginning of the year; today she has recovered. Father (Richard) Hennesy, (C.M.) had a new attack of fever but the doctor succeeded in breaking it. P.S. They received the ordos; how many Masses are they to say.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {6}


1849 Jan. 8
Lloyd, Henry: New York, New York
 to O(restes) A. Brownson: (Boston, Massachusetts)

He acknowledges that he was to blame while agent for the "Review' in New York, but because of domestic difficulties and the want of fortitude to bear up against them he was taken sick. Before going to the hospital one Dunigan promised to care for the agency and return it to him when he came from the hospital. When he did leave the hospital, Dunigan sent him to O'Flaherty who said he had nothing to do with it. He sees no other remedy now than to ask Brownson for the return of the agency and throws himself upon Brownson's Christian charity for another chance.

I-3-i - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {1}


1849 Jan. 8
Montgomery, O.P., Father Charlws: Zanesville, Ohio
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Purcell is already aware that a difference has existed between Father (George) Wilson and Mr. James Kinsley concerning the stone work of St. Thomas' Church of this place. Montgomery writes now to give Purcell a full knowledge of the whole affair. When the church was about to be commenced Mr. Kinsley put in his bid for the stone work. He induced Father Wilson to believe that he had plenty of money and that he could build a considerable portion of it on his own resources, and that he would wait some time for a considerable amount of what might be coming to him after the work should be completed. An article or agreement was then made specifying the kind of work, the time within which it should be finished, and the price. Shortly after the work commenced they discovered that Mr. Kinsley was greatly in debt for property purchased some time before. He received pay for his work as it progressed, and in order to try and save some of the property for which he owed several thousand dollars, they advanced $1500 all at once, which together with what they had already paid him was sacrificed after all. The time for finishing the whole had expired, and the walls were scarcely up far enough for the roof when winter set in, leaving the church in a ruinous condition. The church sustained a great loss by Kinsley's failure to complete the work according to the time specified in the contract. The work was measured by two men appointed for the purpose and Father Wilson paid Kinsley near a $1000 more than the work he had done came to. Mr. Kinsley still insisted on having more. Father Wilson, for peace and to avoid further trouble, offered him $1500 more, which Kinsley refused and threatened to put the matter in court. To avoid scandal Father Wilson proposed to submit the matter to arbitration to which Kinsley agreed. In case of disagreement a third man, was to act as umpire. After hearing the testimony, they disagreed in their judgment, the one offering $1500 and the other demanding $2500. Father Wilson's arbitrator offered $1500 merely for the sake of peace; on the evidence given he could not award anything to Kinsley. Mr. McCaddon was called in as umpire. He transcended his authority as umpire, threw aside what had been done, called in additional testimony, which he misconstryed, and awarded over $3500 to Kinsley. They (Montgomery and Wilson) called on McCaddon and remonstrated on the illegality of his whole proceedings. McCaddon acknowledged his error and immediately informed Kinsley of it. Kinsley agreed to throw off $700. So incredible does the above appear that Montgomery encloses an exact copy of McCaddon's letter in which he declares that on the evidence given he could not award anything to Kinsley, that he overstepped his authority as umpire, and that Kinsley is not entitled to the amount of the award which McCaddon had previously made. (A copy of his letter follows.) Father Wilson has now paid Kinsley nearly $4000 more than what his contract called for. Kinsley demands the whole award and refuses to throw off anything, grounding his refusal on a conversation he says he had with Purcell. Montgomery asks for an answer.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 8vo. - {3}


1849 Jan. 8
Nota, Father L(eonard): Loretto, Marion Co(unty) K(entucky)
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: Cincinnati, Ohio

He expresses his greetings of the season and his gratitude for Purcell's letter. Had he not at the same time received a similar letter from Bishop (John Martin) Spalding he would not have any choice but to accept Purcell's invitation. However, acting on the advice of friends he thinks he should remain in Kentucky because he is too well known in Cincinnati and because there is need for a priest to be chaplain to the nuns of Loretto and to take care of the small neighboring missions. Bishop Spalding wrote to him as soon as he heard that Nota was leaving the Jesuits, expressing the invitation of old Bishop (Benedict Joseph) Flaget that he remain. However, Nota asks, if possible, that Purcell regard him as lent to the diocese of Kentucky until such time as Kentucky can spare him when he would be free to go to Cincinnati. He sends his regards to the priests of Purcell's household.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {5}


1849 Jan. 8
Whelan, Richard Vincent, Bp. Richmond: Wheeling, Virginia
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Whelan regrets that Purcell should have listened to the tattle of Moore and Lane and that it should have been encouraged by promises of interference. Whelan's course towards the Sisters of Charity at the Mountain, at St. Joseph's and in Richmond should have been presumptive evidence of the propriety of his course here. As the special superior and confessor of the community here, Whelan is frequently called on. Their rule forbids them to locate where they cannot get such spiritual and temporal advice. The privation of such aid would have been most keenly felt by the Sisters. Whelan has been governed by a conscientious sense of duty in his intercourse with them. With a few exceptions he has never visited them without business or taken a meal in their house unless his engagements there interferred with his hours for meals at home. This happened frequently as confessions were heard in the evenings so as not to interfere with classes. Whelan has always approached the convent with reluctance and was desirous of diminishing his intercourse with it. He would give up the confessions if it were found that it could be done without disadvantage. Hence Purcell's countenancing the complaints has wounded him deeply. Circumstances connected with his brother's visit here last Spring led to Whelan's relinquishment of former habits of intimacy with the families of Mrs. Moore and Mrs. Lane. They attributed it to the coming of the nuns and circulated such reports. If any remarks have been made by Protestants here is the only source. They had the impudence to make a formal complaint to the Archbishop of Whelan's having ceased to visit them. Whelan trusts that the subject be now entirely dropped. As regards the housekeepers, Whelan would prefer the most tidy and cleanly in her habits. Purcell should make the selection on this ground. The wages are poor $5 or $6 a month. Whelan asks him to send her on immediately. He sends his regards to Father David (Whelan) and all the clergy.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {4}


1849 Jan. 9
Smulders, C.SS.R., Father E(gidius): Monroe, (Michigan)
 to Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefev(e)re: Detroit, Michigan

Although Lefevere has given him the faculty to dispense from the impediment of disparity of worship, Smulders does not believe that it is always prudent, to use it especially when he considers the terrible consequences of these marriages there for he knows that if he begins to grant it a crowd of others will follow. John Mary Beaubien of Swan Creek (Michigan) was married before a magistrate; Smulders pronounced the excommunication three times following Lefevere's orders. It seems that a girl from the same place has done the same thing; when Smulders has the necessary information he will announce the excommunication in the same way. Mary Jane Philips of Irish parents is in Detroit or is to go there to be married by Lefevere or some priest in Detroit. Her parents rightly oppose it and would rather see her dead than marry a Protestant. Smulders has talked to her in the presence of her father but believes that an outright refusal would avert this disaster. Another couple presented themselves to receive the dispensation. Smulders refused them and since the Catholic party cannot write, he consented to write for her the following: Mary Cane, Catholic, desiring to marry Isaac Stoner, infidel, asks a dispensation for various reasons listed. Smulders asks a reply before next Sunday. He is greatly embarrassed by debts and fears to be called before the judge and begs Lefevere to aid him. If possible one of their priests will come next Monday for the rest of the money from the (Association for the) Propagation (of the Faith). He thanks Lefevere for the new directory and asks permission to add the Collect for the Pope to the Mass. The Fathers, Brothers, Sisters and students send their greetings. In a postscript Smulders adds that just as he was finishing the letter the father of Mary Jane Philipps came to tell him that she seemed determined to marry a Protestant.

III-2-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 8vo. - {7}


1849 Jan. 9
Chaigneau, A(lexan)dre(?) L(oui)s: Pont Breaux, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

He renews the request made by Father (F.) Legrand for the obligation made in Blanc's name by Father (L.) Dufour amounting to $250 and due the first of this month for the bill of sale of the land for the church. It is to be sent through Legrand.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {3}


1849 Jan. 9
Van de Velde, S.J., Bishop-elect J(ames Oliver): St. Louis, M(iss)o(uri)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Blanc will have already learned that Van de Velde has been appointed to the see of Chicago. After struggling to rid himself of this burden he has finally yielded to the will of God indicated by the sentiments not only of Cardinal Fransoni and the two Archbishops of the United States but by the judgment of all those he has consulted. He hopes Blanc will join his prayers that God may give him the graces necessary to a life so different from the one he has led for almost 32 years. His consecration will take place here on the 11th of next month. The Archbishop has set the ceremony at this time so that Van de Velde might invite Blanc and the Bishop of Mobile to assist.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {1}


1849 Jan. 9
(Kenrick), Archbishop Peter Richard: St. Louis, (Missouri)
 to Father E(tienne) Rousselon: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

He has received the 120 ordos for 1849 through Mr. Laurenson and 75 Masses have been said. Father (Francis) Cellini died last Saturday. He was the oldest priest in the diocese, esteemed by all.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {3}


1849 Jan. 10
Barthe, Father E(dward): Houma, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Messrs. Frost and Springer, in the coming week, will have finished the brick work on the church. Their work is far superior to the old. Father (Charles M.) Menard, the pastor, who saw it yesterday, found it satisfactory. Barthe does not need to remind Blanc that the first payment will de due February first. He has seen Father (Hyacinthe) Tumoine; his illness is very serious; it will be a great loss as he is a good priest.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {6}


1849 Jan. 10
Lockett, H(enry): New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Sale for account of Henry Lockett, pew No. 8 in St. Patrick's church as per plan and act before F.R. Canas dated January 22, 1842. Sold to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc for $605. Signed by J.A.(?) Beard, for Beard, Calhoun and Company. (Lockett adds that) on January 10, 1849 he received from Blanc $547.75 being the full amount of the above adjudication, less two years ground rent due by Lockett of $48; and the discount of $9.25.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - 1p. - 4to. - {3}


1849 Jan. 10
(Smith, S.C.), Sister Regina: (New Orleans, Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

This morning she missed seeing Blanc. She wanted to show him a letter from Sister Lor(r)etta, (S.C.) which she now incloses (no enclosure). She also wanted to ask whether they could make their retreat this month. They would all be glad to have Father Perché. Some time ago Loretta wrote to get her some lime, etc. Regina got what she wanted on credit but some of the bills have come in and it will amount to $35 or $40. She dislikes to call on Blanc but since she made her last remittance to St. Joseph's, she has no money. She received a letter today from Sister Loyola, (S.C.) who sends respects. Sister Generosa, (S.C.) is in Detroit; she feels the cold and does not like the snow.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {4}


1849 Jan. 10
Vandevelde, S.J., Father James: St. Louis, Missouri
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

After an unsuccessful struggle Vandevelde decided to accept the appointment to the see of Chicago. The earnest entreaties of Cardinal Fransoni and the Archbishop of Baltimore made him distrust his own judgment, biased as he was by his attachment to the Society (Jesuits) and his friends and companions from early youth. Two impartial divines decided that he would be resisting the will of God if he did not accept. Vandevelde asks for prayers that he may obtain the grace and strength necessary to carry the burden. He asks Purcell to be the Assistant Bishop at the Consecration, which is to take place the 11th of next month. The Rev. Father Provincial requests Purcell to take up his residence at the University. Next Sunday was chosen by Father (Maurice) De St. Palais for his consecration at Vincennes. The Archbishop of St. Louis cannot attend and it is doubtful whether Bishops Spalding and Miles will be there. In that case De St. Palais will come to St. Louis to be consecrated with Vandevelde.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {6}


1849 Jan. 10
Verhaegen, S.J., Father P(eter) J.: St. Joseph College, (Bardstown, Kentucky)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

The temporal affairs of their new college demand that Father (John) Duerinck, (S.J.) make a trip to the South. Most of the people who owe them money live there because of the contract they made with the former administration of the College. It is very important to collect all they can as it is certain their losses will be considerable. Blanc sees his present position, master of a school. At his age, a peaceful retreat would have more charms. He is resigned to this forced choice.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {3}


1849 Jan. 10
Boué, Father: Lyons, (France)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Extraordinary occupations have not left him time to breathe. Since the beginning of September they have had a new city administration. When the constitution was proclaimed the mayor invited the Cardinal to sing a Te Deum at the city hall. The Bureau of Charity was organized and Boué is a member; the number of poor has doubled. But confidence has not been restored; the great losses complicate the situation. The majority who brought Napoleon to the presidency have made a step toward order. But the Montagnards and all who succumbed in the election are united in opposition. Boué does not believe the Pope will leave the environs of Naples, although the papers often speak of his arrival in France. All the family is well but (Blanc)'s brothers complain of his long silence. He has not replied to the letters Father Rousselon brought. His nephew, Victor (Blanc) was ordained subdeacon; he will make a good priest. His young brother, (Blanc)'s godson, is of an age to begin his education. They hope that being finished with Victor, (Blanc) would help his godson. Boué sends greetings to Father Rousselon and Tève.

V-5-k - A.L.S. and Envelope - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {2}


1849 Jan. 11
Dufour, Father L(ouis): Paris, (France)
 to Father (Stephen Rousselon: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Dufour wrote the Bishop 10 days ago. Since then a letter from St. Martin saying that Judge Simon, in order to send the money for Dufour's slave, was waiting for the paper he had given him. Rousselon is to take the money. He is also to write to Mr. Dumartray (Adrien Dumartrait?) to send the money which he and Valsaint(?) have received for him and send it all together. He has nothing to add to the letter he wrote the Bishop. Here everyone is concerned with the affairs of the pope.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 8vo. - {4}


1849 Jan. 12
Blin, Father J.E.: Charenton, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

On his last visit to Pat(t)erson Blin had to perform mixed marriage without publication of banns because the parties did not let him know until after the Mass. He faithfully discharged the commission about the funds for an assistant. Franklin, after proposing room and perhaps board and even money, gave him no response. Paterson, on the contrary, is always full of good will. Despite their poverty, they have promised whatever is left from the pew rent after fencing the land, perhaps 100 piastres. But the need for a priest who knows English is felt very much. Almost all here speak that language and many who know no other are only waiting a means to return to the Catholic religion. The most zealous preacher of the place has just announced his departure. One of his pupils has just made his First Communion and three others are asking for the same. Franklin is far from making such progress. He confesses he has neglected it because he cannot speak English and there is no place for Mass. There is no other school for the young ladies except that of the Episcopal minister. His church is the ornament of the town. Their subscription amounts to 1000 piastres. However, he believes that a priest with influence could do much. Blin has dismissed his negress but will keep Patrick. One must live frugally. Four funerals, and he must share with Father Priour, and three marriages, that is all.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 12mo. - {3}


1849 Jan. 12
Keely, Patrick C.: Brooklyn, (New York)
 to Bishop (John) McCloskey: Albany, (New York)

The agents of the quarry state that they got another protest about Troy stone. Keely has sent the trustees 18 sheets of new drawing for the full completion of St. Peter's Church, (Troy, New York). Keely would like to have the carving of the window heads done for the Cathedral (of the Immaculate Conception, Albany, New York). He thinks he could have them done for twenty dollars each, which is very cheap. He thinks they may build the pillars in the same way as at Newport, Rhode Island. Keely wishes McCloskey would send a perspective of the Cathedral.

I-1-i - A.L.S.(Photostat from Archdiocesan Archives of New York) - 2pp. - 8vo. - {3}


1849 Jan. 13
Duffel, Albert (and others): Ascension Parish, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

The trustees of Ascension, having learned that Father (John) Boullier, (C.M.) has received orders from his Superiors which would take him out of the diocese, they believe that his recall is not desired by (Blanc) and ask him to be their mediator so that they may keep him in their parish. They have heard (Blanc) proclaim in their pulpit, the good reputation of their parish. This is the result of the labors of their worthy pastor. (Signing with Duffel are): Edward Duffel, P.G. Dannequin, Narcisse Landry, G. Gaudier, and William H. Atkinson.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {8}


1849 Jan. 14
Mina, Father Ve. M(odest)e: St. John Baptist (German Coast, Louisiana)
 to Father E(tienne) Rousselon: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Joseph Jouzanne wishes to marry Célina Bourgeois and ask for a dispensation from relationship.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {3}


1849 Jan. 14
O'Regan, Father P.D.: Presbytery Cove, Ireland
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

O'Regan recalls that Purcell directed the late Father Collins to make inquiries about the heirs of a man named Oliver Shea who died intestate and who had an illegitimate chold named Margaret and that Purcell had this information from some gentleman who either was himself left the money or who could obtain it for Shea's heirs. When O'Regan ascertained the legal representatives of Shea, he told them that Purcell would give them such information as would enable them to obtain the money which was about $200. The relatives of Shea are excellent characters and in need of the money. Here are the facts: the deceased went to America about 23 years ago, was then unmarried but had an illegitimate chold. He had two brothers, Michael and Jeremiah, and a sister, Ellen. Michael had two sons named Owen and Timothy. Jeremiah had one sone, Michael. Ellen had three children, still living, as are the nephews and his daughter. O'Regan hopes that the relatives in Ireland will abide by O'Neil's distribution of the money. The prospects of Ireland are melancholy. The poor are dying in numbers. The farmers are going to America. Last week saw several executions in the mansions of some of the wealthy.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {3}


1849 Jan. 15
Barron, Bishop-Elect Edward: Mobile, Alabama
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

According to a letter from Bishop Blanc, there are some letters at the postoffice in New Orleans for Barron. One is very important; he fears it may be lost or returned to Washington. He asks Rousselon to send them in care of Bishop Portier if they are still there.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {1}


1849 Jan. 15
Dalloz, Father Ch(arles): (Cocoville, Louisiana?)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Blanc) is perhaps surprised that Dalloz has not yet obeyed his order to break with his trustees. At the Christmas Mass, Dalloz asked them to meet the following Saturday. They paid no attention and on December 31, Dalloz announced that he was leaving. The same day cholera broke out and he thought (Blanc) would not be dissatisfied if he stayed while the epidemic lasted. Now that the danger is past, he will try for a meeting on January 17. If they do not come he will announce his departure. He saw by Miss Générès' face that she had learned something on the subject at the bishop's house but he did not read there that she had told her parents and that they had held the chapter. She came in tears and wanted Dalloz to promise he would not leave. He replied that priests must obey their bishops. Edward (Générès?) learned about it from his wife and told at Marksville that the Bishop was going to retire Dalloz because no one paid him. From there he went to Bayou-des-Glaises with the same rumor. Some say Dalloz is going to California to seek a fortune. Old Générès blames Dalloz for not seeing that he was paid for baptisms and marriages. Dalloz has performed many for them but received only thanks. The Générès family, in two secret meetings, tried to reunite the trustees. Dalloz is opposed as they will do him as much harm as they did Father (Etienne) Chartier. No one any longer believes the family nor Edward; they are blabbers. Dalloz told him a pastor could not stay until there were trustees, but the people hate them. They say the church should belong to the Bishop, that they want a pastor. The proceeds amount annually to 12 to 1500 piastres; the pastor would rely on the bishop for the temporal and soon they could buy the house and beautify the church.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {4}


1849 Jan. 15
Elmsley, J.: Toronto, Canada
 to (Orestes A.) Brownson: Boston, Massachusetts

A stranger to Brownson, he addresses him as a parent on the subject of Catholic Colleges. Brownson, in his article in the January, 1846, "Review", states that he has sent his four boys to Jesuit colleges, and Elmsley coincides with his expression that "science, literature, the most varied and profound scholastic attainments, are more than useless, where coupled with hersy, infidelity or impiety". He feels quite free in relying on Brownson's judgement and intends send - his twelve year old son to Holy Cross. Not remembering whether or not the College in Worcester was Jesuit or not, its exclusion of every non-Catholic recommended it to him, since that is his notion of what a college should be. Indifferentism and tepidity, in religion are the natural and almost certain attendants upon mixed schools. He should prefer his son's being illiterate rather than without a religious foundation; although Worcester has claimed his special preference, he has resolved to take Brownson's advice in the selection of a Jesuit College. Brownson is an "Apostle in these latter days", and his pen is the most powerful weapon of offence and defence in the cause of Faith which has appeared in any language and from his seed the Lord will grant an abundant harvest in his own good time.

I-3-i - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {1}


1849 Jan. 15
Menet, S.J., Father, J(ohn) B(aptist): Sault Ste. Marie, (Michigan)
 to Bishop P(eter) P(aul) Lefev(e)re: Detroit, Michigan

Menet writes about an urgent marriage case that has troubled him for the last three days. How he wishes the distances were shorter as they are when navigation is open. The contracting parties want the banns published tomorrow and to be dispensed from the other two banns. Otherwise they seemed to have the right dispositions. However, on questioning them he found that they are cousins of the third degree and he does not have the faculties to dispense from this. The couple was greatly disappointed. Menet fears a scandal, bad example, a civil marriage, etc. He at last persuaded them to await Lefevere's dispensation. He will publish the banns next Sunday announcing the impediment from which there must be a dispensation from the bishop. Menet hopes that Lefevere will not refuse it. He writes by way of Canada because a courier is leaving today or tomorrow and it will be the first of February before one leaves from this side. He will write again by that route for fear the other may fail. It is trying that winter makes communication so difficult. It is for Lefevere to judge whether it is opportune to extend their powers in urgent cases at least in winter or even in summer. They are extended on the other side but he cannot use them in favor of those who live on this side. Menet no longer has the expense sheet for dispensations in this diocese. Because of the poverty of the inhabitants, he would be glad if the fees were kept down as much as possible, those for whom he writes are not rich. Their submission in this case has made them sad. Menet hopes that Lefevere will have regard for their obedience which will serve, he believes, to repair former scandals. He awaits a satisfactory answer which he has led them to hope for.

III-2-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {1}


1849 Jan. 15
Paris, Father A. S(imon): St. Louis, (Missouri)
 to Father E(tienne) Rousselon: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Paris received the letter telling him of the wine Rousselon sent for Father (Augustin) Ravoux by his brother. Not receiving the letter, Paris thought it was sent for their use by some one in New Orleans. He will write to Ravoux that he will send him something as soon as navigation is open; the good missionary will lose nothing.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {2}


1849 Jan. 15
(Purcell), Bishop J(ohn) B(aptist): Dayton, (Ohio)
 to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Blanc's ever grateful and (Purcell)'s first ordained, Father H(enry) D. Juncker, with whom (Purcell) is sojourning after dedicating the new church of St. Joseph yesterday, furnishes him with paper to reply to Blanc's favor. Polk, the pseudo-episcopus, will never learn from (Purcell) that "Gibraltar's" vainglorious abortion is a vagabond to boot. (Purcell) asks God to spare Blanc and his clergy in their devotion in attending those sick of cholera. He hopes Sisters Regina and Serena are safe. At the request of Eugene Giraud, (Purcell) has directed their principal bell-founder, Mr. Coffin, to communicate with Giraud. Father (James Ignatius?) Mullon's father has just been to see (Purcell). A Mexican family from Puebla came to Cincinnati with the American army. The head of the family, a German Catholic, had attracted the jealousy of the Mexican authorities and seemed likely to expose them to oppression if they remained in Mexico. A young woman lately visited the house of a Captain Lowe, of Batavia, and on her return she informed (Purcell) that Lowe showed her, between the pages of a book, a consecrated Host he had brought from Mexico. (Purcell) and Father (James Frederick) Wood immediately started for Batavia where he was presented by the son, in the absence of his father, who was dining with Judge Fishback, his father-in-law, with a Church of England prayer book in which was the Host. (Purcell) consumed it on the spot. Lowe came home and though disconcerted, received them politely. He said a Mexican officer was mortally wounded and as the priest was taking the Sacrament to him a shell tore the carriage to pieces and killed the priest. An English lieutenant, Jamison, picked up the Host and gave it to Lowe. Can Blanc learn anything of the death of a Mr. Fagin from Cincinnati, who died a few weeks ago at New Orleans and who was brought to Cincinnati for interment in their cemetery. He was worth 20 or $30,000 and it is reported he intended to leave his property to the Church. A lawsuit was lately decided against (Purcell) for property bought by Bishop (Edward Dominic) Fenwick, 17 years ago, for $1700, for which he got a defective deed. The property is now worth upwards of $60,000. A wealthy Catholic has just made (Purcell) a conveyance of property worth $2100 to go towards the endowment of his seminary.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 4to. - {12}


1849 Jan. 17
McCaffrey, Father John W.:
Mt. St. Mary's College, (Emmitsburg, Maryland)
 to O(restes) A. Brownson:

He has read the last "Review" and has found nothing with which to differ with Brownson, particularly in the article on Ireland. From the declamations of repealers, and from Parliamentary discussions he had gathered, contrary to what Brownson alleged that the English has less legal power to oppress his tenantry than the Irish. He merely wants to prevent the repetition of an error which sophistry might turn to its advantage. He contradicts Brownson's allegation that the oppresion of the Catholic religion has been abolished by the Catholic Relief Bill. Even this bill itself contains some new penal laws. He agrees with Brownson, and has taught for years, that constitutions grow, are not made, and that governments derive their powers from God, not from those governed. An admirer of O'Connell, he finds much to condemn in him, and fears that the evil results of his course may outweigh the good. He sees little hope for Ireland except in the downfall of England. English Catholics are nerveless, English Protestants heartless toward the Celt. Irishmen themselves unreasonable. If any good can be done, now is the time, and Brownson is on the track. He thanks Brownson for the declaration in Bishop Hughes Pronunciamento that the cry of liberty is a nuisance. The editor of and contributors to these various papers: in New York, "The People", to be conducted by the Irish Yankee Robinson, "The Nation", by T.D. Magee, the "Boston Pilot", and "N.Y. Truthteller" are men of wrong opinions and bad principles; they are to be avoided for the evils they will do (in the cause of liberty). He cannot understand how Brownson can affect to hope any good from them. He cannot understand the phrase "a miserable demagogue alleges she is antidemocratic". The Church is neither democratic nor antidemocratic. All good men must thank Brownson for dragging Socialism into the light. Bulwer is infected throughout with Socialism, and Dickens is helping the bad cause. Nearly all recent poetry is in the devil's service. He is overwhelmed with his occupations of President, professor, and pastor; and if Brownson or any of his friends wish to review McSherry's "History of Maryland", they are to do so. (James McSherry graduated from there and has lent his talents freely to religion. (George H.) Miles is at work for Brownson and is obedient. This argument strikes him as useful: what do we obey when we obey the law? Not the law, or the magistrate, or the will of the majority, or the parchment, but the will of God. Governments derive their power then, not from the will of the governed, but from the will of God. He asks if there is any flaw. As the name democracy is a name of power and a name dear to many, it is to be touched prudently when Brownson execrates it. The religion of most Protestants in the section is that God should protect them, and by so doing, he is doing merely His duty. Otherwise, they wish to have little to do with him and go to Church merely to satisfy the women, or to promote some personal end. They keep the dol religious names, Methodists, Presbyterians - but acknowledge that all religions are alike. There is a sprinkling of pure (religions) infidelity. They imitate New England: let her move in the right direction, and they will certainly profit by her movement.

I-3-i - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 8vo. - {8}


1849 Jan. 18
Harrt, Father William: New York, (New York)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

At the request of Thomas McCluskey he addresses these lines to Blanc. His son, Bernard McCluskey, died lately in New Orleans of cholera. He possessed some property and was in partnership with Hugh Donnelly who wrote to request his father to appoint a person to settle his affairs. His father asks that Blanc appoint some lawyer.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - 1p. - 4to. - {4}


1849 Jan. 18
Montgomery, O.P., Father Charles P.: Zanesville, Ohio
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Montgomery is sorry that his letter of the 8th should have given Purcell pain. His motive was to give Purcell a full account of the case. With regard to the "complaints" Montgomery may have made against Purcell on the subject whilst at Rome, he is not aware that he made any unjust or unkind remarks. An exact copy of Kinsley's certificate follows, in which he states that Purcell insisted that he (Kinsley) should sue the Dominicans for his claim. Here follows a note signed by Purcell in which he asks Kinsley to read the above letter and send it back after stating whether it is true. (Kinsley's letter follows on the same page, dated Jan. 22, 1849.) Kinsley does not doubt that the certificate is correct though he may have been wrong in signing it. When it was presented for his signature, it was with the view of justifying the Fathers in agreeing to a settlement on other vasis than what the written contract called for. It was represented that there would be complaints made by the people if they paid Kinsley more than the contract entitled him to. He did not understand what he signed. Kinsley was frank in saying to the Fathers that he had Purcell's sanction for urging his claim. (Signed J. Kinsley)

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {3}


1849 Jan. 18
(Odin), Bishop J(ohn) M(ary): Galveston, (Texas)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

He wishes Blanc a happy New Year. The two young Irish postulants will leave tomorrow to go to the Ursulines of New Orleans. Madame Ste. Claire, (R.U.) has consented to receive them. (Odin) has not yet received a reply from Rome for the letters he sent last July. Cardinal Fransoni's long silence embarrasses (Odin) greatly. Many new towns are springing up on the Rio Grande. They ask for priests but as (Odin) fears to usurp a jurisdiction which does not belong to him, he does not send them. Bible societies in all these new places and talk of building churches. Sooner or later the strip of land between the Nueces and Rio Grande will become part of Texas. He does not believe Congress can seriously be thinking of making it a territory. Texas laws are in force there and even before the war Corpus Christi was under the protection of their republic. Father (Eudald) Estany, (C.M.) visited this post quite regularly. Should (Odin) continue, in spite of Rome's silence and the controversy at Washington, to exercise jurisdiction over this part of the country? They say the priest at Laredo is a scandalous man. The Americans there have contempt for him. He hopes at the next council they will designate a bishop for New Mexico whether it belongs or not to Texas. It is impossible for (Odin) to provide for this new conquest; he has written to the Archbishop of Baltimore about this. (Odin) has seen that Bishop (John Joseph) Chanche has run a risk of losing his life at the hand of an assassin. Has he returned to the United States?

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {7}


1849 Jan. 19
Ménard, Father Ch(arle)s M.: Lafourche Interieure, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

According to Blanc's wish, and Father (Edward) Barthe's invitation, Ménard went to Houma last week to examine the work on the church. Everything seems acceptable. Barthe was to write the details to Blanc. Barthe is much esteemed. He will need the courage it takes to establish a parish and build a church. The church at Thibodaux progresses every day and they hope to rent the pews by Easter. This rent will help pay the carpenters who have consented to wait for payment until March 1850 and 1851. Although times are very hard Ménard has begun a new subscription and he dares say they may have their church ready without having debts. The carpenters' contract calls for their work to be done April 1. They have had only 7 or 8 isolated cases of cholera; 3 were the slaves of Mr. Key. But in the last 4 or 5 days it has appeared in several places. Amedée Tete it seems will lose 11 slaves. Father (Hyacinthe) Tumoine is much better since his return from the city. Next week Ménard will write about Mrs. A. Donand who wishes to have an orphan but Blanc is not to consider her because of religion.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {8}


1849 Jan. 20
Jessé, A(ntoine de): Lyons, (France)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

The treasurer of the Council of Paris has already informed Blanc that the Association of the Propagation of the Faith has appropriated to New Orleans 3,000 francs from the funds of 1848. Since, they have voted a new subsidy of 7800 francs for a total of 10,800. Of this Lyons will keep 4,000 which Blanc will receive from Father (Stephen) Rousselon whose letter of November 23 informed them that he had gathered this sum from the Associates at New Orleans. Payment rests with Mr. Choiselat, treasurer at Paris. Jessé signs as president.

V-5-k - L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {3}


1849 Jan. 20
McMaster, James Alphonsus: New York, New York
 to O(restes) A. Brownson: (Boston, Massachusetts)

He says he is very late in giving Brownson notice of the time that they hope to have him lecture. If Brownson can lecture on Thursday evening, Feb. 1st, they will be ready for him. They will go on the supposition that he will lecture on that evening. How well the lecture will succeed, he cannot promise. There have been so many excitements on foot lately, that it will be difficult to get up interest. He sends Brownson $8.00 which he has received for the "Review". He also sends a note for the "Catholic Observer". It encloses $2 from a friend of his for the "Observer". He asks that it be given to Mr. O'Brien.

I-3-i - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 12mo. - {2}


1849 Jan. 20
(Loras), Bishop Mathias: Dubuque, (Iowa)
 to Father E(tienne) Rousselon: New Orleans, Louisiana

(Loras) has received the 18 ordos; the 14 Mass intentions will be said. He sends his respects to Biahop Blanc.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 8vo. - {1}


1849 Jan. 20
Mina, Father Ve. M(odest)e: St. John Baptist, (German Coast, Louisiana)
 to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Ambroise Jouzanne wishes to marry Josephine Bourgeois, whose brother and sister were granted a dispensation this week, they ask for the same favor. P.S. Blanc is to have 25 Masses said; Mina will send the stipends at the first opportunity.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {3}


1849 Jan. 21
Dubuis, Father (Claude Marie): Castroville, (Texas)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

A German family left a child, now about 7 in New Orleans. The father, Ambroise Reitzer and Marguerite Manigolt left Marie with her uncle who afterwards died and the child was placed in an orphanage. The parents desire to have their daughter with them and ask for information about her. As soon as Dubuis receives a reply they will send the money to pay her passage to Labaca.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 8vo. - {3}


1849 Jan. 22
Léveque, R.S.C., Madame Louise: Grand Coteau, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, Louisiana

Blanc will have learned from Madame Landry of the death of Mother du Tour, (R.S.C.). They fear that Mother Lisa, (R.S.C.) will soon follow; she has had a fever for six weeks. Mother feels that a trip to St. Michael will do her good. She will be accompanied by Madame Murphy, (R.S.C.) who does not like Louisiana; outside of sending her to St. Louis, Léveque doubts if she will be any happier. Mother Lavy, (R.S.C.) has returned to Grand Coteau; it seems New York did not suit her. Their Mother spends herself for them especially for the novices. Their pupils have increased since vacation.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {5}


(18)49 Jan. 22
(Mudd, S.C.), Sister M(ary) Austin: (Donaldsonville, Louisiana)
 to (Bishop Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Blanc)'s letter of the 19th was received. They are ready to receive the postulant he has recommended. Their means are slender but sufficient. Their school brings a tolerable income. The classes must necessarily be neglected in the French department. Their French postulant seems determined to make the trial. She has a nervous irritability of temperament. etc.; she will write soon to her family. The novices turned out and nursed the cholera cases with much zeal and courage.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - 1p. - 16mo. - {1}


1849 Jan. 22
Rappe, (Louis) A(madeus), Bp.Cleveland: Tiffin, Ohio
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Rappe accepts the administration of Holmes County. If he has requested Purcell to interfere about Father (Christopher) Grandeler, it was because he thought that Purcell could be more useful. Rappe does not know Grandeler, but to prove to Purcell that he does not shrink from trouble he will fix the matter the best he can. Rappe told Purcell long ago that he (Rappe) was not the man for the job, but since it is done they must be patient and pray for one another. If Rappe has given offence, he will make amends.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {5}


1849 Jan. 23
Piers, Father B(artholomew): St. Peters's, Washington, Indiana
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

It appears by a letter purporting to be from Blanc, that a Father Ducoudray heretofore pastor in this locality, had died in New Orleans December 27. Moreover that a young lady named Judy Egan, formerly of this place, is now among the Sisters in New Orleans. She left Indiana two months ago. The letter bears almost evident marks of a counterfeit. Ducoudray left here with some share of suspicion emanating from his conduct with the lady. Piers asks for confirmation. Solution to these questions will obliterate a deal of infamy.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {3}


1849 Jan. 23
Rousselon, P(au)l: Paris, (France)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

He hopes his uncle has received his letter. The present one is only to send the duplicate of the bill for the box which will arrive by the same boat.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {1}


1849 Jan. 24
Delcros, C.M., Father J(ohn) M.: St. Francisville, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

On returning from Jackson where he is busy with building a church, Delcros found at Mr. Wederstrandt's a letter from Father (J.M.) Masnou, (C.M.) saying that Blanc disapproved of Delcros' having heard 4 or 5 confessions in the chapel before leaving for Bayou Sara. Here are the circumstances. Illness and bad weather made Delcros decide to wait for the Luna. He wanted to say Mass on Sunday and not being able to go elsewhere he went to the chapel. Several people asked him to hear their confessions. He approves Blanc's action but that of some of his confreres is mysterious for him. He has not asked authorization from Father (John) Boullier, (C.M.) for reasons he will explain if time does not do it. He cannot at present do anything for the church here, having decided to go to the city next Monday. However, if time permits he will see about some subscriptions. He stayed at Jackson a few days and the subscription has gone up to 590 piastres. He thinks they can count on 15 or 1600.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {5}


1849 Jan. 24
Greene, W(illiam) B.: Brookfield, Massachusetts
 to O(restes) A. Brownson: Boston, (Massachusetts)

He sends a copy of his "Remarks on Science of History". He asks how Brownson reconciles his remark, "There is an invincible logic in Society which pushes it to the realization of the last consequences of its principles", with the general tenor of his remarks against the logical character of history. He believes his own want of comprehension might be confusing this issue for him. He supposes that Brownson will call him a heretic; but, he believes and accepts all the Churchs' doctrines - as explained by himself. He excuses his writing as he does, but he has had so many plain talks with Brownson, that he always attempts to come to the point with Brownson. He realizes his philosophical and theological indebtedness to Brownson, and regrets that so wide a gulf separates them. But he hopes they both may get together again the the future. He sends his best wishes to Brownson and his family.

I-3-i - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {1}


1849 Jan. 24
Menet, S.J., Father J(ohn) B(aptist): Sault Ste. Marie, (Michigan)
 to Bishop P(eter) P(aul) Lefev(e)re: Detroit, Michigan

Following is the gist of the letter Menet addressed to Lefevere via Canada. "He wrote in an urgent case about a marriage. The contracting parties came on January 13 with the intention of marrying on Monday. When Menet questioned them he found they were related in the third degree and he does not have faculties from the Bishop to dispense in that degree. They were greatly disappointed. Menet fears a scandal, bad example, a civil marriage, etc. He at last persuaded them to wait, he told them he would publish the banns announcing the impediment for the dispensation of which he would have recourse to Lefevere as soon as possible. He hopes that Lefevere will not refuse it. He writes via Canada because a courier leaves today and it will be the first of February before one leaves on the American side. He will write again by that route for fear the other should fail. It is trying that winter makes communication so difficult. It is for Lefevere to judge whether it is opportune to extend their powers in urgent cases, at least in winter or even in summer. they are extended on the other side but he cannot make use of this for those who live on this side. He no longer has an expense sheet for dispensations but due to the poverty of the inhabitants he will be obliged if the fee is reduced to its simplest form and those for whom he writes are not rich. Their submission has been painful for them and he hopes that Lefevere will have regard for their obedience which will serve, he believes, in repairing previous scandals." This is the letter he wrote several days ago to Lefevere. In a postscript he adds that he takes the liberty to put in this same envelope a letter for Father (Nicholas) Point, (S.J.). Mr. MacKnight who gave Menet 25 lbs. of flour and $4.00 on the first of the year, will gladly take charge of it.

III-2-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {2}


1849 Jan. 25
Brownson, O(restes) A.: Boston, (Massachusetts)
 to Father J(eremiah) W. Cummings: (New York, New York)

He received a note from McMaster, telling him that the arrangement for his lecture was made for Thursday, Feb. 1. Shortly after, he received one from Cummings stating the arrangement was for either Feb. 12 or 13. He hardly knows which arrangement to consider, but since the last one came from Cummings he will regard the arrangement by McMaster as postponed. He can go to New York just as well on one of those days as the others. His subject will be "Religious Liberty". His own opinion is that Feb. 12 is the most convenient. But he asks him to fix the date himself and to let him know. He asks also that this note be shown to McMaster as it will serve as a reply to his note. Brownson asks that his respects be given to Cummings' Bishop, whom he is coming to love more and more. He hopes his health is good and that he has not turned his back on his humble "Review".

I-3-i - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {2}


1849 Jan. 25
Figari, (C.M.), Father H(ector): Cloutierville, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Stephen) Rousselon: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

He asks for an ordo to be sent on the Hecla or rather by C(aptain?) E. White. He also wants to subscribe to the Propagateur if Rousselon can give him some Mass intentions to pay for this year. He sees by the St. Louis papers that the Archbishop of St. Louis has ordered prayers for Pope (Pius IX); he does not know whether Bishop Blanc has done the same but wishes to be informed. They were to elect trustees for Natchitoches yesterday but he does not know whether things will go better. He hopes to go down to the city this spring but money is so scarce he does not know whether he can.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {3}


1849 Jan. 25
Fontbonne, Father James: St. Martinville, (Louisiana)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: N(ew) Orleans, L(ouisian)a

He writes about some points of church rule. What is to be done when persons come to be married and are cousins and do not wish to wait until one writes to the Bishop and receives a reply. There have already been two such marriages before the judge. He has received no instructions from the Bishop on this.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {1}


1849 Jan. 25
Kenrick, Bishop Francis Patrick: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
 to O(restes) A. Brownson: (Boston, Massachusetts)

He has forwarded an article on Girard College to Brownson. Professor (George) Allen gives hopes of aiding Brownson, although his views as to persons and things, the poet Wordsworth for instance, may, Kenrick fears, present contrast rather than variety. He wrote a favorable notice of the "Review" for the "(Cathedral) Herald" but the "altum vulnus" of the editor prevented him from publishing it. The editor (Henry Major) complains of having been correctly treated by the Catholic press, and the Bishop (Kenrick) would sever all relation with him were he not sympathizing with him for his pecuniary difficulties. This editor has noticed favorably the enlargement of the "Observer" and perhaps a kind word in that paper might operate as balm.

Brownson's Article "Church of No Church" has led a Georgetown physician into the church, Father Mulledy assured him. A 25 year old son of the late Alston, member of Congress from North Carolina, is dying and has embraced the faith. The brother and sister in law of Charles Billenstein who died suddenly the month previous, have followed his example in entering the Church. He cautions Brownson to say nothing of this in the press.

I-3-i - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {3}


(18)49 Jan. 25
Martin, Father Aug(uste): Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: N(ew) O(rleans, Louisiana)

He is very much troubled about the mistake in their accounts. $38 is always an enormous sum for his purse. He would rather pay it 2 or 3 times than to leave the least doubt about it. He has 3 accounts to settle: he owes $35 for a vestment; Rousselon owes him $30 for 2 months board for Father (Joseph Michael) P(aret) at Plaines and $3 for a notary fee for a deed for the Bishop. Instead of sending the $2 balance he sends 40 leaving $38 for the bill of Mr. Migne which probably came in November or December. It may be that the complication of three accounts and Rousselon's busyness, has led to error. Rousselon has not sent him an ordo. Martin will be waiting for a line to set his mind at rest. He hopes to see Rousselon next month. Father (Charles) Chambost is here; he is very new but he will make it with God's help.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {4}


1849 Jan. 25
Praz, R.S.C.J., Madame A.: St. Michael, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Sister Leconte is going to return to her family. She is difficult; they do not know what to do; they have tried all means without success. She has caused trouble in the different houses she has been in. However, she herself asked to return. They have not yet resumed their classes because of the cholera. They recently learned of the death of Mother Du Tour, (R.S.C.J.) on January 1; it is a loss for their house at Natchitoches. Here they have only 5 children; no one has been ill. The two Egan ladies are still feeble.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {4}


1849 Jan. 25
(Purcell), (Archbishop) J(ohn) B(aptiste): Cincinnati, (Ohio)
 to O(restes) A. Brownson: (Boston, Massachusetts)

He acknowledges receipt of Brownson's letter. A few days before he had requested Father Whelan, who lives with him, to send his and two other subscriptions to the "Review". As the Conahans have discontinued business, his brother will be Brownson's agent there, without any compensation, since approval has already been expressed and has published a notice to that effect in that week's "Telegraph". He is surprised at Brownson's remark: "The only notice I have ever seen of it (the "Review") in the C(atholic) "Telegraph" was a severe censure". It has been highly extolled in that paper, and many large demands made on its contents. Secondly, he did not think that Brownson, who visited poor Bryant with such censure, and almost thrust back the Oxford movement among heretics, and who was free to find fault with Bishop Kenrick's not having taken stronger ground in his former edition of his work on the Primacy, could be so sensitive. He wrote it, but did not intend it as censure at all. He did fear, although not pretending to know the Protestant mind, that it was likely to revive the "Jesuit", Brownson being forgetful of the spirit and traditions of Cheverus. He may be wholly wrong in this opinion but declares it for what it may be worth. He remembers that Brownson broadly asserted that "marriage was a sacrament when blessed by the Church", implying that it was not such when not blessed by the Church. He cannot agree that this is an open question, and invites only because he wishes the "Review" will be well sustained, and because of his admiration for Brownson himself. He would like to speak but not to write to Brownson of certain matters. They could not get a proper orator for their St. Peter's Benevolent Society Anniversary. This theme - provision for destitute female orphans - would open up to a mind like Brownson's the inexhaustible riches of the Catholic Church, and would add largely to his subscription list should he speak in Cincinnati. Any time agreeable to Brownson would suit them, and they should like to have him in addition to his discourse or oration, address an audience on other subjects upon which Catholics and Protestants need enlightening. Brownson should not fret at any little contradiction he may find in the Church, for sincere Catholics are now no better than our Common Master. We must daily take up our cross.

I-3-i - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 12mo. - {2}


1849 Jan. 26
Fontbonne, Father James: St. Martinville, (Louisiana)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: N(ew) Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Rousselon has no doubt received Fontbonne's letter in which he spoke of a marriage difficulty. The parties of one marriage have had scruples and have decided not to go against the laws of the Church. However, all is set for next Tuesday. Fontbonne hopes a dispensation will not be refused. He will proceed on the assumption that in this case the pastor can act and write at once to the Bishop. The pastor of Lafayette said the Bishop had decided thus but Fontbonne wants Rousselon to tell him so that if it is not correct it will not happen again.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {1}


1849 Jan. 26
McFarland, J(ohn) A.: Tiffin, (Ohio)
 to Father F(rancis) P. McFarland: Watertown, N(ew) Y(ork)

Though late he wishes Francis and his mother and Jerome a happy new year. They are well except for some coughs. He is disturbed by the immoralities in the world. Bishop (Amadeus Rappe) was there and gave Confirmation to about 30. He preached in both churches. He will visit Section Ten. While there he received into the Church a Mr. Johnson of Fort Ball and John's wife. He did not urge her but she studied on her own. He speaks of a German who fell into the fire while intoxicated and who later died. There is considerable drinking. Father (Maurice) Howard has started a church building society, each member to pay 12 cents a month. The Methodists have nearly completed their meeting house, costing $5,000. Cholera has been in Cincinnati. They have no cases there but they fear it in the spring. The California fever has not affected them much, only two have left. Governor Ford was inaugurated. The legislature has done nothing else but quarrel. In Brownson's Review he has read "Shandy Maguire." The article will not satisfy the Irish. The Catholic Observer will be increased in size. The Cincinnati Telegraph is not well edited.

I-1-a - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 4to. - {6}


1849 Jan. 26
Giustiniani, C.M., Father J(oseph): Natchitoches, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

He has just received Blanc's letter expressing surprise at his silence under the serious circumstances. He feels sure Fathers (Mariano) Maller, (C.M.) and (Roman) Pasc(u)al, (C.M.) have explained his silence. Blanc's letter had an excellent effect but the hearts of those to whom it was addressed were too hardened to make them return. They say they will resign as trustees while trying all means to be reelected. Those who love their religion are in charge at present. Their first act was to erase the humiliating position imposed on them, to reinstate nearly all the other resolutions, and they asked him to open the church and gave him what he had asked for. Last Sunday, a great feast for Natchitoches, the church was crowded and, though ill, Giustiniani preached a sermon they will perhaps recall for some time. The event which made the most stir was the refusal he gave to Father (Hector) Figari, (C.M.) to marry Adolphe Prudhomme. Father Pascal has no doubt told Blanc about it. He has learned since that Figari has just married a couple on Vielle Rivière without his permission. He has also heard that at Cloutierville he held a solemn service for the repose of Domenique Rachal for whom Giustiniani had refused church burial and who had given rise to all the troubles in the parish. Figari's actions have greatly scandalised those who approve of Giustiniani's conduct and pleased those who condemn it. The Prudhommes have spread the rumor that Giustiniani was at New Orleans to tell all sorts of evil against Figari. If it were only for himself he would suffer it but the good of the parish demands that Blanc be informed. Maller has informed him that he will immediately have a replacement for Pascal whose departure is painful for Giustiniani. Father (Anthony) Chanrion is still with him; his piety and patience is a great consolation. Just now he is at Campté. All their troubles have only confirmed the faith and revealed its enemies.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {8}


1849 Jan. 27
Legrand, Father F.: Pont de Breaux, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

On December 24 he gave Mrs. Chevalier, to give to Mr. St. Clair, representative to the Legislature, a letter for Father (Stephen) Rousselon which was at the same time for Blanc. It enclosed $14 which, with the $20.50 which Rousselon has and future collections, was to buy a chalice, a vestment and altar cards. Ten days later (Francois Louis) Chaigneau came to talk about his credit. Legrand wrote the same day to Blanc. Chaigneau consented to a 5 or 6 months delay. He had hoped to discharge this debt by the sale of cemetery lots but deaths have been few and times are hard. The presbytery is practically finished. He hired an old negress; on the 15th he will move in. Blanc is to keep his good will toward the people of Pont Breaux about the question of the church. Next fall they will build a decent church. Legrand would like Rousselon to come to this area in the spring or summer; he could stimulate the people a little about the church. It will be impossible for Legrand to contribute a large sum. Up to now he has received $514; if by March 15 he is paid what is owed him he will have about $700 for the year. He has spent $620 for the presbytery and cemetery; he still owes $200. He had about 40 Confessions at Christmas time and almost as many children came for catechism as last year.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {5}


1849 Jan. 27
De St. Palais, Maurice, Bp. Vincennes: Vincennes, Indiana
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

If De St. Palais regretted that Purcell could not be present at his consecration, he was consoled by Purcell's assurance that he was there in spirit and by his promise of a continuation of paternal relations. The first service that De St. Palais will ask of Purcell is that he will act as Vicar General of Vincennes. De St. Palais sends Purcell the legal instruments by which he is to transfer the property willed him by Bishop (Stephen) Bazin. That piece of land Purcell speaks of, situated somewhere in Indiana, is not mentioned in the deed. The land is of little value and perhaps the deed is not recorded so that it might still be deeded by the owner to De St. Palais. When Purcell sends back the deed of transfer, he is to send a list of his expenses he incurred for the Diocese of Vincennes.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {3}


1849 Jan. 27
Miles, George H.: Baltimore, (Maryland)
 to O(restes) A. Brownson: Boston, (Massachusetts)

But for a festered fore-finger on his right hand, Brownson would have received the enclosed article sooner. It is still in time for the first of Feb. He infused himself into it in the beginning to make the narrative attractive. He asks Brownson to correct it with a free hand. He thinks he will write a review of Goethe's autobiography, in which he will show how Young and others went sickened out of Protestantism and groped for Catholicity without knowing it.

I-3-i - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {1}


1849 Jan. 27
Ste. Ursule, Sister:
 to My dear Mother (Superior):

She cannot let the day pass without sending word of the steps she has taken. The pains and regrets are not of a few months but date from the very year of her profession. Fear of scandal prevented her for a long time. Her intention is to remain with her parents who are old. Mother (Superior) is to tell Sister St. Louis that she will write her before long.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 32mo. - {1}


(18)49 Jan. 28
Emily, (S.C.), Sister: Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Father (Auguste) Martin says that Blanc sends for money for the house. It would be the greatest pleasure to send the entire sum but it is not at her disposal. She will send what she can. She hopes Blanc will come to see them and then he will see where the money has gone. She knows nothing about the house as neither Blanc, nor Martin, nor Sister M(ary) Margaret, (S.C.) said a word to her about it. Since Christmas they have had very few scholars. She heard that Sister Regina (Smith, S.C.) has been very ill. Sister Mary Ambrose, (S.C.) is not at all well; Sister Rosina(?), (S.C.) also. Sister Clotilda, (S.C.) complains often. Blanc almost made Emily jealous sending for Clotilda. She asks to be remembered to her Sisters and to Margaret.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 4to. - {7}


1849 Jan. 29
Audran, Father E.: Vincennes, (Indiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Being the only relative in this country of Father Du Coudray, whose death they learned from the Propagateur, Audran thinks it his duty to inform (Blanc) that he left a farm and some property and before he left had some money and several things which would be dear to his family. He does not know whether Du Coudray asked on his deathbed that they write his sisters. A letter addressed to him was received here and Audran opened it. It told that one of his sisters had become a widow.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 12mo. - {2}


1849 Jan. 29
(Blanc), Ant(hony), Bp. of New Orleans: New Orleans, Louisiana
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He has received Purcell's letter dated from Dayton Jan. 15. He has only time enough to say that it will be very difficult or impossible to obtain the information Purcell desires about the man from Cincinnati who died in New Orleans, and whose remains have been transported to Purcell for burial. He desires more information than Purcell sent because New Orleans is so extensive and Blanc is not sure that he understands the name of the person. He does not mean to criticize Purcell's writing because the same could be said of his writing. He reads it as Frazin. If that is not the name Purcell will please write otherwise. He will do all he can to get the information Purcell desires. It would have been easier if the man were buried in New Orleans. Blanc has been invited by the new bishop of Chicago (James Vandevelde S.J.) to assist at his consecration but Blanc finds it impossible to go because of his rheumatism.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - (French) - {4}


1849 Jan. 29
Cummings, Father J(eremiah) W.: New York, New York
 to O(restes) A. Brownson: Boston, Massachusetts

Owing to Brownson's delay in answering Cumming's telegram, the Tabernacle is not available for the days mentioned, but has been engaged for Brownson's lecture on February 14. He desired someone else to take the Lecture in hand since he is engaged in the building of a church and for the same reason, will be unable to contribute to the "Review" for some time. He will not turn his back on the Editor of the Review, but will continue to win him new friends and new subscribers. Although not able to stomach some of the non-essentails of the "Review", he defies any theologian to put his finger on any statement written by Brownson since he mended his pen with the Catholic penknife which could be proven to be unsound in doctrine or unedifying in its tendency. He thinks that he has written too much in the past two years and desires to keep out of print, but will unhesitatingly recommend it from the pulpit. He is not likely to be influenced unfavorably toward Brownson, and hopes that this "Review" will go ahead more and more, there being many questions which it could take up, lending it variety without changing its tone. He asks Brownson to read and indorse a lecture of his appearing in the last "Freeman's Journal". He is glad to see that his young friend (James A.) McMaster works well with Brownson. He is alternately an emphasizer and a shuffler, but will one day be a great man, or at least, an honest man, which last he has commenced to be boldly enough already.

I-3-i - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {2}


1849 Jan. 29
Hafkenscheid, C.SS.R., Father Bernard T: Baltimore, (Maryland)
 to (Bishop Peter Paul Lefevere,: Detroit, Michigan)

Hafkenscheid has been appointed Provincial of all the Redemptorist houses in the States and has all the faculties required by a disposition of the Superiors dated December 8, 1848. His residence will be at Baltimore at the German church of St. Alphonsus. He will not neglect the first opportunity of calling on Lefevere. In the meantime he recommends to his care and protection the Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer and particularly its members under his episcopal charge. He hopes no disagreement will ever arise but if something should happen Hafkenscheid will feel most happy to make any disposition agreeing with their Rule. But he has the greatest confidence that they will labor with constant zeal under(Lefevere's) direction.

III-2-h - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {2}


(18)49 Jan. 29
McGarahan, Father James: Mobile, Alabama
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Bishop (Edward) Barron has been expecting a letter of some importance for several weeks. Blanc informed Barron that Father Rousselon had seen a letter at the postoffice addressed to him. Barron again wrote to Rousselon but no answer came. McGarahan had the postmaster here inquire at New Orleans. The answer this morning said the letter was advertised on the 5th and since taken out of the office by some person unknown. This letter is supposed to contain a draft.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {2}


1849 Jan. 30
Baraga (Father) Frederick: L'Anse, Michigan
 to (Bishop Peter Paul Lefevere: Detroit, Michigan)

Baraga received the Bishop's letter of Dec. 24, 1848, on Jan. 24, 1849. He is glad to have the dispensation of fasting, because at present he finds it very difficult to fast. Every morning, except on Sundays, he gets up before 3 o'clock, usually at 2:30 A.M. and after he has finished his prayers, he begins to write. As there are already many in Baraga's Indian missions who can read but who have only those two books which he had printed for them, he is now writing a new book for them in the Indian language, meditations about the virtues and good works of a Christian, about different offenses, and about all the truths of the Catholic religion. Baraga can write now in Indian almost as well as in French. He is writing this book in such an easy, simple and clear style that all Indians who can read, can understand and enjoy it perfectly. The book will have about 600 pages. Besides that, Baraga is still working from time to time on his Grammar and Dictionary of the Chippewa language. He wants to get these books finished as soon as possible, so that the missionaries who come afterwards to the missions can use them. He has already more than 6,000 words for his dictionary and he hopes to find 2 or 3,000 more. He writes it in 3 languages, Chippewa, French and English. Chippewa is not as rich in words as the civilized languages. In order to get on with there writings, which are done apart from his school- and his mission-work, he must work during a good part of the night and therefore he cannot wait until noon without taking a little nourishment. Baraga also thanks the Bishop for accepting his money orders. But he had to draw another one for $67. - which does not have to be paid until the end of next June. That will absorb all the $300 which the Bishop allowed him this spring. He warns the Bishop never to accept a money order from him without being notified by himself in a letter. One could imitate his handwriting.

III-2-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 8vo. - {1}


1849 Jan. 31
(McMaster), Rebekah: Oxford, Ohio
 to (James Alphonsus McMaster): (New York, New York)

She thanks James for a pleasant surprise upon the receipt of a package. She wishes to know the cost of it. The family is in good health at present; although influenza had made some of them suffer. M. McMaster left for his home in Princeton on Tuesday of this week. He spent several days with his daughter. It has been two and a half years since his last visit to her. Gilbert has grown to be almost as tall as Rebekah, who is quite tall. At the present Gilbert is at the University. He is not the student they had hoped he would be. She says that they are soon to leave (Oxford, Ohio), and expresses her regret; although she is very willing to go to New Albany. She states her reasons for her love of (Oxford, Ohio) as a home. Her brother's relations to the place are most desirable. The University has never been in such good condition, even though the number of students is not large. Rebekah states that she has become to several persons. She asks James if he has seen a volume of poetry entitled "A Rhyme of the North Countries" by A. M. Gleeman. The author's name as stated is fictitious as Professor Moffat of this University is the author. It was so published because he wished to see how it would be received. She asks why James does not answer her inquires about H. W. Merrile. She comments on the mild winter they had and present weather. She encloses a book mark which she made for her brother.

I-1-m - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 12mo. - {1}