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1849 Mar. 1
(Mudd, S.C.), Sister Mary Austin: (Donaldsonville, Louisiana)
 to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Sister sends their thanks for Blanc's visit. They have to thank him for the happy result of Sister Marie, (S.C.)'s trial. She received a letter this morning from her uncle expressing satisfaction at her decision of remaining in the Community; he commended her for it. Sister Austin fears their poor weak Creole postulant will not hold out. She has a terrible temper. She has a good understanding of the spirit of their rules and marks of a vocation. All are well. They expect Sister Serena, (S.C.) on Sunday.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 4to. - {3}


1849 Mar. 1
Nesmith, Mary (D.): (New York, New York)
 to Father (James Roosevelt) Bayley: (New York, New York)

Bayley's words of kindness melt her to tears. Is it self she seeks? She does not know. She must go up to the chapel tomorrow. She has been very unwell. She will be there a little before eleven o'clock and any time after that hour that may best suit Bayley. (P.S.) Bayley should pardon her for supposing that he would suspect her good intention. She thanks Bayley for the sermon.

II-2-n - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 16mo. - {1}


1849 March 2
Baraga, (Father) Frederick: L'Anse, Michigan
 to Bishop Peter Paul Lefevere: Detroit, Michigan

Baraga has received complaints from several places that the Catholic Indians who can read, cannot get any prayerbooks anymore, because there are none. Naturally it is the desire of every missionary that Baraga should quickly produce a new edition, because the number of those who can read is increasing every year and there is no other book for them but that prayerbook. Baraga wants $200 — from the Bishop, he will procure the rest of the expenses and will go to Detroit in the summer to have another edition printed.

III-2-h - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 8vo - {1}


1849 Mar. 2
Blanc, Ant(hony), Bp. of New Orleans: New Orleans, Louisiana
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Father (Stephen) Rousselon has communicated to him Purcell's letter in reference to the payment of certain funds and he wishes to propose a means to the means for exchanging funds which he considers more suitable. The mother superior of the Ursulines of (Brown County Ohio) have had him receive for them a sum of $75, which he has notified her is awaiting her disposition. If she has not drawn this money Purcell can pay her that money, which is nearly the amount Purcell owes Rousselon, and the excess of which Blanc will pay the next year. But if at the reception of this letter the nun has already drawn on Rousselon Blanc accepts Purcell's proposal for paying the debt of Purcell. On the subject of the act of incorporation (of Church Property) which Purcell wants him to take with him to the Provincial Council (1849) Blanc says that they have never demanded nor obtained it from their legislature. His opinion is that the fact of the erection of a new see of which act there is authentic proof, is sufficient act of incorporation. He awaits the arrival of Bishop (John) Odin the next week. Odin has written that considering his miserable state he has decided that he cannot make the trip to the Council. Odin's condition is sad but Blanc has written him to come and they will try together to provide his expenses. Blanc thinks that they all have to face the picture of miseries of some of their confreres, whose condition is very unlovely. Bishop (John J.) Chanche should leave Liverpool on his return on the 7th. Blanc expects to see Purcell the last of this month or the first of the next, if he goes as he has planned by the Southern route.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - (French) - {8}


1849 Mar. 3
Brogess, Father C(aspar) H.: Columbus, Ohio
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Borgess cannot refrain from expressing his feeling of gratitude for Purcell's parential kindness. His health has improved considerably. He is pleased with his congregation with regard to both spiritual and temporal affairs. There are the best prospects of the whole debt of $3776 being paid within three or four years. With regard to the school nothing better could be expected under the present circumstances in the German language. The English portion is thinking of erecting a school for their children in April. Borgess asks Purcell's permission to use the old church as a school house as the English could not afford to build a school room for the Germans is too small. The old church could be fitted up for both at a cost of $140. Borgess will not be able to visit the mission until after Easter. He asks for a chalice, a pocket missal, and an iron to bake the altar bread. Sickness among the Catholics keeps Borgess busy. He has two evening services, on Tuesdays for the English and on Fridays for the Germans.

P.S. He asks Purcell to forward him and Jacob prang the Catholic Telegraph. He wishes the two or three preceding numbers.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {3}


1849 Mar. 4
(Chanche), Bishop John Joseph: Paris, (France)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

(Chanche) received Blanc's letter of January 19. He would probably remain longer in Europe were it not for the council. He hopes with what he has done he will be able to keep above water. He will leave on April 7 from Liverpool to be in Baltimore some days before the council. He will be in the company of Bishop (John Martin) Henni who is here now. There will be some other priests with them, one from the seminary. He has nobody with him for himself; if any come it will be only in October. The Pope hesitated settling arrangements for the Province in the United States before the council. In his last letter (Chanche) gave the pope some reasons which may move him. (Chanche) is obliged for the information concerning Natchez; he is pleased matters have gone so well. Father (Blaise) Raho, (C.M.) undoubtedly deserves a great deal of credit. He has proved himself worthy of confidence. (Chanche) has attended to Blanc's commissions. The chalices, oil-stocks, etc. will be sent to Natchez in a box of books and other articles. It is said that the French government has determined to interfere in the affairs of Pope (Pius IX) and see him once more placed in peace in Rome. For that unfortunate city things are going on worse and worse. In less than 60 days Blanc and he will meet in Baltimore. He saw the Marquis de Talaru(?); he is well and active.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 4to. - {6}


(18)49 Mar. 4
Emily, (S.C.), Sister: Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)
 to (Bishop Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Blanc)'s letter was received. She was in hopes he would soon pay a visit to Baton Rouge and she would have the opportunity of showing the books and yearly account of the house. She will not make apology for not sending money for she does not know if she will ever have any. She hopes some one else will have that pleasure. If there are any old French catechisms she asks for several. She hopes he will come before he goes north. The free school is no better. Father Martin spoke about it from the altar today.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (English and French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {1}


1849 Mar. 4
Mégret, Father A(nthony) D(ésiré): Vermillionville, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

For nine days he held a procession in honor of Our Lady of Grace through all the streets of the village. Their prayers were granted and the cholera disappeared. His parishioners were made strong by their faith.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {1}


1849 Mar. 4
Raho, C.M., Father B(laise): Natchez, (Mississippi)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Raho encloses two letters to Blanc (no enclosures). He wishes Father (Mark) Ant(h)ony, (C.M.) would spend 2 or 3 weeks in Natchez during the Easter duty. No news from Bishop Chanche.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {2}


(18)49 Mar. 4
Serena, (S.C.), Sister M.: Donaldsonville, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Before this Blanc has received Sister Mary Austin's letter with a copy of the one received by Sister Marie, (S.C.) from her uncle. She trusts from Mr. Mullen's letter that the grace of God has effected a change in his sentiments. Sister Marie is now visiting her uncle to thank him. After parting with Blanc on Friday she determined to start for here on Saturday. She arrived this morning in time for the first Mass. She trusts she will not presume too much on Blanc's kindness during her stay in the South.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 4to. - {3}


1849 Mar. 5
Benoit, Father J(ulian): Fort Wayne, Indiana
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He thanks Purcell for the present which Purcell has passed on to him and while he does not know the giver, and cannot thank her he wishes to thank Purcell for his part in it. He wrote to Father (Edward) Sorin, C.S.C. immediately after receiving Purcell's letter and has given its contents to him. He has no doubt that Sorin will receive the young man only when he is so determined by Purcell's recommendation. As soon as Benoit receives Sorin's response he will communicate it to Purcell.

P.S. Father Edward Faller and his (Sisters of Providence) of Fort Wayne are very sensible of Purcell's remembrance and send to him their good wishes and thanks.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - (French) - {5}


1849 Mar. 5
Praz, R.S.C.J., Madame A.: St. Michael, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Scarletina has been here since Friday; up to now only three children are ill. Antonia Lacoste is one but she is much better today. Since yesterday 12 children have left and perhaps more of the ninety will go. She has asked Father (Vital) Gilles, (S.J.) to erect a Way of the Cross in their church; he replied that he did not have this faculty. She asks Blanc to authorize this ceremony. She also asks him to hear the final vows of Madame Egan who wishes to have this consolation before dying. The other Egan lady is not any better.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {4}


1849 Mar. 5
Whe(l)pley, James D.:
Editor of American Review New York (City), (New York)
 to (Orestes A.) Brownson: (Boston, Mass(achusetts)

Whe(l)pley was unable to converse with Brownson after the meeting at (James) McMaster's. To renew the conversation would be agreeable. Whe(l)pley wants to open a correspondence in regard to the Journal because he believes Brownson's sentiments and opinions on subjects strictly national and constitutional will find a ready echo in the hearts of many of Whe(l)pley's readers. He is willing to pay Brownson $50.00 and furnish an article on the veto power, its value and importance and Whe(l)pley shall publish it anonymously.

P.S. If propostion is agreeable, Whe(l)pley wants the article for the May issue of the American Review.

I-4-c - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {3}


(18)49 Mar. 5
Martin, Father Aug(uste): Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)
 to Father E(tienne) Rousselon: N(ew) Orleans, (Louisiana)

This letter will be brought by an ill young man from the seminary at Vincennes who spent the winter with Martin. He is returning to his mother in Indiana. If he does not find a boat on arriving at New Orleans, Martin asks Blanc for a day or two of hospitality. Mr. Opperman will help him find a means of transportation. Martin has given him $26.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {2}


1849 Mar. 7
Legrand, Father F.: Pont de Breaux, (Louisiana)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: New Orleans, Louisiana

Legrand received the articles Rousselon procured for him. Rousselon is to give Father Perché 4.50 for his subscription. The cholera is here. Mrs. Lastrappe and Mrs. Dupré, the judge's wife, are very ill. The negroes fall ill enmasse; he has been called for only two. Can Rousselon buy him a silver chalice and Legrand will send the money he has toward it. First Communion at Easter will be large.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {3}


1849 Mar. 7
Peyrot(?), Father: St. Pierre, Martinique
 to Father (Stephen Rousselon: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Had it not been for a peculiar circumstance, Peyrot would be in New Orleans and thanking Rousselon for the steps taken by Mr. Arnoud, former notary of St. Pierre in his favor. But only a few days before Arnoud's letter, a change in the offices of the Navy Ministry at Paris restored calm to the clergy of Martinique. The very ones who declared the destruction of the convent of which Peyrot was the chaplain, were forced to give up their power and he was appointed titular chaplain of the clergy of the colonies. Considering all the kindnesses the Sisters had done for him and the inconvenience his leaving would cause them, he feels obliged to stay. If circumstances ever force him to seek a refuge, he will present himself to Rousselon's bishop.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {2}


1849 Mar. 9
Child, A.: Havre, (France)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

A bill of lading on the Jane M. Glidden for a package of books sent by V(ictor) Marziou and Company.

V-5-k - Bill S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {2}


1849 Mar. 9
Monaghan, Father Michael,: Flint, (Michigan)
 to Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefev(e)re:

On arriving home from the missions of Shiawassee, (Michigan), Monaghan received a note and the deed enclosed here (not here) for Lefevere's inspection from Mr. Birney of Lower Saginaw, (Michigan). Monaghan was well pleased with his last mission in Shiawasee and the neighborhood of Flint. All in Shiawassee attended to their Paschal duty except Peter Goldsmith and wife, two in the Corcoran's Settlement, and two of the Havlins in Byron, (Michigan) who had it reported that Monaghan had been removed from Flint and replaced by an old priest. The Goldsmiths have been unfriendly; this is manifest from the fact of Frederick Holms writing to his countrymen. All stratagems have been used to cause Mrs. Pane to complain, and working their way even in Saginaw, Monaghan does not complain of Goldsmith but thinks he is an honest, industrious man. Lefevere will be gratified to hear of Squire Nash's conversion to the Catholic faith; he lives nine miles from Flint. On Monaghan's return from Shiawassee, he held a station in his house. Nash told him that there was scarcely a Methodist Preacher in the country who had not made an attack on him but all to no purpose. The house was crowded with Methodists to see the "man of sin" offer sacrifice to the unknown God. All went off well, it was stated that "that man preaches pretty sound doctrine." Monaghan sees by the deed that Birney is not up to his word as he promised to give 5 years time to build on those lots. The people are inclined to build and in good circumstances but there are no more than 12 Catholic families. Monaghan got them a schoolmaster. In Upper Saginaw, (Michigan), it is almost impossible to make a good mission until they get a good Catholic French and English teacher to teach catechism. Monaghan had to prohibit the children from going to the Methodist Sunday schools. There are no less than three stationary ministers at present.

III-2-h - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {7}


1849 Mar. 10
Haslinger, Father M.: Detroit, Michigan.
 to O(restes) A. Brownson: (Boston, Massachusetts)

In Brownson's article on Socialism and the Church, his assertions that the Church is wedded to no political or social order, and that forms of government, abstractly considered, are matters of indifference. These views may be construed into very dangerous, false, and unchristian meanings. The vital question is whether nations, dissatisfied with their existing form of government, or of their maladministration, have a right to institute new ones. Brownson justly denies the right of rebellion unless there exists a legal claim against the government, but what legal claim could exist if forms of government are indifferent, that is, not founded as sacred right? If indifferent, what right has the Church to teach that all power is from God, or what right have princes to their thrones? He is sorry to see that almost all writers tacitly grant that all governments are mere political machines. Every society, avers Haslinger, rests on the right of individual or corporative property, and the amount of this lawful possession is the measure of a man's power. As soon as real superiority, grounded as just power, is lost, sovereignty ceases at once; if the present pope could prove that his crownlands are his lawful property, he has a right and a duty to reoccupy them, even by force; if the property is wasted away, he has no right to them. Forms of government are not matters of indifference, but of justice, and he who would usurp this property of the states would commit, not an indifferent act, but one of theft. A prince may renounce his rights if he does not hold them in testamentary trust, but it would be injustice, and not indifferent, to upset his throne and divide the spoils among the people, unless he has encroached on their rights. The right is from God, and justice is a divine ordination, and if so the Church is wedded to every political order by the law of justice, and she has no right to create new rights by recognizing insurrection and usurpation. These views are borrowed mostly from Lewis Haller's "Restoration of Political Science". The political waves will not subside as long as we shall not have States standing on the foundation of right, and Christians respecting other men's rights and loving each other.

I-3-i - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 8vo. - {1}


1849 Mar. 10
Keely, P(atrick) C.: Albany, (New York)
 to Bishop (John) McCloskey: (Albany, New York)

Keely is sorry he did not see McCloskey this week to clear up all the charges. He will be up again to try the first of the week. (St. Peter's Church), Troy, (New York) is now going on well and Keely hopes it will be finished by the specified time. McCloskey ought to see some of his Clergymen to have the dirt removed from the Cathedral (of the Immaculate Conception, Albany, New York). It can be done by donations otherwise it will cost considerable.

I-1-i - A.L.S. (Photostat from Archdiocesan Archives of New York) - 1p. - 16mo. - {3}


1849 Mar. 10
Robillard, J.C.: New York, (New York)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

The assent of Bishops Hughes, McCloskey, Tyler, Fit(z)patrick, etc. to whom he has written, makes Robillard address Blanc about an engraving representing the (7th) Council of Baltimore and the portrait of each bishop. At the last council he was presented by Father Quiblier under whom Robillard made part of his studies at the College of Montreal. Blanc could send his daguerrotype through a merchant of New Orleans who has accepted this commission. Robillard is the agent of Mr. Choiselat and of Father Migne, all of whose publications he has. Robillard wants to save the pastors of the interior from the Jewish peddlers who sell inferior articles at high prices. (P.S.) The daguerrotype can be taken in ordinary clothes as they want the face.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {5}


(18)49 Mar. 12
Sanson, Father (Charles): Mexico
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

After a rough crossing from New Orleans to Vera Cruz, where he almost died, he left as soon as possible to avoid the typhus. He arrived in Mexico more dead than alive. They were obliged to take several escorts to defend them from robbers. When he presented himself to the authorities for permission to say Mass, they demanded his exeat. Not having it, he was deprived of offering it for some days. He met a priest to whom he told his trouble who went to the authorities. He asks (Blanc) to send his exeat as soon as possible with a certificate of conduct. Sanson asks forgiveness for any trouble and he will never forget (Blanc)'s kindnesses nor those of Fathers Rousselon and Perché. He was so discouraged that he could not do the good he wanted to in (Blanc)'s diocese. He also wishes to enter a community. When his health is better he will go to Vera Cruz where he will sail for France. These are the only reasons which made him leave. It was painful because he had thought to spend long years with (Blanc). His papers are to be addressed to Mr. Palouzier, merchant at Vera Cruz, who will see that they reach him. (On the letter in another hand): John McHugh, Chapitoulas.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {3}


1849 Mar. 13
(Odin), Bishop J(ohn) M(ary): Galveston, (Texas)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

(Odin) has received Rousselon's letter of the 8th. It will be impossible to send a bill for the articles because Mr. Choiselat did not notify him of the shipment. They should cost 1800 francs. The chalice belongs to Father (Angelo) Mascaroni. Of the rest, Rousselon is to sell as many as he can. (Odin) has heavy debts and many priests to support. He counted on the Association of the Propagation of the Faith and because of the revolutions in Europe his allocation is only 7645 francs. Last year the support of the priests in Texas, and come contributions to chapels, cost $4090. He needs 5 or 6 more priests to visit their scattered Catholics. He caused great embarrassment to the Ursulines at Notre Dame by sending them the two young Irish postulants. He had no suspicion of insanity. He wrote to Sister Regina (Smith, S.C.) to have them admitted to the asylum but she replied that this part of their house has been transferred to Jackson.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {6}


1849 Mar. 14
Barthe, Father E(dward): Houma, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

He replies to Blanc's letter of the 10th to thank him for the 15 Mass intentions. He has signed a draft on Blanc's account for Messrs. Frost and Springer payable July 1. He will have the money for the Mass intentions brought by Father (Charles M.) Ménard, pastor of Thibodaux, when he goes for the holy oils. He has been asked, with Deputy Sheriff Mr. Verret to collect the subscription for the church although money is very scarce with the Creoles. They hope to collect $1800. There will remain $1000 to cover the expenses and debt contracted by Fathers (F. Charles Boutelou de) St. Aubin and (Z.?) Levesque for this church which the members of the committee are willing to assume and toward the end of the month will come to see Blanc about where to go for this loan. The debt is $2800 as scarcely anything had been paid. There has been a real swindle. The debts once paid, they will give the work to a contractor. The cholera has gone, and while the river goes up the bayous are low.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {8}


1849 Mar. 14
Brownson, O(restes) A.: Boston, (Massachusetts)
 to (James Alphonsus) McMaster: (New York, New York)

He denies authorizing the statement that he is to become editor of the Freeman's Journal. Archbishop (John Hughes) of New York did have a plan whereby Brownson was to become associated with the Journal, but without interfering with McMaster's interest. Dr. (Jeremiah) Cummings will tell McMaster of the plan. Hughes wants a Catholic newspaper in New York that will take up all the others with the Journal as the basis, and with Brownson's Review included. Hughes asked him to think it over until Easter with the advice of Bishop (John B. Fitzpatrick) of Boston; but Brownson's mind was made up before leaving New York that such an attempt would be useless. He feared that Hughes would abandon the Journal in its hour of need and that the controversy with (Henry Major) was likely to injure the Journal. If McMaster can weather the present storms, he should have clear sailing. Dr. (Ambrose) Monahan will write to Cummings this week, communicating his views as to the best way of promoting the Journal's interest. Manahan and Brownson have had a long explanation and are on their old footing. It is the duty of McMaster and Brownson to get a firm hold on the Catholic people. Were it not for continued imigration, Catholicity would lose ground. They must prevent their children from growing up in the protestant ranks. If it were not for the Irish Catholics, who bring over a civilization far below that which they find here, he would be in favor of isolating the Catholic communities from the Protestant. In manner and moral and social virtues, the Irish Catholics are the most deficient class of their community. Even the clergy are only a grade advanced of the mass of low Irish Catholics. Isolation will tend to perpetuate this lowliness and will identify Catholicity with Irish barbarism and will create false notions against Protestants. Undoubtedly the protestant community will predominate in the communities and the Catholics will be absorbed in it without their faith or with it. Thus far the loss of faith has been equal to the progress of the absorption, which is what is to be prevented. McMaster's belief that this could be prevented by purely Catholic schools might be true of other countries, but not in this one where the Catholic schools, except for the French and German ones, would be semi-barbarian and those educated by them would be the most savage portion of the community and would be the first to turn their backs on religion when they are out in the world. The machinery of schools in the country is very good and it must be proven to the Irish Catholics that they can become Americans and still be Catholics. This may be done by educating them in the public schools, for it is not there that they learn their iniquity, but in the homes, on the streets, and in the haunts of intemperance and scenes of brutality. If the machinery of public education was to be destroyed when the country becomes Catholic, it would only have to be rebuilt, so why not use it and give their children the advantages of it. They should learn that their religion does not keep them from attaining the highest civilization of their country, but that they should learn to know Protestants and respect them for their virtues, and to distinguish between their human and social virtues and religion, in order to keep from losing their own Catholicity. They must adopt a policy which will soonest place their Catholics at the summit of civilization without detriment to their religion. They must divert their youth from their attempts to meliorate foreign countries and provide for them a sphere of activity here at home, preferably in religion. They would have no one left if all the restless and active were thrown aside, so they must be worked in and made to rise as far as can be done without sacrifice of principles. The Irish clergy educate the young and make converts, while denouncing the Americans or fawning around them. This evil is best remedied by McMaster and Brownson, as conductors of the Press, to be just, generous to Protestants and to show them and their own people that their only differing features are religion. This is the view Brownson is going to take, and he asks McMaster's views. He asks him to tell () Whelpling that Brownson will comply with his request and shall oppose any change in the constitutional veto of the President. He assures McMaster of his respect and esteem and mentions the article he wrote in the Observer of last week concerning McMaster. P.S. He asks that the lecture McMaster gave be prepared by the first of May for the July number of the Review.

I-1-m - A.L.S. - 8pp. - 8vo. - {5}


1849 Mar. 14
(Cadolini), Cardinal Ignatius: (Ferrara, Italy)
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Braida desires to know if his brother has really dismissed the Swiss woman and taken back his real wife whom he took with his two children when he embarked for America, and Cadolini asks above that some assurance. He will await Purcell's answer. They have in Italy need of prayers. (They are behind lock.) Some have proclaimed a republic. Without a miracle they cannot escape greater evils. He asks prayers for the Pope, the church and for himself.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - (French) - {2}


1849 Mar. 14
Paret, Father J(oseph) M(ichael): St. Charles, (German Coast, Louisiana)
 to Father E(tienne) Rousselon: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

He is sending back the boy he took to educate. He is without piety or talents and Paret thinks it better to take someone more worthy. (He recounts his misdeeds). Edmond Fortier died Sunday. Paret did not go to the house because he knew he would not be admitted. He hopes to see Rousselon next week.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 8vo. - {2}


(18)49 Mar. 15
Martin, Father Aug(uste): B(aton) R(ouge, Louisiana)
 to Father E(tienne) Rousselon: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Martin acknowledges receipt of Louis' clothes received this morning with the books sent by Father Perché. The child is well and seems very pleased. He studies well. A letter from the Bishop of Cincinnati tells of a box at his house addressed to Martin. Possibly he will send it to Rousselon. Rousselon knows of the disaster in West Baton Rouge. He is afraid it is only the beginning of greater misfortunes.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {2}


1849 Mar. 15
Mazzuchelli, Father Fr(ancis): Spring Hill, (Alabama)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

He has written to Father (Martin) Kundig, vicar general of Milwaukee, respecting his exeat. He has also written his uncle informing him of his new resolution. He will enter his retreat this evening. He has been well received by the Bishop of Mobile and his clergymen. He said nothing except that he was going to the college to make his retreat. P.S. May he say Mass after his retreat?

V-5-k - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {2}


1849 Mar. 16
Brunner, C.PP.S., Father Francis D.: Thompson, Seneca Country, Ohio
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

In Wappakonetta and Freiburg a retreat of ten or eight days seems necessary, because the misery there is great. If Purcell will send two priests there from Cincinnati to conduct it the people would be grateful. But if Purcell cannot do that and desires Brunner to send two Precious Blood Fathers which he intends to send to Minster, Purcell should send this information to Brunner. He extends to Purcell the greetings of the coming Easter season.

P.S. Perhaps it would be better to take the school away from Mister since there are murmurers there. Especially if they do not wish to separate the boys and girls it seems better to him to disolve the school and recall the Sisters of the Precious Blood.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 1p.(Latin) - {6}


1849 Mar. 17
Mènard, Father Ch(arle)s M.: La Fourche Interieure, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Work on their church is going forward rapidly. They hope to rent the pews at Easter and say the first Mass on the 3rd Sunday after. But there are several things he asks Blanc to decide. They hope he will bless or consecrate the church of which he laid the first stone. But since it will not be entirely finished when they rent the pews, they ask him to put off this ceremony until next fall. If it is to be blessed before Mass is said there, he asks for this faculty and also for a priest whom he will invite. Father (Hyacinthe) Tumoine is well since his return from the city. (On the back of the letter in Blanc's hand): J(osep)h McHugh, shop (address and) Patrick Coleman, grocery store (address).

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {4}


1849 Mar. 17
(Portier), Bishop Michael: Mobile, (Alabama)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: N(ew) Orleans, (Louisiana)

He asks Rousselon to give the enclosed letter as soon as possible to (T.E.?) Giraud, the architect. They have not a day to lose in putting on the roof and this is what he writes Giraud about.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {3}


1849 Mar. 18
Lorretta, (S.C.), Sister M.: Donaldsonville, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

This morning another letter came from Sister Martina, (S.C.) saying the Bishop is much displeased. He has written to Father (Louis Regis) Deluol. He is vexed that the Sisters (of Charity) would be removed without superiors' orders. The ending may be like that of Bishop (John) Hughes, forbidding Visatrix to enter his diocese. She received a letter from Sisters Martha and M(ary) Margaret. All are well. Their novices will take the names of Bernard and Joseph.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {5}


1849 Mar. 18
(Mudd, S.C.), Sister Mary Austin: (Donaldsonville, Louisiana)
 to (Bishop Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

She received (Blanc)'s letter of the 10th. They heard this morning that Sister (Francis) Regis, (S.C.) is much better. Next Sunday will be the consecration and renewal of vows. They beg the favor of having Mass in their chapel; the novices will be able to be present. Some time ago she asked Sister Regina to ask (Blanc) about the propriety of having some person to keep the lot in order. Her brother at Opelousas has offered to send them a servant. Sister thought they would let him know they accept. Emilie begs for the habit. Sister Serena, (S.C.) has granted it to her. If she perseveres she will be a very good, useful person.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 16mo. - {3}


1849 March 18
McMaster, James A.: New York, (New York)
 to (Orestes A.) Brownson: (Boston, Massachusetts)

He was glad to hear from Brownson, but sorry that he should feel it necessary to contradict a story that gave him no uneasiness whatever. He never thought of tracing the story to Brownson. He believed it might have sprung from the Bishop, but had no way of knowing. He is fully convinced of the propriety of the course Brownson recommends for their (Freeman's) Journal, and intends to try putting it into practice. He feels indebted to Brownson for his article in the (Catholic) Observer" and is in no way offended with it. As to the matter of education, he believes that Catholic youth is better off in the worst Irish schools than in mixed schools which perpetuate a continual apostacy. He is glad to hear that Brownson is back on terms with Dr. Manahan, since personal sentiments must be abregated if they are to do anything in these times. The lecture he delivered in Boston is too unfinished and rhetorical for inclusion in the "Review", and he has no time to correct it. He delivered Brownson's message to Whelpley, but the latter asks a direct answer to the point he mentioned in his letter.

I-3-i - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {3}


1849 Mar. 18
(Odin), Bishop J(ohn) M(ary): Galveston, (Texas)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

He wanted to write when Father (Mariano) Maller, (C.M.) left but did not have time. He received (Blanc)'s letter of the 8th. Mr. Matton has not appeared here; (Odin) hopes he has given up the long trip he was thinking of. The news from California is that anarchy is harrassing the people. More than 800 are returning to the United States. (Odin) wants to attend the Council and make the trip with (Blanc) but he does not know if his purse will permit. He received a letter from Mr. Choiselat informing him that the allocation for Texas is 7645 francs, about $1400. The mission expenses were $4090 last year. How can he pay his heavy debts and provide for his priests? If he decides to go to the council he will leave after Easter and try to be in New Orleans some time before April 22. The sad fate of the Misses Stephenson afflicted him greatly especially when he thought of the embarrassment he caused the Ursulines. They had discovered no sign of insanity. He is going to write to the Sisters at the hospital at St. Louis to ask them to take them. He had written to Sister Regina (Smith, S.C.) but it seems that the house for the insane has been transferred to another part of the state. He will also write to Father Dowley, who sent them from Ireland.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {7}


1849 March 19
Brownson, R(elief): Ballston, (New York)
 to Orestes A. Brownson: Boston, Massachusetts

She thankfully acknowledges the receipt of forty-five dollars. She should have written sooner, but they were expecting to see him there until he last wrote. She reproves him for saying he is neglectful and undutiful when he does so much for them. Orin sent five dollars in February. His health is rather better and he would like Orestes to write him. Samuel was there. Perlina has been very sick, but is much better. Melvin Ludington also paid a visit to them. The Fowler family are well. Therina sends her love. Major Saunders was thrown from his sleigh and had a shoulder blade and three ribs broken, but is coming along slowly. All are well, and she sends him her love, and also to Sally and the children.

I-3-i - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {1}


1849 Mar. 19
Laurence, Bishop B(ertrand) S(everus): Tarbes, (France)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, Louisiana

He writes in the interests of two of his dioceans, married in a civil marriage, who wish to be married by a priest. By a judgment rendered June 28, 1848 by the New Orleans court, the divorce was given to Alphonse Noel Brière and Marie Contant, married 7 years earlier. On July 17, 1848, a justice of the peace married Honoré Abadie and the above Marie. They returned to their native country and asked to have a Catholic marriage. But this a difficult. If Brière's death is not proved, the union of Marie and Abadie cannot be blessed. Laurence asks (Blanc) to have the records searched. Marie says the marriage took place in 1840 or 1841. Brière left on business immediately after and has never been heard from. The person bringing this letter will bring back the reply.

V-5-k - L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {4}


1849 Mar. 21
Gora, Theodosia: Grand Coteau, (Louisiana
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

She did not see Blanc last year during his visit here. She has been here the last three years and her husband has been here for five years, a professor of music and drawing in the College. Her name was Theodosia Lee, niece of Madame St. Clair, (R.U.) of the Ursuline Convent in New Orleans where she was educated. They wish to settle in Grand Coteau and as the place they now occupy, the former residence of Mr. and Mrs. (Pierce) Connelly, belongs to Blanc they hope to be able to make arrangements for it. This new administration of the College from whom they rent exact a much higher rent than the house in its present condition is worth. They prefer moving the house to the College rather than to diminish the rent. They apply to Blanc, wishing to purchase the ground or lease for a number of years. Thus they may be able to build a dwelling of their own.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - 3pp. - folio - {4}


1849 Mar. 21
(Purcell), Bishop J(ohn) B(aptist): Cin(cinnati, Ohio)
 to Father E(tienne) Rousselon: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

He is exceedingly obliged for forwarding the box from Paris by the "Gen(eral) Scott". He will send the $71.55. If no opportunity comes before Bishop (Anthony) Blanc comes, en route to Baltimore, he will give it to him. (Purcell) entreats the Bishop to bring to the council the copy of the act of incorporation granted him for the secure holding of church property. It will be a guide in the most important of the subjects to be discussed again.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {2}


1849 Mar. 22
Boué, Father: Lyons, (France)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Boué received (Blanc)'s letter of January 27. In a letter of December 16, written by Father (Anthony) Thèves, Boué learned of the cholera at New Orleans. For several months the plague(?) has been in the northern provinces but has not appeared in Paris. They fear the results of their revolution. But piety has not made the progress Boué hoped for. People crowd the church to hear Father Carbois(?) but the town as a whole is cold. Boué has Father Styre of Sury, brother-in-law of his nephew, who is not without talent. Work has resumed somewhat. Europe is still on fire; the Pope (Pius IX) is still at Gaete. The Bishops have published pastorals to obtain help for the Pope. They have lost their old Canon Bonnevie; he may be replaced by Father de Faubert. About a month ago a canon of Valance visited Boué. He is distinguished by his liturgical and archeological knowledge. He is also a good preacher; he is about 40. He asked Boué to offer him to (Blanc). In his last letter Boué spoke of (Blanc)'s nephew's education. The father and mother ask (Blanc) to take charge of the education of his godson. (Blanc) could reply directly to them as they complain of his long silence. The Superior of the seminary spoke of a plan to form an association to build churches in America. He asked Boué to get (Blanc)'s advice. (Blanc) could talk it over with his confreres at their next meeting in Baltimore. Boué encloses a letter for Thèves. He sends greetings to Father Rousselon.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - & Envelope (French) - 5pp. - 4to. - {6}


1849 Mar. 26
Blin, Father J.E.: (Charenton, Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

The painter should turn over the church to them for Easter. The money comes in slowly this year. The pew rent which came to 760 has brought in only $100 so far. The painter has already received $500 without help from anyone. Meanwhile the carpenters have their mouths open for their 750 from the pew rent. Blin tried to get a small loan but was refused. If he could get out of this he would not undertake anything without the money in hand. If a priest could make $600 here, it would be all. The people are not numerous or fervent enough. A priest would not have enough to pay for the long trips to Pat(t)erson and the Bay. Blin has served that congregation for two years with only one fee of $15 for a marriage. His carriage and harness are worn out and he has no funds to procure others. And he no longer has the $4000 he sacrificed to establish here. On Palm Sunday he notified them that he would no longer come at fixed intervals; that they would have to come after him when they needed him. He is sorry to be pushed to such an extremity as this congregation is superior to (Charenton?). It would be a consolation to a resident priest. At least he would find a church and good will. One must speak English to be understood there. He has not yet set up the fees; he asks to be authorized to follow that of St. Martin.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {2}


1849 Mar. 27
Juncker, Father Henry D.: Dayton, Ohio
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Juncker sends by Mr. Muller $300 which Purcell will hand to Father (Emanuel) Thienpont on the note he holds from Purcell for Juncker. Juncker asks Purcell to send him six fine large candlesticks and a new missal. He has not been well the last two weeks.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {3}


1849 Mar. 27
Father of a Family: St. James, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony) LeBlanc(!): New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Blanc cannot believe the consternation in which he has plunged their parish by taking away Father (A. Pierre) Ladavière, (S.J.) to give them Father (John Francis) Ab(b)adie, (S.J.) who, during his short stay here has committed scandals. It is infamous to have their young girls treated so roughly by such language.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {3}


1849 Mar. 27
Marziou, V(ictor) and Company: Havre, (France)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

They confirm their last letter of (February) 27 which gave notice of a box of books on the Rockingham. They also send notice (no enclosure) of a book shop bale sent by D(omini)que Meynis of Lyons which they have sent on the Vesta, Captain Holwick(?).

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {3}


1849 Mar. 29
Beckmann, Father: Osnabruck, Germany

Baptismal certificate for Leonard Joseph Menge, son of Lawrence and Regina Maris Klicke Menge. Born Aug. 28, 1831, baptized Sept. 1831 in the Cathedral church at Osnabruck with Joseph Bernard Vogelsang as sponsor.

II-4-k - A.D.S. - 1p. - 12mo. - (German) - {2}


1849 Mar. 29
Benoit, Father J(ulian): Fort Wayne, Indiana
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He has received a response from Father (Edward) Sorin C.S.C. concerning the tardy nephew of the great Washington. He can betake himself to South Bend when the time seems good, and under the conditions expressed in Purcell's letter. He will be welcome. The opening of the navigation on the canal will not delay him longer. It will not be difficult for him to get to his destination.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - (French) - {4}


(1849 Mar. 30)
(Blin, R.U., Sister St. Arsène: Galveston, Texas)
 to Father E(tienne) Rousselon: New O(rleans, Louisiana)

She recently wrote to Father (Adrien) Rouquette asking him to do a favor and several days later she learned that he had gone. Rousselon is to open this letter, read what is for himself, and then burn it. It will be too old on his return. She wishes to verify the news of Sister Ste. Ursule, (R.U.); it seems so strange. Temporal affairs are going well. They had 3 First Communions on the 17th. What will (St. Arsène) do at the end of her three years? She is not equipped to go further. Young Nagle will bring Rousselon's letters free. They say the results of the council will embrace many things and that is is probable that Father (Napoleon Joseph) Perché may be a bishop. No postulants are coming here; if she had the money she would prefer professed already formed. Sister St. Stanislas (R.U.) has told one of the two novices that she has not shown enough zeal in carrying out an order. The novice is discouraged and says that she does not want to stay in this house. She will not give up her vocation but this house, and this before the Bishop arrives.

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 12mo. - {6}


1849 Mar. 30
Choiselat Gallien, J.: Paris, (France)
 to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

The receipts of the Association of the Propagation of the Faith were diminished because of the disastrous events. The two councils have allocated to New Orleans from the receipts of 1848, 16,200 francs. By his letter of April 30, he told Blanc that after payment of the Poidebord draft there remained 910 francs in his 1847 allocation. He has paid on Blanc's order: 265 francs on June 29 to Mr. Dicharry, student at Urban College in Rome; 500 on August 16 to Father (F. Charles Henry) Boutelou de St. Aubin; and Blanc will find enclosed a form for a draft on Choiselat for 8,000 francs leaving a total of 4,345. He kept it, thinking Blanc would use it to pay debts he may contract in France. The Bishop of Calcedoine (Bishop Peter Marcellus Bonamie?) asked him if he could send him, out of Blanc's funds, the 2000 francs which were due him at New Orleans. He told him that he would have to have Blanc's authorization.

V-5-k - L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {6}


1849 Mar. 30
Raviol, Father John F.: Opelousas, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

He validated the marriage of Joseph Guillory and Elodie Jean Bap(tis)te Guillory. This marriage, contracted 5 years ago was rehabilitated at Grande Prairie on the occasion of the baptism of their child. He recalls to (Blanc) that his trip to France was to be during May. Since May is near and (Blanc) is going to the council at Baltimore, he wishes to fix the date and the priest who is to replace him. He must be back for December. Father (Simon) Rominger could replace him unless (Blanc) thinks otherwise. The Temperance Society, composed of Protestants and Catholics, has asked for the use of the church for May 4 for their meeting. What shall he do? Up to now they have met in the Methodist church. Also what to do about the collections made by the Protestant and Catholic ladies of the Charitable Society?

V-5-k - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {5}


1849 March 30
Rosecrans, Sylvester H.: Rome, Italy
 to Bishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He offers in explanation for his failure to write oftener that he has written every month to Mr. Purcell. He writes now in order to aid Purcell get another priest in the place of the Franciscan who has been causing him so much trouble. The man he mentions is at present unable to return to his native land because by studying in Switzerland and Rome without the government's permission and avoiding military service he has lost his citizenship. He desires to come with the emigrants from his country to America and has chosen the Cincinnati diocese to repair the damage done by the other priest, his fellow-countryman. There are 2 difficulties, he does not know what bishop will receive him, and he wishes to go by way of his home to see if he can convert his protestant parents, which way of going is forbidden by the Propaganda. The first difficulty Purcell can take away; to obtain the second he must have the permission of his future bishop and the means to pay the added expense, which in this case Purcell would have to pay. That would be about $125 or more. The man will be ordained soon. An answer from Purcell is desired immediately. Rosecrans gives a detailed description of the man's character, his being first in theology, his thoroughness and obedience. They themselves hear many rumors about Rome. Monsgr. Barnabo will not let him ruin his course now. Barnabo himself is not seen much there now. He speaks of a procession of Pope Pius IX, barefooted, of rumors about military movements, of bells being melted into cannons. He mentions the triumvirate of Mazzini, Armellini and Sasi. Achili is now in Rome. There are other Englishmen in Rome to convert the city. He speaks of buying books and asks Purcell to send him some money, since his brother did not send him any. He asks Mr. Purcell to see that he gets an answer at least to the first part of this letter in case Bishop Purcell is in the Baltimore Council. P.S. (In Italian) to Father Frederick Wood he sends a short note of greeting.

II-4-k - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 8vo. - {10}