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1853 Nov.
Raymond, Father G(ilbert): Angers, (France)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Several times during a year and a half, Raymond has heard that (Blanc) was coming to France. But he has waited in vain. A short time after the last Council of Baltimore some clergymen wrote from the United States that the rumor was that Raymond has been designated for one of the newly erected sees. 5 or 6 months later, another person told him that on (Blanc)'s proposal, he had been designated for Natchitoches but that other arrangements had been made. Raymond was grateful, on one hand, he would have refused without hesitation, and on the other hand his desire to work in the missions might have made him inclined to accept. He sent a letter to the Sulpician Seminary to be given to (Blanc) on his arrival but now takes the opportunity to write. (Blanc) has too high an opinion of him, but Raymond will try to be more worthy of it. He has recently learned that in Paris, desiring that none of their men be promoted to the episcopate, Father Faillon, director of the "Solitude," who knows Cardinal Fornari well, wrote him a very; urgent memorial on this subject and the Cardinal promised to take into consideration. (Blanc) has probably seen the letter Raymond wrote to Bishop (John Mary) Odin before Odin's departure for America. He told that ever since he had entered the seminary, he, Raymond, had had a great attraction to work in the missions. At St. Sulpice, he told his director that he had always been attracted to the missions. At the "Solitude," at the Seminary at Lyons, he felt it as strongly as before. His Superiors sent him to Baltimore. He was disappointed when he found he was limited there to classes in French, Algebra, etc. When he was president of the college his duties kept him from thinking of the missions. After a short trip to France, Raymond decided to take a definite stand. His character fits with the Americans; he thought then of returning there. He preferred the poor, the ignorant, the negroes, and slaves. This is what he wrote to Odin. Although Raymond is gay, loving to joke and laugh, he has always felt drawn to lead a hard and austere life, even like the Trappists. 3, 4, or 5 priests could be attached to central church, which some would serve while the others went out, two together on missions retreats. For example, at Baltimore, where Raymond was, one year, Superior of the little seminary of St. Charles, 5 miles from Baltimore. There were almost 400 Catholics, most of whom were slaves, living in a pitiable state as far as religion goes. If some priests had established themselves among them for some time, most would have been converted. There was another case of a Protestant, whose wife was Catholic. There were a number of slaves on the farm, living without any religion whatever; in the vicintiy there were many farms like it. This man said that although Protestants, he and his neighbors would be very glad to have a Catholic priest instruct their negroes and would even contribute to his expense. But there was no priest available; the nearest Catholic chapel was far away. Raymond heard it told to Archbishop (Samuel) Eccleston that there were places in the diocese, almost entirely made up of Protestant slaves, where it would have been easy to make conversions. But Eccleston would have had to have at his disposition priests of detachment. Raymond wrote to (Blanc) and Odin in March 1852. He intended to go to Paris in the coming vacation but the house of which he was superior was at that time being emptied with the "little" seminaries, and the priests at Angers all told him that a change of Superior then would be very injurious to their house and that he must remain. When Raymond was at Lyons, Father Gardette did not want him to leave. At Baltimore it seemed the house could not get along without him. Father (Louis) Deluol could hardly give him time for a retreat. The Superior General could not agree to his taking a short trip to Paris. Raymond wrote again last May asking for permission to work in the missions in some poor diocese in the United States; they said that permissions like that were granted with difficulty. Raymond consulted priests and talked to his Bishop, who blessed the rules he had outlined. Again Raymond appealed to his Superiors; he was told that because of the difficulties of executing his plans, he could not remain in the order and become a missionary in the sense he intended it. They left him free to choose. He returned to Angers a few days later and has been there 5 weeks. Their enrollment has been larger than usual; the difficulties of the "little" seminar have concluded favorable. He is going to pass this year with all fervor possible to know the will of God. He believes he will find others who will be delighted to live in the way he has spoken of. If he can leave at vacation time, a young priest has offered to leave with him. There are some seminarians at the seminary of Angers who ask nothing better than to go. A pious layman offers to accompany them as a Brother. 2 or 3 with a good Brother would be all they would need to begin. As to pecuniary means, Raymond believes he could find among his acquaintances and friends the means to arrive at the scene and the subsequent expenses would never seem embarrassing. Raymond knows the country. The diocese in the west of the United States seem to have the most to do. But he has also thought of the South where almost half are negroes and slaves and he knows the Bishops. Because of his knowledge of French and English he would prefer the diocese of New Orleans. He would also gladly work in Galveston or Mobile, in Natchez or Natchitoches. He believes several Bishops of the United States would be glad to see him return. He will leave for America without hesitation, with confidence in (Blanc)'s goodness. He would ask that this be kept a secret until it is decided, except for Odin. P.S. He wants to say how sad he is to see the ravages of yellow fever.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - (French) - 8pp. - 4to. - {6}


1853 Nov. 1
(Haughery), Margaret (Gaffney): (New Orleans, Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Receipted bill for $24.40 for milk in Sep(tember) and Oct(ober).

VI-1-f - A. Receipt S. - 1p. - 32mo. - {1}


1853 Nov. 1
Lambert, Rich(ar)d: New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Father E(tienne) Rousselon: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Receipt for $20 for one month's service as organist.

VI-1-f - A. Receipt S. - 1p. - 32mo. - {1}


1853 Nov. 1
McAnrow, Mathew: Maysville, K(entuck)y
 to Archbishop Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

McAnrow has entrusted $20 to Blanc's care to be forwarded to Cornelius and Margret Archdeacon who are on their way from Ireland. They are advised to call on Blanc for this money to pay their passage to Maysville where their brother-in-law and sister live. If they do not call, Blanc is to hold the money until McAnrow writes again.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {3}


1853 Nov. 2
Buteux, Father S(tanislaus): Bay St. Louis, (Mississippi)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

When Brother Pipérion (F.S.C.) was here, he gave them to understand that the Brother Visitor, Brother Facile, (F.S.C.) of Montreal would make great changes. When Brother Gelisaire, (F.S.C.), who was director here 3 months ago and who was recalled to France, was about to depart, he told Buteux that his replacement was sent with hostile views; that he had read one of his letters in which there were actual lies about Buteux. Buteux did not pay much attention to this; he saw many extraordinary things tending to destroy their boarding school but he never dreamed that the day school was threatened. Buteux just learned the day before yesterday that the Brother Director has received letters from Montreal which gave him hope that the day school would be closed here. Buteux will begin with the temporal consideration; it is the least important part. Of the $600 which Buteux pledged to pay for the travel and establishing expenses of 3 Brothers (of Christian Instuction), he has already paid $400. Could they in justice give him only one year of year of school, during which they have been paid, besides $50 during 9 months and $33 during 3 months? This is not speaking of the expenses of filling in the playground, of furnishing tables, maps, pictures, of building the brick house which (Blanc) saw. He does not speak of the 5 years of suffering and anxiety to found this work. On the religious side, Buteux was glad to have the Brothers because of the good they would have done here for the youth. What a blow to have the school close! What a triumph for the Protestants, the bad Catholics, for the French Freemasons. Especially after having repeated over and over that once established, the Brother's school would endure. According to the agreement between Facile and Buteux, the school was to resume today. The Brother Director refuses to open it. Facile has not written. Buteux thinks that Facile will see (Blanc) before he comes here. He will especially give as the reason for leaving the Bay, that Buteux has not built a house for the Brothers. Even if Buteux was in good health, he could not, in the limits of one letter, give the excellent explanations about the house. Buteux asks (Blanc) to let him know when Facile will be in New Orleans and to suspend judgement until he can explain to him in (Blanc)'s Presence. The new Director is excessively slow to understand; Buteux is confirmed in this by the complaints of the parents. Buteux is not worrying about 2 piastres but about a principle. It had been agreed between Pipérion, Gelisaire, and Buteux that the half-boarder would pay $7, of which $2 would go to the priest and $5 to the Brothers. It seems that Gelisaire admitted one for only $5 without letting Buteux know or asking consent. Buteux demanded the 2 piastres from the portion allowed the Brothers. This idea never got into the Director's head and at the third attempt, he said Buteux would do well to wait for Facile to come for he would never pay the money. Buteux renews his thanks for (Blanc)'s Kindness in inconveniencing himself to visit him at the beginning of his illness and give him the happiness of Confession.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {6}


1853 Nov. 2
Monsseaux, P.H.: New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Father E(tienne) Rousselon: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

A receipted bill for $32 for a tombstone in memory of Father (Jean) E(tienne) Blin and one for Father V(alcourt) G. Gauthreaux. Receipted by F. (?) Chevalier.

VI-1-f - A. Bill S. - (French) - 2pp. - 16mo. - {4}


1853 Nov. 2
Esseiva, S.J., Father J(ohn): Grand Coteau, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Esseiva asks (Blanc) to delegate one of them to bless the two chapels under construction and which in spite of their disaster, will soon be opened. The one at Plaquemine has no other ceiling but the roof and no walls except the outer ones. Perhaps because of lack of resources, the ceiling and interior walls could be done only in 2 or 3 years. The Father in charge of the parish of this chapel plans to open it soon. They would like to know if it can be blessed unfinished or must they continue as they have been in the old one which has become too small? Esseiva takes this opportunity to tell (Blanc) how pained he was to learn the step their Superior (Jesuits) has just taken so suddenly in regard to this College of (St. Charles). The lack of subjects necessitated this extreme measure. It is not Esseiva's place to judge the reasons of Father (Anthony J.) Jourdan(t, S.J.). Esseiva would never have believed the news would have caused so much consternation among their students, their parents, and the general population. P.S. Perhaps Esseiva is a bit bold but it seems to him that there is a means of reopening this college a year from now. This is his plan. The German province, to which he belongs, has no mission overseas. Many subjects are still dispersed in different provinces since their expulsion from Switzerland. He proposes to go to Europe and offer this college to the German Provincial. They would not rub elbows with the Lyond Province; the space between the Mississippi and the Pacific is large enough. This plan should not be known before the major Superiors pronounce on it.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {5}


1853 Nov. 3
Buteux, Father S(tanislaus): Bay (St. Louis, Mississippi)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Mrs. Dujay could not leave last night; Buteux takes the opportunity to ask (Blanc) to write to Brother Albien, (F.S.C.), their present Director, and tell him to reopen the school. Brother Facile, (F.S.C.), when he was here, gave Buteux his word that it would reopen on November 2. Buteux does not know what to tell the parents. If it goes on, they will begin to suspect and the Freemasons will be quick to set up a school. Would it be just for the (Christian) Brothers to leave before Buteux has someone to replace them? He asks (Blanc) to come to their aid by intervening with his authority.

- A.L.S. -


 On the same paper: 

1853 Nov. 4
Buteux, Father S(tanislaus): (Bay St. Louis, Mississippi)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

A third delay in Mrs. Dujay's departure emboldens Buteux to submit another idea. It is for (Blanc) to write to Brother Albien to open the school on Monday and continue it until Bishop (James Oliver) Vandevelde arrives and settles affairs. It seems to Buteux that the Brothers could not leave without episcopal authority. Buteux rented to the Brothers. Mr. Poincy's house at the Bay. They have made changes but promised to replace things as they were. It will be impossible to repair the house for less than $100. Also could the Brothers receive $400, two-thirds of the amount for their travel and cost of setting up permanently, and then stay only one year? If they do not keep to their agreement and do not recompense him, Buteux will hold their furniture. The value would not repay one-fourth of the expenditures he has made. He asks (Blanc) to put his reply in the mail Saturday before noon so that he can have it for Sunday morning on the Creole.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {8}


1853 Nov. 3
Klaholz, C.SS.R., Father Fr(ancis): Lafayette, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop Anthony (Blanc): New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Herman Ahlers wishes to marry Mary Helen Mollering, widow of his brother Gerard Henry Ahlers who died in Europe May 13, 1850. A dispensation is asked, for if the woman and the child of the first marriage come to America there is a danger that she will not be able to support herself.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - (Latin) - 2pp. - folio. - {4}


1853 Nov. 3
Hallinan, Father M:
Mt. St. Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, (Ohio)
 to (Orestes A.) Brownson: (Boston, Massachusetts)

He would have writtin sooner but he was awaiting the opportunity to send the seminary philosophy which Brownson consented to examine. Brownson will remember that Hallinan promised to settle matters between Brownson and Father (Edward) Purcell. Hallinan felt a certain delicacy to introduce the subject. At present he feels less inclined to speak to Purcell on the matter on account of the criticism which appeared in the (Catholic) Telegraph on Brownson's last number to which Hallinan objected. Although the misunderstanding between Brownson and Purcell is but a trifle, Hallinan prefers to let matters rest until he sees Brownson in Cincinnati.

I-3-k - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {3}


1853 Nov. 4
Mina, Father Ve. M(odest)e: St. John Baptist, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop Ant(hony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

He is alone again; Father (john?) Flanagan left suddenly yesterday. The epidemic continues its ravages. Last Wednesday, 7 burials; yesterday 2; and today 4. It is impossible with his infirmities for Mina to supply all the needs. Will Blanc send Flanagan back, at least for 2 weeks. Everyone is satisfied with Flanagan and although he does not speak French well, he makes himself understood. The seals on the effects of the late Father (Edward E.) Legendre have not have been lifted because of the absence of the recorder who has been in New Orleans almost a month for fear of the epidemic. As soon as they are lifted, Mina will pack up what belonged to him and send it to the archbishopric. In his last confession, Legendre told of having received books from France with the condition of saying 200 Masses and that he had not fulfilled this promise. Mina asks Blanc to have 35 Masses said; he will send the stipends at the first opportunity.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {3}


1853 Nov. 6
Buteux, Father S(tanislaus): Bay St. Louis, (Mississippi)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Buteux thanks (Blanc) for the promptness with which (Blanc) sent his consoling reply. Buteux does not know whether Brother Albien, (F.S.C.) has received (Blanc)'s letter; it is 5 in the evening and he has not seen him. Buteux's state of weakness was the principal cause of so little order in his letters, also his anxiety about his school. Buteux does not want (Blanc) to condemn the Brothers (of Christian Instruction) without hearing them. Perhaps Albien will leave the city this evening. Buteux asks the same for himself; he cannot go for some days as his leg still has an open sore. Albien is much given to equivocation. If Buteux knew why the Brothers have acted as they have, he would tell it even if he is wrong. When the new Brother Director came with the Brothers destined for the New Orleans school, Buteux did not talk to them for 8 or 10 days after their arrival; they did not come to seek him out. So it was 8 or 10 days later that Brother Gélisaire, (F.S.C.) presented his successor who had already written false things about Buteux. Since then they have talked 10 or 12 times and almost always it has been painful. On All Saints day he forbade the Brothers to sing the Tantum Ergo if Buteux gave Benediction. Today he refused to ask a Brother to help Buteux ring the bell. Albien once told him that he was content that the pupils did not return because the work was badly begun. Buteux knows of only two reasons for acting like this. 1. Buteux had learned from a letter of Brother Facile (F.S.C.)'s after his visit here about a year ago that he looked on this establishment as a place of retreat for himself, that he planned to resign as Visitor and ask to be named director here and so he wanted it to be very small and above all an occassional lodging and house in the country for the Brothers of New Orleans. His hope was disappointed. 2. When Buteux asked for the Brothers, he never dreamed of anything but a day school for the children of the Bay and those of New Orleans whose parents came to spend the summer here. Facile talked of a boarding school. Buteux knew that the boarders were under the Brothers' control and that the day school had nothing to do with it. However Buteux was ready to help them. It seems that the 3 directors did not obey Facile's orders about the boarding School. Buteux's brick house could not be suitable as a boarding school. He cannot enter into all the details but he is sure that he can make a satisfactory explanation. Buteux begs (Blanc) to settle this by episcopal authority. Last year, when the day school opened the were, as today, only 3 Brothers, with the difference that only 2 were capable of teaching. This year all 3 are. Even if the Brothers leave, they could not refuse to have the school until Bishop (James Oliver) Vandevelde arrives and sees to replacing them. The parents ask when the school will resume. The only ting is for the Brothers to have the school up to the last day of their stay here and that on that day Buteux have other religious continue it. The Creole returns here tomorrow night or Tuesday. Can Buteux expect a word from (Blanc) for himself and one for Albien?

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {7}


1853 Nov. 6
Gouesse, (C.S.C.), Father F(rancis): New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

If (Blanc) sees any of their administrators, will he say a word about this "horse-power" they have been promising for so long. Gouesse cannot be "at the pump" 10 hours a week as he is now. During the day he has all his duties to perform, visitors to receive, the chapel to keep in order; at night, the Asylum registers to keep. The same work for 2 months and more to come. It is beyond his strength. He has said nothing of what he owes the Brothers and Sisters and above all in contingencies which is not the least part. P.S. This would be an indiscretion if (Blanc) has written for reinforcements.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {1}


1853 Nov. 6
Grignon, Father M(athurin) F.: Natchez, (Mississippi)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

In consequence of (Blanc)'s last letter about Father (John Andrew) Fierabras, Grignon wrote to Port Gibson for the paper Mr. Moore made out immediately after Fierabras' death. If (Blanc) judges it right to countersign this copy, Grignon will send it as soon as he receives it. (Blanc) could also tell him if the letter Grignon will send to Fierabras' parents should go at the same time and the same address. He believes Fierabras has several sisters but knows the address of only one to whom Fierabras wrote often. Grignon has been waiting for a letter from Jackson for a week; his telegram of yesterday is still unanswered. But this morning he received a letter from a young man from Vicksburg; he spoke of Father (Francis Xavier) Leray as recovered. He also had a letter from Father (Julian) Guillou who worries Grignon. He has just written Guillou to come to Natchez to convalesce. (Blanc) can judge better from his letter which he sends (no enclosure). (P.S.) If Bishop (James Oliver) Vandevelde is to stay in Chicago until the news of an appointment comes from Rome, Grignon does not know what will become of the Catholic children at Natchez. There is no school for them and the expectation of a Bishop has kept Grignon from doing anything about it. Lacking a Brother, but with a good Catholic layman, one could form a good little primary school.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 8vo. - {6}


(18)53 Nov. 6
(Ray, R.U.), Sister Ste. Séraphine: New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Some notices sent here have informed (the Ursulines) that they are share holders in the Citizens' Bank. They have denied it several times but circumstances made them take steps to find out what this public opinion was based on. To their regret they have discovered that under Sister St. Etienne (Marin, R.U.) in 1842, an act had been passed making them share holders. It has been impossible to find this act and those who are shown as representing the Community have no recollection of ever having signed. They remember only the opposition of the Chapter. They remember that Mr. Garidel came to urge them to recall their decision but the Chapter felt obliged to persist in its determination. The Community wishes this act to be annulled as soon possible. Sister writes to know what (Blanc) thinks of the matter.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {5}


1853 Nov. 7
(Cavaroc, Charles?): New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell: Cincinnati, (Ohio)

Duplicate. (Cavaroc) encloses the bill of lading of 17 casks shipped by the st(eame)r U.S. Mail and the amount of (Cavarod)'s expenses which has been cashed by Father E(tienne) Rousselon. The condition in which they reached here was the worst ever seen, not a single hoop on; 5 to 10 gallons wantage must be accounted. Purcell was ill treated in Bordeaux; the same might have been bought at lower prices and better quality. The statement of expenses totals $258.95.

VI-1-f - Copy - 1p. - 4to. - {2}


1853 Nov. 7
(Purcell), Archbishop J(ohn) B(aptist): Cincinnati, (Ohio)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

They have had their grand ceremony and all passed off like clockwork, thanks to Father David (Whelan). The Telegraph will have told who were present. Bishop Frederic) Baraga is publishing a pastoral in Indian and English. This once printed he will set out for Europe-Ireland, Vienna, Rome-to be back in May. Bishop (Michael) O'Connor left this morning for Pittsburgh. They are all surprised at the communication written by Bishop (James Oliver) V(andevelde) and signed Rhadamanthus in the Western Tablet. The Dr. (J.M.?) Ives who was his travelling companion on that occasion had to get a certificate at Washington that it was not a certain disease he had! This Ives was sent away from the last council by Archbishop (Francis Patrick) K(enrick). He wheedled the simple-minded Provincial of the Jesuits out of a D.D. He would forge and invitation from one young lady at Washington to another to have a chance of passing an evening with her. The trouble at Chicago is much exaggerated; it would offer no serious difficulty if treated with a little charity and prudence. (Purcell) thanks Father Rousselon for his attention to the wine. In future (Purcell) will never import any more. There is a fine stage of water in the Ohio from here to the mouth. The Nuncio (Archbishop Cajetan Bedini) writes that he will be here towards the middle of this month but (Purcell) thinks his visit may be deferred until the Christmas holidays. (Purcell) has sent $300 towards the Ex-Bishop (Levi Silliman) Ives fund. Bishop (Maurice) De St. Palais is quite an invalid with chills and fevers. (Purcell) thinks (Blanc) should distribute those little orphans throughout the West. (Purcell) will have room for 700 in an asylum on a 12 acre lot next summer. They could take 20 female orphans now at the rate proposed by the Howard Association. The Sisters' Hospital is doing well. A young Irish priest is giving (Purcell) a farm of 320 acres worth $35 an acre and about $10,000 worth of property elsewhere for a "petit seminaire". (Purcell) has presented an entirely different set of names for Chicago and Quincy. For Chicago, Father (James Frederick) Wood, Father (William) Unterthiner, (O.F.M.), Father (Pirminius) Eberhard, (O.F.M.); for Quincy, Father (John?) McCaffrey, Father (Henry Damien) Juncker, Father Josue M. Young, if he will not be sent to Erie or Pittsburgh. Wood and McCaffrey are the men.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {21}


1853 Nov. 7
The Relief Society: Baltimore, (Maryland)
 to (Archbishop Anthony Blanc?: New Orleans, Louisiana)

At a meeting called by Archbishop Francis Patrick Kenrick were present Father H.B. Coskery, Father F(rancis) L'Homme, Father Thomas Foley, Father John Early, S.J., Father F(rancis) X(avier) Seelos, (C.Ss.R.), B.R. Spalding and T. Parkin Scott. The Archbishop proposed the formation of a Society to aid clerical converts to the Catholic Church. (The constitution is given).

VI-1-f - Printed L. - 1p. - 4to. - {9}


1853 Nov. 7
(Vandevelde), Bishop James Oliver: St. Louis, (Missouri)
 to Archbishop A(nthony) Blanc: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

He is enroute to Natchez; he has said goodbye to Chicago. However he must visit St. Charles, St. Stanislas, and Quincy this week. And he has promised to give the veil next Sunday at the Ladies of the Sacred Heart to a young person from Illinois, the daughter of Governor Carlin, a convert from Protestantism. He will leave St. Louis on the 14th or 15th and go direct to New Orleans before taking possession of his new see. If Bishop (Auguste) Martin can put off his consecration until his arrival, (Vandevelde) would like to attend.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {4}


1853 Nov. 8
Cavaroc, Charles: New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Father E(tienne) Rousselon: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Receipted bill for $77.70 for freight, oil, and one b(arrel) of wine for Father (Mathurin F.) Grignon.

VI-1-f - A. Receipt S. - (French) - 1p. - 12mo. - {2}


1853 Nov. 8
Grebenstein, J.: New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to (Archbishop Anthony Blanc?: New Orleans, Louisiana)

A receipt for $9 for making a sofa.

VI-1-f - A. Receipt S. - 1p. - 16mo. - {1}


(18)53 Nov. 8
Martin, Bishop-elect Aug(uste): Natchitoches, (Louisiana)
 to (Archbishop Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

It was because of the difficulties of communication that Martin, in his last letter, asked (Blanc) to set the day of his consecration on November 30, since (Blanc) did not think it suitable to put it off until the 4th, the second Sunday of Advent. Martin has written to Bishop (James Oliver) Vandevelde and has announced the 30th publicly, knowing that several intend to go to New Orleans for the ceremony. Father (Vital) Giles, (S.J.) left G(rand) Coteau 10 days ago and has not arrived. This delay worries Martin both for this good old man and for himself who should already be on retreat. Martin wrote last week asking Father Jourdan(t) to leave him here until after Martin's return. Father (Hector Figari, C.M.) Figarri who spent several days here, would like to go to the consecration but Martin prefers that he come here to prepare for a reception for (Blanc), hoping that not having the consecration in his own poor cathedral, (Blanc) will not refuse, to Martin or to their Catholics, the consolation of being introduced by (Blanc). On receiving (Blanc)'s letter yesterday, the ladies of the convent set to work on the sandals; as for the hose, it is useless to think of them. He has not yet received anything from Father Rousselon but he is not surprised as it is so difficult to obtain anything from the city just now. The agitation caused by the epidemic is unbelievable, harvests, navigation, postal service, all are suspended. If Martin is consecrated in a black cassock, he will not be the first in this mission country. The epidemic is entirely gone except at the convent. Mothers, Sisters, and servants were all stricken. Three are dead. He is worried about Mother Simoni, (R.S.C.J.), the most regrettable if she is taken. What a trial for the boarding school! The absent families are about to return. The Lacomte family returns today after 2 months' absence 5 miles from here on their large plantation at Cloutierville. Mr. Lacomte has lost three stewards in succession. Martin must leave for the city between the 18th and 20th in order to arrive 3 or 4 days ahead. He will write once more before then.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {6}


1853 Nov. 8
Penco, C.M., Father A(nthony): St. Louis, (Missouri)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Penco thanks (Blanc) for writing about Ascension parish. He was not indifferent to the true state of things but up to now it has been impossible to remedy them. Father (Joseph) Giustiniani, (C.m.) is expected to return to America at the end of this month or beginning of the next. He could be back in L(ouisian)a as soon as he has subjects.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 16mo. - {3}


1853 Nov. 8
Roes, S.J., Father Jo(h)n: St. Louis, (Missouri)
 to Archbishop A(nthony) Blanc: N(ew) O(rleans, Louisiana)

Blanc's letter of (October) 23 Bishop (James Oliver) Vande Velde was received at the time Vande Velde was leaving for Quincy, where he was needed before his final leaving for the South. He wished to answer by telegraph but the wires were out of order. He will leave St. Louis for New Orleans on the 13th or 14th; he is almost sure he cannot reach New Orleans much less Natchitoches by Nov(ember) 21 because of the low water. He thinks he could be at Natchitoches if the consecration of the Bishop-elect (Auguste Martin) were postponed to the last Sunday in November or the first Sunday in December. Vande Velde seems to be in good spirits.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {3}


1853 Nov. 9
Kenrick, Peter Richard, Abp. St. Louis: St. Louis, Missouri
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Kenrick is of Purcell's opinion that none of the candidates proposed by him is the one required by the circumstances. The nations are greatly mixed in Illinois. Father (William) Quinn and Father (William) Harnett are young. Quinn was put on the list because he was praised so highly by the Archbishop of New York. (Bishop James) Vandevelde would have preferred Father (Anthony) O'Regan's name first, but Rome did not appear to pay any attention to his name when first proposed. O'Regan's weak voice and inexperience led Kenrick to omit his name. Because Archbishop Francis Patrick Kenrick preferred O'Regan, Kenrick later sent in O'Regan's name. He can recommend O'Regan for virtue and love of study. It was Kenrick's brother who suggested Father (Charles) Montgomery. The best to be done is to urge Rome to reinstate Bishop (Michael) O'Connor in Pittsburgh, giving him the administration of Erie, and to urge the appointment of Father (Josue) Young for Chicago. Kenrick is in favor of Father (Henry D.) Juncker for Quincy although it is said that he spoke no language well. It is probable that the Bulls will be sent back to Father (Joseph) Melcher. Kenrick feels that his imperfect knowledge of English would be for him a considerable difficulty. His loss would be much felt around here; it would endanger the success of a German Ursuline Convent which he founded. Kenrick is of the opinion that Rome should not require any oath or impose any embarrassing conditions. If the Nuncio's (Archbishop Cajetan Bedini visit is to have any favorable result, it will be by letting in light on Rome and making them seek for precedents of action. Bishop Vandevelde is at present at Quincy but will leave for Natchez in a few days.

II-4-l - A.L.S. - 6pp. - 8vo. - {19}


(18)53 Nov. 9
Martin, Bishop-elect Aug(uste): Natchitoches, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Blanc)'s letter of the 2nd arrived yesterday; this will be the last before Martin leaves. This tergiversation of the good Fathers is certainly vexatious. They have kept him between yes and no for two months. The first boat passing Grand-Ecore after Sunday will take Martin to Alexandria where he will have to wait for a riverboat. He can scarcely arrive before the 20th and as soon as he does he will go into retreat. Last Sunday he announced that he would return, accompanied by (Blanc). This can be arranged if the day after Martin's consecration (Blanc) will leave for Natchez where Martin could accompany him and from where they could go down directly to Grand-Ecore if Bishop (James Oliver) Vandevelde consents to put off his installation to the 4th Sunday of Advent, or, if Martin's installation were deferred to the 4th Sunday. Father (Vital?) Gil(l)es, (S.J.?) not having arrived, Martin will have to send Father (Hector Figari, C.M.) Figarri to replace him. Father (Felix) D(icharry) does not want and cannot be left alone. If some French priest presents himself, Martin could use him at once. He has some hope of getting a fellow student of D(icharry) at Propaganda, young Hays, now at Halifax where the climate is too severe for his health. D(icharry) has written to him as well as to his brother studying law at Alexandria. Martin wants to confide two orphans of 12 to 14 to D(icharry). Martin cannot prepare too soon for the future of acclimated subjects. Madame Simoni, (R.S.C.J.) was better yesterday; last night's cold has affected her and Martin is fearful. He has just learned that a boat from Shreveport will come down to Grand-Ecore on Tuesday, Martin will no doubt take it. (P.S.) Martin has finally found some merino for a purple cassock, an old silk robe for a cape and even a pair of hose forgotten in a store. At Ile, there is a young priest, a runaway from the diocese of Galveston, under an assumed name. He does not know that Martin knows it; he will wait to talk with (Blanc) and Bishop Odin.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {7}


1853 Nov. 10
Mégret, Father A(nthony) D(ésiré): Vermillionville, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, (Louisiana)

There were two cases of yellow fever before (Blanc)'s departure for Lafayette. The one, for whose burial Mégret left (Blanc) at Mrs. Chevallier de L'homme's, was the third to succumb. From then on until October 18 when Mégret wrote from St. Martinville, 70 persons died and since that date, 8 have died. This loss has been within the limits of the corporation alone. The country has not had a single death. There were 5 Protestant, asked to be baptized. Not knowing how to give thanks for the great blessing he filled the altar with gold and notes, asking Mégret to accept them. The epidemic is now at its end; however Sister Ste. Marie, (O. Carm.?) is still in the grip of the yellow fever; she is all right but they had feared to lose her. Mégret has not had a moment to write; he is alone in the midst of the dead. In the epidemic he had recourse to the protection of the Blessed Virgin, as he did for the cholera but the procession was turned into an impious one. From the next day on, the burials did not stop. The authors of the scandal were the first victims; a single exception, one who lost his wife. Mégret invited the Sisters (of Mount Carmel) to go to the Ladies at Grand Coteau or to Mrs. Dubuclet's but they did not want to. Mégret would like to retire 2 steps from town and from there he will come every day for his ministry. Suzanne died as a good Christian and Silvestre like a true professed religious. Mégret believes he will see (Blanc) soon.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {7}


1853 Nov. 10
Despouey, J.: New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

A receipted bill for $12.10 for corn, oats, and hay.

VI-1-f - A. Bills S. - 1p. - 16mo. - {1}


1853 Nov. 10
Glajeux, Berard Des: Paris, (France)
 to Bishop Peter Paul Lefevere: Detroit, (Michigan)

The Central Council of the Association of the Propagation has allotted the Diocese of Detroit 12,000 francs of which 2000 is provided from alms of the Jubilee. This additional sum will not be the basis of future allocations. Lefevere's deeds are of constant interest to them. They have in mind his chapels, schools, and especially his seminary for zealous missionaries. The Holy Father has recommended to the whole Catholic world the gift of charity for the missions. P.S. The secretary-treasurer, Charles Choiselat, on this first occasion of writing to Lefevere, offers his respects.

III-2-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 8vo. - {3}


1853 Nov. 11
Dantoine, Father P.: St. Pierre, Martinique
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, (Louisiana)

For a long time Dantoine has had a great desire to serve in the United States. Father Maril, chaplain at the hospital, in whom he confided a few days ago, confirmed him in his plan by making him hope that (Blanc) might receive him in his diocese. The post of chaplain which Dantoine holds is a post of confidence which Dantoine holds is a post of confidence which Bishop (John Francis Stephen) Leherpeur had given to his brother who died in the last epidemic. Dantoine directs 40 Sisters of St. Joseph of Cluny, and 200 boarders from the best families of the Colony. He is often invited to preach at the Cathedral. If (Blanc) wishes to have information about him, he may write to the Bishop of Carcassonne who allowed him to go to the Bishop of Martinique who desired his services. Dantoine has written without talking to Leherpeur who is in France. Dantoine had made good studies in literature and theology and has some knowledge of English.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {4}


1853 Nov. 12
Roduit, S.J., Father J(oseph): Grand Coteau, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Father (Anthony J.) Jourdant, (S.J.) has just written that from now on there will be only three priests here, Father (Vital) Gilles, (S.J.), Father (Louis) Rocoffort, (S.J.) and Roduit. Gilles is away; he will not return from Natchitoches until about December 8 and they will be only 2 until he does. In the interest of the people, accustomed for so many years to have several Masses on Sunday, Roduit asks (Blanc) for permission to binate as often as necessary.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {4}


1853 Nov. 14
Lesne, Father J(ames): New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

A person whom Lesne prepared for her First Communion about 8 years ago, and who could not make it then because of her parents who were not religious, came to ask him to make it now. She married civilly about 4 years ago. The church ceremony was prevented by her brother-in-law. She seems well disposed but her husband barely consented as he said he did not want anyone to know that he was married in the church. Lesne asks for the faculty to marry them. (Blanc writes and signs this note on the letter): Lesne may perform the marriage in the presence of two witnesses.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {1}


1853 Nov. 15
(Lamy), Bishop John: Santa Fé, (New Mexico)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Lamy) is thinking of leaving here at the end of January to go to Europe. He would like to know if (Blanc) would go at the same time. They could meet at New York or elsewhere for the beginning of March. (Blanc) is to write to him at St. Louis. He also asks (Blanc) to send him his little niece, (Marie Lamy) at Covington, K(entuck)y to the home of Mrs. Mosset. The child knows the family; they live on Main Street. They have a shop. (Lamy) will write about this to the Ursulines to tell them that he will wait for his niece at Covington to take her back to her parents. (Lamy) hopes the epidemic has ceased. He saw in the papers that all the Brothers were victims and many of the priests dead and some very ill. The little girl must be at Covington the 8th or the 12th of February.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {3}


1853 Nov. 15
Jordain, Father Ph(ilibert): Grande-Trappe, (France)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

The silence (Blanc) has maintained for almost six months, despite the numerous letters Jordain has written, plunges him into despair. He is not surprised when he considers his unworthy conduct and the evil he did to religion in (Blanc)'s diocese. What can he do to obtain from (Blanc) the request he has made for so long? He asks him to send his letters of ordination and his exeat for the diocese of his origin. Without that it is impossible to present himself anywhere without being suspect. Without that he can only lead a miserable life and his days more miserable than he began them.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 12mo. - {1}


1853 Nov. 15
Spalding, Bishop M(artin) J.: Louisville, (Kentucky)
 to O(restes) A. Brownson: (Boston, Massachusetts)

Many Catholics of Louisville, Spalding among the number, feel a strong desire to hear Brownson lecture. Two years ago Brownson was pleased to give them hopes of a visit. Spalding's absence in Europe that winter prevented him from urging the invitation upon him at that time. He hopes Brownson will give them a few days this winter.

I-3-k - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {1}


1853 Nov. 15(?)
(Fleix y Solans), Bishop Fr(a)ncois: Havana, (Cuba)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc): N(ew) Orleans, (Louisiana)

In spite of promises it seems (Fleixy Solans) will never receive a visit from (Blanc). Mr. Semanat, brother of (Blanc)'s subjects, his sisters, was presented and (Fleixy Solans) offered him hospitality and his recommendation. He thanks (Blanc) for the copy of the Acts of the National Council. He congratulates (Blanc) on the end of the epidemic. The cases here have not been so violent as in the summer.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 12mo. - {2}


1853 Nov. 16
Chalon, Father G(abriel): Mobile, (Alabama)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

As soon as Chalon got (Blanc)'s letter he set about getting the death certificate. He could get it notarized only yesterday. The heirs owe him 4 and piastres; the counsul's fee was 12 francs 50 and those of the secretariat, 2 piastres. Bishop (Michael) Portier on his way to Bishop (Auguste) Martin's consecration, will bring Father (Louis) Dufour's trunk. They have resumed their usual occupations, no more sick, it seems like a vacation. They are expecting Portier any day; (Blanc) will see him before they do. He will probably come back fat and strong. Chalon sends greetings to Father Rousselon.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 8vo. - {4}


1853 Nov. 16
Duffy, Father P(atrick): Yazoo City, (Mississippi)
 to Archbishop Anthony Blanc: N(ew) Orleans, (Louisiana)

Duffy arrived here yesterday; he found Father (Julian Guillou?) Guillot very low. It will be some time before he will be able to go to Orleans. He has been in bed 6 weeks and does not seem to rally from his late attack of yellow fever. The priest of Jackson is also sick; Father (Richard) Hard(e)y had a dispatch on Sunday to visit him. The epidemic still prevails; one death and 5 new cases today. Some of the citizens who had returned are again going to the country. 52 Catholics died here; a large number in such a small congregation. Duffy's own health is very good. He boards at the hotel as Guillot's house is too small.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - 1p. - 4to. - {3}


(18)53 Nov. 16
Guinand, R.S.C.J., Madame A(dine): Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Her three daughters (Religious of the Sacred Heart) who saw (Blanc) at St. Michael told her of his kind interest. As (Blanc) wished, she went to St. Michael; she could stay only three days. They had to return to complete their work and spend a few days in recollection. All is ready. Not being able to have a Jesuit for their retreat, she left it up to God. She was not able to make the retreat at this time. classes resumed on November 3. They did not have one student. some day scholars only. On the 7th, 4 came, 2 others since, about 15 day scholars. That is all they have. The Sisters are in good health thanks to Mother (Annette) Praz, (R.S.C.J.). Their travelers from the north, expected for 3 months, have not arrived and they have had no news. Doctor Romer has made new requests to buy his house. Guinand has told him that the thing did not depend on her and that it was too far from town. But they would have need of more ground so that the children and young teachers could take more exercise. They would like to take a long walk as at G(ran)d Coteau and St. Michael.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {4}


1853 Nov. 16
Rézé, C.S.C., Father J(osep)h: St. Laurent, (Canada)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc): N(ew) Orleans, (Louisiana)

Up to now Rézé thought that the Visitor and Father (Edward F.) Sorin, (C.S.C.) had gone to France to negotiate the peace so long desired. Father (Pierre) Chappé, (C.S.C.) was to go to New Orleans to end his visit to America. Rézé is waiting advice on his part, with Sorin, about the personnel (Blanc) asked for. If this reconciliation comes about, there will be means to answer his request. Rézé shares (Blanc)'s opinion of Father (Francis) Gouesse, (C.S.C.); the Visitor thinks the same. But this shifting will present difficulties since Father (Peter) Salmon, (C.S.C.), who is going to New Orleans, does not know English and to take a Superior at Lac, Holy Cross must be able to count on his perfect submission to Sorin. Rézé is truly happy in the confidence Gouesse shows in (Blanc); he could not put it in a better place. Rézé is grateful for the interest (Blanc) has in their Congregation (of Holy Cross) and the desire he has to see peace concluded between Holy Cross and Notre Dame du) Lac. The latter establishment took a path which would inevitably lead to its destruction.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 12mo. - {7}


1853 Nov. 16
Neumann, Bishop John N(epomucene): Philadelphia, (pennsylvania)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Neumann transmits the note of John Lacarini who is very grateful for the dispatch with which he received the amount he had deposited at New Orleans. (Enclosed is a receipt dated) October 13, 1852, for 300 piastres payable in a year with interest at 5 percent. (Blanc's signature on this note has been crossed out).

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 16mo. - {2}


1853 Nov. 17
Glajeux, Bérard des: Paris, (France)
 to Archbishop Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

The two Coucils of the Association of the Propagation of the Faith have allotted to New Orleans, 5000 francs, 2000 of which come from the alms of the Jubilee. The allocation from the ordinary receipts is subject to reduction in case these receipts are below their anticipation. Blanc will understand that the small figure is because of the consideration given to missions in jeopardy. The total subsidy forNatchez, on Blanc's recommendations as administrator, is 25,000 francs, of which 20,000 from the jubilee alms have already been paid by their late treasurer. They thank Blanc for having initiated the Association in his diocese. They hope his example will be followed by all the Bishops in America. (Signed also by) the secretary-treasurer, Ch(arles) Choiselat.

- L.S. -


 On the same paper: 

(1853 Nov. 17)
Choiselat, Ch(arles): (Paris, France)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

2000 francs were allocated to New Orleans from jubilee alms, and 900 as three tenths of the portions chargeable to the ordinary receipts. For the diocese of Natchez 20,000 francs from the jubilee and 1500 from the ordinary receipts. The 20,000 for Natchez is placed at the disposition of (Blanc) who has at hand for the Association 515.60 francs by the remittance on April 21, a draft of 19,484.40 francs. There remain to be paid to Natchez, only 1500 francs for the sending of which a form is enclosed. As for the 2900 francs which Choiselat is going to send on the allocation for (Blanc)'s diocese, (Blanc) is to deduct this amount from money collected for the Association which Father (Stephen) Rousselon has just notified Choiselat of placing in (Blanc)'s hands. (P.S.) Choiselat offers (Blanc) in this first relationship his respect and devotion, asking for prayers for his father whom (Blanc) knew and appreciated, and for his son that he may inherit his virtues for the interest of the missions to which he consecrated his life. He incloses a letter for Rousselon.

- A.L.S. -


 Enclosure: 

1853 Oct. (!)16
Choiselat, Ch(arles): Paris, (France)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Choiselat has just received (Rousselon)'s letter of October 24 and he thanks him for the sentiments expressed on the occasion of his cruel loss. Nothing can enhearten them like the prayers which arise from all points of the world for him who so loved God and desired to make Him loved. A most holy death must crown so beautiful a life. Rousselon is to pray also that Choiselat may worthily carry his heavy burden. Choiselat has entered in the receipts of the Association in New Orleans, the 4000 francs of whose collection Rousselon has notified him.

- A.L.S. -


VI-1-f - L.S., A.L.S. and Printed forms - (French) - 9pp. - 4to.&12mo. - {6}


1853 Nov. 17
Spalding, M(artin) J. Bp. of Louisville: Louisville, Kentucky
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He thanks Purcell for his opinion in regard to the feast of the Immaculate Conception, communicated to him through Father D(avid) Whelan, Purcell's rubricist general. The only modification Spalding would suggest is that if the Solemnity be transferred to the following Sunday, the early Mass on the day should not be "Solemn", Spalding supposes that the Nuncio (Archbishop Cajetan Bedini) is now on his way west. He asks Purcell to notify him of his arrival in Cincinnati and invite him to Louisville. Spalding hopes to come up for him. He will soon establish his chancery. He learned from St. Louis that the Jesuits are thinking of leaving Cincinnati as they have left Louisville. They ought to talk with the Nuncio about the relation of religious orders with Bishops. The Jesuits giving up the College in Louisville created much embarrassment for Spalding. Bishop (John) McCloskey writes that his Vicar General, Father (John J.) Conroy, is first on the list for Portland. Father Whelan misunderstood Spalding's remark about the copies of the new Ordo for Louisville.

II-4-l - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 8vo. - {9}


(18)53 Nov. 17
(Truchet), R.U., Sister Marie de St. Stanislas: Galveston, (Texas)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Sister had resolved to write before Bishop (John Mary) Odin's departure on a personal matter but (Blanc)'s absence and sickness prevented her. She believes that now he has been informed as she had told Father (Napoleon Joseph) Perché and Mother St. Seraphine (Ray, R.U.) no doubt told (Blanc). several reasons have forced her to this. If the excessive heat of this climate was not so adverse for her she would have asked to return to the convent where she has already spent 11 years. Odin authorized her to take steps to return to France. She wrote to the Community of her choice and when she gets a reply, he will give her an obedience. Sister has just finished a retreat of 10 days during which she was inspired to write to (Blanc) and to follow his decision whether to stay in this country or to go. This must be decided in order to have the box sent, which is at N(ew?) O(rleans?) or to have the contents sold to pay the expenses of her trip, as Odin says the Community will give nothing. (Blanc) could send a letter by Odin troubled about a perpetual vow which their Superior proposes for the whole Community (Ursulines) which would involve novenas for all the feasts of the Blessed Virgin and processions. Since she has told St. Stanislas more processions. Since she has told St. Stanislas more than once that their constitutions had too many vocal prayers what they ought to deduct, St. Stanislas finds it a little extraordinary to want to add to them and she does not think a Superior can have perpetual vows made by her Community. That is why she consulted Ste. Seraphine who advised writing to the old Communities and abiding by their decisions. She does not know the results but this vow was made. Whatever reports have been made to (Blanc) about her conduct since the beginning of this new house, in all the painful circumstances in regard to inexperienced superiors and a personality much given to change, St. Stanislas has always acted for the spiritual and temporal good of this convent. All her trials have come from opposing things which assuredly were not according to God. If she had less religious instruction, she would have let things go as in the Boston convent. If there had been someone there who had given information about what was going on, it would exist today. They have few young persons, novices or postulants, but since they are Irish, Sister does not count on their reception as their Superior has said many times that she would not receive any. Sickness has not yet stopped here; each day several die of the fever. Father (Peter F.) Parisot, (O.M.I) has it; he now out of danger. There are always some sick in their Community. Sister St. Thoma, (R.u.), their Superior's companion, was in bed tow weeks. Sister St. Bruno, (R.U.) was in bed for 3 weeks with a tumor in her mouth.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {9}


1853 Nov. 18
Kenrick, Peter Richard, Abp. St. Louis: St. Louis, Missouri
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Kenrick wrote to Cardinal Fransoni to withdraw the name of Father (Thomas) G(race) and to say that he did not care whether Bishops were appointed for Chicago and Quincy from his list or Purcell's list. He stated that Father (Henry D.) Juncker would be best for Qunicy and Father (Josue M.) Young for Chicago. He hopes Bishop (Michael) O'Connor will be restored to Pittsburgh and that Erie will be intrusted to him. He believes that they cannot make any serious mistake in raising their voice against Secret Societies. As to the ipso facto excommunication, so many conditions are necessary in order that a censure be actually incurred, that scarcely any are actually excommunicated on account of their adhesion to secret societies. He believes that a person may lawfully take nine percent interest from a railroad company because the periculum sortis is found in every such loan. What a person can do lawfully with his own money, he should not do with money entrusted to his care. Of all investments railroads are the least likely to prove satisfactory. Kenrick never lends a cent. Besides what he puts in the Banks, he employs in improving the property of the church. His creditors are sure to have an available resource for the payment of their demands. He is opposed to receiving more than the legal interest because of the scandal it might cause. The plan Kenrick intends to adopt is to give no more than four percent interest and in time to give none at all.

P.S. He does not intend to make the Immaculate Conception a feast of obligation. He does not intend to write to Rome against the oath required at ordination. He will write if Purcell writes. Something ought to be done to place the title of church property in safety.

II-4-l - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 8vo. - {11}


1853 Nov. 18
Turibe, (F.S.C.), Brother: Montreal, (Canada)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Blanc)'s letter of the 8th came today in the absence of Brother Facile, (F.S.C.) who is in St. Louis. Turibe will send it to him immediately. But he fears it will not arrive in time as he wrote that he wanted to leave there before December 1, to return to Montreal. In reading the letter one sees that (Blanc) has been informed by someone foreign to the affairs of their Brothers (of Christian instruction) at Bay St. Louis. It was not because they did not have subjects that the Brothers were withdrawn from the Bay. Father (Stanislaus) Buteux should know that. Turibe does not understand how anyone cold say that Buteux would be responsive to the closing of heir establishment. But nothing in his conduct gave a hint that he was anxious to have the Brothers in his parish. The person who talked to (Blanc) must have heard talk of the retirement of the Brothers and came to (Blanc) with all the fine sentiments in (Blanc)'s letter. Buteux found nothing. The fault was to have been too patient. They hoped that in time Buteux would decide to do at least part of what he had promised. The fault was that they were at the Bay with no other guarantee except Buteux's word. The Brothers became disgusted with the accumulation of petty vexationa; their Brother Provincial decided to withdraw the Brother. (Blanc) can see that this account differs from that in the letter. Buteux deceived them. They have just withdrawn from another city for the same reason. There is a third city where they had gone too far to withdraw for the present at least. There they were also misled. Turibe does not think it dishonorable for their Provincial to have had too much confidence in the word of a priest. Turibe's letter has no official bearing; the Brother Visitor is absent. It is Turibe's opinion after letters from Buteux and the Brothers. He would be sorry if Facile be taken in.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {4}


1853 Nov. 19
(Allon), August Bp. Meaux: Meaux, France
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

After receiving Purcell's letter he has done what depended upon him in order to give Purcell a successor to Father (Theodore) Hobigand. It is with confidence that he sends a young priest who has not yet been proved in talent or merit and he hopes that he will do very well in the new world where they see from day to day new progress of the Catholic religion.

II-4-l - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - (French) - {3}


1853 Nov. 20
Vignes, H(enriet)te: Pointe Coupée, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop A(nthony) Blanc: N(ew) Orleans, (Louisiana)

Blanc's letter arrived with one from Father (John) Esseiva, (S.J.); the latter told her that Joseph (Vignes) was no longer to go to the College of the same Society at Baton Rouge. Esseiva informed her of the reasons for the suspension of the College at G(rand) Coteau and expressed his regret because of Joseph. Vignes received Blanc's letter since the strange events happened to her but she had delayed answering it. She places all her confidence in God. She has been ill for some days. Her children are well; little Josephine is beginning to talk. She is saying nothing of her affairs because she knows nothing. Provosty has had an inventory made. She does not know where she will be living.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 12mo. - {4}


1853 Nov. 21
Martin, Augustin, Bishop elect of Natohitoches, L(ouisian)a: New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to (Archbishop John Baptist Purcell): (Cincinnati, Ohio)

Before starting his retreat before his consecration, which will take place on the feast of St. Andrew, he wishes to pay his respects to Purcell and ask his prayers for himself and his diocese. Despite his unworthiness he hopes that God through his ministry will do good work. He asks Purcell's prayers to that end.

II-4-1 - A.L.S. - lp. - 8vo. - {1}


1853 Nov.21
Chavaete, Father P.S.: Woumen, (Belgium)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Chavaete received (Blanc)'s letter of September 27 about a month ago. He had seen in the papers here that the yellow fever had had many victims at New Orleans but did not think it had reached such a point. Chavaete recalls that (Blanc) mentioned that he had been advised that 10 per cent was to be paid on everything sent to a foreign country. While Chavaete does not know the American law, he will give (Blanc) his opinion on this subject. On reading the will, Chavaete finds no foreign heir; (Blanc) is the only heir and the universal heir. It seems the testator made the will this way expressly to avoid difficulties in taxes. (Blanc) is the executor. Chavaete believes if (Blanc) insists on this point, they could force him to pay these taxes.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 12mo. - {1}


1853 Nov.22
Smith, (S.C.), Sister M. Raphael: (Emmitsburg, Maryland)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Sister regretted that she was obliged to leave N(ew) Orleans without seeing (Blanc). The little visits she had while there were always a gratification. She is again in her former duty as Directress of the Academy. Sister Regina (Smith, S.C.) will see (Blanc) and tell him how well the trip south has made Sister Raphael. Regina is taking with her another reinforcement to supply the vacancy made by the fever. Sister Raphael sends a little memento (no enclosure). She will always consider herself one of (Blanc)'s Creole children. When he sees Mr. Darby's family he is to give her remembrances.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - lp. - 16mo. - {3}


1853 Nov. 23
Fitnam, Father John C.: St. Bridget's Church, St. Louis, (Mo.).
 to Orestes A. Brownson: Boston, Massachusetts)

Perceiving that Brownson proposes visiting the west, he presumes upon his kindness and zeal for religion to ask him to lecture for the benefit of his church. The church is new and there is a considerable debt on the building.

I-3-k - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {1}


1853 Nov. 23
Garesche, Alex: St. Louis, (Missouri)
 to O(restes) A. Brownson: (Boston, Massachusetts)

He asks for the Jan. 1852 number of the Review as he loaned his to a friend who lost it. He is just now recovering after a dangerous illness of eight weeks. The Archbishop (Peter Richard Kenrick) objected to the courses of the Catholic Institute two years age because it partook too much of religious subjects. Brownson must not be to severe. No allusion was made to Brownson either direct or indirect. Brownson will be challenged to a discussion by the Rev. Mr. Rice of Cincinnati notoriety who has charge of the Presbyterian church in St. Louis.

I-3-k - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. -


1853 Nov.24
Mina, Father Ve. M(odest)e: St. John Baptist, (Louisiana)
 to Father E(tienne) Rousselon: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Importuned to say Mass, Mina has asked Rousselon to have 30 said. Mina refuses because some want to know the day the Mass will be said, others wish to attend, and most ask for one a month. He has asked them to ask other priests. Mina regrets not being able to attend the consecration of Bishop Martin since on the 29th and December 1, he has 2 services to hold and Father Basile must visit the sick. The epidemic has lost much of its intensity but there are still some new cases; he has heard of 3 since yesterday.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {2}


1853 Nov.25
Chambost, Father C(harles):
College of the I(mmaculate) C(onception) (Plaquemine, Louisiana)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Chambost takes a minute to reply to Rousselon's encouraging letter. The same troubles which at the time of his convalescence had made him fail in the obedience and gratitude he owes to Rousselon and the Archbishop and which would have no doubt been lost to him without Father (Napoleon Joseph) Perché, had still left in his heart, the impression that Rousselon was opposed to his work. But now he knows where he stands. The Archbishop's nephew, Father Victor Blanc, still wants very much to come here. The Archbishop saw his letter and seemed satisfied. Chambost's brother, (August Chambost) is not yet a priest; he is in the position Chambost was in coming here. The yellow fever has left at last; Chambost's house was severely struck. Mr. Sibileau, his assistant, is dead; Mr. Baubé, Mr. Grace and his mother have been near death. A little 6 year old orphan also died. Sixty some have died. Chambost attended 52 and buried 57. Their good ministers have fled in fear. All their schools have failed. Chambost is anxious to receive materials for the Living Rosary; there will be about 300 members. Last Wednesday, Chambost said Mass for the Archbishop; there were 20 Communions for his intention. Yesterday he held an anniversary service for Father (Casimir) Mouret; there 30 to 35 Communions. He hopes to have at least that many for Rousselon on St. Stephen's day. He held a service for Father (Louis) Dufour but since it was during the epidemic and he was not very popular, only Chambost's household attended. Baubée is better now. If Rousselon has some young men disposed toward the priesthood, he is to send them.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 12mo. - {10}


1853 Nov.25
Cointet, S.S.C., Father F(rancis): Notre Dame, (Indiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Their Superior, Father (Edward F. Sorin, C.S.C.) having received an order form the motherhouse to leave immediately for France, he was to sail from New York on the 12th. He hoped to be back for Christmas; they will be happy if he returns in January. Since Cointet left New Orleans he had been almost constantly on mission; he was very glad to have to opportunity to be out of affairs of administration. During the Superior's absence he will have to be at the college more often. P(atrick) J(ames) Conway is now learning bookkeeping; there is no extra charge but there is a charge of $12 a year for French. If Blanc agrees they will start him on February 1, the beginning of the next session. He tried to make Conway understand that he should learn a trade at the end of the school year but he has not succeeded. Father (M. P.) Rooney, (C.S.C.) says he has placed Conway in a trade 2 or 3 times without success. Cointet will order winter and summer clothes for him. P.S. Cointet has received the $150 for Conway.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {4}


1853 Nov.26
(Byrne), Bishop Andrew: Little Rock, (Arkansas)
 to Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

On his arrival here from Fort Smith, (Byrne) found Blanc's last favor. In the case of Dr. (Levi Silliman) Ives, (Byrne) at present does not have the means to do what he would desire. Circumstanses are very limited in a pecuniary point of view. Two trips lately to Fort Smith have cost him more than he received in his diocese for the last 12 months. When he has the means of meeting the desire of the Holy Father and Blanc, he will not be wanting. Blanc had severe trials in the loss of so many clergymen and religious. (Byrne) sees by the papers that Archbishop (John) Hughes had been very ill; it would be difficult to find one to succeed him. (Byrne) is glad that Natchitoches is filled with Blanc's own choice.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {4}


1853 Nov.26
Galard Terraube, M(arqu)is de: Lectoure, France
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Counting on (Blanc)'s charity, Terraube writes again about an affair with which (Blanc) concerned himself some years ago. As a former member of the Central Council of the Propagation of the Faith in Paris, Terraube asked in 1848, through Mr. Choiselat treasurer, if (Blanc) could find Mr. Bax who left for New Orleans in 1833 and of whom his parents had had no news since 1836. Only July 25, 1848, Choiselat wrote to Galard Terraube that he had news of Bax in a letter from (Blanc) stating that Pierre Bax, formerly at Baton Rouge and since than a baker at Natchitoches where he did very well, had opened a dry goods store in Vera Cruz, Mexico. (Blanc) who got this information from the pastor of Baton Rouse, added that he had written to Natchitoches and would send further details if he obtained any. Galard Terraube wrote directly to the French consul at Vera Cruz on August 3, 1850 and received a reply stating that all efforts to find this person had failed. At the insistence of Bax's mother he wrote a year ago to the pastor of Baton Rouge. But his letter remains without a reply. The mother asks him to write to (Blanc) again, asking (Blanc) to write to the authorities at Vera Cruz.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 8vo. - {3}


1853 Nov. 26
Meagher, Father James: Columbus, Ohio
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Meagher asks for a dispensation, parties unnamed for disparity of cult, as he thinks the man has not been baptized. There is an urgent reason for the dispensation, and he assures Purcell that all the conditions required by the Holy See will be fulfilled.

II-4-1 - A.L.S. - lp. - 12mo. - {2}


1853 Nov.27
Jourdain, Father Philibert: G(rande?) Trappe, (France)
 to Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

Jordain received Blanc's letter dated October 22. He thanks Blanc for the willingness with which Blanc acceded to his request; he thought he had given him only one address. It would be difficult to express his regret at having so often saddened Blanc during his stay in his diocese. He is an unfortunate one; he committed only follies in the world. To make it impossible to do so any more he has condemned himself to spend the rest of his days at LaTrappe. Today he took the novice's habit and hopes to commit himself irrevocably next year. He sees only a life of penitence ahead and he embraces it.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 12mo. - {1}


1853 Nov.27
Mégret Father A(nthony) D(ésiré): Vermillionville, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Mégret received (Blanc)'s replay to his first letter. "Thy will be done" was his repose during the first part of his sacrifice. He had intended to leave last Thursday for the city, Sister Marie, (O. Carm.) having recovered, but that day Sister Mathurine, (O. Carm.) became ill. She is better today. A person in the village is also ill. Mégret hopes to leave next week. It has been a very sad autumn for them. No one comes to the village. During the epidemic there was neither a baker nor a butcher. Now they have bread and meat but lack almost everything else. For more than three months he has received nothing and can count on very little in fees.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {3}


1853 Nov.28
Curiel, Jos(eph): (New Orleans, Louisiana)
 to Father E(tien)ne Rousselon: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Receipt for $16.20 for one barrel of sugar.

VI-1-f - A. Receipt S. - (French) - lp. - 32mo. - {1}


1853 Nov.28
Admas and Co(mpany): New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Receipt for $2.50 for freight. Receipted by Bunabeil(?).

VI-1-f - Receipt - lp. - 16mo. - {2}


1853 Nov.28
Curiel, Jos(eph): New (Orleans, Louisiana)
 to Father E(tien)ne Rousselon: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Receipt for 12 piastres for the hire of a servant, Cohn(?) and Sons(?).

VI-1-f - A. Receipt S. - (French) - lp. - 12mo. - {2}


1853 Nov.28
Paris, Father A(ugust) S(imon): St. Michael, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Paris asks (Blanc) not to forget him and to send Father (Claude Anthony) Tholomier as soon as possible. If he cannot come, Paris hopes (Blanc) will send a young man to take while waiting. Paris' courage has not yet left him but at times his situation affects him seriously. Father (Jean?) Martin will talk to (Blanc) and Paris hopes he will bring a positive answer.

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - (French) - lp. - 12mo. - {3}


1853 (Nov.29)
D'Aquin, Th(oma)s: (New Orleans, Louisiana)
 to Archbishop A(nthony) Blanc: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

A receipted bill for $35.12 for groceries. Receipted by J. Miard(?).

VI-1-f - A. Bill - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {2}


1853 Nov.30
Chambost, Father C(harles): Plaquemine, Iberville, (Louisiana)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Chambost's brother (August Chambost) arrived Sunday morning; he dieregarded all the orders. He should have had an understanding with Father Victor Blanc and Father Duplay, Superior of the seminary, about Victor's leaving. Chambost had also given him several commissions for himself and Father (Joseph Michael) Paret; all this was thrust aside. He did not even notify Chambost of his arrival. Imagine Chambost's surprise when he saw this long beard and white hat, like Don Quixote on Rosinante. His brother is well; his trip by way of New York was short. He has already begun to study English. Chambost is going to write Duplay to no longer wait for him but to send his men as soon as they are ready. He will also write the Bishop. Chambost would have written sooner to both but he thought they would be numbed and vexed by the noise and dust of the gun fire(?).

VI-1-f - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 12mo. - {5}