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(1855) (Sep.)
Brownson, Orestes A.: Boston, Massachusetts
 to Bishop M(ichael) O'Connor: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Brownson regrets that O'Connor has requested that his name be dropped from the letter of approbation at the head of the Review. Brownson intends to take out the letter in the next volume and regrets ever inserting it. He will probably remove from Boston and publish on his own responsibility but with the permission of his own diocese. He claims O'Connor has accused him of holding doctrines that he has not held and has been unfair in his treatment of him. Even the doctrine ascribed to him has never been condemned by John XXII and Pius VI that the Pope cannot visit the public acts of a prince with censure. Perhaps it was imprudent to express his own opinion but Brownson does not think so. No action of the bishops can keep the American people from believing this to be the true doctrines of the Church. He is not afraid and thinks Catholics have displayed a lack of firmness in the part. He did not intend to answer O'Connor's article except indirectly. He is writing against non-Catholics not Catholics. He will continue to teach his opinions until stopped by the Pope. Brownson writes candidly but respectfully. His position is difficult. He is attacked by non-Catholics yet no Catholics defend him. He begs O'Connor to forgive him his mistakes.

I-3-l - A.L.S. - 10pp. - 12mo. - {1}


1855 Sep. 1
Doane, George H.: Grey Cliff, (Newport, Rhode Island)
 to Bishop (James Roosevelt Bayley: Newark, New Jersey)

Although George has written one letter to (Bayley) today from (Emily) Harper's, he finds cause to write another. His father, (Bishop William Doane), instead of answering the manuscripts which George sent, replied in a way that George does not know how to answer. Doane's father said that Doanie's paper was not at all what he pledged himself to make. His father must disavow any right in Doane to throw up at his pleasure a pledge solemnly given and received. Doane should discharge his first duty which is to his father and the Church of his orders. As his father he implores George and as his bishop commands him to do justice to himself. He will not be released from his engagements. George does not recollect making any pledge at all as to the paper referred to. The note referred to is one in which he declared his intention to become a catechumen. He also withdrew the proposal that while a chance remained of his returning to the Episcopal Church, he would consult only (Bayley), his father and his brother on the subject. The great question in George's mind was the existence of the one Church, of which he was clearly satisfied at their first interview. It looks as though the conflict were narrowing to a final struggle. George will not reply to his father's letter until he hears from (Bayley).

II-2-n - A.L.S. - 8pp. - 16mo. - {3}


1855 Sep. 1
Doane, George H.: The Rocks, (Newport, Rhode Island)
 to Bishop (James Roosevelt Bayley: Newark, New Jersey)

Doane was much relieved to receive (Bayley)'s letter approving of the course he had pursued. A hint of the possibility of (Bayley)'s coming to Newport also gave Doane pleasure. The ladies of the house sympathized with this point. Within him, Doane has a peace of mind he has never experienced. (Bayley)'s advice to let controversy go will be gladly followed. Doane cannot be too thankful that he has such kind friends here. He has Father Faber's book on the Blessed Sacrament and is delighted. He hopes to see Father (William) O'Reilly next week. Would there be any impropriety in Doane using the offices in the Breviary?

I-5-n - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 16mo. - {2}


1855 Sept. 1
Hecker, C.SS.R. Fr. I(saac) T.: (New York, New York)
 to Orestes A. Brownson: (Boston, Massachusetts)

Hecker has had visits from Dr. (Ambrose) Monahan and Dr. (Jeremiah W.) Cummings to discuss Brownson's proposed visit to New York. They want to know when he can come and what rent he is willing to pay for a suitable house. As soon as it is certain Brownson is coming, they will speak to the Archbishop (John) Hughes. He suggests a house in Manhattanville. Brownson's friends will pay the first year's rent. Hecker questions if it would not be wise for Brownson to come now, even if he has taken a lease on his present house till spring. Hecker speaks of the need of friendship among Catholics against their common enemy. As regards (John Gilmary) Shea, he does not believe him to be a man of profound judgment. He advises Brownson to conciliate Shea, but not to expect a large return. He has not seen Dr. (Levi Silliman) Ives since receiving Brownson's note.

I-3-l - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 12mo. - {6}


1855 Sep. 2
(Purcell), Archbishop J(ohn) B(aptist): Cin(cinnati, Ohio)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Father (J.A.) Faure must have already presented himself to (Blanc) having declared himself superior to the fear of "yellow jacket" and anxious to prove himself a soldier on the battlefield. (Purcell) anticipated (Blanc)'s advice to him to stop in some healthy town on the coast until he heard from (Blanc), but (Purcell) presumes he pushed on. The Louisville riots have thus far shown that the Bishops of native birth are not more influential with their compatriots than the "outremers." Father Carrière writes that the wisest Bishops of France do not say much. Chicago is in a glorious mess. The Bishop of Mobile has not passed this way. (Purcell) is glad (Portier) was not on the N(ew) Jersey railroad when the smash took place. Cincinnati is quite healthy; they hope for a quiet election next week. (Purcell) advanced $30 to Faure. (P.S.) A letter from Cardinal (James Philip) F(ransoni) of July 25 acknowledging receipt of their acts and decrees of May. Pretty quick.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 12mo. - {6}


1855 Sept. 3
McQuaid, B(ernard) J.: Newark, (New Jersey)
 to O(restes) A. Brownson: (Boston, Massachusetts)

McQuaid says that he had no reply to his letter inviting Brownson to deliver a course of lectures in Newark and must suppose the letter never reached Brownson. He repeats his offer to pay fifty dollars for the lectures. If Brownson accepts the invitation, he will inform him what dates are open and leave the choice of a date to him.

I-3-l - A.L.S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {2}


1855 Sept. 4
O'Connor, M(ichael) (Bishop): Pittsburgh, (Pennsylvania)
 to O(restes) A. Brownson: (Boston, Massachusetts)

He wants to have his name withdrawn from the letter printed on the cover containing an approbation of his Review. He differed somewhat on some of Brownson's doctrines and didn't feel responsible for everything Brownson wrote. Since Brownson has adopted as a leading principle of the Review a theory with which he disagrees, he feels as though it may cause some mischief throughout the county, and so it is better that his name be withdrawn from any connection with the publication, that would seem to imply any kind of approbation.

I-3-l - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {1}


1855 Sept. 4
Murtagh, James: Albany, (New York)
 to Orestes A. Brownson: (Boston, Massachusetts)

Murtagh as the Corresponding Secretary of the Young Men's Catholic Library Society invites Brownson to deliver a lecture before the Society; he lists ten dates, any one of which will be acceptable, and hopes for an early acceptance of the invitation.

I-3-l - A.L.S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {1}


1855 Sep. 4
Curioz, (S.J.), Father (Aloysius): (New Orleans, Louisiana)
 to Father (Felix) Dicharry: (Natchitoches, Louisiana)

A bill for $11.20 for books.

VI-1-i - A. Bill - (French) - 1p. - 32mo. - {1}


1855 Sep. 4

Hébert, V(ict)or and Company (New Orleans, Louisiana)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

A bill for $8.50 for books (for?) Natchitoches.

VI-1-e - Bill - (French) - 1p. - 8vo. - {1}


1855 Sep. 4
Lelièvre, J.F.: New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

A bill for $7.52 for books. (On the back in Rousselon's hand) Father F(elix) Dicharry of Natchitoches.

VI-1-i - Bill - 2pp. - folio - {2}


1855 Sept. 6
Spalding, M(artin) J. Bp. Louisville: Louisville, Kentucky
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati Ohio

He thank Purcell for the Roman Document and for his kind letter. He will comply with Purcell's instruction with regard to the former. He hopes Purcell will receive it again, but he fears when it gets to Vincennes it will get no farther. He regrets that he could send only one student to the provincial seminary. He is uneasy about the fall elections. He learns that great excitement and bloody work is anticipated in Cincinnati. What does Purcell think about it? The reaction must come although it is slow in developing. Spalding fears that grass will soon grow in their streets. (Orestes A.) Brownson and the editor of the Shepherd have done them great harm. Their names have been paraded from every stand in the South. They have obtained a dismal notoriety. Were they sworn enemies of the Church they could not have done as much harm. Spalding thinks steps should be taken to repudiate them publicly. He will concur in any measure Purcell thinks proper. Spalding has just returned from Chicago where he preached a retreat to the clergy. Affaris have been sadly mismanaged in Chicago. How poor Bishop (Anthony) O'Regan has suffered. Chicago will be the first city of the west in less than ten years. P.S. Many Catholics have left Louisville.

II-4-m - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 12mo. - {7}


1855 Sept. 7
Montgomery, O.P., Father Charles: Zanesville, Ohio
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Purcell is aware that there are six or seven families living in Mattingly's Settlement ten miles from Zanesville. For years they have attended them about once a month. As their houses are too small they are desirous of putting up a small church. One of them will give a lot. Montgomery asks whether he may encourage them or not. They have completed a brick school house on the lots opposite the church. He hopes that Purcell's health has improved.

II-4-m - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {3}


1855 Sep. 8
(Byrne), Bishop Andrew: Little Rock, (Arkansas)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

It would be better to wait for the meeting of the Bishops in council to answer the questions. (Byrne) is much opposed to mixed marriages. He fear that more restrictions in faculties will drive nominal Catholics to associate more with the heterodox. The sum mentioned in the Annals (of the Association of the Propagation of the Faith) was first intended to be given to (Byrne)'s diocese but the officers changed their minds and gave 2400 francs. (Byrne) would not feel it so much if they had not placed him before the world as receiving 8000 francs. There was no year that he needed more assistance as he had to employ the best counsel in the case of the college property he gained at Fort Smith and which only has prevented his visiting Rome at the close of 10 years. If he were not here, the case would be lost and as the defeated party has carried it up to the Supreme Court, (Byrne) must still watch the progress.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {4}


1855 Sept. 8
H, G I: St. Louis, (Missouri)
 to Orestes A. Brownson: (Boston, Massachusetts)

The writer has recently read in the "London Quarterly Review" an article entitled "The Feast of the Conception". Many mistatements in the article prompted the writer to bring Brownson's attention to this. He urges Brownson to expose his views on (The Immaculate Conception) in a more lengthy manner than he has previously treated this subject. He wishes him to prove in (Brownson's) Review that Mary was free from the stain of original sin.

I-3-l - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {4}


1855 (Sep. 9)
Lynch, C.M., Father J(ohn): Paris, (France)
 to Archbishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Lynch found a very excellent curé in Rome, highly recommended by his Bishop of B(e)auvais, by the superior of the seminary and many other priests, and who voyaged with Blanc many years ago in France and was anxious to labor in L(ouisian)a. Lynch encouraged him to go at once so he determined to start from Genoa by the first occasion. He has only 250 francs; Lynch told him that on arriving in New Orleans he could borrow the money and refund it conveniently. He came to Rome to join a religious order but was dissuaded by his friends, particularly the Bishop of Heliopolis, and Archbishop Barnabò encouraged him to go to Blanc's diocese. Lynch hopes to see Blanc in the winter; he starts Sept(ember) 22 for N(ew) York. (P.S.) Lynch saw Father Ceretta; he wears purple neck bands.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 16mo. - {2}


1855 Sep. 10
Remi, Brother Marie (Henry Aubert): New Melleray, (Iowa)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Blanc) was perhaps surprised to not receive a reply to his letter of last May but he understood that in a little while (Blanc) would send some books which Remi asked for. This is why he had not written of his joy at (Blanc)'s return. He followed (Blanc)'s journey in the newspapers. Remi has been here a year today and his regular trial is ended; he must make a decision. After 2 years at Gethsemani, he will not be accused of inconstancy or precipitation. On leaving Kentucky, he thought he was called to die a Trappist. He came here content and joyful. Today he writes of his misery; the advice of the Prior and of his (novice?) master both of whom know his past and present life, will be the will of God for Remi. The active life suits his temperament and character. He believes he has done all he can to repair his fault. In better days, (Blanc) asked for his help in the difficult mission of Louisiana; today after 3 years of penance, Remi asks (Blanc) to recall him. He would accept anything, education, missions, seminary, or parish. In case this is impossible he asks for at least momentary asylum, from where he could more easily return to England or Belgium. If 2 years of suffering is not enough, the Prior said he would keep Remi as a novice. But the Trappist life is hard for him. (Blanc) wrote that he lacks priests, that Father (Richard) Kane is ill. Remi is without resources here; he does not know whether the Bishop of Dubuque will help him. Whatever (Blanc)'s decision, to accept him as a missionary or only to give him temporary asylum, Remi asks him to send, instead of books, some pecuniary help. The trip from here would cost 40 or 50 piastres, judging from what it costs from Louisville to Dubuque. One important question: Should he keep his pseudonym John Henry, or resume his real name, J.B.A Aubert?

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {5}


1855 Sept. 11
Montgomery, O.P., Father Charles: Zanesville, Ohio
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Purcell's truly terrible letter of the 9th caused Montgomery much pain. When Purcell has evidence that Montgomery is no longer fit to serve the mission, he should require from his Superior his immediate removal. With respect to Mr. Brenon's case, Montgomery did not understand Purcell's letter as conveying any command. He therefore thought it best to carry out Purcell's first requisition and that it would prevent any talk among the people here. He had no thought of disobedience. He does not know one single member of the congregations who is not admitted to the Sacraments merely because he will not take the Pledge, Father (William) Dieters' assertion to the contrary notwithstanding. As regards Father Bender, he never positively refused to hear his confession, but only evaded it. He thought Father (Fred) Bender under the influence of liquor and did not want to take charge of his soul. Father (Thomas) Sheahan was scandalized to see Bender drinking in the taverns with the laity.

II-4-m - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {4}


1855 Sept. 12
Spalding, M(artin) J. Bp. Louisville: Louisville, Kentucky
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He will give his views in reference to the affairs of Chicago which are in a condition of great confusion. Bishop (Anthony) O'Regan is not to be blamed. Spalding found him in a state of great despondency. The clergy urged O'Regan to build a fine house promising liberal contributions. O'Regan regrets that he undertook it, and says he was deceived as to the cost and hoped for assistance. A committee examined the accounts of the new Church and found a deficit over $30,000 wholly unaccounted for. For the good of religion they advised that O'Regan should settle it. Spalding advised him to sell a portion of the Church lot to raise money. O'Regan is easily disheartened. Spalding advised him to get rid of the worst of his clergy. Spalding thinks that the Association of the Propagation should make him a liberal allowance of 50 thousand francs with the hope that this will enable him to escape his more pressing difficulties. Spalding thinks all will be well in Louisville if they pass over the fall election quietly.

II-4-m - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 12mo. - {5}


1855 Sep. 14
Alemany, Bishop Jos(eph) S(adoc): San Francisco, (California)
 to Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Alemany is in need of a document from Mexico and as it is almost impossible to obtain communication from Mexico, he begs Blanc to mail the enclosed document (no enclosure) and send him the answer. If Blanc sees Bishop (Thaddeus) Amat he is to induce him not to make more delay. If he wishes to visit Mexico, it will be better to do so after arriving in Cal(iforni)a. His people are most anxious.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {2}


(18)55 Sep. 14
Conway, Patrick (James):
University of Notre Dame, (Indiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

At present Conway is very well; he has not written for a long time. Father (Edward F. Sorin, C.S.C.) has had the (St. Mary's) Academy removed from Bertrand, (Michigan) to the banks of the St. Joseph River about a mile from the College. Conway would be glad if (Blanc) would send him $6 for spending money. There are between 50 and 60 boys at Notre Dame, (University of). Conway hopes (Blanc) will give him permission to learn an instrument. (Sorin) has bought a large tract of land extending a few miles along the St. Joseph on which they are building an academy. In vacation, the boys frequently went fishing in the lakes or on the banks of the St. Joseph. On Wednesdays all the boys go walking and those that have spending money buy apples, pears, peaches, and other things. Conway would like (Blanc) to send him some clothes and a trunk. He will try to study better than he has ever done before.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {5}


1855 Sept. 14
Greene, B(enjamin) H.: Boston, (Massachusetts)
 to Orestes A. Brownson: (Boston, Massachusetts)

Greene asks if Brownson will not give up his idea of publishing the Review in New York and asks if arrangements could not be made to continue printing it in Boston. Greene asks if he could not make satisfactory arrangements with Brownson for paying him a certain sum for his editorial work and leave Greene to attend to all the business of publishing the Review. He suggests that Brownson consider this suggestion before making the change.

I-3-l - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {1}


1855 Sep. 14
(Mudd), S.C., Sister Mary Austin: St. Joseph's, (Maryland)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

She asks herself why she remains here so long since she is permitted again to resume her duties at her beloved mission. She is too old to be weaned. She is well; exercise and fresh air and good water have been her remedies. She is sorry to find at her return to Donaldsonville that Sister Florence, (S.C.) has been removed; she is called to St. Louis to take the place of Sister Serena, (S.C.) who died of cholera. The orphans will feel her loss. Austin was glad to hear of the safe arrival of Sisters Marie and Ann Margaret. Mother Regina (Smith, S.C.) is not well. Sister Augustine, (S.C.) seems quite well. Mother Xavier, (S.C.) is daily expected to die. Austin is to leave here on the 17th; she will go by way St. Louis.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {8}


1855 Sep. 15
Chavaete, Father P.J.: Woumen, (Belgium)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Since (Blanc)'s last letter from Lyons several days before departing for America, Chavaete has heard nothing of his health. He hopes that the indisposition he complained of was not of long duration and that he made the ocean crossing without danger. However, God permitted (Blanc) to be tried in another way. The papers have informed him that (Blanc)'s seminary was consumed by fire. All goes well here. At the hospice there are 50 persons, comprising the Sisters. However, it is hard to get supplies for so many. Chavaete is as economical as possible but there is always a lack. So he asks (Blanc) to send him, as in the past, the revenue from the inheritance. (Blanc) is also to send him the draft in order not to have it paid twice as it was last year, once at Paris and then in Belgium. He saw by the newspapers that (Father Stephen Rousselon) has arrived in Belgium; it will be a month before Chavaete could hope to see him.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 8vo. - {2}


1855 Sept. 16
Chambige, Father F(rancis): St. Thomas' (near Bardstown, Kentucky)
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Father (Peter J.) Lavialle will hand this to Purcell and will give him any information in regard to the establishment and the young men. Although Lavialle can hardly be spared at this time of year, they will make the sacrifice willingly. Their German teacher Father (Christion) Kavder has left them. He has written to Father (Joseph) Ferneding to spare no means to procure one. They are also on the lookout in Louisville for one. Chambige will do his best to have Euclid and algebra taught. Had he known that Mr. Fitzgerald had finished his Theology and was not to be ordained immediately, he would have requested Purcell to allow him to become one of their professors.

II-4-m - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {7}


1855 Sept. 17
Monahan, Father James: Cleveland, Ohio
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Bishop (Louis Amadeus) Rappe told Monahan that he would give him an exeat if he would get a document from a bishop saying that he would receive him. Monahan offers his services to Purcell. He does not say what he can or cannot do; he only asks that Purcell give him a trial.

II-4-m - A.L.S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {4}


1855 Sept. 17
Timon, John Bp. Buffalo: Buffalo, New York
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He put off answering Purcell's letter because he had intended to go in person to thank him for the loan of Father (William) Deiters. But he must give up the hope at least until after his synod. He now asks Purcell to accept his heartfelt thanks. Father (Francis X.) Weninger says that Purcell will waive for the moment a substitute from another diocese. Timon thanks Purcell again for this. He asks that Father E(dward) Purcell be allowed to preach the sermon at the opening of their Diocesan Synod. It will be the first in St. Joseph's Cathedral. They have little to fear from the Know-Nothings now. But there seems to be an anti-Catholic twang in much of that the Republican Party write and say.

II-4-m - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {6}


1855 Sept. 19
Miles, Richard Pius Bp. Nashville: Nashville, Tennessee
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Miles fears that what Father (John M) Jacquet takes for a refusal originated in too much delicacy on the part of Abp. (Joseph) Alemany, and that Miles is the cause of it. Miles told Alemany that he did not wish to spare Jacquet. Later Jacquet told Miles that he had agreed to stay ten years in Nashville and then go to California. When that time arrived Miles gave him his exeat without informing the archbishop of it. Now it is too late to correct the mistake. He is an excellent missioner, honest and blunt.

II-4-m - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {5}


1855 Sep. 19
Querbes, (C.S.V.) Father (Louis Joseph): Vourles, (France)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Querbes would have liked some other circumstance to recall to (Blanc) one of his former codisciples in the seminary of Lyons who comes to ask him to amend the hasty decision of one of (Blanc)'s priests. For a number of years, Querbes directed a congregation brothers, Clerics of St. Viator, whose statutes were approved by apostolic authority. The brothers could not be dispensed from their vows except by the director of the Association or the Pope. One of the brothers, named Chambost on the basis of a letter from a priest, Father (Charles Chambost) of the same name who directs a college in (Blanc)'s diocese, abandoned his post, went to Havre and from there to New Orleans. He had asked the Cardinal Archbishop of Lyons as well as Querbes for the dispensation from his vows but he had also told Querbes that he intended to carry out his plan no matter what the decisions were in his regard. This unfortunate person who made apostasy a step to the priesthood is far from having the talents necessary for the studies to be made. He promised he would be a priest before 1858. He does not have the stability of conduct necessary for a missionary in the United States. Querbes would have let him go without protect if he was not bound in conscience to stop the spread of example.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 12mo. - {4}


1855 Sep. 20
Guinand, R.S.C.J., Madame A(dine): St. Michael, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, Louisiana)

The Master has just taken Mother (Annette) Praz, (R.S.C.J.). Sunday she felt the symptoms of fever. Guinand arrived between 2 and 3 the night of Tuesday-Wednesday and saw at once that there was no hope. Last week one of their coadjutor Sisters died at Baton Rouge; two other persons had the fever but are fine now. Mother (Crescence) Alschner, (R.S.C.J.) came until Guinand returns to her post. They are thinking of setting back the return of the pupils later than October 1 as they had first set it. Mother (Louise de) Barbarin, (R.S.C.J.) also wishes to write as (Blanc) knew about the death of Father Noir which leaves them deprived of spiritual aid.

- A.L.S. -


 On the same paper: 

(1855 Sep. 20)
Barbarin, R.S.C.J., Mother L(ouise) de: (St. Michael, Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

She cannot let Guinand's letter leave without speaking of her deep affliction. She will give the details about Noir. Mother (Amélie) Jouve, (R.S.C.J.) will speak about their spiritual interests. Father (Jean Francois) Abbadie, (S.J.), who gave their retreat, promised to remain until a new order. But she would like to ask what to do about Noir's temporal affairs; nothing has been settled. P.S. Mother Stanislas, (R.S.C.J.) is still in the same state as (Blanc) saw her.

- A.L.S. -



(The above letters are written on the printed notice of the death of) their Superior Praz on September 19, aged 44. (Blanc's address has been changed to) St. Mary's Attakapas, in care of Father N(icholas) Francais.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. Printed Notice - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {9}


1855 Sept. 20
(Rappe, Louis) A(madeus) Bp. Cleveland: Cleveland, Ohio
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

The whole of Father (James) Monahan's conduct is not bad. He made himself disagreeable because of some change Rappe made in his missions. He will do better with Purcell if Purcell will try him and with this letter Purcell can consider him as leaving his jurisdiction when he enters that of Purcell. Bishop (Louis) DeGoesbriand has finally returned with some missionaries. He has a vast field without missionaries. Those he found on his arrival have abandoned him their pockets well filled. Love of money and of drink he thinks will cause the young Church in America more harm than the Knownothings. Rappe awaits the return of Father (James) Conlan who has been at Burlington, Vermont during DeGoesbriand's absence. P.S. Tomorrow or the next day he will send a note to Rome. Purcell notes (on the back) that this is an unsatisfactory answer to a letter asking a full and complete answer but still is a kind of exeat.

II-4-m - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - (French) - {7}


1855 Sept. 20
Whelan, Father David: Mt. St. Mary's (Emmittsburg, Maryland)
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

It was with much concern that Whelan learned from the Telegraph of Purcell's serious indisposition. He trusts that God will spare him for many years to come. Whelan understands from Dan McMeal that Purcell had the services of his father in the occasion of Purcell's sickness at Canal Dover. Whelan hopes that Purcell took the opportunity to give the poor man some salutary advice. The son is a fine boy. Dr. Dan McMeal from Pittsburg was here a few days ago. Whelan does not know what to do about the publication of the Ordo this year. (John) Murphy lost money on it last year. The clergy seem to think that some one is making a great deal of money out of it. Whelan had to pay something every year out of his own pocket. The school is flourishing. There are several here from Georgetown College who find the work a little harder than among the Jesuits.

II-4-m - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {7}


1855 Sept. 21
Ogden Henry: New York, (New York)
 to William Seton:

Ogden received with delight Seton's letter of Aug. 1. It came by a slow steamer. He wrote to Mr. Ray at New port afterwards. As Ray had received Seton's letter, he sent Ogden some money, promising whatever more Ogden needed. Ogden found the best peach brandy at Mr. Corwin's in Broad Way. It has been boxed, ready for shipment, for a fortnight. He will put it in the charge of the Master of a Liverpool or London ship, who will pay the duties, freight, etc. The bottles of Bay rum and the box of Kellinger are also ready. He hurried to get the Bay rum on board a vessel sailing for Rotterdam but it had cleared port. Ogden hopes that Seton will inherit the estate of Sir George Cayley who received him so cordially. Emma is taking good care of the picture of Seton's grandfather. She will have to move in the spring as her house is in other hands. Ogden promises to take care of the picture then. Seton's bonds are not worthless but will from what Ogden can learn still come up. Dr. Short is hard at work and having difficulty only with his shaking a tabled in separating the gold. These improvements completed, the company will make money and pay dividends. Ogden will apply for Seton's stock soon, when the company is organized. Ogden is surprised Seton did not receive the Tribune and Freeman's January last year. They will now go to Green and C. Paxies Ogden has his office in the same buildings as the Freeman's Journal and sees his old acquaintance, the editor, Mr. James Alphonsus McMaster two or three times a day. Ogden's wife can walk no better. Four weeks at Mrs. Hoffman's at Goshen improved her bodily health but she still drags her left leg behind her. Yet they are still hopeful. With a bountiful harvest and the demand for their grain their farmers will make a good profit this year, as also will the merchants and ship owners. Already business is profitable. For example in muslins, linens, etc. one large importing firm has sold with ten days $423,000. Emma and Eth are well and have had a fuller house this summer. William was well when Ogden last heard from him Oregon. Ogden will write soon.

II-1-a - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 12mo. - {3}


1855 Sept. 21
Timon, John Bp. Buffalo: Buffalo, New York
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Timon regrets the error into which he was led by representations of their mutual friend that Purcell waived the coming of another priest. Now the only reparation Timon can make is to offer Purcell a substitute. He would have done it at once had not he been led to expect that a priest from Milwaukee would go. God will have accepted Purcell's resignation in bearing what must have seemed a heavy cross.

II-4-m - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {3}


1855 Sep. 22
Briant, George P.: Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc : New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Father (Joseph Prachensky, S.J.) Prachenski who left here for New Orleans 20 days ago rendered Briant a great service by replying to a letter he had sent him at New Orleans about a week ago. It was to give Briant information about the account of a German, Henry Menken who left on the same boat as Prachenski. Menken was manager of a wood yard belonging to Briant's son and the Messrs. McHattan. Menken had bought a one tenth interest in this wood yard which he was to pay for on the 6th and he was going, he said, to New Orleans with two aims: 1. to get from a Mr. Rodenberg some money placed with a firm of which Rodenberg was the principal member, in order to pay them; 2. to marry at Mississippi City or Biloxi, a German girl whom he had known while working for Mr. Tegarden at Mississippi City. Menken complained of a headache when he left here. He had not settled his accounts as manager of the wood yard for more than two months. Briant does not know what to think, whether he is trying to avoid paying them. For almost 18 months they had the greatest confidence in Menken who behaved well, was a Catholic and was supposed to know Prachenski. In taking his letter from the mail and seeing that it reached Prachenski was a big favor.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {6}


1855 Sept. 23
Dominic, O.C., Father M.: Little Clairveaux, Tracadie, Nova Scotia
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell : of Cincinnati, Ohio

Having seen in the "Boston Pilot" of Purcell's illness and subsequent recovery, he sends his congratulations and best wishes. Dominic left the monastery of Gethsemani (Kentucky) for this little monastery with the hope of raising it from its prostrate condition, but his efforts were unavailing. This place was established 30 years ago, but their Holy Rule and Constitution have never been carried out. It had many novices but none made their profession. Dominic hoped to restore the Rule of the Cistercians. No one would profess in the house because of the violent temper of the old prior who almost starved the poor Brethren. Five of the eight members of this Community of Trappists solicit Dominic to apply to some Bishop in the hope of establishing a Monastery of their Order. They would have a good free school attached to the monastery. They are perfectly free to locate in any part of the United States where a Bishop will receive them. The Abbot, Father Eutropius, certifies that Dominic is under no ecclesiastical censure, and that as he made no vow of stability to the Bishop of Louisville he was free to go wherever he might think best. Bishop (Colin Francis) McKinnon has also given Dominic a certificate to this effect. He may apply to Purcell that he may encourage them to found a Monastery in his archdiocese. A farm of two or three hundred acres is necessary for the support of the Community as they are bound to support themselves by manual labor. He does not request a reply until after his next communication.

II-4-m - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 8vo. - {7}


1855 Sep. 25
Lescuru, Father E.: Genes, (France)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Lescuru came to Rome three months ago with the permission of his bishop, the Bishop of Beauvais, to enter the Servites, but more mature examination made him renounce this plan. He was disposed to follow the Bishop of Montreal whom he met at the house of the Abbot of La Trappe at Staoueli(?) when he met Father (Jean) Caretta, (C.M.) and Father (John) Lynch, (C.M.). They talked about (Blanc's) diocese and its needs. Lynch said that he was charged by (Blanc) to look for priests. At their advice, Lescuru left Rome and came to Genes to get a boat for New Orleans. He stayed at the (Vincentians') house. He found there two French priests, Fathers (Philip) Borgna, (C.M.) and Romagnini, (C.M.) who knew America and (Blanc's) diocese well. They encouraged him and helped him with money on the promise that (Blanc) would reimburse them on Lescuru's arrival. A French lady, Miss de Mont-fort living at Genes for several years, advanced him 500 francs. Tomorrow, the 26th, Lescuru will board a sailing vessel, La Louisianne to go to (Blanc's) diocese. Lescuru wanted to wait to get the money in France; these priests did not want him to and he obeyed. Borgna and Romagnini send (Blanc) their respects. Father Villa Vecchia, (C.M.), the Superior, also sends his.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 12mo. - {9}


1855 Sept. 25
Little, Brown, & Co.: (per Niles, H.T.)
 to O(restes) A. Brownson: (Boston, Massachusetts)

H.T. Niles of the firm of Little, Brown& Co., asks Brownson about the sending of the "Spirit Rapper" to C. Dolman of London; he wants to know if it was purchased by Dolman or was sent on a commission account. Niles explains that since the arrangements were made by the later Mr. Brown the firm is ignorant of them, since Brown made no record of them.

I-3-l - A.L. - 1p. - 12mo. - {2}


1855 Sept. 25
Whelan, Father David: Mt. St. Mary's (Emmittsburg, Maryland)
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

When Whelan paid his usual visit to Archbishop(Francis Patrick) Kenrick of Baltimore, the Archbishop proposed that Whelan go to Rome to make the preliminary arrangements for the establishment of the American College of Rome. Whelan was taken by surprise and requested time to consider the matter. His personal inclinations were not favorable to the charge, but on the advice of his brother he decided to yield. Kenrick told him to inform Purcell so that Purcell may make any objections as his superior. Whelan was not willing to resist the judgment of others. This makes necessary an early answer on the publication of the Ordo, as Kenrick is anxious that he make an early start for Rome.

II-4-m - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {4}


1855 Sep. 26
Gouesse, (C.S.C.), Father F(rancis): Detroit, Mich(igan)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Thanks to (Blanc)'s writing, Gouesse has succeeded beyond his hopes. On his return from Montreal to New York, he found Archbishop (John Joseph) Hughes disposed to find a post for him in New York. The Bishop of Brooklin(!) whom one of Gouesse's friends saw in his behalf, did not wait for a visit from him to give him all he was seeking. By chance, Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere) of Detroit who has known him for 13 years, also knew of Gouesse's return to the United States and wrote to him. He called on the Archbishop to whom he explained his affairs and left it to him to say what he should do. The Archbishop said that Gouesse could perhaps call on the Bishop of Detroit and if he kept him at his cathedral in a city where there are as many French Catholics as Irish and where Gouesse has acquaintances, he would be able to give great service to Bishop Lefevere. He would be near Le Lac but it would have nothing to do with the affairs of the diocese. Besides he said to try it. Gouesse felt he should come here. He would prefer to be further away from Le Lac but he must endure what he cannot avoid. Later, the Bishop of Kingston came to offer the direction of his famous College (of Regiopolis) which Gouesse talked about to (Blanc) 4 years ago. The professors are partly clergymen and partly laymen and the students number 125 to 150. The post is difficult. (Blanc) would do him a favor by giving his opinion on the above. All this would have to be with the consent of the Bishop of Detroit. P.S. Not a word from Father (Edward F.) Sorin, (C.S.C.) about his exeat.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {5}


1855 Sept. 26
Hemsteger, John F.: West Alexandria, Ohio
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Some time in January Hemsteger went security for Father Jeremiah O'Connor for $100. O'Connor left without settling it. Besides O'Connor owes him $50 for some goods. Hemsteger learns now that Purcell had undertaken the trouble of settling O'Connor's debts. Necessity compels him to write to Purcell as he borrowed the money for Father O'Connor and the note is due again today. Times are hard for a business man and he is not able to meet his own claims. Will Purcell inform him in what manner he may receive the money. For the $50 he is willing to wait until it suits Purcell's Convenience.

II-4-m - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {3}


1855 Sept. 26
Montgomery, O.P., Father Charles: Zanesville, Ohio
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

As Purcell's letter of the 20th contains new charges, Montgomery thinks that he should hear both sides. During his 22 years in the Ohio Missions he has never meddled with any neighboring priest nor been the medium of talebearing to the Bishop against them. If he has deviated somewhat from this course in his last letter, it was only in self-defense. He has attended all sickcalls within 14 miles. If he has refused to go 20 miles it was only because of his sickness. Only twice has he collected on the railroads. With regard to Dresden, Coshocton, etc., from the articles in the Telegraph appointing pastors to them, they concluded that Purcell did not desire them to have any charge over them. To avoid further trouble, Montgomery will ask Father Provincial (of the Dominicans) to remove him from the missions. He consoles himself with the thought that he will not have long to drink the cup of affliction. (A note in Purcell's handwriting states that Montgomery accused a virtuous priest of being under the influence of liquor and refused to hear his confession - and refused to marry persons to whom Purcell granted a dispensation.)

II-4-m - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {5}


1855 Sep. 26
White, Father Cha(rle)s I.: Pikesville, (Maryland)
 to Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Some days ago, Blanc promised White the use of such papers from his diocesan archives, as would be useful in the compilation of a church history. White renews the assurance that every care will be taken of what Blanc confides to him and that it will be safely returned. Any package may be addressed to Lucas Brothers.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {1}


1855 Sept. 26
(Rappe, Louis) A(madeus) Bp. Cleveland: Cleveland, Ohio
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He received Purcell's letter of Sept. 24 yesterday and as he is just setting out on another mission and needs time to answer the questions of the cardinal prefect he will answer them on his return about the middle of next week. As to (Father James) Monahan Rappe does not believe him capable of the faults mentioned in Purcell's letter. He will hold to what he said in the previous letter. He tells Purcell that he feels that towards men trained and ordained by him from his own seminary that their setting out is a kind of original work and he should preserve silence as (Archbishop Peter Richard Kenrick of St. Louis) does leaving to the bishop who consents to receive him to get his knowledge from some other sources.

II-4-m - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - (French) - {4}


(18)55 Sep. 29
Jouve, R.S.C., Madame (Amélie?) Al.: G(ran)d Coteau, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

What trials (Blanc) has had since leaving Grand Coteau. (Blanc)'s interest for the (Religious of the) Sacred Heart is too well known to doubt his sharing in the desolation of the community at St. Michael, deprived in a few days of its superior and chaplain. In the name of Mother (Annette) Praz, (R.S.C.J.), Jouve asks (Blanc) to make a supreme effort to replace the vacancy left by the death of Father Noir. The intention of (Blanc)'s vicar general was to have Jouve installed at St. Michael and Praz at Grand Coteau. Jouve at present does not see Mother (Adine) Guinand, (R.S.C.J.) placed here except to support Mother (Victorine) Martinez, (R.S.C.J.) and see to the novices. The fewness of subjects has made them give up Baton Rouge. Three superiors have been taken from them in less than a year. Among Guinand's daughters there is one of very weak vocation. Probably uniting this little community to that of St. Michael will help the school established a year ago and for which Praz asked for teachers whom Jouve could not give. Jouve thinks the 18 or 20 pupils at Baton Rouge could easily finish at Sacred Heart if they wished. Jouve would not have stayed here except for Praz's death. Jouve does not know whether (Blanc) has returned from his difficult tour. They are well at Grand Coteau but sickness is all around them. (P.S.) She has just received the news of the death of Mother Louisa Leveque, (R.S.C.J.); she did not recover her reason. Three Sisters are very ill at St. Michael.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {7}


1855 Sept. 29
Kenrick, Peter Richard Abp. St. Louis: St. Louis, Missouri
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Enclosed Purcell will find the certificate of Joseph Meilaspin's death. Kenrick expresses his gratification at the restoration of Purcell's health. They are to have their Council in eight days. He is not very sanguine as to the results of Counciliar action in remedying the evils from which they suffer. There is such a diversity of view among the best of men. The question of Church Property will be left in statu quo. Each Bishop will continue to have his seminary, being unwilling to lose even the shadow of a thing he can never hope to realize. Kenrick regards the establishment of a really good seminary as scarcely to be looked for He does not know how Purcell's Provincial Seminary is working, but would not be astonished to learn that the Bishops forgot all the resolves which they made in the council.

II-4-m - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {3}


1855 Sept. 29
Sorin, C.S.C., Father E(dward): Erie, Pennsylvania
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Sorin came to Erie at the request of Bishop (Josue M) Young to effect a loan to enable him to meet Mr. Phelan's liabilities at Lancaster (Ohio). Sorin need not acquaint Purcell with the particulars of the transaction at Lancaster as he already knows them. When Sorin sent the 4 brothers to take charge of Phelan's farm, he intended to write Purcell but learned that he had gone on a visit through the archdiocese. At present all they can do is to try to make the land pay an indebtedness of $8000. He asks if Purcell has any particular desire or advice as to what they should do there. Their manual labor school for girls will not be ready before Nov. 1. All their exertions have been devoted to the removal and finishing of the Sisters' (St. Mary's) Academy at (Notre Dame) which has opened the first of this month with over 50 boarders. The 22 bells were cast on the 10th of Aug. and will be at Notre Dame Nov. 1. The accord and effect are said to be admirable. (Note on back in Purcell's handwriting states that this is news to Purcell, that he had given no permission for an establishment at Phelans knew not even that one was proposed there, and had no desire to express.

II-4-m - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 16to. - {6}


1855 Sep. 30
Raymond, Father G(ilbert): Opelousas, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

Raymond thinks his letter will arrive in New Orleans, about the same time as Blanc. But before that Blanc will have heard the sad news of the losses among the clergy. At Ville Platte, where Raymond went to see about the site for the church, on the 25th there was a meeting of the parish, held in English. Thirty were at the meeting and two appeared afterwards. They ratified the resolution 31 to 1 to build the church next to the cemetery leaving space between the church, presbytery, and cemetery as Blanc had decided; that the old church would remain where it is until the new one is built. The church will be of the dimensions Blanc indicated, especially with a width of about 45 feet which could be extended later. A committee of 15 was named, the church as well as the land to be in Blanc's name. It seems to be the wish of the parish to have the church near the cemetery; all seem disposed to cooperate. After Blanc left, there was two weeks' vacation; now the two men are preparing for their ordination. Raymond will write again before they go down to the city around the beginning of November after the danger of the yellow fever is past.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {2}


(18)55 Sep. 30
St. Jean, (S.S.J.), Sister: McSherrytown, (Pennsylvania)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Sister asks (Blanc) for information on the last moments of the brother of one of their Sisters who died at New Orleans August 23. He was a doctor, a Catholic, named Michael Gegan. He was ill only a few days. His sister desires to know whether he received the last sacraments. The people with whom he boarded have given no information on this subject. He resided and died at the home of J.S. Torley(?). Sister believes he was buried in a Protestant cemetery.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {3}


1855 Sep. 30
Victor, Mathilde: Pleasant Valley, (Mississippi)
 to Father M(athurin) F. Grignon: Natchez, Miss(issipp)i

Her long silence may seem strange but ever since her return they have been under a strict quarantine. The fever is still making fearful ravages at Fort Adams; she was obliged to come here on horseback as Mr. Hunter was afraid to send for her. She opened her school on August 27 but has been obliged to suspend until frost. The people are panic stricken. She was sent for to nurse a family about 3 miles distant. Father (J.) Adams, (S.J.) has left them. In him and Father (George Blackney, S.J.) Blackley she has lost almost her only friends in the south. She feels her absence from church. She has read a good deal in the book Grignon gave her. Grignon is to ask the Bishop not to forget her in his prayers. She will be happy to receive a letter from Grignon directed to Percy's Creek. Col(onel) Hunter is so afraid of having the fever on his place that no one leaves it or comes on it. Should there be employment at Natchez Grignon is to let her know.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {4}