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1855 Oct.
(Rappe, Louis) A(madeus) Bp. Cleveland: Cleveland, Ohio
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He encloses $25 for Dr. (Silliman) Ives and a like sum for the Roman College. The congregation at East Liverpool is without land for its church and cannot buy property for one at this time. Rappe asks that Purcell share this information with Mr. Boyle.

II-4-m - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - (French) - {5}


1855 Oct. 1
Chiswell, George W.,: William A. Chiswell,: C.N. Mossbury,: Howard Griffith,: T. Randolph Hall,: Benjamin F. Reid: Poolesville, Montgomery County, Maryland
 to Orestes A. Brownson: Boston, Massachusetts

They are Democrats. Election day draws near and the Know-Nothings criticize the Pope, Brownson, and Catholicity. Brownson has been accused of writings, derogatory their principles as Americans and to their institutions. They do not believe the charges and wish Brownson to help refute them. They ask for a copy of (Brownson's) Review containing "Allegiance to the Pope," and Brownson's strictures on (Joseph) Chandler's defense of Catholic principles in the last session of Congress. Brownson is asked if his Review is the recognized organ of the Catholic Church in the U.S.—if the Catholic Bishops recognize it as the propounder of Catholic faith—if he ever asserted that the Catholics of the U.S. owed temporal allegiance to the Pope—if he ever asserted that the principles mentioned in Chandler's speech were not those of the Church.

I-3-l - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {11}


1855 Oct. 1
Hecker, C.SS.R. Father I(saac) T.: (New York, New York)
 to O(restes) A. Brownson: (Boston, Massachusetts)

Archbishop (John Hughes) has given his approval for Brownson to come to New York. Hecker has not found a suitable house for Brownson. Rents are high near the City. Dr. (Ambrose Manahan) Mannahan has found a house in Yorkville which he believes would suit Brownson, the house has modern conveniences and rents for $350. Father Hecker urges Brownson to come on immediately and make his choice. If Brownson is not coming immediately, Hecker wants him to write what he thinks is best. Dr. George H. Doane, a convert, has been stopping at the Convent to prepare to receive the Sacraments. He has left for St. Sulpice to study for the priesthood. P.S. Mr & Mrs. George Hecker would be glad to have Brownson stay with them.

I-3-l - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 12mo. - {5}


1855 Oct. 2
(Martin), Bishop Aug(uste) M(ar)ie: Natchitoches, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

When this letter reaches (Blanc) he will be back from his long tour to deplore the numerous victims of the epidemic. Up to now none of his own have been stricken although all have been more or less ill this summer. (Martin) is uneasy about Father (J.M.) Beaulieu, an excellent young Priest, assistant at Avoyelles which is now in the grip of the yellow fever. They are glad that there is neither navigation nor railroad to bring in the pestilence. Father (Hector) Figari, (C.M.) talks of going to offer his services to (Blanc). He is dissatisfied. He has declared a hostility against the convent of the (Religious of the) Sacred Heart which gives, he says, a Christian education which is not on a level with the country. He would even rather pay the board of the girls from Alexandria at Nazareth than to let them return to Natchitoches. For two years Figari has asked (Martin) to establish a school at Alexandria. (Martin) fell in with it and obtained the Sisters of Providence. Figari wanted immediately a boarding school which from the first would rival the best in Louisiana and without (Martin)'s knowledge had had dealings at Nazareth (Sisters of Loretto) who have already tried to attract their young people to Kentucky and had given them a half-promise. Since they cannot come without (Martin)'s authorization and since (Martin) has good reasons to refuse it; Figari will likely leave. (Martin) would regret it; Figari is very popular among the American non Catholics. Father (J.) Guy may also withdraw. This would be a vacancy but no loss. (Martin) expects 4 new subjects this winter, of whom 3 are deacons or priests, with the Sisters of the (Holy) Cross for Avoyelles. All (Martin)'s other young people, except two who have not completed their course, are zealously at work. (Martin) has not had a request from the young man from Natchez whom (Martin) would willingly accept. He hears no further talk of Mr. Gilly. At the end of November, (Martin) should go to New Orleans to receive his colony. He will send (Blanc) a copy of a reply to questions sent him by an attorney, an anti-K(now) N(othing) champion. H. Hertzogg has publicly declared himself a champion of the Church. The whole Cote Joyeuse say they want priests but no Pope or bishops. No reply from (Martin)'s claim for May from the (Association) of the Propagation of the Faith. He is badly in need.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 12mo. - {13}


1855 Oct. 2
Putnam, Edw(ard): North Whitefield, M(ain)e
 to O(restes) A. Brownson: Chelsea, Mass(achusetts)

The writer encloses a leaf from l'Univers upon which is printed a letter of the Bishop Montauban. The philosophical articles in the Review have pleased him much. He wishes Brownson to loan him a copy of Bonnethy's(?) "Annales" or some work of him. He gets no satisfaction from the booksellers of North Whitefield, or of Montreal.

I-3-l - A.L.S. - 1pg. - 8vo. - {1}


(1855 Oct. 3)
Mullon, Father J(ames) I(gnatius): (New Orleans, Louisiana)
 to (Archbishop Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Returns for Sept(ember), St. Patrick's (Church).

VI-1-i - A.D.S. - 1p. - 4to. - {2}


(18)55 Oct. 3
Pabet (?): New York, (New York)
 to Father (Stephen Rousselon: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Pabet has sent a small box addressed to the Archbishop for Father (A.) Beaugier who is his cousin. (Rousselon) is to keep the receipt and Pabet will reimburse him when he goes through. (The receipt enclosed is from the) United States Mail Steamship Company of New Orleans, Jennings, Laughland and Co(mpany), agent for $1.60 and signed by Crawford.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 16mo. - {4}


1855 Oct. 4
Kane, Father R(ichard): Donaldsonville, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Kane went to Donaldsonville early this morning in hopes of meeting (Blanc) on his return from Attakapas. As he was disappointed, he writes some tidings about himself. He would have written (Blanc) at Franklin or Patterson but he thought the same fatality which had accelarated his return would have prevented (Blanc) from visiting either on the day agreed upon. The fatigue of traveling incommoded Kane for a few days, after which he recovered his usual health. He was a welcome visitor on the coast; he found everyone suffering from a yellow fever or terror; people died whether from sickness or fear. Now mortality is on the decrease. Medical skill rescues the majority. Kane has had quite a numerous congregation here the last two Sundays. Kane is sincerely afflicted at the distressing news that awaited (Blanc) in New Orleans. It would seem that God culled the brightest flowers among the clergy and leaves others in perpetual uselessness. P.S. If (Blanc) writes, Kane will go to the city next, week. All the family send respects, particularly Aimée and Luce.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {1}


1855 Oct. 4
Spalding, M(artin) J. Bp. Louisville: Louisville, Kentucky
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He encloses a memorandum of replies to the queries of the Sacred Congregation. The document was sent on to the Bishop of Vincennes with the request to keep it "going". Spalding hopes that Purcell will hear from all his suffragans soon. Purcell can make what use he deems proper of the suggestions Spalding offers. He was much pained to learn from Father (Peter J.) Lavialle that the provincial seminary is not better patronized. The only one that Spalding could send did not turn out well as to health. The suffragan Bishops should have stood by their agreement. Spalding finds that the names of persons presented for Fort Wayne have leaked out in Indiana. There is a reign of Jacobin Clubs in Louisville, but Spalding thinks they are growing ashamed of themselves. A reaction must come. He is glad that Purcell put Johnson down. His missionary clergymen complain of the transferred feasts in the Ordo. He thinks he will return to the old Ordo. P.S. Spalding's brother has a fever. Father (Charles) Boeswald is still very low though there are hopes of his recovery.

II-4-m - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 16to. - {7}


1855 Oct. 4
Tholomier, Father (Claude Anthony): St. Michael, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Tholomier asks for a dispensation for Justilien Theriot and Eulalie Nome(?). Tholomier has just given the last rites to Madame (Louise de) Barbarin, (R.S.C. J.) who died, as have two of her colleagues and ten other (Religious of the Sacred Heart) of the sickness which surrounds them. The convent has felt the hardest blow; 13 victims in one month. Who could have foreseen this three weeks ago when all were so well.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 12mo. - {5}


1855 Oct. 5
DeBolle, Father J(ohn) H.: Detroit, (Michigan)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

He has been in Detroit 4 years. Because of his inclinations and tastes the Bishop has for 2 years confided the hospital to DeBolle's care. This year they have had 130 patients. DeBolle has to go a quarter of a league every morning for Mass which in the winter is quite a hardship. The Bishop of Detroit has not seen fit to make any arrangements. DeBolle is convinced of the usefulness of his service as a great number are so lapsed that he has to teach them their prayers. Having learned from Father (Francis) Gouesse, (C.S.C.) that (Blanc) does not have a priest for the hospital he asks for a position. P.S. Gouesse adds on the same paper that he believes that DeBolle, aged 34, and speaking English, French, and German, could be of great use. Since Gouesse has been in Detroit, he has heard nothing to DeBolle's disadvantage. If the Bishop gives him his exeat, it will be a loss for the diocese.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {2}


1855 Oct. 6
Chambost, Father C(harles): Plaquemine, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisia)na

Chambost has just received Blanc's letter of October 2. The epidemic has taken 3 victims at Chambost's, Father Noir, Mr. Boudet, and a young French cook. He saved four and could perhaps have saved all if they had let themselves be treated. During the retreat of the Ladies of the Sacred Heart at St. Michael, Noir came to visit Father Auguste (Chambost) and Noir conformed in character and opinions. Sunday evening, September 9 Noir told how sad he was to leave, and an instant later he was stricken. There was then no case of yellow fever at Plaquemine or at the College. Chambost called Dr. Scratchley but Noir proved to be an unmanageable patient. He refused to take the medicines. Chambost's brother, Mr. Hurley, the cook and a little orphan fell ill the same day. Noir seemed out of danger on Thursday; at four in the morning, he was delirious and he died at 10 Friday morning. Chambost was stricken with a nervous attack brought on by fatigue and when he came to they told him all that had happened and that his brother had only two hours to live. For six days they repeated that Auguste was dying. In the meantime, the French cook and Boudet died. Boudet came with Father Raymond; he was to be their French teacher this year. Auguste overcame all by his patience and is up, as are the other three. Father (Peter) Lucas also is up. As soon as Lucas became ill, Chambost sent Father (R.) O'Reilly to him and he stayed at his bedside 7 days and nights. When O'Reilly became ill, Chambost took him away a week ago. Noir made no arrangements. Chambost sent Madame (Adine) Guinand, (R.S.C.J.) a note of the cost of his coffin, the hearse, and his doctor. They made him a metal coffin thinking that the Ladies would want to have him taken to the convent. The coffin is $75; the hearse, $25; the doctor $25. Auguste presents his respects; he will go to the city next week. He looks like a skeleton. Mr. Bottis(?) is here; Chambost hopes he will be useful. Enclosed in this letter is a clipping from The Iberville Gazette containing a letter from Chambost to Mr. Jennings, the editor. Chambost gives a short sketch of the victims of the epidemic, Noir, Victor Ranchal who came from France at the request of Chambost's brother, and Mr. Boudrt, (Boudet?). Philipp Heelin was, after their doctor, their first helper, attending everyone with great skill.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. & clipping - (French) - 5pp. - 12mo. - {15}


1855 Oct. 6
Dupuy, Father Enn(emond): Iberville, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Dupuy sees by (Blanc)'s letter that Father (Michael?) Lyons has explained badly the precise state of the question and what Mr. Labauve told him. Labauve, so well disposed in the beginning, has been won over by the family of R. Tusson for whom he is the lawyer in the Fletcher question. Therefore, the alleged embarrassment in upholding (Blanc) and Dupuy. After what Labauve said to Lyons, he knows positively that they are right and that there is no longer a road in that channel. But after being won over, he asks whether the Archbishop is really the owner of the church land and says that this land belongs to the Catholics and that the transfer is not legal. This is what Lyons has not told (Blanc); he said he has not seen the map and does not believe that the trustees had the right to transfer it. At the time of the transfer, the trustees, charter in hand, consulted all the lawyers in Plaquemine to find a reason for not ceding it. In the presence of Lyons, Father (Charles?) Chambost blamed Dupuy and (Blanc) and said they were doing a great wrong, that there was a road and he did not see why they opposed it; that Dupuy, knowing that he was wrong, had sent Lyons to replace him until he saw how the affair would turn out. Chambost had Rousseau to dinner and Rousseau said that the police had made a road there and that he had been over it. Dupuy has told Lyons to write to Labauve to take the affair to another court later, that (Blanc) was not ready, because of losses in the clergy. Dupuy will see Labauve and if there is any doubt about the legality of the transfer, Dupuy would let this Place go which has never given anything but trouble. The other side is preferable according to all reports. P.S. As for the ditch that Labauve says he will make, Dupuy's reply is that if he wants to build one he does not need Labauve.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {7}


1855 Oct. 6
Maugin, Father C(harles J.?): Philadelphia, (Pennsylvania)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Maugin has just heard of the death of several of (Blanc)'s clergy. He should be with (Blanc) to help. But having been unfaithful in his duties, Maugin no longer dares to count on being among (Blanc)'s workers. He thought a word from him might give (Blanc) some pleasure. He does not propose going to replace the vacancies left by death but (Blanc) knows that Maugin is always ready to obey him. He would not fear the yellow fever if it was a condition which could again place him under (Blanc)'s orders.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {1}


1855 Oct. 6
Ursulines: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

A list of 35 Sisters and 3 postulants(?), giving the age, years of profession and occupation of: Mother (St. Seraphine Ray?) Superior, Mother (Ste. Claire?) Assistant, Sister Ste. Angèle, Sister Ste. Gertrude, Sister St. Gabriel, Sister St. Michel, Sister Ste. Paule, Sister St. Augustin, Sister Ste. Eulalie, Sister Ste. Hélène, Sister Ste. Philomène, Sister St. Joseph, Sister St. Louis, Sister St. Pierre, Sister St. Placide, Sister Ste. Lucie, Sister St. Charles, Sister Ste. Marie, Sister Ste. Scholastiques, Sister Ste. Thérèse, Sister Ste. Agathe, Sister Ste. Marcelline, Sister Ste. Ursule, Sister St. Stanislas, Sister St. Jean, Sister Mary Claire, Sister Ste. Marthe, Sister Ste. Monique, Sister Ste. Elisabeth, Sister St. Xavier, Sister St. Vincent, Sister St. Bernard, Sister Ste. Martine, Sister Ste. Anne, Sister Ste. Magdaleine, Miss Marguerite, Miss Marguerite, Elisa Marrin, and Catherine Long.

VI-1-i - List - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {38}


1855 Oct. 7
(Mudd, S.C.), Sister Mary Austin: Donaldsonville, (Louisiana)
 to (Archbishop Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Sister arrived safe at home and found the Sisters and children well. Sister Florence, (S.C.) left them for St. Louis; Austin cannot complain as she ought not to be selfish. She would have been glad to keep Florence as they know each other. As a Sister of Charity, she is bound to endeavor to be submissive. Her health and strength are very much improved. The school is going on on a small scale. The carpenters have not yet finished their job; they have run her into debt. She has just received a letter from Mother; some Sisters are coming out for the southern missions.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 16mo. - {3}


1855 Oct. 7
Tancioni, Filippo Monsignor Rector: Collegio Urbano, Rome, Italy
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

The Rector writes to Purcell to explain confidentally the case of Daniel Dixon. This young man studying for the diocese of Cincinnati, although he gave some promise at the beginning, has steadily manifested a lacking in the qualities that should be found in the sacerdotal state. Tancioni tries to discourage the boy's talk of "no vocation" but has finally decided that it would be better for the young man to quit. For in addition to being rather light-minded and impatient he has been a constant violater of the rules; and it seems has been talking of the opposite sex with some show of attraction. For his sake and that of the students Tancioni thinks it best to send him back. It hurts him to do this because of Purcell's kindnesses but he concludes by saying that after all he is doing Purcell a favor in giving him the facts about Dixon. Dixon will be sent home at the end of the fall term.

II-4-m - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - (Italian) - {3}


1855 Oct. 8
Andrieu, C.M., Father (Anthony): Assumption, (Louisiana)
 to Father E(tienne) Rousselon: New Orleans, L(ouisiana)

Andrieu asks for a dispensation for Baptiste Frilloux who wishes to marry Rosalie Dupui, sister of his deceased wife. Frilloux says he lives alone, far from any neighbor, that he has a small child, and that his sister-in-law, herself an orphan, could take care of it. Rousselon is to tell the Archbishop that Father (Anthony) Verrina, (C.M.), has been sent to Paincourt to take care of the congregation.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {4}


1855 Oct. 8
Brownson, O(restes) A.: Boston, (Massachusetts)
 to (George W. Chiswell.: William A. Chiswell,: C.N. Mossbury,: Howard Griffith,: T. Randolph Hall,: and Benjamin F. Reid: Poolesville, Montgomery Country, Maryland)

Brownson received their letter of the first and would have replied earlier had he not been absent from home. He cannot send the number of (Brownson's) Review in which he asserted civil allegiance to the Pope because he has never asserted, out of the papal state, any civil authority or jurisdiction for the Pope. Nor has he published writings derogatory to American institutions and principles. He is not a revolutionist or a radical but a Conservative. There never was and never can be a more ridiculously false charge than that brought against them as Catholics of hostility to American liberty and disloyalty to republican institutions. Their religion condemns every species of tyranny. In answer to their questions: He is not the acknowledged organ of the Catholic Church in the United States. The only such organ is the Pope and, in communion with him, the bishops, each in his own diocese. The bishops do not acknowledge his Review as the authoritative propounder of the Faith, but only as generally conforming in its doctrine to the Faith. Catholics owe obedience to the Pope only in spiritual matters, but that spiritual authority extends to the morality of temporal things in so far as they are spiritually related or have a spiritual character. The Pope has recognized the American Constitution as compatible with the law of God. If the Supreme Court decides the Fugitive Slave law to be constititional, he is bound in conscience to obey that law and the Pope cannot dispense him from his obligation to obey. If the Constitution or a law should command him to be an idolator or a Presbyterian, the Pope would have the right to declare it null and void for Catholic consciences because repugnant to the law of God. Finally, in regard to (Joseph) Chandler's speech, he sends the last Review. He has never asserted that Chandler's principles are incompatible with the Catholic faith: he only maintains that, in the sense in which the public will understand him and in which, not unlikely, he understands himself, he sets forth, not Catholic doctrine, but the opinion of some Catholics which he may hold but is not obliged to hold. He is an American by birth and education, and he yields to no man in his love of his country or his loyalty as a citizen. Personally he belongs to the same political party (The Democratic Party) as they do. But he claims the Divine, the natural, and the civil right to be a member of the Roman Catholic Church.

I-3-l - A.Draft S. - 6pp. - 4to. - {10}


1855 Oct. 9
Spalding, M(artin) J. Bp. Louisville: Louisville, Kentucky
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Spalding doubts whether any confidence can be placed in Rev. (Maria) Dominic. His antecedents are of the worst, and this probably accounts for his wish to leave Tracadie. Spalding's information is derived from the Abbot who gave an account of what certain Bishops in Nova Scotia and Newfoundland has revealed to him. Spalding looks upon Dominic as a dangerous subject. Rev. (Charles) Boeswald is something better although still very low and not out of danger. Spalding's brother is almost better. Spalding hopes nothing will happen in today's election that will bring Purcell trouble. P.S. (Orestes A.) Brownson is becoming absolutely insufferable. He will be a stumbling block in the Church. He is proud and obstinate. Spalding has written to Archbishop (Francis Patrick) Kenrick of Baltimore on the subject and will write to Bishop (John) Fitzpatrick. Although the strictures which appeared in the Telegraph were severe, they were just. Their names should be left from the cover of his Review.

II-4-m - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 12mo. - {9}


1855 Oct. 9
Kevin, Mich(ae)l: Corofin, Ireland
 to Archbishop Anthony Blanck(!): (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Kevin asks (Blanc) to hand the enclosed (no enclosure) to the solicitor through whom Kevin and his brother received 25 Pounds(?) each. Kevin wrote to (Blanc) on October 4, 1854 and requested same letter and never heard respecting the contents. He expected whereas there is no account of the brother of the late Rich(ar)d O'C(onnor?), that they were entitled, according to the will, to the amount left Simon O'Connor. Kevin hopes (Blanc) will see that they are properly dealt with. The small affair would be of great service to them, being two orphans striving to live on the industry of a little shop in a small village.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 16mo. - {3}


1855 Oct. 9
Major, James: Georgetown, D(istrict of) C(olumbia)
 to Archbishop Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

The Young Catholics Friend Society of Georgetown at a meeting on June 3, 1855 resolved that Blanc be elected an honorary member. The object of this association is the education of poor Catholic children. The funds are applied to books and clothing and to the support of a school. The Society is now making an effort towards increasing the number of teachers.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - 1p. - 4to. - {2}


1855 Oct. 10
Chambige, Father F(rancis): St. Thomas' (near Bardstown, Kentucky)
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Purcell's students are giving general satisfaction. All save Mr. Voght are in excellent health. He fears Francis Mayer's vocation is rather doubtful. Samuel Brent is doing better, but he is young and giddy. Mr. Saviolle has resumed his duties as professor and prefect of studies. They have not succeeded in getting a German teacher. They have given over the German classes to Mr. Vogt. Chambige supposes they have lost irrevocably the two proteges of Father (Maurice) Howard. He encloses the account for the first part of the session. P.S. He will draw on Father Edward Purcell next week.

II-4-m - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {3}


(18)55 Oct. 11
Jouve, R.S.C.J., Madame Al(Amélie?): (St. Michael, Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Jouve believes since (Blanc)'s last letter of October 4, he does not know all the misfortunes that have befallen this house. A third of the (Religious of the Sacred Heart) have been taken by the terrible epidemic. Mother (Annette) Praz, (R.S.C.J.) headed the list, will it be closed by Mother (Louise) de Barbarin, (R.S.C.J.)? Jouve does not dare to hope and fears that Mother (Adine) Guinand, (R.S.C.J.) may succumb. With her, Jouve's last support would be taken. Who can better understand than Blanc who has lost so many? Jouve cannot probe the future of their society in Louisiana. This new trial proves that foreigners cannot withstand the epidemic. All who have died are from the States or from Europe. Madame (Aloysia?) Hardey, (R.S.C.J.) had already sent five Sisters; they are no longer living. Hardey had been authorized to take Praz to replace Jouve in Canada because of the difficulty caused by the illness of Mother (Louisa?) Leveque, (R.S.C.J.) and the trouble to (Blanc) from such a change; she left Praz and God has taken her away. No doubt they are not worthy to succeed and others would do better. The house at G(ran)d Coteau is going to make a generous effort to help St. Michael but they must also keep Baton Rouge. Jouve has written their Mother General; it is she who will decide; her last letter gave little hope. They cannot ignore what (Blanc) has done to establish Baton Rouge.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {7}


1855 Oct. 12
Kenrick, Francis Patrick, Abp. Baltimore: Baltimore, Maryland
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Father David Whelan has intimated to Kenrick Purcell's assent to his appointment as Agent for the opening of a (American) College at Rome, and Purcell's willingness to honor the draft for the necessary contribution. He will not draw on Purcell until he communicates to his suffragans that $50 is expected from each. The departure of the Agent is delayed only for want of funds. Kenrick is happy to see that Purcell's health is restored. He has the Pope's reply to their letter, but the acts are under examination.

II-4-m - A.L.S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {5}


1855 Oct. 12
Noon, Rev. P. D.:
St. Joseph's College (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
 to (Orestes) A. Brownson: (Boston, Massachusetts)

He is sending $3 for St. Joseph's Convent's subscription and he tells Brownson to continue sending his Review to the Philadelphia Historical Society. Mr. Bennett wants to discontinue as he will be in Eli, Iowa. He would like Brownson to come to their Institution, for everyone at the University sympathizes with Brownson; he is sorry to see how many people grossly misunderstand him. He would like Brownson to give the July, 1856 Commencement address and if he could accept, Father Noon would send the traveling expenses.

I-3-l - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {2}


1855 Oct. 13
Dupuy, Father Enn(emond): Iberville, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Dupuy is sending a copy of the charter of St. Gabriel Church, copied from the acts of the legislature of 1818. It has never been changed. At the time of the transfer, search was made by Dupuy and by the trustees. Now one could say that if the transfer is not legal, the lawyers here could change everything to their taste. (Blanc) has a copy of the act drawn up between him and the trustees. Labauve's "turnback" is a result of Father (Charles) Chambost. Dupuy does not think that Dupuy had led (Blanc) into error. Dupuy is not much better and Father (Michael?) Lyons says he will leave tomorrow. Dupuy does not know what he will do and he cannot understand what this Irishman wants. He seemed satisfied but he is Irish and has the idea of traveling.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {5}


1855 Oct. 13
Dupuy, Father Enn(emond): Iberville, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

On receiving (Blanc)'s letter this morning, Dupuy felt so much grief that he could not resist talking to (Blanc) again. He well believes that (Blanc) cannot occupy himself with other things amid all the losses. The good Sisters of the Sacred Heart at St. Michael are the guardian angels of the Parishes and does it not seem that this disaster is a punishment for a people who refuse to receive the divine light. Dupuy did not leave his country to gather flowers but to tread on the thorns.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {2}


1855 Oct. 13
Kenrick, Archbishop Francis Patrick: Balt(imore, Maryland)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: N(ew) Orleans, (Louisiana)

In accordance with a resolution of their Provincial Council, Father David Whelan is about to proceed to Rome to take measures to open the (American) College (in Rome) for the youth of the States, as is the desire of His Holiness. Each prelate who wishes to share in this is expected to contribute $50. (Blanc) is to communicate this to his suffragans and transmit any contributions to Kenrick. The agent is delayed only until funds be procured.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {3}


1855 Oct. 13
Layton, Tho(ma)s: New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Layton has forwarded the original of the enclosed check to Father (Edward F.) Sorin, (C.S.C.). Also $5 the change due to Blanc. (Enclosed is the) duplicate check for $95 to Corning and Co(mpany) of New York, signed by the cashier of the Southern Bank.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - 2pp.4to. & 16mo. {4}


1855 Oct. 13
(Portier), Bishop Michael: Mobile, (Alabama)
 to (Archbishop Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

He wishes to see (Blanc) so much that he will leave next Monday for New Orleans. He says nothing more as they will have time to chat(?).

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 12mo. - {1}


1855 Oct. 14
Abbadie, S.J., Father J(ean) F(rancis): St. Michael, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Thursday evening at 7:30, Madame (Melanie) Carrard, (R.S.C.J.) went to join in eternity, the 13 companions who preceded her in the train of their Mother Annette Praz, (R.S.C.J.). There is one new case, a novice. The 6 or 7 convalescents are fine. At 4 today, Abbadie go to assist Father (Jean?) Martin for the funeral of Drouzin Gaudet. This morning Abbadie was called for the little girl of Edg. Druilhet. Mrs. Felix came to tell Abbadie that her daughter Mrs. J. Le Bourgeois has been quite ill for 2 days. Abbadie plans to go to see her after Mass tomorrow. Abbadie looked at Father Noir's belongings and made a partial list; there is not much. Abbadie sent to B(aton) Rouge, by Madame (Adine) Guinand, R.S.C.J. most of the books; he will send the clothing(?) there to give the newly-formed hospital what they could not use. Abbadie found money in three different places: 1. $30 in silver; 2. $46 in gold, silver and notes; 3. a roll of gold pieces, 48 twenty franc pieces and $8 in American; these with $2 separately makes $270 of which Abbadie gave Guinand 240. Noir had said that he had a deposit to keep and Father (Claude Anthony) Tholomier asked whether Abbadie had not found the money deposited by his workman whom Tholomier himself had paid $30, and Edg. Druilhet had paid 16 which would make at least $46. Abbadie gave Tholomier $30; should he give him $16 more? The workman is dead. If so the $270 already reduced to 240 will be reduced to $224. The account to pay at Plaquemine is $125.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {11}


1855 Oct. 14
(Martin), Bishop Aug(uste) M(ar)ie: Natchitoches, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

(Martin) sees by the Propagateur that (Blanc) is back in the city. (Blanc) will have received (Martin)'s letter and in receiving the list of the losses in the Convent as St. Michael, (Martin) feels the need of expressing his sympathy. Although up to now there are no signs of sickness in the country, the epidemic is making ravages at Alexandria and the surroundings. They will really be safe only up to the end of November. At Avoyelles, Father (Hyacinthe) Tumoine has forbidden his young confrere to visit the sick. Elsewhere the epidemic is not raging except at Marksville and on the river banks. It is also at Milliken's Rend where one of (Martin)'s young priests, who was at Vicksburg, has taken refuge with Father (Simon) D'Angles. Last Sunday, (Martin) gave Confirmation at Cloutierville. Father (J.) Guy gave more satisfaction than (Martin) expected and made many fine promises. He asked for a confrere; (Martin) will give him one for this winter. Yesterday (Martin) received a letter from the Bishop of Nantes who is sending an excellent subject from his seminary who has completed his theology. It is the 3rd one he has been promised; he hopes for two others.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 12mo. - {5}


1855 Oct. 15
(Aucoin, O. Carm.), Sister St. Paul: Vermillionville, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Sister wants to inform (Blanc) of some difficulties about music. Having been here, (Blanc) can judge of the means they must take to keep up their house. (Blanc) has found the repeated requests of the parents and others to be just reasons for teaching music. But fear of the yellow fever has forced them to declare a vacation. The children have been gone since the 19th of last month and they are to return on the 19th of this month. They have told parents that they will have music and have arranged it with the teacher. (Blanc) told St. Paul to inform Mother Thérèse (Chevrel, O. Carm.) of his intentions on this subject and that when he returned to New Orleans he would talk with her. When Sister Magdeleine, (O. Carm.) left, St. Paul asked her to take on this duty and she promised to do so. Thérèse said nothing more about it but Mother St. Augustin, (O. Carm.) wrote that she hoped they would not start music without Thérèse's permission and not to start it until Father (Stephen) Rousselon arrived. They made their retreat of 8 days with Father (Joseph) Roduit, (S.J.). Sickness has not yet shown up in their village. All the Sisters join in respects.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {6}


1855 Oct. 15
De Chaignon, S.J., Father Ant(hony): Vermillionville, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

De Chaignon asks for a dispensation for Simon Eugène Saulnier, son of the late Jean Baptiste Saulnier and Marie Clemence Brand; and Marie Emerida Brand, daughter of Pierre Rosemont Brand and Calixte Arcenaux. De Chaignon also asks (Blanc) to tell him what to do in the following case: A divorced woman wishes to be reconciled to God. The case concerns the validity of the first marriage. De Chaignon has not yet completely carried out the promise to send (Blanc) an account of the revenues of the parish and he has not yet written to Father (Aloysius) Curioz, (S.J.). De Chaignon must put if off for some days as having secured from Father (Joseph) Roduit, (S.J.) the permission to make his annual retreat, he did not want to miss the opportunity.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French & Latin) - 3pp. - 4to. - {9}


(18)55 Oct. 15
Dupuy, Father Enn(emond): Iberville, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Father (Michael?) Lyons left yesterday in spite of all Dupuy's remonstrances and the work he saw to be done, without the slightest reason of health of dissatisfaction. Dupuy is beginning to recover a bit and must take up more work than ever. Lyons said he had (Blanc)'s permission but Dupuy doubts it. Dupuy has treated Lyons as cordially and affectionately as possible but his Irish heart did not understand. He has received $138 for his stay of 3 months and 8 days and this besides the intentions and offerings at baptisms. If (Blanc) thinks this is not enough, he is to ask Father Rousselon to pay the balance. Dupuy does not want to see Lyons again.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {2}


(18)55 Oct. 15
Thirion, Father (Hubert): Pointe Coupée, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc: N(ew) O(rleans, Louisiana)

John B. Trusdell, obliged by family interests to be absent for some time, leaving his place vacant at Poydras College, Thirion asks Blanc to help them in the choice of a replacement. Thirion has written to Father Perché and Father Bellier. They are well; they still have several cases of yellow fever and deaths every day. (P.S.) They also would like to have a French teacher. The number of students is growing.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 12mo. - {3}


1855 Oct. 16
(Baraga) Frederick, Bishop of Saut Ste. Marie: Saut Ste. Marie, Michigan
 to Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefevere: Detroit, (Michigan)

Yesterday Baraga received a communication from Mr. Manypenny, stating that Baraga's drafts in favor of Messrs. Morre and Poote have been paid. He asks Lefevere to draw the money and send it to him in gold by Fargo's Express. P.S. Baraga has just received Lefevere's letter of Oct. 10. He apologizes for his forgetfulness and acknowledges the receipt of the money. P.S. Baraga asks Lefevere to give to Mr. King $57.00 of the above mentionned money.

III-2-i - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {1}


1855 Oct. 16
Comte, Father J(ose)ph: Montreal, (Canada)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Comte asks a favor for a poor widow. Cyrille Michon of Montreal, who lived for some years at New Orleans, is said to have died last June. His mother, Widow Herse, has heard this news; it was her only son. Comte asks for information about this rumor. It would be a great consolation for this mother to learn that her son died a good Christian. She has lost within several years her husband, her son-in-law, her daughter and her fortune.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {3}


1855 Oct. 16
(Vandevelde), Bishop James Oliver: Natchez, (Mississippi)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Yesterday (Vandevelde) received (Blanc)'s letter of the 11th. Since his letter to Father (Stephen) Rousselon they . . . (For complete calendar see original of 7 cards)

Cross references:

1. Archbishop Anthony Blanc
2. Father Stephen Rousselon
3. Father Rene Toussaint Courjault
4. Sister of Charity
5. Father Paul Marie Lecorre
6. Father Francis Xavier Leray
7. Father Julian Gillou
8. Mother Cecilia Renot, C.S.J.
9. Sisters of St. Joseph
10. Father Simon August Paris
11. Bishop Anthony O'Regan
12. Father Denis Dunn
13. Father Henry Coyle
14. Father John Bernard Weikamp
15. Father Jeremiah A. Kinsella
16. Father Mathurin F. Grignon

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 12mo. - {16}


1855 Oct. 17
(Kenrick), Archbishop Peter Richard: St. Louis, (Missouri)
 to Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Kenrick) encloses a draft for $100 to be given to Mr. Kearney. He also makes known the nominations, made by the Council which terminated last Sunday: The present Vicar Apostolic, Bishop (John Baptist) Miége, to be made Bishop of Leavenworth, Kansas Territory. A Vicariate Apostolic to be established comprising Nebraska Territory and that part of Minnesota Territory west of the 96th degree. Proposed for the Vicariate are Father Peter J. (De Smet) S.J. De Smedt, St. Louis; Father (A.) Trevis of Dubuque; Father Florimond Bonduel of Milwaukee. A new episcopal see is proposed to be erected in Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin for which are proposed: Father H(enry) D(amien) Jun(c)ker of the Cincinnati Diocese; Father Lucian Galtier of Milwaukee;Father Anth(on)y Pelamourgues, V(icar) G(eneral) of Dubuque. The see of Quincy is recommended to be changed to Alton as a more central and important place. The names porposed: Father Joseph Patschowski, S.J. of St. Louis; Jun(c)ker; and Father Tobias Mullen of Pittsburgh. A coadjutor is asked for Dubuque; names proposed: Father (Timothy) Clement Smyth, (O.C.S.O.), Prior of the Trappist Monastery; Pelamourges; and Father (J.M. Villars) J.B. Villar from Iowa. A coadjutor for St. Louis: Father Ja(me)s Duggan, V(icar) G(eneral) of St. Louis; Father (John B. Byrne) John D. Byrne of Baltimore; Father Arnold Damen, S.J.s of St. Louis. They had fine weather during the Council and all passed off agreeably. (Kenrick) thanks Blanc for writing him an account of the money matter(?).

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {17}


1855 Oct. 17
Kenrick, Peter Richard, Abp. St. Louis: St. Louis, Missouri
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He sends the names proposed for the new sees which they have asked to be erected. They have asked that Leavenworth City, (Kas.), the residence of Bishop (John B.) Miege, be made an episcopal see, the present Vicar Apostolic be Bishop. Also that a new Vicariate be established in Nebraska and that part of Minnesota west of 96 degrees longitude. The names proposed are Father Peter J. De Smet, S.J. of St. Louis; Father (J.) Tracy of Dubuque; Father Florimond Bonduel of Milwaukee. The names for the new see of Prairie du Chien are Father Henry D. Juncker of Cincinnati; Father Lucas Galtier of Milwaukee; Father Anthony Pelamourgues of Dubuque. They have recommended that Quincy be suppressed and that Alton be substituted for it. The names proposed are Father J(oseph) Patschowski, S.J. of St. Louis; Father Juncker; Father Tobias Mullen of Pittsburg. They have asked for a Coadjutor for the Bishop of Dubuque - names, Father Clement Symth, Provincial of the Trappist Monastery near Dubuque; Father Pelamourgues; Father John B. Villars of Dubuque. Also for St. Louis Father James Duggan S.J.; Father John D. Byrne of Baltimore; Father Arnold Damen S.J. of St. Louis. Kenrick always believed that Purcell's wishes were followed in the selection for Covington. He hopes that Purcell finds the pastoral letter of the council satisfactory. He believes that (Orestes A.) Brownson and the Shepherd of the Valley have been badly treated.

II-4-m - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 8vo. - {31}


1855 Oct. 17
Tholomier, Father (Claude Anthony): St. Michael, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Last Sunday Tholomier published the first and last banns of marriage for Francois Bourgeois, widower of the late Rose Huguet, and Marie Carmelita Arcenaux, widow of Ludger Duchon. As soon as the banns were published, he was told that a relationship existed between them. Rose Huguet was a sister of Marie Carmelite and also her godmother. So Tholomier told Bourgeois that he could not bless the marriage without a dispensation from (Blanc). This person concealed the affinity. Things are so so at the convent; one Sister is dangerously ill. The sick in the parish seem to be lessening.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 12mo. - {5}


1855 Oct. 18
Kane, Father R(ichard): Donaldsonville, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

It is a fortnight since Kane wrote expressing his readiness to go to New Orleans. He is forced to conclude that it did not reach (Blanc). Sickness and mortality is disappearing. In the whole parish there are only four cases of yellow fever. Kane asks to be remembered to Father Rousselon and the priests of the house.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {1}


1855 Oct. 18
Spalding, M(artin) J. Bp. Louisville: Louisville, Kentucky
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He hopes to see Purcell early in December when he lectures for Bishop (George) Carrell and perhaps for Purcell's Catholic Institute. These lectures are a bore and do little good. He sent $50 to Archbishop (Francis Patrick) Kenrick for the foundation of the (American) College of Rome. When Purcell lets him know what is his quota for Dr. (Silliman) Ives' fund, he will send it. Archbishop Kenrick of Baltimore writes declining to take further steps in regard to removing their names from Brownson's Cover as Bishop (Michael) O'Connor has done. Spalding thinks he will write to (Orestes A.) Brownson begging him to omit all their names in the future. It is a delicate subject but he will try to write a kind letter. He hopes Brownson may omit the names on his removal to New York. Spalding does not recollect the precise connection in which he used the term disparis cultus. He trusts that Father Drise or (J.B. Druyts) will not be the nominee. Jesuits are little suited by training to be bishops. Kenrick knows nothing of any change of mind in Bishop (John Neumann) of Philadelphia. Spalding's clergy complain of the difficulty of reciting the Roman office during the last three months. He has determined to return to the Baltimore Ordo. It is his opinion that he can return to the old ordo without writing to Rome.

II-4-m - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 12mo. - {12}


1855 Oct. 18
Tyler, Samuel: Frederick, Maryland
 to O(restes) A. Brownson: (Boston, Massachusetts)

Tyler, a lawyer, expresses his approval of an article on the philosophy of Hume and others of his school. He encloses an article he has written on "Sir William Hamilton and his Philosophy". He asks if Brownson has a spare copy of the article on Hume; if so, Tyler would appreciate having it to preserve among valuable papers.

I-3-l - A.L.S. - 1p. - 10mo. - {1}


1855 Oct. 19
Benoit, Father J(ulian): Fort Wayne, (Indiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

It was not good for Benoit to be so late in thanking (Blanc) for all his kindnesses during Benoit's short stay at New Orleans. This silence of two years was not because of ingratitude or forgetfulness. How many times he has told people of his kindness. He left (Blanc)'s diocese for two reasons. (Blanc) knows the first and he can guess the second. His bishop persisted in recalling him and Benoit did not find himself strong enough to struggle against the indifference of most of the Creoles. In other ways he liked Louisiana, his health was very good there, better than in Indiana. On his return to Vincennes, he had a serious and prolonged illness and since that he has suffered from favers and rheumatism. Benoit also was glad to have more ample means of existence and to be delivered from the burden of his own maintenance, something he has borne continually since entering the mission of Vincennes. But he is more comfortable in his poverty, surrounded by warmhearted Irishmen, than he could be when he was pastor of (Blanc)'s cathedral, with Father (Constantine Maenhaut) Mahenaut's revenues. If he tells these Celts to come to services, they come and it when in danger of death they do not have the church's blessing, it is never because of impiety or despair. At St. Michael, Benoit buried several whites who, not wanting a priest to pray for them, had their bodies brought to the church to receive a blessing which hardly blessed them. In revenge they tossed money like a bribe. Such things disgusted Benoit and he gave in to it. This does not lessen his gratitude to (Blanc). Fort Wayne is going to be the seat of a new bishopric. May its first bishop be a worthy imitator of the virtues of the Dubois, Flagets, Brutés.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {3}


1855 Oct. 19
Delente, O(lympe): St. Martinville, (Louisiana)
 to (Archbishop Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Blanc)'s losses and his sad face on leaving St. Martin fills her with bitterness. (Blanc) would never have said those heart breaking words had he foreseen how they hurt her. On Sunday Father (Ange Marie) Jan had to say to low Mass since a High Mass would be sung to the walls. There are still many sick. Delente is on the eve of leaving this village; what happiness to find herself again near (Blanc). One thing worries her: where will she go? However, in 2 weeks she will arrive in the city, convinced that there will be a corner for her.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {2}


1855 Oct. 19
Hall, F. Winn: New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Hall finds that the "bands" of his sister's marriage have never been published, Ma having forgotten it. Hall left that to them and fully expected it would be attended to. He asks the favor to dispense with the two publications as there is only one Sunday before the marriage. After Blanc agreeing to marry them, Hall is almost afraid to ask. (Hall writes on stationery of the) New Orleans Post Office.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {1}


1855 Oct. 21
Andrieu, C.M., Father A(nthony): Assumption, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop A(nthony) Blanc: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Andrieu is pleased that Blanc's wishes concerning the diocesan seminary are satisfied. Andrieu believes that Father (J.) Masnou, C.M., their Provisitor knows of this affair; he has the sole authority to settle with Blanc. Andrieu is writing Masnou to ask him to go down soon. Andrieu's choice for the place is still Donaldson.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 12mo. - {2}


1855 Oct. 21
Porte, Father: Estensan, (France)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Dominique Porte, his nephew, whom (Blanc) has received in his seminary, has given signs of a great vocation. He spent his youth with Porte in his presbytery, up to the age of 14. Then he went to the minor seminary to the great satisfaction of his professors. It was lack of money that decided him to cross the ocean. He cannot praise (Blanc)'s kindness too much; he wishes to become (Blanc)'s subject. He has asked the Bishop of Tarbes for his exeat which (Blanc) will find enclosed (no enclosure). The signs of a true vocation which his nephew has shown gives hope that he will be a worthy priest and that he will repay the sacrifices (Blanc) has made for him.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 12mo. - {2}


1855 Oct. 22
Callaghan, Ann: Boston, Massachusetts
 to Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Enclosed (no enclosure) is a letter to Father (Moynihan) Moynahan of (Blanc)'s diocese. She saw in the Boston Post, taken from the New Orleans Bulletin that on July 13 a man named Daniel Callaghan 24, was executed. Moynahan administered the rites of religion to him. As an afflicted widow and mother, she asks for information. P.S. (The answer is to be directed to) Fearing, Thacher, Whiton for Denis Callaghan.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {5}


1855 Oct. 23
Clarke, Mrs. C.E.T.: Cypress Top, Harris Co(unty), Texas
 to O(restes A.) Brownson: (Boston, Massachusetts)

Mrs. Clarke wrote a previous letter asking Brownson to fulfill his promise to introduce her to publishers when she has completed her book. As she has not received an answer she fears the letter was lost. She outlines the story. She says that some of her friends and acquaintences, including the priest of the Church she attends, have praised her work, after hearing extracts from it. She tells Brownson she has added one character because of a suggestion he made a Catholic lover for her principal female character, who is used chiefly to express Catholic dogmas. She has been sick and was discouraged by not hearing from Brownson. She begs an answer. She has fled from Houston because of the yellow fever. She describes her unpleasant living conditions.

P.S. They have not received the October number of the Review.

I-3-l - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 8vo. - {2}


1855 Oct. 23
Hall, F. Winn: (New Orleans, Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Owing to the non-arrival of Mr. Barrow, Hall's sister's marriage will not come off this evening as expected. Hall will give Blanc notice and will bring the gentleman to see him, to satisfy that all is right.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {2}


1855 Oct. 23
(Martin), Bishop Aug(ust) M(ar)ie: Natchitoches, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Martin) thought (Blanc) would like to read a letter of Judge Campbell concerning the 2 big questions whose solution seoms bound to be division instead of union, tyranny instead of liberty. The position Campbell takes, based on the treaty of the ceding of Louisiana to the United States by France is based on the arguments which he has put forth and which their anti- K(now?) N(othings?) publicists have neglected too much. It is impossible to predict the out come of the elections of November 5 in their Parish. The American element dominates and among the rich Creoles the hatred of the Church is worthy of Voltaire. (Martin) regrets being indiscreet in the letter published in the Chronicle and which they say is republished in the Courrier. Immediately after All Saints, (Martin) will send (Blanc) some of his desires in regard to the points to be discussed in the Council. He is expecting a Jesuit from Spring Hill for the retreat at the convent. If he has to, (Martin) will give it together with Father (Pierre Felix) Dicharry. School is to reopen November 2; it will be scanty. Alexandria, which usually sends 8 to 12 students, will be entirely lacking and distress is so great here that many families are putting off sending their children for a year. All provisions remain at a ruinous price and (Martin) personally is in great want. But there is no sickness. Alexandria and Avoyelles still have it. In a month (Martin) hopes to be with (Blanc). (P.S.) He asks to be remembered to Father Rousselon.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 12mo. - {4}


(18)55 Oct. 23
Pritchard, Caroline: Evergreen, L(ouisian)a
 to Archbishop A(nthony) LeBlanc: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Having heard through (Father Ennemond?) Dupuy about the yellow fever raging in the convent of the Sacred Heart, and of the death of 14 of its inmates, Pritchard asks the names of the victims. Their little daughter was attached to some of the Ladies and is much distressed. She thinks it preferable to enter the Ursuline convent than to return to Sacred Heart and find all her teachers gone. The account of the loss of those Ladies and of Father Noir of the convent has created much excitement, and many tears of sorrow. Pritchard has desired much to converse with Blanc since her baptism and First Communion; her entire nature has become changed. Dr. (Pritchard) is in usual health and much softened relative to the Church; he accompanies her often to church. Pritchard asks for Blanc's views relative to her placing her daughter in the Ursuline convent.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 4to. - {4}


1855 Oct. 23
(Vandevelde), Bishop James Oliver: Natchez, (Mississippi)
 to Archbishop A(nthony) Blanc: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Father (Claude Paschal) Maistre of the Diocese of Chicago arrived here Yesterday morning. As he had an exeat and (Vandevelde) knew his history, he promised to admit him provided he made several months' retreat with the Trappists of Kentucky. (Vandevelde)'s intention was to place him at Pascagoula. Arrived at Cairo to go to La Trappe, they took his baggage on a boat for New Orleans and Maistre boarded a boat for Louisville and discovered the mistake. He decided to follow his trunks. Yesterday it was agreed that he would return to go to Trappists and (Vandevelde) sent a second letter to Fathers Eutrope and Placide. At the landing, Maistre was told there would not be a boat before Wednesday. Today (Vandevelde) reflected that perhaps Blanc would be willing to employ him. Maistre consented to go to see Blanc. If Blanc does accept him, (Vandevelde) asks him to test Maistre out by several weeks with the Redemptorists or elsewhere. He shows good dispositions but has the same sickness as someone Blanc knows: the mania to make money. Some time ago another priest of the Chicago diocese, suspended by his Bishop, wrote to ask (Vandevelde) to interceds with Blanc for a place in his diocese. He is a Canadian, zealous but a little impetuous. He is a Canadian, zealous but a little impetuous. It was for him that (Vandevelde) built the French Church in Chicago which Bishop (Anthony) O'R(egan) has changed to an Irish church. The newspapers talk about it; just today there was an article about it in the Natch Daily Courier taken from the Tribune of Chicago. (The priest) wrote that the Bishop made him give up everything he had, put him out on the sidewalk and refused to give him faculties or an exeat. He was much loved in Chicago which caused jealousy, etc. (Vandevelde) told him to write to Blanc. (Vandevelde) wanted to leave for Chicago but the doctor did not want to let him go for fear of the yellow fever and his friends here did all they could to prevent him. Father (Mathurin F.) Grignon went to Vicksburg to officiate on Sunday and visit the sick. (Vandevelde) expects him today or tomorrow. Grignon will be glad to find him here. (Vandevelde) has sent all his testimony to get O'Regan out of his bad Position.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {5}


1855 Oct. 24
(De St. Palais), Maurice Bp. Vincennes: Vincennes, Indiana
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He has already sent the document to Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefevere which Purcell sent him through Bishop (Martin John) Spalding, and asked that he forward them to Bishop (Louis Amadeus) Rappe. As to the question therein discussed De St. Palais thinks that their powers now are all that their position requires. As to protestant baptisms there are always the proper form and matter in theory but in practice he does not know what they do. As the Provincial Council of Cincinnati it was decided that the best means of providing for the support of the bishop was by taxing the parishes five per cent of the income which would not be difficult in Indiana. If there is difficulty elsewhere he suggests that the salaries of priests be fixed and the priests be made to send each year a sum fixed in proportion to their salaries. The bishops of the provincial synod decided that it was not expedient to form an American College at Rome, and De St. Palais retains the same view. He will not have a subject to send to the Provincial seminary this year and does not think he will have one for Rome for many years. Neither has he the means to pay the cost of travel and instruction. For the see of Fort Wayne he suggests the same 3 candidates, and while he desires Father (James Frederick) wood he has no substitutes to offer. He said nothing to his clergy about this and if anyone knows he has guessed them. He was happy to learn that the troubles expected during the election at Cincinnati did not occur. He hopes that the outrages of Louisville be not repeated elsewhere. He does not expect to see Purcell before spring as he has a visit to make in the north and that will be his last until a better season.

II-4-m - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - (French) - {12}


(18)55 Oct. 25
Grignon, Father M(athurin) F.: Natchez, Mississippi
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

A very sad accident has just occurred at Natchez. Bishop (James Oliver) Vandevelde broke his leg Tuesday evening in a misstep in going down the steps leading to the street. The three doctors who were called spent more than 4 hours in bandaging and putting the leg in a sling. Yesterday on Grignon's arrival from Vicksburg, he found Vandevelde suffering greatly. Whatever the consequences of this fall, it is certain that it will take much time to heal.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 12mo. - {2}


1855 Oct. 25
Remi, Brother M(arie) Henry Aubert: New Mellary, (Iowa)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Remi received (Blanc)'s letter 10 days ago and has not replied sooner because the Prior was in St. Louis for the provincial council. Yesterday as soon as he returned, Remi told him of (Blanc)'s generous sentiments in Remi's regard. They decided together the time of Remi's departure. He will leave with regret to embark on the sea of the world, and with joy because he is going to a beloved father. The rest of his life will express his gratitude. In a short time he will see (Blanc) again. (P.S.) Remi received the $50 and sends his thanks for this new favor.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {2}


1855 Oct. 26
Francais, Father (Nicholas): Charenton, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Francais received (Blanc)'s letter of the 21st. Francais can assure (Blanc) that all that false Catholic claims in that evil newspaper is false. It is pure calumny. Laclaire Fuselier to whom Francais showed it, told him not to reply. He said that by keeping silent he would humiliate them more. For the 21 years Francais has been in Louisiana as a priest, Francais has never mixed in politics. He has never used his citizenship which he acquired 15 years ago. The men connected with this party came to Charenton and took the good faith of some of his parishioners by surprise. Aided by Mr. Meynard, a zealous Catholic, Francais was able to bring back a large number. This is what angered them. Francais has refused baptism and burial to them.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {4}


1855 Oct. 26
Whelan, Father David: Mt. St. Mary's (Emmittsburg, Maryland)
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Purcell need not be distressed about Bishop (Martin J.) Spalding's having abandoned the "Kalendarium Romanum", for Whelan had not prepared any Supplementum for his diocese this year. Whelan informed Spalding when he came to the Mountain that he would have to get some one else to do it. Whelan is still in the dark concerning the mission to Rome. He was in hopes that Purcell would object. He is perfectly content to stay at the Mountain. Archbishop (Francis Patrick Kenrick) of Baltimore will notify Whelan when he has raised the funds. He does not know whether he is to assume the Rectorship of the (American) College (of Rome). He thinks that if he is content there, the Archbishop will be glad if he should remain in that capacity. He hopes to have the whole Ordo corrected before his departure. If his duties in Rome permit, he will be willing to continue work on the Ordo. He sends his greetings to all in Purcell's household.

II-4-m - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {5}


1855 Oct. 27
Chambige, Father F(rancis): St. Thomas' (near Bardstown, Kentucky)
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

It is with great pleasure that he responds to Purcell's questions. He has charged $50 for each student on the presumption that all would apply for clothing. What is not taken in clothing would go to the credit of the next session Mayers had not left when the bill was drawn. Dietz's and Mahoney's account should have been charged to their proper correspondents. He deplores the want of sincerity of Donahue. Evidently his object is to be exempt from the last year. Donahue needs to review his Latin and mathematics. It is only with the help of his fellow students that he gets along. In consideration of his want of ability they have given him no regular class to teach. If Chambige could read his letter to the students, it would be a cure of that mania of making unjust complaints.

II-4-m - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 8vo. - {3}


1855 Oct. 27
Miles, George H.: Balt(imore, Maryland)
 to O(restes) A. Brownson: (New York, New York)

Miles orders the Review, reports his health improving, and says he will try to write an article for Brownson during the winter. He wishes Brownson success in New York; he says that he declined association with The Metropolitan chiefly because of their attacks on Brownson but that he is now kept busy with his remunerative law practice and has no time for anything better than a well considered editorial in a weekly newspaper. He asks to be put down as a regular subscriber and says he will remain one as long as he lives.

I-3-l - A.L.S. - 1p. - 4to. - {2}


1855 Oct. 28
Dubernard, (Jean Honoré): Spring-Hill, (Alabama)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

The President having warned him to prepare for certain orders, on the 10th of next month, Dubernard submits to (Blanc) 2 cases regarding himself. The first would be ex defectu lenitatis(?), during the war in Africa. But as this war was probably just and he killed no one perhaps it does not apply. The second case would be ex defectu libertatis which Dubernard told (Blanc) about last year through Mr. Willermos. At that time Dubernard feared this but after (Blanc)'s letter and after consulting Fathers Andrieux and Brands, he was reassured. After serving 7 years in the army, he signed up for the same length of time and obtained permission to live at home. Being called to the ecclesiastical state, he left for Martinique intending to serve that diocese. He soon learned that the state of war in France obliged the government to call all military on leave. This made Dubernard immediately take measures to get out from under a law which could not bind him in conscience since he had served 7 years. It was then that Dubernard came to (Blanc)'s diocese. He asks (Blanc) to give him a definitive decision so that the thought of having got into the ministry illictly could never trouble him. As Father (F.) Gautrelet, (S.J.) simply said to prepare for ordination, Dubernard asks (Blanc) if the Bishop of Mobile is to confer the sub-diaconate.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {3}


1855 Oct. 29
(Blanc), Archbishop Ant(hony): N(ew) Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Brother Ellis: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Father (Claude Pascal) Maistre is authorized to go to St. Mary's Catholic (Boys') Orphanage to hear the confessions of the children. Ellis is to present them and arrange a convenient time.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 12mo. - {3}


1855 Oct. 29
Boinge, F.: New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

A receipt for $120 in payment for the estate of Father (Louis) Dufour at the order of Delpeuch and Chataigné.

VI-1-i - A. Receipt S. - (French) - 1p. - 32mo. - {3}


1855 Oct. 29
Chambost, Fathers A(ugust) and C(harles): Plaquemine, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, L(ouisia)na

Chambost hastens to give a reply about Mr. Chambost. About 2 years ago he was at the end of his tether, writing to his brother and getting in touch with his spiritual director. He was a teacher at St. Genest. If Father Chambost had ever known that he belonged to Father Corte's congregation, he had completely forgotten it. According to what August tells him, he would be their cousin in the fourth degree. Otherwise, he knew nothing of his family until the beginning of 1854 when he was told of his great desire to be a priest and missionary. Since that time he has given him the least hope possible. It was only last August that he decided to tell him to come at the beginning of November and that he would probably soon be ordained. After a letter from Father Chambost's father, which he has just received, he is really pleased with this young man; he will be very useful. If Corbe is suspicious of him, Father Chambost would rather take the testimony of the 2 excellent priests who have seen him grow up and have directed him from his youth: the pastors of Damplepius and of St. Genest. Father Chambost is sorry to bring up the subject of Iherville again. Again this week he had to visit two of Father (Ennemond) Dupuy's sick; it is like that all year. A month ago Mr. Cropper committed suicide in coming from Dernière Ile; Father Chambost refused to bury him. Dupuy buried him with great solemnity and several days later, supposing charitably that Chambost was ill, Dupuy came to marry the brother-in-law of the suicide at the home of Balthazar Dupuy. He stayed 2 days; be assured that people put a pretty reason on his long stay. Whatever the scandals, Chambost washes his hands of it. He will send the death record for Father Noir on a larger piece of paper. P.S. They will begin classes November 10; (Blanc) is to notify the young man about whom they spoke.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 12mo. - {9}


1855 Oct. 29
Greene, Benj(amin H.): Boston, (Massachusetts)
 to O(restes) A. Brownson: (New York, New York)

Greene has delivered all papers requested by Brownson to Mr. (Patrick) Donahoe to be forwarded to Dunnigan. Donahoe has not sent them, but says he will do so at once. Greene is compiling a circulation list to send in a few days; he is also collecting some outstanding accounts and has retained the account book to enable him to continue doing so. If Brownson wishes, Greene will draw upon Dunnigan for the amount he owes.

I-3-l - A.L.S. - 1p. - 4to. - {3}


(18)55 Oct. 29
Jouve, R.S.C., Madame Al(oysia): Grand Coteau, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Her first thought in coming out of retreat is to thank (Blanc) for his visit at St. Michael and the letter which followed. After the death of the 15th all courage left her but now she is a little more resigned. In her reorganization plans she cannot count on France nor anywhere else. They must make the supreme effort again to sustain St. Michael, the most important of their establishments. The suppression of Baton Rouge is far from filling the void. Jouve is bringing Madame Hyacinthe, (R.S.C.) for the economy; this needs a good head. Mother (Annette) Praz, (R.S.C.) did not let anyone in on the affairs of her house; there will be much to sort out. Jouve is recalling Mother (Anna) Shannon, (R.S.C.) to take over the house at G(ran)d Coteau; she has been in the area for 15 years and is well liked. If Jouve was convinced that she who replaces her would do as well at St. Joseph, Jouve would be content but she does not dare hope. Her intention is to keep Mother (Adine) Guinand, (R.S.C.) at St. Michael; she will be the assistant and will be a big security during Jouve's frequent absences. Madame (Crescence) Alschner, (R.S.C.) having been designated by Mothers (Anna) du Rousier, (R.S.C.) and Praz, to have particular charge of the pupils, Jouve thinks she should conform to their choice; she is much loved by the children. She came with Mother (Louise) de Barbarin(R.S.C.) and has never left St. Michael. All these plans have been submitted to Mother General; they could be changed especially if she sends them help. Mother Stanislas, R.S.C. is still on the threshold of eternity; she received the last sacrements several days ago. She will be the 16th at St. Michael, and the 21st religious they have lost in 6 months. In the same space of time Jouve has given the veil to one. Jouve knows that (Blanc) is busy finding them a chaplain. They suffered such a great loss in Father Noir that it will be difficult to replace him. There is someone who seems to have all the desirable qualities. But will (Blanc) give him to Sacred Heart and would he accept it. She asked this of Father (Claude Anthony) Tholomier, pastor of St. Michael. The Grand Coteau family continues serene; health is perfect. Except for St. Michael, there has been no trouble since (Blanc)'s visit. On the 24th they had an anniversary service for Mother (Maris) Cutts, (R.S.C.). Jouve thinks Cutts is so well off in heaven she is calling all her daughters.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {13}


(18)55 Oct. 29
St. Jean, (S.S.J.) Sister: McSherrystown, (Pennsylvania)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Sister has just received (Blanc)'s letter and thanks him for informing them about the young man. While the news is not as good as they would like, it is a great consolation for the Catholic parents. If (Blanc) ever visits Baltimore or Philadelphia, they ask him to visit them. While she is the only Frenchman in their community and the only one who knows (Blanc), all would be happy to have him.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {1}


1855 Oct. 29
Troné, Stephanie Menard Widow P. Troné: New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

She called on (Blanc) yesterday but was unable to see him. She has had to separate from two members of her family because of a certain domestic jealousy. Her religion obliges her to take her children away from all bad example, especially that of bad Christians. This is why her children have been so ill treated and learned so little during 2 years in a convent. She attributes it to the cold and peculiar exterior of her brother (Father Charles M. Menard?) toward her little family which for a long time has been wounded by abandonment and forgetfulness. Her brother will not see about leasing her land so that she can pay her rent here. The work of her hands could support her family. Two and a half months ago she made a trip to Thibodeau to rent her house. The obstacle to renting it was that her brother had said nothing about it, saying that she would return. She hopes to persevere in her resolution to remain a widow. So she is happy to be away from them until they change to better conduct toward her. But knowing her brother's partiality for her sister (Josephine Menard?) she has little hope. So she rented the undesirable half for(?) $4 and the other half for $6, not being able to ask more because of the need of repairs. Two trees were cut down although she had asked in one of her letter not to cut them. While at Thibodeaux she had asked someone to send her the rent money each month and asked her brother to find out whether it was sent. He recommended that she not regard him as a brother but as a stranger. So for two and a half months she has had no rent money which amounts to $8 and $10 for furniture sold. She has written 4 times and once to her brother but without a reply. She has not been able to pay her rent here for 2 months. The owner of the house hates priests and knowing that she has one for a brother makes him furious. He seized her sewing machine which cost her $115 and on which she had not finished payment. She offered him a wardrobe worth(?) $20 but he did not wish to accept it although she only owes $19. He explained that he wanted to see if this money would be kept from her longer, as she has witnesses that this money is due to her, and to see how persons of religion come to the aid of poor widows with children. Without her sewing machine, how can she get sewing for she has not received 5 sous from her brother in four months. She has been offered a place as a seamstress, a room and food, but she must place her children, at least two of them, the other she can keep with her and she has the privilege of seeing her learn the trade of milliner. Troné is free to fulfill her duties and 25 piastres for the first month and 30 for the following ones. She decided to put her children with the Ursulines paying $15 a month for the two if they would accept it but they refused. She went to the Sisters (of the Holy Cross) at the Ouvroir to have them take the two as boarders at the same price. They wanted $12 each and $2 for laundry, or they would receive them as orphans. It is not the work which Troné fears for them but the fear that they would get little instruction. Her children have suffered enough although they have members of the family in distinguished places. It is shameful to live in the church with so much love for money and scorn for those who work to spread religion. It is not so in other sects; she has seen it in their treatment of her children whom her brother, by his conduct, has forced her to put in their school. Not being able to get into a convent, they will continue in their former boarding school. For the oldest, being strong in her religion, Troné has no fear. She has taken smaller lodgings at $8 instead of $12 in Royale Street. If her rent from Thibodaux is paid every month, she can handle her affairs. It is useless to count on her brother. The Jews give $20 a month to each widow of their sect with orphans; in case of need the Oddfellows(?) and Freemasons do the same. Her brother said he had received at least 12 letters of reproach and one from (Blanc) but he will do nothing.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {5}


1855 Oct. 30
(Vandevelde), Bishop James Oliver: Natchez, (Mississippi)
 to Archbishop A(nthony) Blanc: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Blanc will already know that (Vandevelde) broke his right leg the same day he wrote . . . (For complete calendar see original of 6 cards)

Cross references:

1. Archbishop Anthony Blanc
2. Father Claude Paschal Maistre
3. Father Rene Toussaint Courjault
4. Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin
5. Leavenworth City, Kansas
6. Father John Baptist Miége, S.J.
7. Bishop Joseph Cretin
8. Bishop Peter Richard Kenrick
9. Quincy, Illinois
10. Alton, Illinois
11. Belleville, Illinois
12. Kansas
13. Nebraska
14. Bishop Mathias Loras
15. Father James Duggan

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 12mo. - {15}


(1855) Oct. 31
Guinand, R.S.C.J., Madame A(dine): St. Michael, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Yesterday at 10 o'clock Mother Stanislas, (R.S. C.J.) went to rejoin her God. She suffered greatly the three last days of her life. All the rest of the community is doing well now. Friday Guinand is going to Baton Rouge and next week she will bring all her daughters here except Madame McDonough, (R.S.C.J.) who will accompany Madame Berry (R.S.C.J.) to St. Joseph. Madame (A.) Shannon, (R.S.C.J.) will come down for Grand Coteau. A letter from Mother (Aloysia?) Hardey, (R.S.C.J.) said nothing of help to send them. They do not know when classes will resume. Their Mother Assistant will arrange it once she is here with a colony which she says she is bringing with her from Grand C(oteau). (This letter is written on the announcement) of the death of Mother Delaide Stanislas Aguiard, (P.S.C.J.) who died October 30, 1855, aged 49 and professed 16 years.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {7}