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1855 Dec. 1
Marcilly, E(mma): Weat Ely, M(iss)o(uri)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Last night she replied in a few words to (Blanc)'s letter of November 15. She is tormented with anxiety and she will explain the cause. On her arrival in Missouri she did not find a house and was obliged to board at the house of Mrs. Shannon with her sisters and her servants who are too young to be hired out. The expenses are almost as high as at Natchez and she is counting on the money which she should receive. She has contracted to build a house, part of the payments for which must be made in January 1856 and the rest in May of the same year. She has given her notes for the land she bought; these notes are insured by mortgages on the property. The payment of these notes are based on the money she is to receive from the sale of Rose Hill. She begs (Blanc) to make arrangements for the payment of the notes. It is the fruit of 35 years of hard work. Bishop (James Oliver) Vandevelde wrote her that his notes would be faithfully paid and she acted on this promise. (P.S.) She can change nothing at present about the conditions of the sale of Rose Hill. After the payment of the note for 4,000 in May 1856 she will extend, if (Blanc) desires, the terms of the last payments provided the interest at 6 percent is paid every six months.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {4}


1855 (Dec. ?)
Shannon, (R.S.C.J.), Madame A(nna): Grand Coteau, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Blanc) will be astonished to find her so near. Their supplications ascend for spiritual and temporal favours for (Blanc) during the ensuing year.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {1}


1855 Dec. 1
Benson, Joseph: New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to John H. Behan: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

A receipted bill for $67.50 for new sky lights and ladder for St. Patrick's Church, carpenter work for 16 days and lumber, nails, screws, etc. John Benson signs for Joseph, stating that the amount was received from Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc for Behan.

VI-1-i - Bill S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {4}


1855 Dec. 1
Benson, Joseph: New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to St. Patrick's Church: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

A bill for $37.45 for painting and glazing a new skylight. Receipted by John Benson.

VI-1-i - Bill - 1p. - 12mo. - {2}


1855 Dec. 1
Spalding, M(artin) J. Bp. Louisville: Louisville, Kentucky
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

This will be handed to Purcell by Mr. James Hamilton who has run off with his first cousin to get married. Spalding had as many as five applications for marriage between relatives. It has become an abuse. He has refused Hamilton four times, but he is determined to marry, by the squire if necessary. Hamilton is Spalding's cousin, and Spalding cannot give him a dispensation without being charged with partiality. At the suggestion of his brother, he sends Hamilton to Purcell with full authority to grant the dispensation. This marrying of cousins is an epidemic in this county. Spalding asks Purcell to pardon the liberty which he takes. P.S. He will probably be in Cincinnati next Wednesday to lecture before the Catholic Institute.

II-4-m - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 12mo. - {4}


(18)55 Dec. 2
Guillou, Father J(ulian) M.: Sulphur Springs, Miss(issippi)
 to Archbishop A(nthony) Blanc: N(ew) O(rleans, Louisiana)

Several days ago, Guillou received Blanc's letter written from Natchez. In his new position, he is thankful for Blanc's support although regretting the circumstances which caused it. The blow struck Guillou more than any other priest of the diocese because his obligations to Bishop (James Oliver) Vandevelde were greater. Guillou has begun 30 Masses for their Bishop. Guillou also thanks Blanc for continuing his faculties. All goes well here. Their Sisters (of St. Joseph of Carondelet) are managing perfectly; they count on 45 pupils for this year; it is good enough for a beginning. Guillou's health is improving. Last week he made a pastoral visit of around 200 miles in his former mission and was not too tired. He goes to Yazoo once a month during the week.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {4}


(18)55 Dec. 2(!)
Guinand, (R.)S.C.J.; Mother A(dine): St. Michael, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Guinand expresses their good wishes for (Blanc); he is to pray that God will recompense him for his sufferings. If he comes to Sacred heart some day, he can rest from his long labors. Father (J.F.?) Masquelet seems content; he is a little bored however. Guinand asked him to say a few words to the children on Christmas Day which he did with success. Masquelet always says he does not understand their way of life but things are going well up to now. He seems to get along well with Father (Claude Anthony) Tholomier. Guinand is sending Mr. Elder the sum returned from Father Noir and is asking him to pay it to (Blanc). The sum due is $245(?). Guinand asks (Blanc) to bless this family, Mothers and children at this first of the year.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {5}


1855 Dec. 2
(Martin), Bishop Aug(uste) M(ar)ie: Natchitoches, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Yesterday, on his return from New Orleans and Avoyelles, he found (Blanc)'s letter. It was at the mouth of the Red River at the home of Mrs. Torras when he learned of the death of (Blanc)'s colleague. What an unfortunate diocese, struck twice in so short a time. The name (Blanc) proposes was already presented to (Martin). (Martin) fears that the Archbishop of Cincinnati already has designs on him for another diocese. Outside of (Blanc)'s province, (Martin) knows no one he could suggest and he hesitatingly adds 2 others. (Blanc) now knows of the passing of (Martin)'s little colony through New Orleans. He has installed these excellent Daughters of the Cross in their community at Hydropolis on the property bought from Judge Baillo. (Martin) hopes to have another community of the same order next year under the same conditions at the other end of the diocese, toward Bayou(Cye) Sie or Las Hormigas and bring religious instruction to the most abandoned places. (Martin) has received letters from 3 bishops who came to his aid and assured him of continuing their favorable dispositions. (Martin)'s young missionaries of one year have overcome the difficulty of English.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 12mo. - {7}


1855 Dec. 3
Alemany, Archbishop Jos(eph) S(adoc): San Francisco, (California)
 to Archbishop A(nthony) Blanch(!): New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Since his last communication the check of $300 etc. has appeared. At the bank of Lucas, Turner, and Co(mpany) here, they say it was through mistake that they stated that such check had already been cashed in New Orleans.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - 1p. - 4to. - {2}


1855 Dec. 3
Chambost, Father C(harles): Plaquemine, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, L(ouisiana)

He had hoped to come down to see (Blanc) today but it is impossible. Saturday the famous (J.A.) Botti arrived and asked to see Chambost. He said he came from the Archbishop to inform Chambost that he was lost if he did not do as Botti said. Chambost ended the meeting abruptly. Botti presented an account which Chambost rejected. Then Botti went to see Mr. Desobry who called Mr. Schlatre; it ended by Botti declaring that he wanted the money at any price in order to return to Italy. Schlatre promised him a flogging if he did not leave Plaquemine at once; no one knows where he is. Chambost received a letter from Mr. O'Donnell with another mystery. Chambost was expecting from New York a friend of Mr. Hurley who, like O'Donnell wished to become a priest. Chambost had sent funds to O'Donnell to have him come here. Botti had gone to O'Donnell and asked about the young man. Then a telegram came to Hurley to come down to the city, that his friend was quite ill on arrival. It was Botti who did it all. The two young men are in the city, Chambost is getting them off his hands as (Blanc) knows on July 25 Chambost asked (Blanc) for Hurley to have his friend received on the same conditions as himself and (Blanc) consented. There has been no scandal; even the people of Chambost's household do not know about it, except for the escape by night of these two unfortunates. Nothing has been suspended; Chambost is professor of English, etc. The three other professors are doing their duty well. The (College of the Immaculate Conception) opened only 2 weeks ago and they already have 60 pupils, 10 of them boarders. On Wednesday Chambost has a funeral service for Paulette Dupuy, Thursday the baptism and validation of an adult and the feast of the Immaculate Conception so that he cannot think of coming to see (Blanc) before next Monday. Hurley being in the city, will no doubt see (Blanc) about his vocation; Chambost asks (Blanc) not to decide anything until he can come down. He will tell (Blanc) about it. Hurley has the national failing. Chambost keeps Father August (Chambost) at his business and prevents him from giving any external sign. Chambost was never more calm, only he has no peace and cannot eat since he heard this terrible news. If his presence is necessary, (Blanc) is to telegraph and Chambost will be there.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 12mo. - {9}


(18)55 Dec. 3
Grignon, Father M(athurin) F.: Natchez, (Mississippi)
 to (Archbishop Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

In his preceding letter to Bishop (James Oliver) Vandevelde, Father (Richard B.) Hardey asked for his exeat and said that his health would not permit him to return to Vicksburg. It seems that he got no reply; will (Blanc) send an answer? Grignon has just received (Blanc)'s letter about Rose Hill. All are well. Father (Paul Marie) Le Corre is going to leave for Jackson next Wednesday. It is best to separate these two as they speak French all the time they are together. P.S. Grignon believes he said the note for lumber was $826.38; it should be only $727.22 but he does not know if the balance due J. Deaver has been paid or not.

A.L.S.(French) -


 Written on the other side of the following: 

(18)55 Nov. 24
Hardey, Father R(ichard) B.: Covington, K(entuck)y
 to Father J.(!) M. Grignon: Natchez, Miss(issippi)

Hardy wrote to Vandevelde about a month since and he has not received an answer. The letter must have reached Natchez before the Bishop's death. Hardey is not well enough to return to Vicksburg. Grignon is to let him know if his letter has been handed to the Administrator and who he is. Hardey's physican tells him to remain here for a time.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French & English) - 2pp. - 6 4to. - {6}


1855 Dec. 3
MacCabe, W(illia)m B.: Dublin, (Ireland)
 to Orestes A. Brownson: (Boston, Massachusetts)

MacCabe calls Brownson's attention to the allusion to his name in the Review in the article on the Know Nothing Platform. MacCabe wishes to reply personally, instead of publicly, to Brownson that he mistakes the position MacCabe occupies in Ireland. He feels Brownson does not fully apprehend the question which puts him in a hostile position regarding the late Mr. (Frederick) Lucas. He believes Brownson would have adopted his position had he been lying in Ireland the past four years. Brownson may find the answer for MacCabe's opposition to Lucas by reading the enclosed extract of a letter written by Father James Maher. Lucas had quarrelled with Cardinal (Nicholas) Wiseman, the Catholic Bishop of London, the English aristocracy and gentry. Lucas' "The Tablet," was so badly supported in London, he transferred it to Dublin. Success for Lucas would have meant bitter quarrelling between English and Irish Catholics. MacCabe warned the English Catholics not to identify themselves with Lucas. The Irish Catholic tenant farmers look to the Tories for the settlement of their question. Lucas' mistake was in popularizing Toryism among those who had been victims of Toryism. Lucas' crime was his inordinate ambition to monopolize the Irish representation by making and unmaking members of Parliment as O'Connell was once able to do. MacCabe gives his own history as a writer both in England and in Ireland. Since his editorship of the "Weekly Telegraph" in Dublin, he has given its readers an unbiased opinion. This paper was denounced by Father Tho(ma)s O'Keefe at Callan the day after Sadlin and Keagh took office. However, neither of the latter two were connected with the paper. MacCabe has never alluded to this treatment publicly for fear of giving a triumph to the enemies of Catholicity. MacCabe has never taken part in politics; he wishes to be understood as he really is, and not maligned so. He wishes Brownson to accept a copy of his book "Bertha."

I-3-l - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 8vo. - {9}


1855 Dec. 3
Lavay, S.J., Father J(oseph): Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Mathilde) Victor arrived yesterday. She seems to be capable. She announced the opening of classes for the 10th. She would be very glad to have the French teacher whom (Blanc) suggested as soon as possible. She could only offer her $30 a month with board and laundry, perhaps she could give more later. She sends her thanks for lending her the house.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {2}


1855 Dec. 3
(O'Regan), Bishop Anthony: St. Louis, (Missouri)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, (Louisiana)

A copy of Bishop (James Oliver) Vandevelde's will has been shown to (O'Regan), from which he learns that (Blanc) is sole executor and that Vandevelde has bequeathed to the future Bishop of Quincy whatever real property he may possess in Missouri. (O'Regan) asks (Blanc) to obviate the many evils that may spring from the undue claims of (O'Regan's) predecessor to this property. From the documents in (Blanc)'s possession he must be aware that Vandevelde had no claim to this property since he ceased to be Bishop of Chicago. He and his advisors committed a most fatal mistake. It is no use to ask (O'Regan) to cede the rights of his diocese; there are many others prepared to insist. Two Jesuits of St. Louis, Fathers (John Anthony) Elet, (S.J.) and (Arnold Damen, S.J.?) Dahmen moved by the spiritual destitution of Chicago, represented this to Mrs. (Anne Lucas) Hunt to solicit her aid. Hunt said that she expected much spiritual benefit from this donation as Vandevelde was of all the Jesuits, the one she liked the least and hence she was influenced by no personal consideration. (Blanc) has Elet and Dahmen's testimony as given by Father (William S.) Murphy, (S.J.), the present provincial. About 12 months later, Hunt made a deed and put it on record. The deed tells clearly that she did not change her mind and make it a personal gift. Last March Hunt said to (O'Regan) that her gift was made to God and not for any man or Bishop. Ever since she made the first deed, and recorded it, Hunt retained no further control over that property. The deed was made to Vandevelde and his successors in office. It was full 3 months after he ceased to be Bishop of Chicago and about a month after he ceased to be even its Administrator, after leaving the diocese and when in St. Louis, on his way to Natches, in fine, 26 days after Bishop (Martin) Henni became Administrator of Chicago that Vandevelde made his very unwise deed of this property to Hunt and agreed with her to get it to himself as if either could take it away from its rightful destination. (O'Regan) has before him the strange deed made by Vandevelde to Hunt Nov(ember) 15, 1853. If the property were a personal gift, why did he have recourse to this? He says in this deed that he gives her back the property because, being no longer Bishop of Chicago, he cannot carry out the object of the donation. (O'Regan) has submitted this case to at least 10 prelates and to many learned priests and Catholic lawyers and to 2 eminent non Catholic lawyers. All recommended to regard Vandevelde's acts as a mere nullity and to take possession of the property. He asks (Blanc) to put an end to this dispute. (O'Regan) recommends to (Blanc)'s attention, one of his priests, Father (John) Larkin, now in New Orleans. P.S. Should (Blanc) find among Vandevelde's papers, any belonging to (O'Regan)'s diocese, he is to give them to Larkin for (O'Regan). He would want a copy of Vandevelde's will and the documents from the probate court. (O'Regan) is returning to Chicago in a day or two.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 4to. - {9}


1855 December 4
Greene, Benj(ami)n H.: Boston, (Massachusetts)
 to Orestes A. Brownson: (New York, New York)

Greene sends the Account Book and explains the meanings of certain notations made in pencil to indicate payments on the accounts. The block lines on the pages of the mail lists indicate years for which payment has been or is to be made. Greene wishes Brownson the highest success he has anticìpated with the Review (in New York) and closes by saying that he has laboured faithfully for its success.

I-3-l - A.L.S. - 1p. - 4to. - {1}


1855 Dec. 4
Roes, S.J., Father Jo(h)n: St. Louis, (Missouri)
 to Archbishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

Roes received Blanc's letter of (November) 21. When Bishop (James Oliver) Van de Velde was last in St. Louis, he requested Roes to settle the taxes on a lot then belonging to him in the city and he would repay by intentions and the money was to be credited to his acc(ount) Roes was glad to hear that the Masses would be distributed among the priests of his diocese and he hopes they will be paid out of the private funds of the late Bishop. Counting all the intentions sent, together with Father (Arnold) Damen, (S.J.), still leaves $13.25 due the University. Roes will not send any more intentions but expect that balance to be refunded by the persons to whom the Bishop may have deeded that lot. Last year, Vandevelde collected an old debt due the University and as he was very much in need of funds to finish his cathedral, they agreed to divide the money, $200 for him and $200 for them. Roes hopes this claim will not be rejected by his executors. In regard to the two students over whom he was guardian, they left for Chicago whither they were ordered by the court to choose their guardian. Roes asks for the last account regarding them; he wants to have it approved in St. Louis and sent to Bishop A(nthony) O'Regan in Chicago. When things are settled, Roes trusts that Blanc will let them know what to do.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {4}


1855 Dec. 5
Duplessis, Ed(war)d: New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Duplessis has often had recourse to (Blanc) and sees himself in the sad situation of again doing so. He has just spent two years in Mississippi where he worked hard and by economy was able to save, above the expenses of his family, enough to pay some of the debts contracted with (Blanc) and others. But the business firm failed and he lost $500 of his salary. He tried for 4 months to make them pay; the laws of that state offered no recourse and he was obliged to submit to this loss. His only remaining son wrote him to return to New Orleans and he would give him all he could do as a notary. His son preferred a more active kind of business. He had an excellent clientele. On this proposal, Duplessis came down. He worked about 2 weeks and then the son sold his Commission to the governor, leaving Duplessis without a position, and went to take the position of Constable of the third justice of the peace. Duplessis is ashamed to confess that his son has a position giving him al least $10,000 a year. He has changed; he will do nothing for Duplessis who would rather lack for everything than have recourse to him. Duplessis has been in the city two months but has only been able to earn enough to pay his rent. His house is in Lafayette far from the center of the town. Fortunately, his wife who came to the city before Duplessis did, to spend some time with her father and family, will remain some weeks longer. This will give Duplessis time to bring from Vicksburg, the little furniture he has left. Some of his friends have seen about his having a place in a store and Duplessis believes that in a little while he will have a good place. He has been very ill for the last three weeks but is beginning to feel better. His son is probably the only one who knows his real position. (Blanc) has been Duplessis' benefactor, he performed his marriage to one of the best women in the world; (Blanc) has loaned him money several times but he knows (Blanc) will help him if he can. Duplessis needs about $50 to give his wife some articles for winter which are indispensable. Duplessis has not been able to buy medicine. Even if (Blanc) can do nothing for him, Duplessis will always have the same gratitude for any part of this sum (Blanc) may send.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {1}


1855 Dec. 5
Gautrelet, S.J., Father Fr(ancis de Sales): Spring Hill, (Alabama)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Father (Jean Honoré) Dubernard left today according to (Blanc)'s plan. Father (Hyppolyte) Gache, (S.J.) arrived too late yesterday to make preparations to go. Gache also spoke about Mr. Bready (Thomas T. Brady?) in a way which makes Gautrelet doubt that (Blanc) has really received him for Natchez. The Bishop of Mobile told Gautrelet that (Blanc) had received Bready for Natchez and that he wished him to take a year of theology here. Therefore, Bready has been here for 4 days. If this is contrary to (Blanc)'s wishes he is to let Gautrelet know. (Blanc) is also to let him know whether Bready should wear the cassock, which he has not yet done. The three other seminarians are doing well. They will continue to give them one hour a day of English. They all seem to have an excellent spirit.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 8vo. - {4}


1855 Dec. 5
Slark, Stauffer and Co(mpany): New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to (Father Gilbert?) Raymond: (New Orleans, Louisiana?)

A bill for $9.43 for 5 sheets of sheathing copper. Receipted by Trott.

VI-1-i - Bill - 1p. - 16mo. - {3}


1855 Dec. 6
Buteux, Father S(tanislaus): Bay St. Louis, (Mississippi)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Buteux only yesterday received (Blanc)'s letter from Natchez. He will gladly take the three Masses for Bishop (James Oliver) Vande Velde. Mr. Layton said one time this summer that (Blanc) saw with sadness that Buteux did not come to see him when he went to the city. His principal reason for not going to see (Blanc) has been fear of troubling him. His presence seemed so disagreeable when he did present himself, not even being offered a seat, that he believed it his duty to spare (Blanc) this brother. Buteux is innocent of the grave charges made against him. He reduces himself to poverty to endow his parish with schools. When in the city, he visits some families whom (Blanc) knows. He thanks (Blanc) for continuing the special faculties his bishop had given him. He can dispense in cases of mixed religion if urgent and when the Bishop is not available. His faculties for dispensing first cousins expired on October 30. He would be grateful if it were renewed. People come from 25, 30 or 40 miles and want to be married that same day. If refused, they go to the judge.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {3}


1855 Dec. 6
Lombard, Father Ed.: Stigny, (France)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Blanc)'s letter of October 16 arrived November 20. After reflecting some days on the proposition (Blanc) made, Lombard decided to return to his first intention of consecrating himself to the ministry in (Blanc)'s diocese, particularly at New Orleans. His departure will take place after Trinity Sunday of 1856. At that time of year, ordinations take place in the diocese of Sens and immediately after that the changes are made. Once at New Orleans he will devote himself to the work of the church he proposes to have built at Bayou St. John. (Blanc) understands that Lombard could not insist on his immediate departure from the Bishop of Sens. He would perhaps have accepted the post of chaplain at the Sacred at St. Michael if it had been possible to leave sooner.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 12mo. - {2}


1855 Dec. 6
Maguire, John J.: Strabane, (Ireland)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

A letter was sent to (Blanc) by Father W(illia)m Browne in September or early October enclosing a draft for 12 pounds to defray the expense of passage for Mrs. McCaffrey and child from New Orleans to Liverpool. Not having heard, Maguire is directed to write to order some intelligence respecting the letter.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - 1p. - 4to. - {3}


1855 Dec. 7
Gouesse, Father F(rancis): Detroit, Mich(igan)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Father (John H.) De Bolle is about to leave, having received (Blanc)'s letter. Gouesse believes De Bolle will be of great service in (Blanc)'s hospital. They learned with sadness of the death of Bishop Vandevelde and surmise this will be another extra load. Expecting in a few days, that famous "yes" or "no" which 8 months failed to pull out, Gouesse will give the "yes" or "no" about his books, his music books, and his chalice. P.S. He asks (Blanc) to give the enclosed note (no enclosure) to Father Rousselon.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {2}


1855 Dec. 7
(Odin), Bishop J(ohn) M(ary): Galveston, (Texas)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Odin) returned to Galveston yesterday. (Blanc)'s letter of October 14 came back by the same boat. He hopes to come to New Orleans for the council. He has thought of questions it would be useful to submit to the council but has found none not already settled is preceding councils. The division of the diocese of Galveston would be desirable because of the immensity of the state but he doubts that it would be practicable. There is no other important town in the state except San Antonio. If this was made a see, the Bishop of Galveston would hardly have any Catholics in his diocese. He will ask the Fathers of the Council to aid him on this point. (Odin)'s health is perfectly restored. For two months he has travelled constantly, visiting the whole valley of the San Antonio river, that of Médina and several other points such as San Patricio, Corpus Christi, Victoria, and Halletsville. The Catholics are increasing especially the Germans but they are so scattered it is difficult to minister to them effectively. The missionaries have long trips to make under a burning sun. The schools seem to prosper in spite of opposition. (Odin) is very sad to learn of (Blanc)'s losses, also that the Bishop of Natchez is dead. In 5 different stations, (Odin) had to visit each family to obtain subscriptions for building chapels. He will write more in a few days.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 12mo. - {3}


1855 Dec. 8
Ste. Ursule, (R.U.), Sister Marie de: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

The vows of Sister Ste. Ursule as an Ursuline.

VI-1-i - A.D.S. - (French) - 1p. - 12mo. - {1}


1855 Dec. 10
(Baraga), Frederick, Bp. Sault Ste. Marie: L'Arbre Croche, Michigan
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Dec. 8, he received a letter from Cleveland from Bishop (Louis Amadeus) Rappe including a letter of Cardinal (James Philip) Fransoni asking certain questions of the American bishops. In his remote diocese Baraga has nothing to say about most of the questions - except that on marriage. Under the existing circumstances of danger of perversion and attempted marriages outside the church, he thinks that for the sake of the children and the hope of conversion the faculties for dispensing in mixed marriages should be given to the bishops of the Provinces of the United States with the requirement that such marriages should first be discouraged. Further there should be given the power of subdelegating to missionaries. Baraga tells Purcell that he is now at Arbre Croche or Little Traverse Bay in consequence of a promise made last summer. He is giving the Indians full instructions in religion, and preparing some of First Communion because the resident priest does not yet know the native language. He will return to Sault Ste. Marie in January. Father (J.B.) Weikamp, O.S.F. who has been in Chicago belongs to the 3rd order of St. Francis and came to Arbre Croche with his community of 10 Brothers of St. Francis and 11 Sisters of St. Francis. He will settle next spring on land given him by Baraga five miles from the mission. The Brothers will cultivate the ground, and the Brothers and Sisters will conduct a school and Father Weikamp will open a new mission. Two of the brothers are studying theology and received Dec. 8 tonsure and minor orders from Baraga.

II-4-m - A.L.S. - (The marriage question is discussed in Latin) - 3pp. - 8vo. - {9}


1855 Dec. 10
Chambost, Fathers C(harles) and Aug(ust): Plaquemine, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisiana)

Chambost returned here Friday; never has his parish or house been more peaceful. The students are back and Thursday they are to get the 11th boarder. Applications are above a hundred. He saw Mr. Hurley and told him that he was free to remain or go elsewhere. If he wants to remain he must have class every day, he must study the rules. Chambost told him it would be better for him to be in a seminary for formation. All the other teachers, especially Mr. Riordan think this is what he ought to do. They are expecting Father (Napoleon Joseph) Perché any moment. Mr. Desobry and Mr. Schlatre wanted to go down into the city but Chambost asked them to wait for Perché's advice. Chambost asks Blanc again to write to (M.R.) Crenan about the orphan in question. Messrs. O'R(e)illy(?) and O'Brian wished to write to Blanc about the conduct of Messrs. Botti, and Hurley and (Peter?) Walsh in the last two weeks. This humiliation has broken Chambost's heart; it will serve to make him more humble. Blanc can judge it. Aug(ust) is humbled by having been the victim. They are without ambition or rancour.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 12mo. - {12}


1855 Dec. 10
Crenan, M.R.: Jackson, L(ouisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, Louisiana

Crenan received (Blanc)'s letter of the 3rd by Peter Walsh. He has given Walsh a home for the present still hoping he may do better. He has done bad things. It was his pilfering deeds and bad company that caused Crenan to send him to Father (Charles) Chambost. Walsh acknowledges that he was well treated there and left place in company with a priest without Chambost's knowledge. He says the name of the priest is Father (Botti?) Boaty and that he left this priest at a grocery in New Orleans. The grocer's name is, as Peter says, Charles Sheil. Crenan has given (Blanc)'s letter to Father Cooper at Bayou Sara where he was raising subscriptions for a church at that place. Cooper has also awakened the people of Jackson which was almost impossible without a priest. Cooper has contracted for the finishing of the church at Jackson and it will be finished in a very short time. They hope they will not be left without a priest.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {7}


1855 Dec. 11
Faizende, Father: Fort de France, Martinique
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Newspapers from the United States have brought them the news that (Blanc)'s clergy have been decimated by the yellow fever. The chaplain of Fort Desaix and the prison of Fort de France, who writes this, would be happy to fill one of these vacancies. For a long time he has thought of New Orleans. Is the English language absolutely necessary for exercising the ministry in (Blanc)'s diocese? As soon as he knows (Blanc)'s decision he would begin to study it. Faizende is sure that the bishops who will give an account of him, will prove that he only wants to be of service. He is now working on a series of conferences and questions of the Church. The Bishops of St. Pierre and Fort de France have urged him to continue the work. If (Blanc) approves it, Faizende may decide to give it to a publisher. Father Dantoine and Father Boē could give information about Faizende's intelligence and morality. During their short stay in Martinique they would have heard enough of Faizende to know. Besides letters written by his Bishop, he also has letters of encouragement in France from Fathers Lecourtier, and Charles Deplace. Several priests of the colony also propose to go to Louisiana. They await (Blanc)'s decision in Faizende's regard. The aspect of the yellow fever is not an obstacle. Why fear to face it in a country so hospitable to it as the Antilles! For 2 months the hospitals have been full and deaths frequent. An Irish priest would like to attract Faizende to New York but he prefers New Orleans because he thinks it is more Catholic.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {5}


1855 Dec. 12
Delort, Father (Anthony?): Aurillac, (France)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Delort asks (Blanc) to send him via London, the 1200 piastres with the interest it will have for 6 years by January 9, 1856. Jamaica does so much business with England it will be easy for (Blanc) to get Delort out of a great embarrassment. He owes everywhere. Times are bad. Delort has a letter from Father (Guillaume Le Mercier Duquesnay) Duquenez, brought by the Chateniers(?) makers(?) of vestments, in which he advises Delort to pay 50 piastres which he owes. In (Blanc)'s calculation, (Blanc) said that Father (J.M.Lefranc) Lefrancs had paid 75 piastres to (J.M. Lamon) Lamond: (Blanc) is to ask him whether it was not the late Father (Casimir?) Mouret who asked. Delort consents to pay the 50 and keep on account of what he received from Father (Stephen Rousselon) Roussellon but he does not want to be deceived, he knows (Blanc) only wants justice and that (Blanc)'s name figures nobly in the papers. Delort read in La Verité that the diocese of Lyons gloried in counting among the prelates it has given, those of New Orleans and St. Flour. (Blanc) is to send Delort what is due him, by the safest way. He did not earn it in Louisiana. Duquesnez kept it for him. At Baton Rouge the trustees prescribed that Delort would have no fees above $10. Messrs. Dorville and Blanchar(d) were up in arms about it. At the Ursulines, not a sou; at Duquenez's, Masses enough. He slept on a pallet(?) where he got rheumatism. A victim at Plaquemine where Mouret was distracted(?) by debts and Father (Louis) Dufour came to ask him where Mouret had hidden his money. Delort had only the small legacy(?) of the deceased to compensate for all the sacrifices. (Blanc) is to send his money through the Jesuits or the banks.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. and envelope - (French) - 3pp. - 12mo. - {11}


1855 Dec. 13
Delente, O(lympe): St. Martinsville, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

She thanks (Blanc) for his 2 letters and for what he has done for her. She sees that since his departure from St. Martin she has been a subject of torment for him. She cannot leave immediately as (Blanc) recommended as she still has to pay several parents. She has written letter of excuse to Father (Joseph) Lavay, (S.J.) and next Monday she will leave St. Martin. Enclosed is a poem to Mary Immaculate by Delente.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {2}


1855 Dec. 13
Duffel, Albert: Donaldsonville, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

During Blanc's absence from Louisiana, on February 5, Duffel, as a trustee of the Church of the Ascension, wrote to Father (Stephen) Rousselon for his advice on the subject mentioned in his letter of which a copy is attached. On the 8th, Rousselon sent a reply, of which a copy is also attached. The last legislature not having had time to consider the request of the trustees to dispose of part of the church property for the purpose mentioned in his letter and Father (Michael) Calvo, (C.M.) not approving of this disposition and intimating that Blanc's sentiment would be contrary to that of Rousselon, Duffel, for his own satisfaction and before applying again to the next legislature, writes Blanc directly to know what to do.

- A.L.S. -


 On the same paper: 

1855 Feb. 5
Duffel, Albert: Donaldsonville, (Louisiana)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Copy. As one of the trustees, Duffel wants Rousselon's advice on a proposition to be made in their next meeting, on the 21st and which Duffel is inclined to favor. The church owns a piece of land 4 arpents wide and 40 deep. The Protestants have a plot on this land which serves as their cemetery and which is filled; they are asking for another piece. The Jews, who are without a cemetery, are making a similar request. It is almost impossible for them to find a burial place around Donaldsonville. The church has much more land than it needs and 110 arpents for houses and sugar cane. The Protestants and Jews would receive this land by donation or purchase, as decided by the trustees. Apart from the motive of humanity, this land has never been ratified by Congress and could be now only with difficulty. As vicar general of the Archbishop who has not yet returned from Rome, they ask for a definite reply.

- Copy -


 On the same paper: 

1855 Feb. 8
Rousselon, Father E(tienne): New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Albert Duffel: Donaldsonville, (Louisiana)

Copy. After reflecting on Duffel's request in his letter of the 5th Rousselon believes that, in view of the motives expressed, Duffel could in conscience consent to the proposition to cede a piece of church land either to the Protestants or Jews.

- Copy -


VI-1-i - A.L.S., Copies - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {4}


1855 Dec. 13
Gautrelet, S.J., Father F(rancis): Spring Hill, (Alabama)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, (Louisiana)

He understood from (Blanc)'s last letter that it would be very embarrassing with Father (Thomas T.?) Brady.Bp.(Michael) Portier had understood that (Blanc)'s reply was positive. But knowing that Brady will not be sorry to go another diocese, and especially to St. Louis where the Archbishop promised to receive him, Gautrelet proposed the thing and he accepted willingly. Otherwise it would have been difficult to place him in the south(?). Bishop (Auguste) Martin saw him and did not accept him. The young man will do better at St. Louis. Gautrelet proposed it to Portier and he approved. (Blanc)'s 3 seminarians are doing well; they will carry out (Blanc)'s intentions in regard to their clothes.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 12mo. - {4}


1855 Dec. 13
Tholomier, Father (Claude Anthony): St. Michael, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Tholomier asks for a dispensation for Alphonse Sechexnaider and Marie Elise Sechexnaider. From Tholomier's point of view it is desirable. Tholomier also expresses his astonishment at (Blanc)'s silence in regard to the Religious of the Sacred Heart. It is impossible for one priest to serve the parish and the convent. It could be done for a week or two but not for longer. Tholomier does not doubt that (Blanc) is pressed to provide a chaplain for these ladies, but it is a double burden on Tholomier's shoulders. He would have written sooner had they not had the hope of seeing (Blanc) here. He asks (Blanc) to have pity on him and send him help. He has other things to say which he will keep until he sees (Blanc). The Ladies also want to see him.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 12mo. - {4}


1855 Dec. 14
Chambige, Father F(rancis): St. Thomas's (Bardstown, Kentucky)
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

They have been indirectly informed that Purcell intends to withdraw his students from St. Thomas's Seminary. Chambige speaks plainly on the measure, but will submit without complaint. They anticipate unhappy results for their institution from such a move. They incurred heavy expenses to carry on the institution with the hope of Purcell's continued patronage. The withdrawal will operate unfavorably in the minds of the other bishops who patronize the institution. These will not be the most deplorable results. All good clergymen had anticipated great improvements in the education of the clergy by the establishment of the provincial seminary. Others predicted that the bishops of the province would never carry on the project; that they would never succeed in establishing a common seminary. Should then the reported intention of Purcell be carried into affect, the pious anticipations of the well-intentioned clergymen would be frustrated. They would resign themselves to any decision of the bishops even if it should cause the fall of their institution. He regrets that the Theological Seminary was not more numerously attended. This is not very encouraging to Purcell after the sacrifices he has made. But such institutions must work themselves into favor only by their tried merit. This requires time. Should then the seminaries of St. Mary's (Lebanon, Ky.) and St. Thomas's continue in their exertions with zeal and thereby succeed, the prelates would see the advantages of the institutions and patronize them. Bishops (Frederick) Baraga and (Peter Paul) Lefevere will certainly send their subjects when they have any. They are progressing steadily at St. Thomas's. Besides improvements in buildings, the organization of the classes has undergone a change for the better; the teachers are improving. They have taken measures to completely separate the orphans from the seminary. Chambige assures Purcell they will continue their exertions with the same ardor. N.B. He asks forgiveness if he has been wanting in propriety and due respect. P.S. Bishop (Martin John) Spalding knows nothing about this letter.

II-4-m - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 8vo. - {6}


1855 Dec. 14
Cutts, R.S.C., Madame Hy(acinthe?): Grand Coteau, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

They have just learned of the arrival of Madame (Anna) Shannon, (R.S.C.J.) who is going to fill the place of Superior in their house. Mother (Amelie?) Jouve, (R.S.C.J.) will leave immediately. But before going she wishes to have Madame Mary Moran, (R.S.C.J.) make her first vows and give the habit to Maria Bertrand. Jouve asks Cutts to ask for (Blanc)'s approval for this ceremony to take place before Christmas. (Blanc) is also to name the Jesuit who is to examine her. Cutts will soon visit (Blanc). Her hope is founded on the lot that has fallen to her to fill a part of the numerous gaps at St. Michael.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {5}


1855 Dec. 15
(Blanc), Ant(hony) Abp. New Orleans: New Orleans, Louisiana)
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Rev. Durieur, a subdeacon, and Mr. Langlois arrived from France for the diocese of New Orleans. Blanc asks that they be admitted to Mount St. Mary's Seminary, (Cincinnati) to complete their theology. Purcell should draw on Father (Stephen) Rousselon for their board and tuition, adding it to the $30 Purcell advanced to Father (M.) Faure.

II-4-m - A.L.S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {6}


1855 Dec. 15
(Odin), Bishop J(ohn) M(ary): Galveston, (Texas)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Odin) has just received (Blanc)'s letter of the 10th(?) and understands how urgent it is to get a successor for Natchez. Propaganda will not hesitate to conform to (Blanc)'s views. The three names proposed seem very suitable. Perhaps Father (John de) Blieck, (S.J.), if there was hope of getting him, would be more useful than the two first. Natchez needs an active man not afraid of the fatigue and privations of journeys. Fathers Ed(ward) Purcell and (James M.) Lancaster are accustomed to a sedentary life; perhaps they would find it difficult. However, (Odin) proposes: 1) Edward Purcell of Cincinnati; 2) Lancaster of Covington; and 3) J.D.(?) Blieck of Louisville. (Odin) had hoped that (Blanc) would excuse him from speaking in public during the council. After 15 years in Texas, and so little time for study he feels incapable of giving a discourse. He asks (Blanc) to ask some one else. If he must go into the pulpit, (Blanc) is to tell him whether it would be well to speak not only of Bishop (James Oliver) Vandevelde but also of Bishops (Ignatius A.) Reynolds and (Francis Xavier) Gartland. He asks to be excused if possible. He has just received the ordos; Father Rousselon is to let him know how many Masses are to be said.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 12mo. - {8}


1855 Dec. 16
De Smet, S.J., Father P(eter) J.: St. Louis University, (Missouri)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Annexed (Blanc) will find a receipt for the papers connected with the Walsh case. The manuscripts, etc. of the good Bishop have been delivered by Father (Peter) Tscheider to the Provincial. It is a considerable disappointment not to find in the package the letter of both of them to him nor those of their superior in Rome. As these letters are all of a confidential nature addressed not to the Bishop but to the Jesuit, they can be of no use to his successor. Consequently when they have been examined by (Blanc) they should be returned to them. Those from the superiors, are directed by their rules to be burned unread; this will be religiously attended to. They have received a few letters addressed in early times to the Bishop and presume there remain some received by him as superior of this vice-province. They ask to receive them also. They would be pained to learn that anyone else might read them.

- A.L.S. -


 On the same paper: 

1855 Dec. 16
De Smet, S.J., Father P(eter) J.: St. Louis, (Missouri)

De Smet acknowledges receiving from Blanc, the letter and other documents relating to the estate of John and Luke Welsh of Chicago, wards of the late Bishop (James Oliver) Van De Velde, the said writings having been found among his papers.

VI-1-i - A.D.S. A.L.S., A.D.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {5}


1855 Dec. 16
(Martin), Bishop Aug(uste): Natchitoches, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

As (Blanc) will see from the copy of the decision (Martin) is sending that the affair of Campté has been finished. It is not probable … (For complete calander see original of 7 cards)

Cross references:

1. Natchitoches, Louisiana
2. Archbishop Anthony Blanc
3. Campté, Louisiana
4. Jules C.N. Luvini
5. Judge Campbell
6. Jesuits
7. Cloutierville, Louisiana
8. Ile Brévelle, Louisiana
9. Daughters of the Cross
10. Homer, Louisiana
11. Father Felix Dicharry
12. Mr. Cops
13. Miss O'Neil
14. Bayou Pierre, Louisiana
15. Presles, Louisiana
16. Father Jean Pierre
17. Shreveport, Louisiana
18. Catholic College of Natchitoches
19. Judge Chaplin
20. Father Philibert Jourdain
21. Francoise Trichel
22. Bishop Leon de Neckère

VI-1-i - A.L.S. and 3 clippings - (French) - - 12mo. - {22}


1855 Dec. 17
Lavey, S.J., Father J(oseph): Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

At last they will take possession of the new church (St. Joseph's) next Sunday, although it is not yet finished. They are now bringing the old pews while waiting for the new. The revenues of the old church hardly suffice to pay the interest on what is already borrowed. Now that the revenues are more they can go ahead. If it is necessary to bless the new church before having Mass there, will (Blanc) authorize them to do so (Mathilde) Victor has not yet received a French teacher. She would like to know if (Blanc) does not know one they could have in case the first one cannot come.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {3}


1855 Dec. 19
Anwander, C.SS.R., Father Thaddeus: New Orl(eans, Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

With profound respect and compliments.

VI-1-i - A. Note S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {1}


1855 Dec. 19
Cooper, Father George F.: Jackson, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Cooper has partly succeeded in getting a certain sum of money together. He has nearly $1100 he can rely on in the first 15 days of January. The building at Jackson is progressing rapidly. About $100 more will be wanted to finish the building here. Furniture for the chapel will be necessary. He is willing to leave his own rooms bare. The Catholics of Jackson appear to be lovers of this world and not disposed to any great sacrifice. He always excepts the excellent Mr. Crennan (M.R. Crenan) and his wife. Would (Blanc) approve of Cooper coming to the city to try to collect a little money among the Irish to finish and furnish this place. He is sorry to hear here and elsewhere reports very disadvantageous to Father (August?) Chambost. Cooper has seen and heard enough of the young man who has spread these reports to conclude that he is utterly unworthy of credit. P.S. If (Blanc) writes, the letter will be delivered to Cooper by Crennan.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 4to. - {4}


1855 Dec. 19
Gouesse, (C.S.C.), Father F(rancis): Detroit, (Michigan)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Gouesse joins his new year's wishes to those of (Blanc)'s clergy, in spirit with his confreres of New Orleans laboring under (Blanc). For a year he has put (Blanc)'s intention in the canon at least 150 times. Gouesse is ashamed to have given (Blanc) embarrassment by saying a word at (St. Mary's Catholic Boys') Asylum about his affairs. But (Blanc) understands that after 8 months of waiting for a yes or no, Gouesse could not do otherwise. He is still obliged to wait, and coming through (Notre Dame du) Lac, when will it arrive? His exeat, which is there and which is no use to them, has never been able to be extracted. His chalice, his music books, lives of the saints, etc. are all that he asked for for 8 months. At (Blanc)'s advice he has thanked the Bishop of Kingston, promising him a visit next spring. Father (J.H.) De Bolles will leave tomorrow for New Orleans. They say he is nervous; Gouesse does not see what he has to fear at New Orleans. Gouesse thinks he will give marvelous service in (Blanc)'s hospital. But he is not to let the yellow fever take him next summer. Gouesse could not be more glad to hear what (Blanc) says about the orphans among whom the Congregation of Holy Cross never wished to leave Gouesse in peace. He does not think it possible to make a man suffer more. If it were not for (Blanc) and the asylum he would not have worked at it for two years.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {5}


1855 Dec. 19
Yon, John E.: St. Louis, Missouri
 to O(restes) A. Brownson: New York, New York

He was glad to hear that Brownson accepted his invitation to come and lecture at the Institution in St. Louis. January 7th will be too early for Brownson to come, so they want him to be there on the 14th. The Committee wants him to deliver two lectures; there will be fifteen altogether, including the home lectures, they issued Season Tickets for the lectures. He will write Brownson around January third or fourth and let him know the precise time of his first lecture.

I-3-l - A.L.S. - 1p. - 4to. - {1}


1855 Dec. 20
Glajeux, Berard des: Paris, (France)
 to Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefevere: Detroit, (Michigan)

The Association for the Propagation of the Faith has allocated to the Diocese of Detroit, the sum of 9,000 francs. One fifth of this as usual is reserved until the end of the year. They are happy to be able to raise such a sum in a year when they have had to generally reduce the allocations. Berard hopes that Lefevere's work is a source of consolation to him. Berard signs as president and Ch(arles) Choiselat as treasurer.

- L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 8vo. -


 On the same paper is written: 


Choiselat, Ch(arles): (Paris, France)
 to Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere): (Detroit, Michigan)

The councils have decided to make a partial payment of 3/10; of the allocations of 1855. This 3/10; for Detroit will be 2,700 francs. A draft for this amount is enclosed. P.S. The Councils are very pleased at the development of the Association of the Propagation of the Faith in Lefevere's diocese. They hope that he will continue to keep them informed about it.

III-2-i - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {3}


1855 Dec. 20
Kane, Father Richard: Donaldsonville, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Lest (Blanc) be disappointed at Kane's not returning to New Orleans, as (Blanc) ordered, Kane writes after his interview with the doctor. Mr. Duffel will in a letter Kane expects to receive in time to enclose, give more details relative to Kane's indisposition. He knows Kane's physique better than Kane does. His cough is what determines him to remain here a few days longer; here he can follow what the doctor prescribes. His cough, with the propensities Kane has, may have pernicious consequences. Every number of this excellent family wishes to be remembered to (Blanc).

- A.L.S. -


 Enclosure: 

1855 Dec. 20
Duffel, Dr. E(dwa)rd: Ascension, (Louisiana)

Kane having been under Duffel's medical care for some months, his health has gradually improved and Duffel's opinion is that he would entirely recover could he avoid sedentary habits and undue fatigue. The climate of Cuba or Jamaica during wintry months would also facilitate his recovery. The best remedies in delicate lungs must be sought in employments giving the greatest vigor.

- A.D.S. -


VI-1-i - A.L.S., A.D.S. - 4pp. - 8vo. - {2}


1855 Dec. 20
Kilroy, Father L(awrence): St. Clair, (Michigan)
 to Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere): (Detroit, Michigan)

Kilroy received on December 18 the plat of the church land at Newport, (Michigan) herein enclosed (no enclosure). If 60 feet were marked out for a street the second range of lots would be too near the church. The proprietor of Mr. Parker's mill has taken the water privilege of the Belle river. They have come about halfway toward Mr. Louis Cottrells'. Some person at Newport ought to see to it and get what is lawful. Father (Mary Paul Wehrle came to St. Clair on the 14th.

III-2-i - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {5}


1855 Dec. 20
Rousselon, Father E(tienne): (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Rousselon, with a license from Judge F(ranci?)s Calongne, received the marriage vows of Elfège Bellevue Barbin, son of the late Francois Belleve Barbin and Delphine Trépagnier, and Mélanie Olivier Large, daughter of the late Olivier Large and Marguerite Large in the presence of witnesses, all of whom sign. (Witnesses): P. Lenfort, A. Méynie(?), A.(?) J. Bechet(?).

VI-1-i - A.D.S. - (French) - 1p. - folio - {10}


1855 Dec. 20
Spalding, Bishop M(artin) J(ohn): Louisville, (Kentucky)
 to Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc: N(ew) Orleans, (Louisiana)

Confidential. Spalding has delayed to answer Blanc's letter of the 1st in order to reflect on the subject upon which Blanc asks his opinion. Father (James M.) L(ancaste)r(?) has many good qualities; he is regular in his duties, exemplary in moral character and skilled in financial business. But there are some defects; his talents are mediocre and his learning not deep. They say he is too gallant to the ladies. He has also for some years been a bank director against Spalding's remonstrances when he was his Bishop. Still Spalding believes he would make a safe bishop, would be respectable in morals and manners. Spalding recommends that he be placed third on the list. Spalding has a deep interest in Natchez, having within it several of his acquaintance from Kentucky. Natchez needs a man of zeal and energy and thoroughly conversant with the English language. He proposes two names: 1. Father Isaac Joseph Hecker, O.(!) SS.R. of New York, a convert of some 15 years, about 35 years old, a man of sense and business. He would do much good among the slaves. 2. Father James O'Connor of Pittsburgh, brother of the Bishop. He is a Propagandist, 32 years old, with fine talents. His health has been delicate but a southern climate would suit him as his lungs have been weak. His brother could aid him in the person(n)el which is weak in that diocese. Spalding thanks Blanc for his offer of hospitality; he expects to be with Blanc about January 8. He may begin his lectures any time after the 11th or 12th as may suit the Catholic Institute. He cannot remain longer than 2 weeks after January 13. This will enable him to be with Blanc at the opening of his Provincial Council. When the prelates arrive, Spalding can take lodgings elsewhere. P.S. Blanc is to mention this to (Thomas J. ?) Semmes, sec(retar)y of the Catholic Institute.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 12mo. - {7}


1855 Dec. 21
Byrne, Bishop Andrew: Fort Smith, (Arkansas)
 to Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Byrne has been in the western part of the diocese for nearly the last two months. Blanc's communication calling the first provincial council has reached him, also the death of the Bishop of Natchez through the papers. Byrne will have to spend Christians time in this place and leave by land immediately after for Little Rock on his way to the Council. The institutions here are gaining ground every day. The Sisters of Mercy had an examination and concert last Tuesday which satisfied the most bitter opponent that only Catholic teaching will be permanent. The (Association of) the Propagation of the Faith have not done Byrne justice and he will suffer before he troubles them again with his wants. He proposes to lay them before the friends of religion in the United States. He has not at this moment a candidate for Holy Orders for want of means to support. There are a few respectable families in the southern part of the diocese preparing to embrace the faith. One is the brother of one of their senators in Congress.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {4}


1855 Dec. 21
(Portier), Bishop Michael: Mobile, (Alabama)
 to Archbishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Yesterday (Portier) received Blanc's letter with the list of questions for discussion in the provincial council. He will examine it and communicate his own ideas. Blanc will probably receive today a visit from Father (Thomas) Joyce who has worked for a long time in Kentucky, who has spent 4(?) months. Toronto from where he will bring Blanc a fine letter from Father (John?) Bruyère. Joyce accompanied (Portier) on his last trip from New Orleans to Mobile and spent at least 3 weeks with him. He is a good enough subject, (Portier) was going to say good devil but he is certain he has the weakness of drinking and that it would be imprudent to give him employment. (Portier) will see Blanc on the 15th of next month to settle the questions and committees.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {3}


1855 Dec. 22
Morisot, Father (J.M.): New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Morisot received (Blanc)'s letter with much pleasure. Although the people wish to have a midnight Mass at Annunciation he will do nothing until he receives (Blanc)'s order. However, he believes that some one among them, with a good motive and not knowing (Blanc)'s intentions, is planning to have a solemn midnight Mass. Morisot asks (Blanc) not to try to find out; he is in good faith.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {1}


1855 Dec. 23
(Hughes), Archbishop John: New York, (New York)
 to Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

The Holy Father in his reply to the letter of the Council of New York recommended that the bishops should unite to establish an American College at Rome. (Hughes) has consulted the suffragan bishops of this province. They have responded in a way to manifest their filial obedience and their appreciation of the benefits which will result. A circular letter from the Holy Father has been sent to the other bishops of the country. (Hughes) did not find any one in Rome who seemed authorized to speak officially on the subject. He communicates the substance of what he has been authorized to state. 1. They are prepared to provide for the new college 21 students at an annual pension of $150 each. 2. To provide $2000 for the furnishing of any suitable building the Holy Father offers. 3. They will bear a high proportion of the expenses of a delegate who will proceed to Rome as the representative of all the Bishops of the U(nited) S(tates) east of the Rocky Mountains, or of such as will agree. 4. Such delegate should be a bishop well acquainted with the usages of Rome in reference to national colleges and have authority to enter into negotiations with the proper parties. 5. These would constitute his duties; the details would come up through experience and could be arranged. All bishops of this province agree that Rome has not proved a healthy climate for American youth and that the College should be located in a central and healthy situation. If the College should contain but 60 students yielding an annual pension secured by the bishops to whose diocese they belong of $150 each; say $9000 per annum, there would be a surplus sufficient for the support of a rector and vice rector. If the $2000 for furnishings is not sufficient they will make it $3000. If anything is to be done it should be done by general consent of the episcopacy. (Hughes) has written to each of the metropolitans.

VI-1-i - L.S. - 3pp. - 4to. - {2}


1855 Dec. 23
(Hughes), John Abp. New York: New York, New York
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

In response to the recommendation of the Holy Father that the Bishops establish an American College at Rome, Hughes has consulted his suffragans who have responded in a way favorable to the project. A circular letter from the Holy Father has been sent to the other Bishops of the country in reference to the same subject. Without a general concert among the bishops the enterprise will not be a success. Hughes is not aware that any prelate in this country has been officially designated to speak in behalf of the others. If they would understand each other, it must be by mutual interchange of sentiment on the subject. The Bishops of his province are prepared to provide for the new College 21 students at an annual pension of $150 for each; to advance $2000 for the immediate furnishing of any building that the Holy Father may offer for the purpose; to bear a high proportion of the expenses of the delegate who will proceed to Home. They are of the opinion that the delegate should be a Bishop well acquainted with the usages of Rome in reference to national colleges and to ecclesiastical education. It should be of the utmost importance that the College should be located in a central and at the same time a healthy situation. If they must rent a building the bishops are prepared to make it $3000. A similar letter was addressed to each of the Metropolitans so that they may know the disposition of the Archbishop and suffragans of New York.

II-4-m - L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {3}


1855 Dec. 23
(Martin), Bishop Aug(uste) M(ar)ie: Natchitoches, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

He was annoyed at not being able to reply immediately to (Blanc)'s letter of the 11th. He was very ill when he received it. He has fought the sickness for two weeks; he had to go to bed for an absolute rest. He said Mass this morning. In his state of health and behind as he is in his correspondence (Martin) cannot do the sermon which (Blanc) asks. He asks him to appoint another preacher, more free and capable. Mr. Pitot is here, their habitual guest.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 12mo. - {2}


1855 Dec. 23
Vaultrin, Charles Lawyer of Metz: Metz, France
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Purcell's diocese and the people of northeast France have the contact that both are people by a great number of Germans of Metz and Nancy. It is with pleasure that those in Metz see Purcell's diocese enter into the affairs of Europe and at the same time read in the Annales of the Association of the Propagation the letter of the Provincial Council to the Counseils. Vaultrin presents himself with the recommendation of the Bishop of Metz, Monsignor Dupont des Loges, to care for the following matter. In 1809 Pierre Zingraff born in Romering, of the Canton of Puttelange, May 10, 1781, went to Cuba to seek his fortune. He prospered and was seen in Havana in 1819-20, then went to Philadelphia and later again to Cuba. Mar. 10, 1816 he wrote to his parents and asked that his two brothers be sent to him. The brothers Georges and Jean Joseph Zingraff announced their arrival in Philadelphia Oct. 16, 1816. The later news from them was that they had parted after the death of Pierre's wife and had gone on, presumably to Ohio, on business. A nephew going to America wrote Oct. 27, 1849, that he had learned that his uncles lived in Cincinnati. The Zingraff family in Puttelange received a letter from a fellow countryman, Jan. 8, 1853, stating that Pierre Zingraff died in 1835, and Jean Joseph in 1837, without children or testament, leaving a considerable fortune and a house near Cincinnati. The French consul has told him that they are listed as Germans and their property placed in the courts of Cincinnati. Vaultrin asks Purcell to aid him as the lawyer of this poor and honest family 1st to find out what can be found about the brothers Pierre, Jean Joseph and George being dead. 2nd designate a loyal person to act as mandatory in the matter. 3rd to advise him the procedure to obtain for the family their just rights. P.S. A letter from the family just received states that it was Jean Joseph and not Pierre that was seen in Cuba in 1819-20. (In the same letter) Bishop Paul (Depont des Loges) of Metz witness to the good character of Vaultrin in his own hand dated Metz, Dec. 29, 1855. (To this is added another note of) Vaultrin dated Metz, Jan. 23, 1856. In the interval he has learned that Purcell is not probably such a stranger to their country, having visited at Sarrebourg about 3 years before and has near him Father Henry D. Juncker, an intimate of the cure of Fentrange.

II-4-m - A.L.S. - 5pp. - 12mo. - (French) - {12}


1855 Dec. 24
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Returns from the fair in December. Mrs. Le Baron, $851.75; at the door, $206.65; Mrs. Hyde, $50; Mrs. Simmes, $200; Mrs. La batut, $343.80; Mrs. Dutrmas(?), $251.60; Mrs. Lombard, 938.35; received since, from the Superior of the Sisters, $20; a total of $2862.15.

VI-1-i - List - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {7}


1855 Dec. 24
Faure, Father A(nthony?): New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

It is two months since he has been in the running for the future parish of St. Maurice. The position assigned him does not suit a priest of his age, already experienced in the ministry. It is good only for a young priest; Father (Napoleon Joseph) Perché will be there to form him and warn him. Sunday Faure goes to hold services at St. Maurice chapel for 30 or 40 people. The rest of the week he has absolutely nothing to do. He asks (Blanc) to take him out of a situation where he is dependent on a young priest and useless for preaching. His health is perfect; however, the frequent visits the priest must make to St. Maurice in all weather to create a parish spirit and for catechism is impractical. He does not think a priest could live long at St. Maurice and that is what is needed to create a parish. The undertaking is laudable but very difficult. He hopes (Blanc) will grant his desires. He is expecting a bachelor relative to come to live with him.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {3}


1855 Dec. 25
(Orestes A. Brownson): New York, (New York)
 to Count (Charles de Montalembert: La Roche en Breny, France)

Brownson thanks Montalembert for his letter of November 1st. He appreciates the Count's sympathy and approval. Brownson's residence is now in New York. He will be more able to advocate their old Constitutional doctrines. He is pleased with the reorganization of "Le Correspondent." He will mention the new series in the January issue of (Brownson's) Review and do all he can for its circulation. He considers Father (Auguste Joseph Alphonse) Gratry a very able philosophical writer; but Brownson does not understand his doctrine of induction; he would like to correspond with Gratry, but he does not know French and he does not know whether Gratry knows English. He likes (Jacques Victor Albert) de Broglie as a writer; and holds in high esteem Father (Hyacinthe) de Valroger. In its way, his "Etudes sur Rationalisme" is a masterpiece. Brownson considers Montalambert's "Life and Times of St. Bernard" superior to the "Affairs of the Abbe Ratisbon." Brownson will read with great interest the Count's essay on England. The people of America do not like the Anglo-French Alliance. Brownson sees it as a question of balance of power, not for Europe only, but also for the world. America's sympathies are with Russia. Brownson is willing to see France predominant in the East but wants England no stronger. He is not satisfied with Austria. The concordat is good but he is afraid it will cause much evil by its influence in keeping Catholics chained to absolutism. He fears the young Emperor's policies of centralization. Austria is cultivating the friendship of (the United States), where she needs a much abler minister. They have the same battle to fight as Montalembert and thus far Brownson has had to fight almost single-handed. (American) Catholics are cast in the mold of absolutism and the Irish clergy confound obedience with servility. The Irish people would do well, be a noble people, if they had only a tolerably decent clergy. No care is taken of the morals of the people and the Catholic population, chiefly Irish, furnishes the great mass of the rowdyism in the cities, thieves, pickpockets, burglars and prostitutes. As a body they are the most drunken, fighting, thieving, lying and lascivious class of our population.

I-3-l - A.L. (First draft) - 6pp. - 16to. - {10}


(1855?) Dec. 25
Jouve, R.S.C., Madame Al(oysia) (Amélie?): Grand Coteau, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Obedience having prolonged her stay here, she will not be at St. Michael before the first days of January. She joins the little family here in wishing (Blanc) happier days than those just past. Mother (Anna) Shannon, (R.S.C.J.) was installed as Superior several days ago. All of Grand Coteau rejoiced at her return and no one more than Jouve for she finds precious qualities in Shannon. Mother (Adine) Guinand, (R.S.C.J.) writes that nothing has been decided about the chaplain for St. Michael.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {3}


1855 Dec. 26
Andrieu, C.M., Father A(nthony): Assumption, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

He sends greetings for the new year. He hopes to live for many years under (Blanc)'s wing.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 12mo. - {1}


1855 (Dec. 26)
Doane, George H.: Issy, (France)
 to Bishop (James Roosevelt Bayley: Newark, New Jersey)

Doane received (Bayley)'s letter yesterday. He has not had the first sensation of homesickness, but has trouble on account of the studies in which he seems to be losing time. Doane wrote to Dr. (John Henry) Newman to ask if there was a Seminary in England where the needs of a convert in the way of study would be a better appreciated. Newman recommended Ushaw and asked further questions. Doane has not been very well. If Bayley is satisfied with his remaining here he will do so, but if Newman replies that Doane can devote his time more immediately to the study of theology there, he asks if he should make the change. Doane has been applied to by an ecclesiastic who has been charged to write a history of the decree of the Immaculate Conception to obtain everything that has appeared about it in the United States. Doane is happy with the name "Mr. Benjamin." He hopes to see Mr. Young on Friday, but has not yet seen (Bayley)'s brother. He encloses a note asking if there is an archconfraternity of Notre Dame des Victoires at the Cathedral. Has Mr. Stewart let the controversy go?

II-2-n - A.L.S. - 5pp. - 12mo. - {4}


1855 Dec. 27
Carrell, Geo(rge) A. Bishop of: Covington, K(entucky)
 to Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell of: Cincinnati, Ohio

Mrs. Vierschilling called this afternoon about Anthony Bidenharn, but missing Carrell, left Anthony's letter. His scruples relieve Carrell's anxiety as Father Ignatius Horstman had told him he was wasting money since the man was so fickle. Bidenharn offered himself to Carrell during vacation and Carrell accepted him on condition that he arrange matters satisfactorily with Purcell and pay the cost of his training at St. Thomas. He called later saying that he had arranged the matter with Purcell or his brother, Father Edward, and that Mr. Vierschilling, his uncle, would give his note for the amount. Carrell does not want him and will write him to that effect.

II-4-m - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {4}


1855 Dec. 27
Elliott, R(ichard) R.: Detroit, Michigan
 to O(restes) A. Brownson: New York, N(ew) Y(ork)

The Catholic Institute at Detroit would like to have Brownson give some lectures there. It is the first year for the existance of the place as an Institute, and moreover, the city is predominantly Catholic. He was informed by D. Bryan from Utica that Brownson had an impression regarding the church authorities of the diocese of Detroit of which he was sorry to hear. Their movements are sanctioned by Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere).

I-3-l - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 12mo. - {4}


1855 Dec. 27
Platt, E.H.: Trouprille, Lownds County, G(eorgi)a
 to Orestes A. Brownson: New York, New York

In the last political contest, the writer stood for freedom of worship. The "late" issues involve the essences of all that freemen hold dear. He deems it important that all men of politics he conversant with the true doctrines of the Church. His reading of Milners End of the Controversy has induced him to become fully informed of the "leading truths" of the Church. He intends to procure for his reading a list of books. He wishes Brownson to suggest some. It has been the writer's custom for ten years to engage publicly in discussions in times of high political excitement.

I-3-l - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {1}


(1855) Dec. 27
Sacred Heart, Children of the: Grand Coteau, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

They wish him a happy new year. They cannot forget his numberless favors. They pray that the cross laid on him the past year may be alleviated. Amelia Wartelle signs as secretary.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {2}


1855 Dec. 28
Faure, Father A(nthony?): N(ew) Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

The relative Faure is expecting will not come until next November. Before this time, Faure hopes that he will be placed so that he can receive him. Whatever the position (Blanc) offers him he is certain this relative will be of great help. His conduct has always been very edifying; he is capable of helping in the instruction of the children as a catechist and as a sacristan. Faure regrets that the position at St. Maurice does not need a priest like Faure, trained in ministry, but a young priest. However, Faure will wait patiently until (Blanc) places him, at least as a preacher. He could do good in some organized parish.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {2}


1855 Dec. 28
O'Connor, M(ichael) Bp. Pittsburg: Pittsburg, Pennsylvania
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Father (E.) McMahon has shown O'Connor Purcell's letter regarding Father (Nicholas) Sorg. Evidently Purcell feels hurt at O'Connor's remark, and he writes to explain. If Sorg had any reason for changing which Purcell thought worthy of a priest, even though O'Connor might not be aware of it, O'Connor should not have complained. But the fact is that Sorg wishes to transfer to a land which he has ascertained to abound in rich patronage. Such practice will break up discipline among the clergy. But knowing that a clergyman is anxious to withdraw, the bishop is made to feel that it is to the interest of the diocese to be rid of him as confidence can no longer be placed in him. The effect has been that worthy men by neglect of duty can work themselves a transfer, as the bishop is sooner or later compelled to let them go. He is not surprised that Purcell is willing to give up Father (John) Schmidt. It is hard now to keep Sorg in Schmidt's place. The only thing to do is to require them to give a reasonable motive. In two cases O'Connor did accept men from other diocese because he thought they had good reason for making a change and for thinking it unnecessary to obtain a cordial approbation of the bishops. O'Connor will have to let Sorg go, although constant changes are not good for the congregation. He asks Purcell to excuse the frankness with which he wrote this letter. He does not charge anything but what he knows to have been done by their best men.

II-4-m - A.L.S. - 8pp. - 12mo. - {5}


1855 Dec. 28
(Portier), Bishop Michael: Mobile, (Alabama)
 to Archbishop A(nthony) Blanc: N(ew) Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Portier) sends his wishes and prayers for the future. He recommends to Blanc the bearer of this letter. Mr. Tardy is an excellent young man. Blanc may recall that he visited his mother in Philadelphia last spring. (Portier) will appreciate it if Blanc can help in the career Tardy proposes to follow.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {2}


1855 Dec. 29
Pivot: Tours, (France)
 to Archbishop (Francois N.M. Morlot?: Tours, France)

Pivot recalls (Morlot)'s memory of a poor orphan whom (Morlot) admitted to the charitable institution at Villefranche. Pivot has served his country for six years but his health is bad and he wishes to retire from service. He has some small savings which he does not want to spend. He asks (Morlot) to write the Bishop of New Orleans (Archbishop Anthony Blanc) a letter of recommendation. For a long time his one aim has been to go to America. He has a trade, shoemaker, which he thinks would be more profitable there than in France. If (Morlot) cannot aid him by writing to the American bishop, Pivot will fill any place that (Morlot) gives him. Just now he is in the hospital with a chest disease.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 12mo. - {2}


1855 Dec. 29
(Purcell), Archbishop J(ohn) B(aptist): Cin(cinnati, Ohio)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Blanc)'s letter of the 15th and the two charming ecclesiastical students arrived this morning. They are in fine health and spirits; (Purcell) will leave nothing undone to restore them to (Blanc) as "men of God furnished for every good work." He thanks (Blanc) for this new mark of confidence. He thinks they can furnish more young men board, lodging, washing, books, and mending at $120 per annum. (Father Edward Purcell) will attend to (Blanc)'s direction about the "pension" next week. They are in the midst of a fair for their 300 orphans which promises to turn out well. They are also in a terrible consternation among the Methodists, one of whose preachers has published a pamphlet accusing Bishop Hamline of the corruption of Methodist ladies. His crimes were concealed by the brethren for fear the church would be injured. Hamline was a notoriously bad man in Zanesville 20 years ago. God allows such revelations in order to show the enemies of the Faith their own abominations and let the world see them. Purcell has no news from abroad. Father Henry Damian Juncker has been placed, by the St. Louis Council, first on the list for Prairie du Chien. He will be a loss to (Purcell) but a great blessing wherever he goes. The house of the Christian Brothers of Mary, a community from Bordeaux, at Nazareth, near Dayton, was burned to the ground a few nights ago. (Purcell) sends regards to Father Rousselon.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 12mo. - {7}


1855 Dec. 30
Grignon, Father M(athurin) F.: Natchez, (Mississippi)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Grignon has just received (Blanc)'s letter and the certificate of deposit of $2080 to pay the note of Miss (Emma?) Marcilly but he believes the note will be presented not at Natchez but at New Orleans. As for the second and last payment for the lumber to complete the church, Grignon is certain that on May 31, 1855, he paid $826 and then on June 28, at the time when the promissory note was protested at New Orleans for the second payment, he sent $826 from Natchez to a bank of New Orleans in the name of Bishop (James Oliver) V(an)de(Velde). What remained of the collection for the church could not pay such a note. Grignon must have written at the time that probably this $826 ought to be paid partly to the lumberman, partly to J. Deaver(?). Grignon has not done anything yet about Rose Hill. The lady who offered $1200 has been ill since so he does not know whether she is going to go into it or not. He left it up to her and Judge Thatcher, Attorney Eustis being absent. Grignon has prepared a room for the school in the basement of the church and has procured a teacher. Now he has to find a sufficient number of children to start a primary school. The school opens January 2. Father (Francis Rene) Pont is well and is ready to help in everything. In spite of bad weather, Christmas was very consoling. At the 5 o'clock High Mass there was a good attendance. The collection for the orphans was 80 piastres; they need it, being in debt more than $1,000. (P.S.) Father Rousselon sent only one ordo; they need at least two more for Natchez. P.S. (Blanc) asked whether Vandevelde had spoken of a priest to succeed him in the see of Natchez. During a trip to Vicksburg, in a conversation with (Thomas C.) Reddy and P(eter?) Grant, he spoke of Father (Charles C.) Pise as one he would recommend for Natchez or any other see.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 12mo. - {11}


1855 Dec. 30
Lamy, John, Bishop of Santa Fe: Santa Fe, New Mexico
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

Lamy sees by the papers that in Cincinnati Purcell had his share of troubles in election time. In New Mexico the party of Padre Gallagos succeeded again and sent him to Congress. They are trying to embarrass Lamy. Father Juan Felipe Ortiz returned from Durango and every day Lamy receives new vexations from him. Some of the Mexican padres are more troublesome to Lamy than the Knownothings are to Purcell. Difficulties about money matters are as great as ever. This is why he has not been able to repay Purcell. Lamy lost several thousand dollars worth of church goods. The schools are prospering. He asks Purcell to excuse him for not repaying him. Father (Joseph) Machebeuf may go to Europe next spring to get more priests.

II-4-m - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {7}


1855 Dec. 30
Le Bray: St. Louis, (Missouri)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Le Bray wrote before his departure to send good wishes for the new year. Today he wishes to renew them for his family who are happy in their change. A Mass will be celebrated at St. Vincent de Paul Church on January 19 for all the noble souls at St. Louis and for (Blanc).

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 8vo. - {1}


1855 Dec. 30
Ste. Marie, (R.U.), Sister de: San Antonio, (Texas)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

She hastens to reply to (Blanc)'s letter which shows the interest he has in their little mission in order to express their gratitude. Ste. Marie expected (Blanc)'s reply from Cincinnati without however counting on success since all those who had been at the house, had not been able to conform to their customs, different from theirs in many ways. Today Ste. Marie is in new trouble because of the recall of Sister St. Antoine, (R.U.) taking away an English person and adding to the shortage of teachers whom she needs so much for the classes, complicated by four languages. Mother Superior suggested Sister St. Charles, (R.U.) of Cincinnati. Ste. Marie wrote to her to ask help but one can hardly be eloquent when one has only sacrifices to offer. Ste. Marie asks for (Blanc)'s intercession to make this Sister decide to come to join them. They do not have the contagious diseases here that they have at New O(rleans). Their little community received Holy Communion for (Blanc) on St. Cecilia's day; they also offer their best wishes for the new year.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 12mo. - {3}


1855 Dec. 31
Roduit, S.J., Father J(oseph): Gr(and) Coteau, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Roduit sends his good wishes. He thanks (Blanc) for his kindness toward their Society and especially toward (St. Charles) College of Grand Coteau which they hope will soon be accountable for its new life and prosperity which it is enjoying. To give (Blanc) some positive token of their gratitude, Roduit and Father (James) Bruh(l), (S.J.) will offer Mass for (Blanc) on the first day of the year and on St. Anthony's day. Madame (Aloysia) Jouve, (R.S.C.J.) with Madame H. Cutts, (R.S.C.J.) and Madame Freret, (R.S.C.J.) left yesterday for St. Michael to the great regret of the Sisters and of their acquaintances in Gr(and) Coteau. On St. John's day, two former pupils, Madame Moran, (R.S.C.J.) and Madame Bertrous (?, R.S.C.J.), both of New Orleans, made her vows and took the veil, respectively. Since Father Bruhl's arrival their two chapels have Mass alternately on Sundays. Bruhl says the first Mass at the convent and the second one at Plaquemine-Brulé or at Junction.

VI-1-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {8}


(1855 Dec. 31)
Mullon, Father J(ames) I(gnatius): (New Orleans, Louisiana)
 to (Archbishop Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Receipts and disbursements for November and December for (St. Patrick's Church). The sum for which the pews rented was $2485.50.

VI-1-i - A.D.S. - 2pp. - folio - {2}