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1858 Dec. 1
Gautrelet, S.J., Father F(rancis): N(ew) Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to (Archbishop Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, (Louisiana)

A bill for the seminarians at Spring Hill College from Oct(ober) 8, 1857 to December 1, 1858. Board, clothing, trips for (Jean) Mathieu; for (John D.) Portes; for (Philibert) Gutton; for (J.M. Théodore) Forest.

VI-1-o - Bill - (French) - 2pp. - folio - {6}


1858 Dec. 1
(Martin), Bishop Aug(uste) M(ar)ie: Natchitoches, Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Their retreat is ended; yesterday was the closing of their synod and the promulgation of the statutes. Father Alexander (Cvitkovicz, C.SS.R.) was admirable in his simplicity. Not one of (Martin)'s priests failed to attend. (Martin) is far from having provided for everything in the statutes. Their length was necessary; his diocese is new, his clergy young and inexperienced. He submits them to (Blanc)'s judgment for correction or expansion. (Blanc) will note especially Art(icle) 39 on matrimony. The priest will leave on the Carroll which is at G(ran)d Ecore; (Martin) will send the acts of the synod tomorrow or the day after and when (Blanc) has examined them he is to send them to Father Perché to be printed. Young Charles Lévesque, or Lafrance(?), as his baptismal certificate says, arrived this morning; he pleases (Martin) very much. (Martin) will go to New Orleans in January and settle with Father Rousselon. (P.S.) (Martin) hopes (Blanc) will excuse his having copied some of (Blanc)'s statutes.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 12mo. - {4}


1858 Dec.1
Montiel, Father Bernabé and José Antonio Castillo: Granada, Nicaragua
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc): N(ew) Orleans, (Louisiana)

The undersigned, members of the "Council for the Rebuilding of Churches", authorized as shown in the enclosed, ask for pecuniary aid in rebuilding the churches destroyed by order of William Walker. This city was formerly called the foremost in Nicaragua and in Central America. Now with the churches and public buildings destroyed by the civil war, they do not have the resources necessary to rebuild the churches. (Enclosed is a printed leaflet describing) the meeting on October 7, 1858, giving its aims and the other persons of the Council, Ramon García, Fermin Arana, Mercedes Zelaya, and Vicente Quadra, secretary. (Folded with these documents is) a document dated January 29, 1858(!), signed by Rosalio Cortez certifying the authenticity of the foregoing documents.

VI-1-o - A.D.S., Printed D. - (Spanish) - 6pp. - folio & 4to. - {9}


1858 Dec. 1
(Portier), Bishop Michael: Mobile, (Alabama)
 to Archbishop A(nthony) Blanc: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Blanc no doubt knew that (Portier) almost broke his leg but escaped with losing some skin. The doctor has prescribed rest and some medicine. His foot is still sore.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {1}


1858 Dec. 2
Chambost, Jean (and others): Rockville, Ohio

(Copy). The undersigned, Jean Chambost, Victoire Chambost, Benoit Boland, Joseph Boland, and Benoit Chambost certify that they lived at the College of Plaquemine, Iberville and saw Michel Déal during all the time they were there. Also that Déal was lodged, fed, clothed, and taught as well as those who paid 1000 francs. Also that Fathers C(harles Chambost) and A(uguste) Chambost had wished to take him back to his mother but that Déal had preferred to remain in America. So they placed Déal with a French pastry cook to learn the trade and who was to give him 6 piastres for the first month and 10 piastres for the following months. Before they left Plaquemine, A(uguste) again asked Déal but he replied that he preferred to remain. So A(uguste) gave him some money and left him. (The undersigned) urged Déal to return home or come north with them but he refused and remained alone at Plaquemine. If Déal does not acknowledge what the Fathers Chambost have done for him, he must have an ungrateful soul.

- Copy -


(1858 Dec.)
Chambost, Father C(harles):
 to Michael (Schlatre, Jr.?): (Plaquemine, Louisiana)

They have started such a fuss about Father (Au)guste not bringing Déal back to France that C(harles) thought it proper to have Mr. Benoit and Co(mpany) witness the truth of his refusing to follow them to France. Michael is to have the Archbishop see that copy and try to obtain the letter of that priest.

VI-1-o - Copy, A.L.S. - (French & English) - 2pp. - 4to. - {8}


1858 Dec. 2
McLaughlin, Peter:
Steamer Thomas Dickey, Memphis bound
 to Archbishop A(nthony) Blanc: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Blanc's favor was received with joy and tears. How could he help being troubled about so exalted a friend? Should any letters come for McLaughlin Blanc is to hold them until McLaughlin passes through the city. McLaughlin has been the guest of Bishop (John Martin) Henni for the last month; he dug and built the foundation of (Milwaukee)'s noble and elaborate cathedral. McLaughlin wishes to see Blanc able to walk at will when he sees him.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - 1p. - 4to. - {3}


1858 Dec. 3
Tasset, Father F(rancis): Houma, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

The bearer of this letter is a man capable of instructing in good principles those confided to his care and that of his wife. He is coming to the city to try to get an orphan to help his wife, and act as a companion when he works as a mason.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - folio - {1}


1858 Dec. 3
Wharton, J.K.: New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop Ant(hony) Blanc: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

A ticket to the Lyceum Lectures. (With the ticket is the program for) 5 lectures for the benefit of the Public Library of the First District.

VI-1-o - Ticket & Program - 3pp. - 32mo. & 12mo. - {2}


1858 Dec. 4
Baines, Emily: Waverley, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

When Blanc sees her signature it will take him back to the days when he was curate of Pointe Coupée and her husband was living. Her husband died 15 years since, leaving her with 9 children. She wrote to Blanc at that time and Blanc answered. She heard that Blanc met with an accident aboard a boat. She will be more confined here than ever; her child Ann Clannon is dead. She married Robert Clannon of New Orleans about 5 years ago; she died here on November 5, leaving 2 little children. Baines writes to ask the favor of Blanc's remembrance for her child; she died a true Catholic. Baines' youngest son, 17, has one of his lungs much diseased; he resembles her brother William McDermott. Blanc administered the sacraments to McDermott 30 odd years ago and performed the burial service at Pointe Coupée. If Blanc comes up to this part of the country he must make her house his home.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {4}


1858 Dec.4
Blake, Father James: Pattersonville, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Blake has just received Blanc's note of (November) 20 after his return from Franklin where he has been for 10 days. He sees that Blanc is aware that the church lot in Franklin is being fenced in; it was completed yesterday. Blake cannot give Mr. Haiflegh(?) too much praise for the active part he has taken in it. Blake requested him to open a subscription and he succeeded to raise as much as sufficed for the present. A few were jealous of Blake's appointing him treasurer. When Blake said that the sheriff was treasurer, people were satisfied. Father (Nicholas) Francais told the people of Franklin that he had full jurisdiction there until Blanc would appoint a priest for them and that Blake was to return there no more. Francais told them to prepare for his reception and take up a subscription for his board and lodging. Blanc's lady correspondent was at the head of it and therefore it could not succeed. It would be better if she paid the 3 year's pew rent she owes instead of creating confusion. If Francais had Blanc's sanction, all is right. Blake would have been in his house a month ago but hearing so many things, he declined until Blanc would let him know if he was to be removed or not. There is nearly enough money subscribed to pay for the place. He did not feel like fixing a house for his successor after his work for the last 5 years and paying all the debts on both the churches. Blake would be glad to know if Blanc's leg is gaining strength.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 4to. - {4}


1858 Dec.4
Caldwell, Lafayette: Lobdell's Store, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Caldwell avails himself of the kindness of Father (Peter) Lucas, who is going to the city for a little repose after the long and sickly season, to send his sympathy in Blanc's misfortune which confined him to bed. All friends in this parish and Col(onel) S. Van Wickle hope that Lucas will bring back tidings of Blanc's entire convalescence. Caldwell introduces Ann Howle of Washington City who has accepted a situation as a teacher to the children of Cha(rle)s Kock. She is allied to some of the most distinguished divines, Car(r)oll, Fenwick, Young, and others. Should Blanc be able to show her any attention, he will render a favor to her many friends. Caldwell and his wife wish that they may soon have Blanc's company at their house.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 12mo. - {5}


1858 Dec.4
Ernest, Br(other): St. Paul, (Minnesota)
 to Henry Brownson: (Elizabeth, New Jersey)

The brother sympathizes with Brownson on the loss of his brother John. John, a victim of somnambulism, fell out of a window to his death. He hopes Brownson will not be affected too deeply, as it is the will of God.

I-3-n - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 10mo. - {2}


1858 Dec. 4
Smith, Father Bernard: Rome, (Italy)
 to (Archbishop John Baptist Purcell): (Cincinnati, Ohio)

Smith received Purcell's favor of Sept. 23 and Oct. 28. Smith regrets that (Father Edward Purcell) declined the co-adjutorship of Pittsburg. Smith was anxious because he knew Bishop (Michael) O'Connor wanted his assistance, and fears also that it will not please the Holy Father; as it certainly has displeased the Propaganda. Smith saw the Cardinal and the Secretary since the Papal Bulls were returned and they seem to be dissatisfied. Smith communicated to the Cardinal the reasons Purcell assigned for his brother's refusal. When Smith mentioned to the Cardinal the mistake of the 12 cases instead of 16 from the Paenitentiaria he replied that the decree was made for 16 and that Smith could write to tell Purcell to make use of 16, or get a copy of the decree and send it to Purcell. Smith will secure this copy soon. Smith sends regards from Cardinal and Secretary of Propaganda.

II-5-h - A. L. S. - 1p. - 4to. - {3}


 (Photostatic copy from the Archives of the College of Mt. St. Joseph, Delhi, Ohio.) 

(18)58 Dec. 5
(Bayley), Carleton S.: Uplands, (Illinois)
 to Bishop (James Roosevelt) Bayley: Newark, N(ew) J(ersey)

Many thanks for James' letter. The same mail brought a letter from Maria (Eliza Bayley Jewett). James said nothing of Maria's addition to the population. She thinks Jewitt is better. Why does not Mr. Lamson come out to see Carleton? Last Sunday their long expected Bishop (James) Duggan came and confirmed upwards of a hundred persons. He is a very pleasing man. Carleton wrote to their father (Guy Carleton Bayley) to see if he would lend some money for Helan Hubbard. He said he would send $100 so Carleton promised to pay a judgment against Hubbard. If the Doctor pais the rent there would be some money then. Carleton drove Emma to town yesterday. Carleton's ankle is well though weak. Master Will will not write or send Carleton a pair of gloves. Kate (Catherine Murray Bayley) is quite well and Grace (Bayley) is growing finely. (P.S.) Carleton received Father Paul's life, also the Registers. Carleton thinks the Emperor is green in regard to Montalambert. Grace requests (James) to send the picture of (Seton Hall) College, which Father McQuaid promised.

II-2-n - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 12mo. - {8}


(18)58 Dec. 5
Hardey, Father R(ichard) B.: Baton Rouge, L(ouisian)a
 to Archbishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Hardey cannot in conscience undertake the charge of the parish of St. Joseph of Baton Rouge. He felt well and adequate on his arrival but feels so overcome by the little he has done that he is convinced he could not do justice to the office of pastor. He has been obliged to call on Father (Darius) Hubert, (S.J.) to do much for him. Hardey begs to be relieved. He supposes that he will have to retire from active duty.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {2}


1858 Dec. 5
Hendricken, Father T(homas) F.: Waterbury, C(onnecticu)t
 to (Orestes A.) Brownson: (Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Hendricken invites Brownson to the dedication of his church on December 19th. He has long been an admirer of Brownson and a devotee to the Review. Many bishops will be present as well as the Archbishop.

I-3-n - A.L.S. - 1pg. - 12mo. - {2}


(18)58 Dec. 6
Duplantier, G(uy): New Orleans, (Louisiana)

License is granted to Father Rousselon to marry Auguste Ortenbach and Marie Anne Thenedie (?) Sauton.

VI-1-o - A.D.S. - 1p. - 16mo. - {2}


1858 Dec. 6
Bertail, Father J.M.: Paincourtville, (Louisiana)
 to Father (Stephen Rousselon: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Bertail returns the letter for Louis Berard (no enclosure). Berard left about a month ago. His cousin, a clerk at Francois Varaldy's sai. that Berard left for France to return to his parents' and was to sail from N(ew) Orleans on December 6. If his leaving is delayed, (Rousselon) could find him at Mrs. George's, Hotel Conti. Bertail asks (Rousselon) to enroll four more groups for the Association for the Propagation of the Faith. The heads are: Mrs. Blanchard, Camile Mollère, Mrs. Eléanore Landry, and Miss Stéphanie Trahant. The heavy rains have made it very difficult to come to the church for the Jubilee.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 12mo. - {9}


1858 Dec. 6
O'Connor, Michael Bishop of Pittsburgh: Pittsburgh, (Pennsylvania)
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: Cincinnati, Ohio

O'Connor asks Purcell to give Father(Edward Purcell) the contents of his last note. He writes Purcell that he doesn't know what to do about the Hortina case. It would be best to justify it on acceptable principles for the people in the country. It is part of the system established at Rome. The Catholic Telegraph has made an issue of our taking children in our houses of refuge as become a subject of civilization before undertaking that of the Hortanas. Bishop (John) Timon gave him his views on the Roman (American)College but O'Connor is afraid the right kind of men will not be found to conduct it and the leaders will likely to dispute. In a former letter, O'Connor told Purcell of the mode of administering the diocese in case (Father Edward)Purcell accepted the office of coadjutor. O'Connor was advised by bishops not to make any such statements that would lead one to think he wanted to relinquish his administration. O'Connor still feels the same way but if Purcell has not communicated with his brother yet, to just let things take their ordinary course. If he has, the views here coincide with Purcell's own. O'Connor pledges that the brother of Purcell will have no interference.

II-4-n - A.LS. - 4pp. - 12mo. - {4}


1858 Dec.6

St. Vincent de Paul Society New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

A. Damarin, as secretary, invites Blanc to their General Meeting on the 12th.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - 1p. - 4to. - {2}


1858 Dec. 8
Deynoodt, Jos(ep)h: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Deynoodt gives permission to his mulatto Edouard Auguste to marry Clementine Duvergé, belonging to Rose Nicaud.

- A.D.S. -


 Attached to the above: 

1858 Dec. 8
Nézat, Rose: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Nézat gives permission to her servant Clémentine Duverger to marry Edouard Auguste.

- A.D.S. -


 On the same paper: 

1858 Dec. 8
Rousselon, Father E(tienne): (New Orleans, Louisiana)

This marriage was celebrated December 8, 1858. (Witnesses): Pauline Menier(?), Rose Nézat, Pierre.

- A.D.S. -


VI-1-o - A.D.S. - (French) - 3pp. - folio & 8vo. - {4}


(18)58 Dec. 8
Duplantier, G(uy): New Orleans, (Louisiana)

License is granted to Father Jourdan to marry Aristide Rivarde and Marie Magdaleine Chevalier.

VI-1-o - D.S. - 1p. - 32mo. - {2}


1858 Dec. 8
Legardeur, S.: New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Father E(tienne) Rousselon: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

A receipted bill for $16.30 for app(lication?) and entry per the Roger Stewart, permit on board Nuremberg, app(lication?) and entry per Badin, app(lication?) and entry per Ocean Romp, per New Hampshire.

VI-1-o - A. Bill S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {1}


1858 Dec.8
Lyons, Father C.B.: Dublin, (Ireland)
 to (Orestes A.) Brownson: New York, (New York)

Father Lyons thanks Brownson for the favorable notice of his "Catholic Psalmist" in the October number of the Review. He is sending a copy to Brownson by Father (Jeremiah W.) Cummings as a token of his gratitude and esteem for Brownson. He feels deeply indebted to whomever brought his work to Brownson's attention.

I-3-n - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {2}


1858 Dec.8
McMahon, Father G(eorge): Jackson, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Previous to McMahon's arrival here a donation was executed in (Blanc)'s favor by a Mrs. Meuse. She died last week. Some days before her death she revoked the will in behalf of a Mr. Todevin who has advertised the "Catholic property bought from Meuse" for sale in Clinton. 30 days are allowed for protest and 13 days have already elapsed. Old Mr. Crenan is sick and has not the legal power. Hardesty and Crenan of Clinton will make the necessary act for preserving the church property. McMahon's health is gradually returning; he intends to come to New Orleans after Christmas. The object is to have the protest recorded in time to prevent the alienation of the deed. P.S. The title of the Meuse property is in virtue of a deed of sale and recorded.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 8vo. - {6}


1858 Dec. 8
Siegrist, Father S(imon): Indianapolis, (Indiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Since January Siegrist has been in the German parish here. On his arrival he found the walls of the church unfinished; he has managed to get the building to the point where he could say Mass there. They are $5000 in debt and do not have $40 in the treasury. Needless to say there is no presbytery. The Germans who have remained faithful are poor and those who could help have lost the faith. Father (Anthony) Carius, when at Madison, used to visit Indianapolis; he and Siegrist were fellow students at Strasbourg College. Blanc's great charity has made Siegrist decide to write to him. The Bishop of Vincennes is absent but the Administrator of the diocese, Father (John) Corbe approves of Siegrist's step.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {5}


1858 Dec. 8
Starrs, Father W(illia)m V.G.S.: Director Anderson,: Henry Ja(me)s, Pres. Council of N. Y. Worth,: Edward P., Secretary: New York, (New York)
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: Cincinnati, Ohio

The General Council of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul finding that the American conferences are steadily increasing has in successive meetings in Paris expressed the desire that an Upper Council be organized for the United States with headquarters in New York. The society looks for the advice of the prelates of the dioceses to be included, with the consent of Archbishop (John Hughes), addressed itself to Purcell for his friendly direction. The bishops are asked to regard the erecting of the council with favor and to give it support. In the meantime the special council of New York will perform the duties of an upper council. A copy of the rules of the society is included.

II-4-n - L.S. - 1p. - 4to. - {3}


1858 Dec. 8
Worth, Edward P.: New York, (New York)
 to Archbishop Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

The Council General of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul, finding the American Conferences steadily on the increase has in meetings held in Paris, expressed a desire that an Upper Council be organised in the United States with its sittings in New York. They hope that Blanc will assist with his direction in this step. A copy of the Rules is herewith transmitted (no enclosure). Father W(illia)m Starrs signs as Director; Harry Ja(me)s Anderson as Pres(ident) of the N(ew) Y(ork) Coun(cil) and Worth signs as Secretary.

VI-1-o - L.S. - 1p. - 4to. - {4}


1858 Dec. 9
Mènard, Father Ch(arle)s M.: Thibodaux, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Mènard has bought the presbytery of St. Laurent Church, Chicahoula for $810 payable in three years. It is ready for a pastor; Mènard does not know how he will find the $270 due in March. The people are expecting a subscription to pay for their church indebted for around $300. The coming presence of a priest will help. The sale of Father (RénéM.) Pineau's property will pay his debts but there will not be much to send to his family. Mènard heard through Lemercier Duquesnay, brother of Father Duquesnay, that (Blanc) is now able to go to the chapel; he hopes (Blanc) will soon be entirely recovered.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 8vo. - {4}


1858 Dec. 10
Adams, L.: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Adams gives permission to his black girl Alfonsine to marry Henry belong(ing) to Mrs. Benamy Dupair.

VI-1-o - A.D.S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {1}


1858 Dec. 10
(Blanc), Ant(hony) Archbishop of N(ew) Orleans: N(ew) Orleans, Louisiana
 to (Archbishop John Purcell): of Cincinnati, Ohio

He cannot say he joined Purcell's diocesans in celebrating his Silver Jubilee, but he joined them in gratitude when he heard of it. The 4th of September last was the 25th anniversary of his administration of this diocese. He cannot yet walk with safety. He ventured out of his room and hopes to be able to pontificate Christmas. It is his intention to ask the Louisiana legislature to incorporate himself as Purcell has been incorporated by the Ohio legislature. His friends in both branches of the legislature say that if he can procure legal precedent for their action, they are sure to obtain it for him. He would like a copy of the printed journal of the Ohio legislature in which the bill was recorded. If Purcell cannot do so, if Purcell will let him know the year they might be able to find it in the State library of Louisiana since it is customary to exchange such things between states. He asks also if Purcell knows when such acts were adopted in favor of the Bishop of Philadelphia and the Archbishop of Baltimore. He has had that of the Bishop of Chicago, but has lost it. Two thirds of the churches and all the station-chapels are under his name. He understood that Purcell had been taxed $5,000 for the American College at Rome, and asks why. He hopes he will not be taxed as he cannot pay. He thinks the whole problem of the American College, and its administration should be referred to the next plenary Council lest the burden fall on a few.

II-4-n - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {2}


(18)58 Dec. 10
Mittelbronn, Father (Francis): Pointe Coupée, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Mittelbronn has received Blanc's letter of the 1st letting Mittelbronn know about Father (Hubert) Thirion's promise to settle by proxy with Mittelbronn and his brother. Up to now, Mr. Provosty has received nothing on this subject. Mittelbronn has found that Thirion does not keep his promise. He hopes that Blanc will hold Thirion to this decision and that Thirion will not leave until Blanc has sent this power of attorney to Provosty.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 12mo. - {3}


1858 Dec.11
Boglioli, C.M., Father C(harles): Donaldsonville, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Boglioli sends a letter from Mrs. T(homas) Pugh asking for help. Boglioli cannot answer without consulting (Blanc). (Blanc) is to tell him what to reply and whether in the case of this gentleman, a priest can receive the vow of marriage. (On the letter in another hand): Buysch.

- A.L.S. - (French) -


 Enclosure: 

1858 Nov. 27
Pugh, Mrs. Thomas: Assumption, (Louisiana)
 to Father Bouillioli: (Donaldsonville, Louisiana)

Mrs. Pugh has another daughter about to be married to a man of good principles. But like young Americans, he is not willing to go to a priest and make the required promises though he says he will never prevent the lady he expects to marry from performing her religious duties. Pugh suspects that he has talked to Doctor Ballard, an intimate friend of his. Is there any way that Pugh can have her daughter married by (Boglioli) or any Catholic priest who speaks English? The Episcopal minister, Reverend Fulton, is looking forward to marrying Mr. Ratliff to Pugh's daughter. The usual marriage fee in the Episcopal Church is $50. Pugh is among Protestants; she is writing unbeknown to her sons at home because all wish Fulton to marry their sister to Ratliff. The marriage may be in January or March.

- A.L.S. -


VI-1-o - A.L.S. - (French & English) - 5pp. - 4to. & 12mo. - {5}


1858 Dec. 11
Huard, Aug(uste): New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Huard gives his consent to the marriage of his servant Amélie Lassère to Alphonse Sabatier, the service to take place on the 13th.

- A.D.S. -


 Attached to the above: 

1858 Dec. 10
Sabatier, G.: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Permission is given to his servant Alfonse to marry on the day he chooses.

- A.D.S. -


 On the same paper: 

1858 Dec. 13
Rousselon, Father E(tienne): (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Rousselon married Alphonse and Amélie on December 13. (Signing with) Alphonse and Amélie: L. Henry Mathieu, R. Chichon (?) and Alphonse Mortimer.

- A.D.S. -


VI-1-o - A.D.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. & 12mo. - {7}


(1858) Dec. 12
Gockeln, S.J., Father F.W.:
St. Francis Xavier College (New York, New York)
 to (Orestes A. Brownson): (Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Father Gockeln writes to tell Brownson that last night at 10:25 Father (John) Larkin (S.J.) died suddenly.

I-3-n - A.L.S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {2}


1858 Dec. 13
(Elder), Bishop William Henry: Sulphur Springs, (Mississippi)
 to Archbishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Elder) has just received Blanc's letter of the 1st. He sees no strong reasons for or against the postponement of the Provincial Council till 1860. But he is rather in favor of 1859 because 3 years is the regular period and the want of time for testing former decrees does not seem a strong reason. How would it be towards the end of 1859? (Elder) is much pained to learn that Blanc is not yet able to walk. Blanc's letter reached (Elder) in Baltimore; he got a receipt for the Herald and Visitor and they promised to collect in N(ew) Orleans. (Elder) wrote to a friend in N(ew) York to pay the other bills. (Elder) has come to Sulphur Springs to hold his first ordination for a young man who has been entertained here for some months. The pastor of Yazoo is pressing (Elder) to go there and aid him in the Jubilee till next Sunday. (Elder)'s visit east was only tolerably satisfactory.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {1}


1858 Dec. 14
Adams Express: (New Orleans, Louisiana)
 to Father E(tienne) Rousselon: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Received from Rousselon one little bag of medicine addressed to Bishop A(madeus) Rappe of Cleveland, Ohio. (Signed by) M. Girau(?).

VI-1-o - D.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {3}


(18)58 Dec. 14
(Charbonnel), Bishop Armand F.M.: Toronto, (Canada)
 to Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

Humanly speaking, (Charbonnel) is very flattered by Blanc's offer. He would accept gladly if he would not succeed Blanc under ordinary provisions. To represent Blanc would be a great human comfort. In his first year (Charbonnel) asked for a coadjutor; he was refused three times. At the following provincial council he obtained two subdivisions of the diocese and he has just obtained the promise of a coadjutor, especially because of his insufficiency in English. It is up to (Charbonnel) to find one. He has been held up for 12 to 15 months by the work of decorating their cathedral. Blanc will see by this account that (Charbonnel) is unfit for a see such as Blanc's; if they had known (Charbonnel) well they never would have sent him where he is. When (Charbonnel) heard of Blanc's accident he wanted to write him; he did not expect to have the opportunity Blanc has just given him.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 8vo. - {2}


1858 Dec. 14
Lamy, Father George: Covington, L(ouisian)a
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, Louisiana)

For the good of the church at Bonfouca, Lamy submits the following names as trustees: 1. Anatole Cousin; 2. Etienne Cousin; 3. Adolphe Cousin; 4. Eugene Picheon(,); 5. Avenel Picheon, recommendable by their morality and position. At Bonfouca Lamy saw the young lady whom (Blanc) had placed at the home of Anatole Cousin; she seemed satisfied and adjusted easily to Creole customs. Lamy regrets that her mother cannot teach music and drawing; she could have been placed near the young lady at Mrs. Térence Cousin's. (Blanc) will be pleased to hear that the little difficulties Lamy had with the latter family are entirely forgotten. Father (Victor) Pivet's being too complacent in yielding to the wish Mrs. Terence had of baptizing her slaves at home had something to do with it. The Jubilee has been a success at Bonfouca and 50 persons have enrolled in the Association of the Propagation of the Faith. Lamy does not know whether he can continue the work (Blanc) assigned to him. Last week in going from Covington to Bonfouca, Lamy's horse, broke a leg and fell on him. Since then he has had pains which do not allow him to travel as he wishes. Since Mr. Roche's visit to (Blanc) and the 40 piastres he demanded from (Blanc) although he pocketed the money he collected for the repairs on the church, Roche has been continually drunk. His wife, mistreated, is becoming a little like him. Too late to spare (Blanc) the 100 piastres which he gave this man for them. Father Lesne and other priests have been their victims.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {10}


1858 Dec. 14
Lamy, Father George: Covington, (Louisiana)
 to Father E(tienne) Rousselon: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Rousselon is to add 7 groups (?) to the Propagation of the Faith for 1859 from St. Tammany parish. The expenditures for repairs on the church at Covington, on the presbytery, or the property of the archbishopric surpass the help that Rousselon recently gave Lamy. He has continued them, trying to lighten them and knowing that Rousselon would help him with the difference of 25 to 30 piastres in the estimate. Lamy acted in the hope of passing on to his successor in case he cannot continue, a suitable home, a repaired church, and a mission favorable to the priest. Recently, in going to Bonfouca for the Jubilee, his horse broke his leg and fell on Lamy leaving him with pains all over his body. Lamy left him at Bayou Lacombe where Father (Adrien) Rouquette was waiting for him. Lamy will abandon the missions he thinks it impossible to attend. The Jubilee has succeeded well; he had 57 Communions at Bonfouca. At Bayou Lacombe Rouquette had 19. Lamy will continue here and at Madisonville this week. He has been unable to establish service for Mandeville. There are so few there who come to church; they often go to the city and it is easy to come to Covington.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {6}


1858 Dec. 15
Desert, (M.H.C.), Sister Mary of the: Opelousas, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Sister thanks (Blanc) for his letter of the 9th; she hastened to read it to their Sisters (Marianites of the Holy Cross). Their three novices and she had been summoned to go to New Orleans for the profession in a letter written 3 days before (Blanc)'s. But their Sisters thought it impossible to leave the house as they wrote to their new Superior. They have need of (Blanc)'s concern. Father Superior is unfavorably disposed toward their house; they say he would be glad to see it destroyed. The novices are beginning their fourth year of novitiate and should make their profession. Not being able to go to the city, they should make it here. They put their trust in (Blanc); he is their first Superior.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {2}


1858 Dec. 15
(Fitzpatrick), Bishop (John B.): Boston, (Massachusetts)
 to O(restes) A. Brownson: (Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Bishop Fitzpatrick extends to Brownson and his wife his sympathy in the loss of their son, John Brownson and prays that God may sustain them in their grief by His grace. The lesson to learn from such sorrow is to withdraw our hearts more and more from the world and hold ourselves always ready for the coming of the Divine Judge.

I-3-n - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {2}


1858 Dec. 15
Georget, Father (Henry): Biloxi, (Mississippi)
 to Father (Stephen Rousselon: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Georget is much obliged to (Rousselon) for having his ciborium gilded. If it is ready, hé is to give it to Mrs. Come, the bearer of this letter. Georget would also be obliged if (Rousselon) would tell her where to get wax candles for the altar and candles for lighting.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 8vo. - {2}


1858 Dec. 15
Raymond, Father G(ilbert): Opelousas, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Raymond is back from Washington where they gave the Jubilee exercises. The Sisters (Marianites of the Holy Cross) thank (Blanc) for his letter and his kindness in talking to the new Provincial Superior in their favor. They hope it will put an end to their troubles. Father (Patrick Sheil, C.S.C.) Shiel will again be in, a bad humor because of a letter of recommendation which Raymond sent to the Superior and Sisters at Plaquemine to introduce Father (Francis) Follot. Raymond hopes that the new Mother will succeed in the present difficulty. The Sisters know so well the impossibility of leaving the house to make their profession. Is it their fault that three novices were sent for the three principal classes? Or their fault that the yellow fever and Shiel's absence prevented them from going to the city? Since they are not yet approved by the Pope, they are dependent on (Blanc). On the recommendation of Father (Basil Anthony) Moreau, (C.S.C.) they are to follow (Blanc)'s advice in everything. Father (Anthony) Beaugier has sold all his furniture and is ready to leave. Raymond had a long letter from Follot; he seems very satisfied. He asked for one of their horses; Raymond is going to send one. Raymond will spend tomorrow at Washington.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 8vo. - {7}


(18)58 Dec. 15
Schlatre, Michael Jr.: Bayou Jacob, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc: New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Schlatre gave the young man, Michael (Déal), to understand the wishes of his parents and he replied that he did not wish to return to France now; probably he may in April. He is doing well here but wishes to leave his employer and go to New Orleans. If he goes there he will lose himself. If he desires to return home he receives plenty of wages to do so. Father (Francis) Follot is getting along well; he preaches very well in English. He is at Schlatre's now to celebrate Mass for their people. They finished grinding a few days since and have a fine crop. Schlatre will introduce Follot into the Grosse Tete district. They will have a fair for the Convent about Christmas. P.S. Love to Father Perché.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - 1p. - folio - {3}


1858 Dec. 16
(St.) L(ouis) de G(onzaga, R.U.), Sister: Montpellier, (France)
 to Archbishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana

How good of Blanc to write to her in spite of his accident on September 18. She does not know how he bore the trip from Donaldsonville to New Orleans. She also sympathizes in sufferings caused by the epidemic. Father (James Mary August) Bonniot is still at Montpellier; she has seen him only twice. Bonniot was uncertain about his departure for New Orleans; now they may forecast that he has given it up. Father (Claude Anthony) Tholomier would like to have seen him. The Sister who takes his albs, etc. for laundering said that he said Mass at Notre Dame Church quite far from here. How can (St.) L(ouis) express her surprise and pain at the news of S.'s defection. Her notes revealed the uneasiness of her soul; (St.) L(ouis) had discerned that S.'s nationality took offense at the supervision, the severity. Blanc knows how Americans are. The person of whom Blanc speaks seemed to protect S. and during her nov(itiate) never ceased to enhance the merit of her two model nov(ices) S. and M. L------z. (St.) L(ouis)'s contacts with S. were rare; what will become of her now, surrounded by Protestants. The news makes Sister think of herself, how the hand of God sustained her, probably at the edge of the abyss. Sister is now very busy with 8 students for the piano, playing the organ, chanting, a lesson in English and a smattering of astronomy and physics to the novices and boarders. Vocations are becoming rare for cloistered and teaching orders. They have nearly 70 students, quite a number for the size of the town and the 15 or 20 boarding schools. Blanc says nothing about Father Rousselon; has he forgotten her? If Anais would finish her letter it would be a good New Year's gift; Sister does not forget her or Aimée and their family. Sister wants Blanc to continue his kindness to his exiled daughter. Father Cellier, arrived from Paris, shortly after Aunt Irma's letter, told his Ursulines that before leaving that city, they talked of what happened to Blanc. Cellier was also told about Father (Adrien) Rouguette and wanted to have a copy of the poetry he composed about Blanc's young assistant at the Archbishopric. This piece was sent to Sister by one of her former pupils, Uranie Malus. Sister goes back to S. for whom she had prepared some thoughts drawn from their retreat in September by Father Desjardins. Sister hopes to write to Blanc by Tholomier. For three weeks she has been troubled by a swelling of her left knee; the doctor thinks it is rheumatism. She has gained weight and looks 10 years younger; she will be 39 on January 2. Sister asks Blanc to be kind to her aunt Irma whose position is very sad. At the last news Louise had a fever caused by the flooding; Clotilde was still at Felicie's house and both, like Anais, promised letters. Sister did not believe her sisters could be so thoughtless; her young nieces scarcely know her. Here, she loves all her Sisters and their Mother even more, but she has memories.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - (French) - 6pp. - 4to. - {6}


1858 Dec. 16
Faust, A.L.: Carlisle, P(ennsylvani)a
 to (Orestes A.) Brownson: (Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Faust suggests that Brownson add a feature to his Review to be known as the Quarterly Table of Religious Intelligence, Modeled on the one in the Methodist Quarterly Review, but rather more American. If Brownson wishes to do this, Faust would be glad to write the contents for a fair remuneration.

I-3-n - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {2}


1858 Dec. 17
Lafayette French Parish: Lafayette, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

They have just learned that their families no longer have a place in the German church although each has furnished his share. They had been assigned to the 8 o'clock Mass and they were satisfied for a long time. But it is a long way and they often arrived late and tried to remain for the ten o'clock Mass for the Germans but were prevented by the ill will of the latter. But now it is no longer that; they do not want the Redemptorists to direct them. They beg (Blanc) to send them a priest of their own kind for their French church, Notre Daem de Bon Secours. They are certain they will have to wait but they are willing to do so if they can have one of their own rather than the Redemptorists who show all too well the nationality of their order. Their principal reason is that their children have need of following their religious duties. First Communion has been put off to 1860. Their church is almost finished. There are two large rooms and once installed their priest will never have to complain that they let him starve, as the Redemptorists say. The Father Superior has borrowed 5000 piastres to pay all the debts and finish the church. But if they are left 3 or 4 months without a priest, the interest will accumulate and the debt grow. (Blanc) is to let them know his decision through the Redemptorist Superior to whom they have sent a letter asking him to give over his place. They believe it would not be easy, for him to procure a French priest as their order is all German. (P.S.) They ask for a priest with experience.

VI-1-o - L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {3}


1858 Dec. 17
(Portier), Bishop Michael: Mobile, (Alabama)
 to Archbishop A(nthony) Blanc: N(ew) Or(leans, Louisiana)

Thirty-two years ago on this date, (Portier) took possession of his see or rather his vicariate. He leaves the date of their Council up to Blanc. Dr. Romer advises (Portier) to take a trip to Europe to get rid of some light symptoms of dropsy. (Portier) needs to renew his clergy and to have a coadjutor. He plans to leave toward the end of May.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 8vo. - {2}


1858 Dec. 18
F(itzpatrick) J(ohn) B.: Bishop of Boston: Boston, (Massachusetts)
 to O(restes) A. Brownson: (Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Brownson's letter afforded Fitzpatrick more relief than Fitzpatrick's could give Brownson. They all ask to be saved from a sudden and unprovided death, but if saved from the unprovided, the sudden is of no consequence. Fitzpatrick was afraid that poor John (H. Brownson) might have neglected his Christian duties. He was not, however, a man to trifle with the Sacraments, and the fact that he had been to confession two days before furnishes us motives for hope of his salvation. This is the most we can have in any case. There is no need of a thesis to prove (John's) death was not a suicide; and no man unless a furious maniac could have adopted a mode so fearful to rid himself of life. The supposition should be set aside as an absurdity.

I-4-g - A.L.S. (Photostat, Odiorne collection) - 1p. - 8vo. - {2}


1858 Dec. 18
Van Beveren, Jean: Point à la Hache, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Van Beveren understands from Father (Auguste Barthelemy) Langlois that (Blanc) was surprised by the studying that Van Beveren has been doing. Van Beveren did not begin to learn Latin at St. Mary's College. He had gone to college for 6 years in Belgium. But he lost his parents and there were several children for a small farm so his inheritance was not large enough to continue. Several years later he went to America. At first he had difficulties and then he heard that a large farm belonged to St. Mary's College. He went there and found that they needed someone. He had worked several months when the president began to enroll his servants for the next year. Van Beveren told the president that he had studied in Belgium and now that he had earned some money he would like to continue his studies. He joined the highest classes in Latin and other branches; the most important points of philosophy were also explained to them. A priest told him that the Catechism was the best philosophy. Since it is Van Beveren's intention to work in the vineyard of the Lord, he will try to be useful as soon as possible. He is able to assist Langlois, he submits to (Blanc)'s judgment.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - folio - {2}


(18)58 Dec. 19
Kaiser, Andreas: Baton Rouge,(Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Some time since, Kaiser wrote to Germany, his native country, for his cousin Mary Ekert, aged 30, for the purpose of marrying her. She agreed and Kaiser furnished the means of her traveling and she arrived here not long since. He applied to their parish priest and he refused to marry them because they are cousins and referred them to (Blanc). She has no means to return home. Must they go to the Justice of the Peace to get married?

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - 1p. - 4to. - {2}


1858 Dec. 20
Blache, Célina: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Blanche received from Father (Stephen) Rousselon 12 piastres for one month's hire of her slave Zoé.

VI-1-o - A. Receipt S. - (French) - 1p. - 16mo. - {1}


1858 Dec. 20
Chénal, Father H.J.: Louisville, (Kentucky)
 to Archbishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

If Blanc could see Chénal's burning desire to work in his vineyard, he would call him to be among his priests. Blanc knows Chénal's sad position. His papers are in perfect order and if he had the money to get his trunks which contain them he would already have left to place himself at Blanc's feet. Without shelter or food and far from his family, he hopes Blanc will not abandon him. P.S. If Blanc refuses his plea, Chénal asks him not to refuse him the means to return to France where he has an assured position.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {1}


1858 Dec. 21
(Delebecque), Louis Joseph, Bishop of: Ghent, (Belgium)
 to Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefevere: Detroit, (Michigan)

Delebecque sends Lefevere the final dimissory letters of Fathers (Edward) Joos and (John) DeNeve. He received the letter of Lefevere and Bishop (Martin John Spalding) of Louisville dated October 27 with the notice of the American College at Louvain published in a Catholic paper in the United States. He has had it translated into French and published in the "Bien Public" of Ghent. (Father Peter) Kindekens has told him that he has adopted the rule of the Seminary of Mechlin with some small modification and that he has given the office of Vice-Rector or Spiritual Director to a Luxemburg priest trained at the preparatory seminary at Mechlin. Delebecque replied that he could try it but that he would do better to submit his rule to the approbation of the Belgian episcopacy. Kindekens agreed. As to the Spiritual Director it will be seen at the end of the school year whether he should continue or be replaced by Father Dumont or another. Cardinal (Nicholas) Wiseman has just founded a College for the English missions at Bruges. Only in case of a lack of English students will those of Flanders be admitted. The number of students is kept at 25 and a rich English nobleman bears all expenses. It seems that the founding of the American University at Louvain gave the idea to the English bishops and benefactor. Lefevere is no doubt disturbed about the political state of Belgium. They have been tried by the abuse of the liberty of the press but clergy and religious organizations were never more fervent. It is true that except at Louvain, university education is bad but the Catholic University and Jesuit Colleges of Namur and Ghent have more students than the three other universities together. Ghent had 9 last year and 11 this year while Louvain has 120. In the humanities in his diocese, among 3000 students, the ecclesiastical schools have 2300. It is the same in Bruges. Primary schools are still Catholic, that is, non-rationalist, even those of the government. They are threatened with a change in the Law of 1842. The teachers are good. Lefevere is to show the Bishop of Louisville the part of the letter concerning the American College at Louvain.

III-2-i - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 8vo. - {8}


1858 Dec. 21
Maréchaux, Father A(ugustine): Assumption, (Louisiana)
 to Father (Stephen Rousselon: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Maréchaux sends $66 for the Propagation of the Faith, $12 for the Holy Childhood and $5 for two dispensations. Maréchaux will bring the collection for the seminary, taken on Christmas day, in January. The harvest, bad weather and bad roads presented an obstacle for the Jubilee. The three last days have been fine; 200 have gone to Confession. He sends respects to the Archbishop for whom he wishes a prompt recovery.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {2}


1858 Dec. 22
Brownson, Orestes A.: New York, (New York)
 to Victor Cousin: Paris, France

Since he last wrote, many changes have come over him. He has resumed his study of philosophy during the last nine years. In the next number of his review he has an article called Primitive Elements of Thought. Cousin will find less difference between himself and Brownson than it appears at first sight. He starts with Cousin's own analysis of thought, subject, object, and their relation. He shows that the object is real being and that the relation is the creative act of being. This substitutes syntheisism for eclecticism. Without Cousin's labors, Brownson would never have been able even with the aid of Gioberti to have obtained the formula he insists on as the primum philosophicum. Brownson has two objections to Cousin's philosophy: 1. in distinguishing being idea and being, the Word and God; 2. in regarding being as being only in so much as it is cause. Cousin falls into these mistakes by not keeping in mind his own distinction between intuition and reflection. Brownson has spoken frankly but not without profound respect. He has been greatly interested in many things of M. Saisset. Brownson is a firm Catholic but he honors all who devote themselves to the cause of truth.

I-4-h5pp. - 8vo. - {1}


 Photostat and Typed copy (Bibl. de M. Cousin, Sorbonne) 

1858 Dec. 22
Brownson, William I.: La Crosse, Wis(consin)
 to Orestes A. Brownson: (Elizabeth, New Jersey)

William is returning from St. Paul after gathering all the information on the death of John (H. Brownson). All the testimony that he could hunt up only corroborates the facts expressed in the papers concerning the cause and manner of the death. When John was carried up from the place where he fell and washed, everyone considered him asleep and looked as though he would soon awake. A happy smile was on his face. He was not mangled. There was not a bone broken in his body. John must be happy for he had an unmistakable presentiment of his fate. John feared that death would result from sleeping in his office and that he was determined to prepare himself and keep prepared for eternity. William has attended to John's affairs successfully, having sold most of the furniture and what books William could not bring he has left in safe custody. His clothes and other personal articles William will bring with him. William has two locks of John's hair that he will carry instead of trusting them to the mail. William was to John's grave, his coffin is the best that can be made in that country. William paid $30 for it, and it will cost $6 for it if the remains are to be carried to New York.

P.S.--William is happy to add that John was buried in a worthy manner and nothing that could be desired in the preparations was omitted. (At the top of the first page of this letter appears, "the number of John's grave is St. Paul was (74))

I-4-g - A.L.S. (Photostat, Odiorne collection) - 4pp. - 12mo. - {2}


(18)58 Dec. 22
(Martin), Bishop Aug(uste) M(ar)ie: Natchitoches, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Desiring to celebrate Epiphany here, (Martin) will leave between the 9th and 12th and hopes to be with (Blanc) on the 15th, to spend 3 or 4 days. A dozen years ago Bishop (Benedict Joseph) Flaget said "I believed I would weave a crown of flowers for my old age but God has permitted the flowers to turn to thorns." Is it not thus with (Blanc)? Many bishops have been saints but it has pleased God to sanctify them further.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 12mo. - {2}


(18)58 Dec. 23
Guinand, R.S.C., Madame A(dine): Natchitoches, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Many times her heart has urged Guinand to write but she feared to be indiscreet knowing (Blanc)'s work and trials. They have prayed for him. Most of (Blanc)'s daughters at Natchitoches are doubly his: Mothers Boudreau, (R.S.C.J.), (Isabelle) Dubreuil, (R.S.C.J.), Doyle, (R.S.C.J.), Stegur, (R.S.C.J.), Poursine, (R.S.C.J.), Sister Thériost, (R.S.C.J.) and herself. They have 43 pupils and 4 day scholars. In the Community (Religious of the Sacred Heart) there are 16, 10 choir Sisters and 6 Sisters. The difficulties in the Community are disappearing; union being restored. They are no longer in 1853-54. Then simplicity was a virtue; today it seems a crime. Fortunately Guinand saw it at Lyons and Paris and here in the past. Their pastor visits them from time to time; his health is better. He has his crosses and just now the president of the College is talking about him. (P.S.) Guinand's mother, through her brother, has asked her to return or make a trip to France but not to return to America. Her brother was to consult with the Mother General about it. Guinand has no desire to see her family. But she is tempted to not interfere: 1. to be out of the superiorship; 2. to reveal to the Mother General all she knows.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {8}


1858 Dec. 23
Hubert, S.J., Father D(arius): Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Hubert has decided to remain completely passive, not wishing to incur the blame of his Superior. Father (Richard B.) Hardey arrived; Hubert did not think that Hardey would be the man needed here. He did not impress the people favorably. Hardey left a note saying that (Blanc) had seen Hubert's Superior who wished Hubert to stay here for the present. Hubert received a letter from Father (Aloysius) Curioz, (S.J.) who seems not to know that Hardey is no longer here. What a painful year of inactivity! He does not want to have Curioz think that he wants to stay here. With his poor health he would like a little more rest. But if he left it would be costly for the schools which would close and (Mathilde) Victor's Academy would fail. Some interval seems necessary between Hardey's departure and the sending of another pastor. Curioz seems to need Brother Corne(?. S.J.?) for Grand Coteau. Hubert could dispense with the latter's services and get an altar boy who would do the essentials. P.S. Their church is going forward but yesterday the workmen had to stop for lack of cement. During the Jubilee there was $31.50 in the collection box; this will help with the schools. They are under the direction of Miss Victor. Should Hubert send back the two teachers who arrived from Cincinnati? If only Victor could be helped with the payments on her establishment.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {6}


(18)58 Dec. 23
Martha, (S.C.), Sister: (Emmitsburg, Maryland)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Sister wishes (Blanc) a happy New Year with all the affection of a southern heart. Every time since (Blanc)'s indisposition that their Mother has news of New Orleans, and (Blanc) is not mentioned, the writer gets a good scolding. A Dutchman employed here came with his German paper saying that his Bishop was dead. A German Sister translated the paper and found that it was only the state report of (Blanc)'s accident.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {1}


1858 Dec. 23
Mènard, Father Cha(rle)s M.: Thibodaux, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop Ant(hony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Last Thursday, Mènard was taking the train to Bayou Boeuf, when he saw Father (Justin) Claris getting off the same train to go to Thibodaux. Mènard invited Claris to accompany him. Mènard introduced him to the people of Bayou Boeuf. They returned that evening to Thibodaux. Yesterday Claris left for Bayou Boeuf intending to stay until Saturday evening when he would go to Chicahoula to say Mass on Sunday. Then he planned to go to the Bay. Then he will decide to accept or refuse these missions. However, Mènard thinks it will be difficult for a man of Claris' age to serve these missions; Mènard prays for his installation. Claris will find the two churches have all the necessities for Mass. At Bayou Boeuf there is a chalice, ciborium, vestment and some linens. At Chicahoula there is a vestment, belonging to St. Joseph Church but they can use it. Mènard sent the holy oils which Father Pineau had. Claris talked of 5 vestments, a cope, ostensorium, processional cross, etc. which would not be found in churches which have been only stations. Mènard asks (Blanc) to renew the privilege of binating. Mènard's cross is his sister. He learned that one of her children was living at Thibodaux. She came here to enter the Protestant boarding school but not having succeeded she planned to go to the public school. The mother took her out of the convent and spoke to many, even the Sisters, about pulling(?) her children's hair. Mother Thérèse had offered last year to take one of the children free as a boarder. Mother Thérèse who lives in the city can tell of the embarrassment of the Sisters here with the three children. Mènard's sister's behavior is a real mystery; it seems to be a diabolical obsession.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {4}


1858 Dec. 23
O'Brien, M.W.: Chicago, Ill(inois)
 to O(restes)A. Brownson: (Elizabeth, New Jersey)

The Corresponding Secretary of the "Chicago Catholic Institute" inquires if Brownson can lecture before them on his western trip this coming winter. Perhaps he can visit Chicago in his journey to St. Louis in January.

I-3-n - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {1}


1858 Dec. 23
Ruland, C.SS.R., Father G(eorge): Baltimore, (Maryland)
 to Bishop P(eter) P(aul) Lefevere: Detroit, Mich(igan)

He acknowledges a communication, received Sept. 30, a copy of a letter from the Cardinal Prefect (of Propaganda, Alexander Barnabo) to the Superior General (Nicholas Mauron) of the Redemptorists with reference to Monroe and Detroit, containing, in substance, all the points contained in Lefevere's communication to Propaganda but did nothing about it, since Lefevere had made the appeal, and would be expected to take the first steps for its final settlement. As the Redemptorists cannot return to Monroe, no alternative is left them but that of paying a certain sum, the Sacred Congregation's condition of freeing them from returning to Monroe, unless the arbitrator (Archbishop of Baltimore, Francis Patrick Kenrick) named by the Sacred Congregation, is of the opinion that Monroe has already cost them "too dear", and that justice cannot require of them a still greater loss, but should rather indemnify them. Ruland encloses an extract of the account books from 1845 to 1854 to prove the sacrifices they made for Monroe. His predecessor, Father Bernard (Hafkenscheid) paid off over $2,000 of debts yet now $600 are demanded. He mentions Father (Louis) Gillet, Father (James) Poirier, Father ( ) Schaeffer. (A few marginal notes of Lefevere's in pencil are in these pages).

III-2-i - A.L.S. - 8pp. - 12mo. - {11}


1858 Dec. 24
Gaillenton, V(alérien): New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Archbishop (Anthony Blanc) is to give the bearer of this note the 200 francs sent by Father Boué, pastor of Ainay.

VI-1-o - A. Note S. - (French) - 1p. - 16mo. - {2}


(18)58 Dec. 24
Jouve, R.S.C., Mother Al.: Grand Coteau, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

They pray for (Blanc)'s complete recovery from his accident and to efface the trails of the last months. They hope to see him each autumn at Grand Coteau. At the beginning of February Jouve will be away on a trip which will end in Paris where there will be a general council. Mother (Victoria) Martinez, (R.S.C.J.) will replace Jouve during her absence and Madame E(urgénie) Freret, (R.S.C.J.) will help her with the boarding school and in the administration of the novitiate which is reduced to 2 novices. But Jouve counts on taking from among their young ones to help at St. Michael where there is much more to do than here.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {3}


1858 Dec. 24
Kleinpeter, Josiah: Daton Rouge, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

As president of the Board of Control of the Louisiana Penitentiary, Kleinpeter writes of the case of a negro convict with whom Father (Hector) Figari, (C.M.) is somewhat connected. As they understand it, the boy Abraham (Maurin) and his mother were the property of Madame Maurin, a f(ree) w(oman of) c(olor) of the Parish of Natchitoches. Maurin passed a bill of sale to a certain party on condition that the boy be freed after attaining a certain age. The estate of this party was sold at public sale at which Figari purchased the mother and boy. Before the boy arrived at the age of freedom he rendered himself amenable to the law and was sent to the state prison. He has served out his term here and a year over. They have no authority to discharge him. Nothing but an order from Figari can release the boy. If the facts are not correct, they would like Figari to give a correct statement. If it appears that Figari does not own the boy and no one else orders his release, he becomes the subject of legislative action. As their annual report is soon to be laid before the Legislature they wish to have the facts.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {5}


1858 Dec. 24
Linebaugh, John H.: Havana, Alabama
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Linebaugh wants a very brief sketch of the late Father Antoine (de Sedella, O.M. Cap.) Linebaugh would also like to know the name of the street upon which the date palm grows that (Sedella) is said to have planted. Also was Dr. (William Louis) Du Bourg bishop of New Orleans in 1818? Linebaugh would also like a book on New Orleans as it was 40 years ago. No improper use is intended of the information sought. Is Col(onel) Hickey of Hope Estate still living?

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {5}


1858 Dec. 24
Purcell, Archbishop J(ohn) B(aptist): Cin(cinnati, Ohio)
 to Archbishop Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Purcell thanks God for Blanc's rapid recovery. Purcell has been roughing it over the wildest parts of Ohio until the 23rd. He has not been able to find the documents Blanc speaks of but he will request Father D(avid) Whelan, his secretary, to look for and forward to Blanc as many as they can find. (Continued on) Dec(ember) 28: Purcell had to leave on Christmas Day after singing two High Masses and admitting four Sisters of the Good Shepherd to the habit to go 70 miles to dedicate a church on St. Stephen's day. How can Purcell thank Blanc for his wishes on the occasion of Purcell's 25th anniversary of consecration. Purcell taxed himself for the $5000 for the American College in Rome. The Cardinal seems to think the Sacred Congregation will grant this diocese some privileges - a bourse or two perhaps. There seems to be a great diversity of opinion as to its future government. Bishop (John) Timon inclines to have it directed by Sulpitians or Lazarists. Purcell is not of the opinion that it should be under the direction of any religious community any more than the English, Irish, Belgian on Prop(aganda) Colleges. (Father Edward Purcell) has declined the coadjutorship of Pittsburgh. Bishop O'Connor intimates that he may be compelled to accept. Purcell does not think so. A young man, M. Cushing a Kentuckian whose family, except himself, have joined the Catholic Church, may hand this to Blanc. Blanc is to help him, by a word of advice, into the Church.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {7}


1858 Dec. 24
Thèves, Father A(nthony): Malone, (New York)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

It has been almost a year since Thèves has had news of (Blanc). Although he has found in Bishop (John) McCloskey more kindness and more justice, Thèves has never ceased to love (Blanc) as a father. McCloskey reclaimed Thèves' reputation before Bishop (Martin John) Spalding who had brought from his last trip to New Orleans, everything which Father (Napoleon Josèph) Perché's hate had invented against Thèves. Today Thèves is pastor of a fine parish after a glorious assistantship at the Cathedral of Albany. He is content and happy.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 12mo. - {4}


1858 Dec. 25
Brownson, W(illia)m: St. Louis (Missouri)
 to Orestes A. Brownson: (Elizabeth, New Jersey)

William just arrived in St. Louis. He has just been to St. Paul to gather all the possible testimony relating to the particulars of John's death. On the Thursday previous to his death and until two days before his death John was at the church seeking his confessor every evening, but did not see him until two days before his death. John's confessor told William that John died in the grace of God. John for two weeks previous to his death, had told friends how much he was afraid to sleep in his office. He seemed to have a very strong presentiment that some accident would befall him. (Here there are three pages missing.) John seemed as if he was about to speak to somebody. This fact might have merit in determining whether his last moments were of consciousness or not. John was in remarkably good spirits for some two weeks before his death. Business was better and he had some money. William went to his grave, took the number, 74. The moment could never be erased from William's memory, how sad and meloncholy it looked. William is exhausted, for two weeks he has not changed his clothes. William arranged John's affairs and paid the funeral expenses. Everything together cost about $200. There never was such a funeral in St. Paul, except the Bishop's, nobody did business and sorrow was depicted on every countenance. William believes his life was saved by a miracle when an accident occurred on Lake Pepin. William sends two locks of John's hair, cut off on December 2th.

I-4-g - A.L.S.(Photostat, Odiorne collection) - 3pp. - 8vo. - {2}


1858 Dec. 25
Tasset, Father Fr(ancis): Houma, (Louisiana)
 to Father (Stephen Rousselon: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Isn't it possible to have an ordo this year? Tasset would like to send an icy remark to Father Perché or to Mr. Méridier. Perché said the ordos were at Mér(idier)'s priced at 50 cents. Tasset wrote to send him one but he received no reply. Do they think that Tasset can make a trip to the city to bring them 4 escalins. It is absurd!

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {1}


1858 Dec. 26
Kenna, Mrs. J. P.: St. Paul, (Minnesota)
 to Sarah M. Brownson: (Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Mrs. Kenna would have written sooner but William (Brownson), who was in St. Paul, said that he would visit Sarah and asked Mrs. Kenna not to write. Mrs. Kenna fears he might fail to visit and she wants Sarah to know that both she and Mr. Kenna could not miss John (H. Brownson) more even if he were their brother. John went to confession the Wednesday before his death. John had accepted an invitation from the Kenna's to spend Christmas with them. John was dead when found. Mr. Kenna said that he looked well in death for he had a happy smile on his face and was not disfigured. His physician said he must have fallen in his sleep. John was buried from his own rooms. He was carried to the church and his remains received a great deal of respect. William has John's scapular. Mr. Kenna cut off a lock of John's hair for his mother, which William took when he intended to go to N(ew) Y(ork). P.S. John had on all his clothes when he was found, except his overcoat and shawl.

I-4-g - A.L.S. Photostat, Odiorne collection) - 3pp. - 12mo. - {3}


(18)58 Dec. 26
Otis, Susan S.: Chelsea, (Massachusetts)
 to (Orestes A. Brownson): (Elizabeth, New Jersey)

She extends her sincere condolences on the death of John (H.) Brownson. He was the favorite of all the sons with Otes because of his even temper and kindness. He had that large generous furnishing which is so characteristic of his father. Often he seemed like his father in conversation. The sudden death of a loved one in the glory and strength of his mature manhood calls loudly upon God for grace to bear the trial. She prays that it may come, and peace and solace with it. She writes this to let the Brownsons know that in the town in which they recently resided (Chelsea), there are some who feel earnest sympathy for the Brownsons. She knows that for poor Sarah, this is the darkest hour she has known, because John was her favorite brother.

I-4-g - A.L.S. (Photostat, Odiorne collection) - 6pp. - 12mo. - {2}


(18)58 Dec. 26
St. Stanislaus, R.U., Sister Mary of: Galveston, Texas
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

St. Stanislaus received the answer to her letter; she hopes that (Blanc) is entirely recovered from his accident. Since she has been in America St. Stanislaus has never been so near this terrible epidemic. She attended many victims but only two died. Their community is well; their boarders have not yet all returned. At present they have 26; their day scholars number considerably more. All sent best wishes for the new year.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {2}


1858 Dec. 27
Brownson, O(restes) A.: New York, (New York)
 to (Count Charles de Montalembert: France)

Montalembert must permit Brownson to congratulate him on having been found worthy to suffer government prosecution for his fidelity to the cause of political and religious liberty. Brownson's forthcoming Review, if permitted entrance to France, will tell him the construction he has put on the prosecution and his indignation is stronger against Louis Veuillot than against the Imperial government. Instead of using his influence to restrain the clergy in their reaction against democracy which was so decided in 1851 he has seized upon it and pushed it to the farthest extremes possible. The clergy can rule the future only by commanding free intelligences. It is idle to think that they can extinguish the aspiration after freedom. Henceforth the Church must place its faith in free men. Brownson may be wrong but he thinks that the Church is trying to render middle ground between Caesarism and Red Republicanism intenable and compel Catholics to arrange themselves on the side of the former as the lesser of two evils. The clergy cannot succeed in this. Brownson regrets the change that has come over the Catholic mind. In 1848 they did their best to prevent hot-headed men from treating democracy as a Catholic dogma but now they have to labor even harder to prevent them from committing the Catholics to the cause of despotism. Brownson is not aware of a single American Catholic journal that has expressed any sympathy for Montalembert in his prosecution by the government. Frightened by the know-nothing movement the majority of American clergy are deeply hostile to American institutions and by their measures are justifying the charges of Know-nothings. The design of the movement in behalf of Catholic schools is a movement to train up our children in anti-American sentiments, to perpetuate low and servile sentiments generated by despotism and keep the population a foreign colony. The Irish party is strong, the Catholic party counts for nothing. The distinction between Catholic and non-Catholics is Catholic or Irish and American. The term Native American is used in reproach, yet one half of the Catholic population has been born in America. The clergy fear on the part of the layman, his intelligence, a free independent manly spirit. We have fearfully changed in the last ten years. Ireland wastes her strength in petty quarrels. Catholic England produces only gossip like the last book of Cardinal Wiseman and in France only those speak who speak in favor of Caesarism. This cannot last, the clergy overrate the power and the ductility of the human race. Despotism, he says will not stand. It is almost too late and with Louis Veuillot leading the Catholics he sees little that can be done. Brownson is not an enemy of the Emperor and would not ask for a republic in France but the Emperor can maintain himself only by soliciting the free intelligences of his Empire. The worst constitution he can think of is an emperor and a mob with no mediating institutions between them. Brownson is sure that their religion has far more to fear from despotism than from liberty and that their losses are not from republicanism but from the previous despotism. Unless the clergy cut loose from the governments and stand on the side of freedom they will never see the nation Catholic again. But all things will mend, God has not abandoned his Church. After chastisement the Catholics will be purified. Brownson asks that Montalembert come and visit the United States, where his presence would do an infinite amount of good.

I-4-h - Typed copy with duplicate from Archives du Chateau d'Ecotay - 4pp. - 4to. - {2}


1858 Dec. 27(?)
Cauvin, Father D. André: Natchitoches, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Last night, the 28th, Cauvin returned to Natchitoches from his tour since October 11, interrupted only by the clergy retreat. This morning Madame (Adine) Guinand, (R.S.C.J.) gave Cauvin (Blanc)'s two letters, one dated December 1 and the other the 16th. Cauvin will settle his affairs and leave for (Blanc)'s diocese as soon as possible. He had proposed that the Catholics of the west of the diocese build a small church and Cauvin had subscribed 60(?) piastres for it. He had also contracted to help the parents to pay for several poor girls at the convent. If he does not have enough money to settle his debts he will sell his horse and anything else he needs to. He asks (Blanc) to consider him under his orders; he will go wherever (Blanc) sends him. At the moment he can preach only in French, Spanish and Italian. With time he hopes to do something in English.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 16mo. - {2}


1858 Dec. 27
S., Emile: New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Father (Stephen) Rousselon: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

S. has just learned that on several occasions Rousselon has helped Mrs. P. Hoa by his advice. Mrs. Hoa has a servant by whom S. has two children, one of whom is free. The poor woman had been absent for a week for fear of unmerited punishment; the trouble was with her "petit-maitre" who was intoxicated and who was persuaded that the servant had insulted him and wanted to take her to jail. Frightened by this she stole away and Rousselon was consulted about what was to be done about her. The servant returned in response to a letter addressed to Mrs. B. Lacoste who urged her to return and nothing would be done to her. Nothing was done to her personally but Mrs. Hoa had sent her daughter to the neighborhood where the free child was, The mother had, through S., paid 300 piastres for the child at the age of 2 years. Mrs. Hoa declared that neither the servant or her children could return to claim any rights, that the child was free, only she demanded that the child not stay at her house. The child was placed the same day with a good woman of color for 10 piastres a month which S. paid up to August 10. The child was sick twice and Dr. Rencé thinking that she belonged to Mrs. Hoa, sent Hoa the bill which she refused to pay saying that the child was free. The doctor, more charitable, cancelled the debt. As S. said before, she sent her daughter to look for the child, take her to her house, cut her hair and hold her as a slave; all this to take revenge on the mother! S. asks Rousselon to free this innocent child who is only 4. It will be a means of restoring tranquility to her mother, who is about to commit a crime. She is pregnant and wishes to destroy her child.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {4}


1858 Dec. 28
Fusélier, G.L.: Charenton, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Fusélier is happy to have news of (Blanc)'s health from (Blanc) himself. Fusélier hopes that soon (Blanc) will resume his usual activities and that they will see him on his episcopal visit. During the epidemic they heard through Father Francais that Father (Paul) Guérard had died. Later they heard that it was another person of the same name. They are still in doubt. (At the bottom of the letter): Constant Carlin, Paris.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {3}


1858 Dec. 28
Halpin, Martin Welch, John Leyden, Francis: Detroit, Michigan

This is a copy of the article of agreement of a society, called the Detroit Catholic Guild of Saints Peter and Paul. The Corporation shall continue for 30 years with its office in Detroit; it will assist members, especially widows, orphaned children of deceased members, residing in Michigan, and suffering from disease, infirmity or necessity. 20 trustees shall manage the affairs of said Corporation. The regular offices shall be chosen by the members, a Board of Councillors shall be chosen, one for and from each ward of Detroit. The annual meeting on the second Monday in July. Members must be at least 20 years old and not more than 50, and free of chronic diseases. A candidate must be proposed and seconded by 2 members. In balloting, if he received no more than 6 black balls he is elected.

III-2-i - A.D.S. - 4pp. - folio - {1}


1858 Dec. 28
Raymond, Father G(ilbert): Opelousas, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Raymond has just returned from a sick call after a trip of 40 miles. As soon as he received (Blanc)'s letter, Raymond wrote to Father (Anthony) Beaugier to tell him that his faculties expire at the end of this month. The rumors about Beaugier are no doubt exaggerated; Raymond believes that to repair the damage at Ville Platte it would take a pious and disinterested priest. Raymond does not know if the leading people of Ville Platte are willing to furnish lodging to a new pastor. Raymond will try to come to New Orleans shortly. Raymond sent $250 to Father (Basil Anthony) Moreau, (C.S.C.) for the trip of two Brothers whom Moreau promised from France. Moreau wrote to send him more money. Raymond will send $100 or $150 to Father Rousselon to buy a draft to be sent. Raymond will also send the money of the Propagation of the Faith for the Jubilee. Raymond is happy to learn that (Blanc)'s leg is better. What a good father Father (Louis Regis) Deluol has always been to Raymond. His career ended on earth to begin in heaven. All four Sisters (Marianites of Holy Cross) are going to the city; it could not help but dispel some of the prejudices of certain persons at New Orleans. The children are desolate; rumor is that they will leave if the Sisters are changed. Some 8 or 10 have left while waiting for the Sisters to return. They fear that Sister St. Sebastien, (M.H.C.) will not be kept; this would be a mortal blow to the house. Raymond asks (Blanc) to intervene.

- A.L.S. -


 On the same paper: 

1858 Jan. (?) 23
Raymond, Father G(ilbert): Opelousas, (Louisiana)
 to Father (Anthony) Beaugier: (Ville Platte, Louisiana)

Copy. Several days ago Raymond received a letter from the Archbishop saying that Beaugier was to leave Ville Platte on December 1 and that Raymond was to attend it temporarily. Raymond has just received a second letter expressing his surprise that Beaugier was still there and asking Raymond to tell Beaugier that all his faculties for this parish would cease the last day of this month. Raymond wrote Beaugier a long time ago about the regulations for burials and marriages; Beaugier did not reply. Raymond sends his respects to Beaugier's cousin.

(P.S.) To the Archbishop - Raymond is in a hurry; he has to go to Washington again for a funeral.

- A. Copy -


VI-1-o - A.L.S., A. Copy - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {7}


1858 Dec. 29
Elder, Bishop William Henry: Natchez, (Mississippi)
 to Archbishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Enclosed Blanc will find receipts for Brownson's Review and the N(ew) York Tablet with authority to pay to O'Donnell. If Blanc does not have the receipt for the Philadelphia Herald, Elder will hunt it out. The trustees have negotiated a sale of the site of the old Catholic church in Commerce St(reet). They have been waiting for Elder's signature; he has never received any authority from Rome to sell it. He asked it from the Cardinal seventeen months ago and again last summer. Elder thought he might sanction it: 1. he does not see any service of the lot to the Church; the price of $3500 is very much needed for the Cathedral; 2. the legal title is not in the Bishop but in the trustees; Elder's place as a trustee depends on the votes of the congregation; 3. he thinks the church was not consecrated; he is told it was a frame building and even had stores in it. In so delicate a matter where Elder's consecration oath is in question, he feels afraid to act on his own judgment. If Blanc's judgment approves, Elder will sign the deed. The lot fronts on the street but is completely shut in so it is of little use except to the owner of the property around it and he is the purchaser. Elder is happy to hear of Blanc's improvement. Elder answered Blanc's letter about the Council from Sulphur Springs.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - 6pp. - 4to., 16mo., 32mo. - {2}


1858 Dec. 29
McFaul, Father Michael: Mobile, (Alabama)
 to Father (Stephen Rousselon: New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Rousselon) doubtless recollects that McFaul remained (in New Orleans) a few days on his arrival from St. Louis and previous to leaving for Spring Hill. He asks (Rousselon) to forward his letters to Father James McGarahan. McFaul did not remain at Spring Hill until he had finished his retreat when advised by Father Gautrelet the exercises of the Novitiate would be too severe for him. The Bishop of Mobile invited him to stop at his Cathedral with him. McFaul hopes that the Archbishop will recover soon.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - 2pp. - folio - {1}


1858 Dec. 29
Roduit, S.J., Father J(oseph): Grand Coteau, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

The College of St. Charles has not forgotten its many claims (Blanc) has earned over the years to their affection and gratitude. They send their greetings for the new year.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {2}


1858 Dec. 30
Barker, Father P(eter): Rochester, (New York)
 to (Orestes A.) Brownson: (New York, New York)

Almost a year ago Father Barker ordered (Brownson's) Review, but has never received any copies. He has been buying it from booksellers. He tells Brownson many of his acquaintances suspect Brownson is still a Protestant at heart because of his adverse criticism of Catholic seminaries but Barker believes this suspicion only proves they cannot stand adverse criticism. He asks Brownson to send the Review to him at Rochester. One man in particular, Father (Edward) Chevalier, O.M.I., Superior of the Oblates in Buffalo, who is sincerely Brownson's friend and admirer, was displeased with Brownson. He understands that Brownson's son is about to start a periodical The Catholic World in New York and if so he wants to contribute to it. He wants to know if Brownson is a regular contributor to any other periodical besides his own.

I-3-n - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 12mo. - {6}


(1858 Dec. 30)
Daquine, T(homas): (New Orleans, Louisiana)
 to Archbishop A(nthony) Blanc: (New Orleans, Louisiana)

A receipted bill for $35.68 for vinegar, starch, oil, and lard.

VI-1-o - A. Bill S. - 1p. - 4to. - {1}


1858 Dec. 30
Gautrelet, S.J., Father F(rancis): Spring Hill, (Alabama)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Father (Henry A.) Picherit left today; he is persuaded that he is not called to the Company (of Jesus). As he belongs to New Orleans, Picherit is thinking of asking (Blanc) for a position. He is not bound to the Company by any vows and during his stay here his conduct was very edifying.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {2}


1858 Dec. 30
Hayes S.J., Father James M.: Bardstown, K(entuck)y
 to O(restes) A. Brownson: New York, (New York)

Father Hayes expresses his sympathy to Brownson in his recent bereavement. He and several other priests of the community have offered Masses for Brownson's intention, and he will do so again frequently.

I-3-n - A.L.S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {1}


1858 Dec. 30
Lauer, E(tienne): Vermillionville, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop A(nthony) Blanc: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

They thank Blanc for his kind remembrance of them. Blanc's letter of Nov(ember) 29 saddened them with the news of the inflammation of his leg but gave them hope of his recovery.

- A.L.S. -


 On the same paper: 

(1858 Dec. 30)
Lauer, O(lympe): (Vermillionville, Louisiana)

She has been worried about the swelling of Blanc's leg. They do not forget Father Rousselon.

- A.L.S. -


VI-1-o - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {2}


1858 Dec. 30
Paris, Father A(uguste) S(imon): St. Michael, (Louisiana)
 to Father (Stephen Rousselon: New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Rousselon) paid the porter for the clothes. Should he consider the 12 piastres as intentions or should Paris pay this sum.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 12mo. - {1}


(1858) Dec. 30
Vignonet, Father E(leazar): St. Michael, Louisiana
 to Father (Stephen Rousselon: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Vignonet asks for a dispensation for Fulgence Bourgeois and Rosalie Myrza(?) Clouatre(?).

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 12mo. - {3}


1858 Dec. 31
Brouard, Ezilda: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Brouard permits Irene to marry. (Signatures): Jean Torregano (mark); Irene Simon (mark); Charles Pourselle (mark); Etienne Vignot (mark); Josephine Francois (mark). Father E. Rousselon notes that he blessed this marriage on this date.

VI-1-o - A.D.S. - (French) - 1p. - 16mo. - {5}


1858 Dec. 31
(Odin), Bishop J(ohn) M(ary): Galveston, (Texas)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

He presents his wishes for the new year. (Blanc) loaned Father (Francis?) Gatti, (O.F.M., Conv.?) 50 piastres on his way through New Orleans; (Odin) will repay when he visits (Blanc). Father (Richard B.) Hardey has been here for almost two weeks; he brought no papers. (Father James A.?) Miller who came back with Hardey assured (Odin) that Hardey said Mass every day in New Orleans. (Odin) gave him permission but not knowing him he did not dare encourage him to stay. (Odin) has heard that Hardey is a lover of strong drink. He asks for information from (Blanc). (Odin) sends regards to Father Rousselon.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 12mo. - {4}


1858 Dec. 31
Passion, M.H.C., Sister Mary of the: N(ew) O(rleans, Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Sister sends best wishes for the new year in the name of the (Sisters Marianites of the Holy Cross). They hope to see him come out of the danger which had so worried them.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 12mo. - {2}


1858 Dec. 31
Rodriguez, M.S.C., Sister M(ary) of St. Alphonse: (New Orleans, Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc): New Orleans, (Louisiana)

The Sisters (Marianites) of the Holy Cross send their prayers and wishes for the new year. They thank him for his kindness in the past. She begs him to continue his advice so necessary in her present position.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 12mo. - {2}


1858 Dec. 31
Ste. Claire, (R.U.), Sister de: (New Orleans, Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Although they expect to see (Blanc) soon, they wish to express their best wishes to him. The children and Sisters are anxious to see him. (P.S.) If bad weather prevents his coming, she asks him to permit Father Perché to take part.

VI-1-o - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {1}


1858 Dec. 31
Spalding, M(artin) J(ohn), Bishop of: Louisville, (Kentucky)
 to Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere: Detroit, (Michigan)

Spalding has received two letters from Father (Peter Kindekens) Kindekins who writes that on receipt of their joint letter he had barely time to change the nature of the Association forming in Belgium for the support of their college so as not to interfere with the Association for the Propagation (of the Faith). Kindekens thinks the receipts will be thereby diminished but it would scarcely have been proper to interfere with an association so well established. The Councils of Paris and Lyon have allocated to Spalding and perhaps also to Lefevere a good additional sum on occasion of their extraordinary expenses for this college in the past. He does not suppose that Kindekens will expect them to give to the college all this allocation. Spalding and Lefevere ought to act in harmony on the point. Kindekens thinks that he will not need Lefevere's generous succor of one or two priests to help him but Spalding thinks they should do what the Bishop of Ghent advises hereafter. Bishop (William Henry) Elder of Natchez has joined their "docto corpore" of patrons.

III-2-i - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 12mo. - {4}