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1866 Jul.
(Bacon), David W. Bishop of: Portland, (Maine)
 to Bishop F(rancis) P. McFarland of Hartford: (Providence, Rhode Island)

McFarland has undoubtedly heard of the affliction of the conflagration in Portland, July 4. One half of the Catholics of Portland have lost everything, not only homes but also their church and school houses. Nothing of any value has been saved. The fruit of eleven years is in ashes. Bacon does not know what to do unless the bishops and Catholics of other dioceses aid. He is penniless because it is feared that the insurance will not be paid. He is sure that McFarland will sympathize with him and permit him to appeal to the Catholics of the diocese.

I-1-b - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {2}


1866 July 1
Juncker, H(enry) D., Bp. of Alton: Alton, (Illinois)
 to (Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio)

He received the letter of Mrs. Stuart which Purcell sent him. This week he will have the retreat for the clergy by two Redemptorists, one for the English and the other the Germans. He asks a word of instruction from Purcell. Last year he had so many troubles that he almost lost his mind. Many times he intended to run to Purcell for advice.

II-5-c - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {1}


1866 July 1
X.Y.Z.: New York, New York
 to (James Alphonsus McMaster): (New York, New York)

He congratulates McMaster on the fearless stand taken by his paper. Feeling that the columns of this paper are open to every subject which promotes the freedom of man he describes a visit to St. Bonaventure's College in Alleghany, New York. The young philosophers he met there, as trained by Father Michael Richoudi, will be able to easily refute the atheists who are so numerous in the States. The writer is English and is happy to find that at this school "cramming" is not tolerated. He feels that the spirit at this school is the same as that in Europe, where the teacher and student are friends. The relations between Father Pamfilo (de Magleano, O.S.F.) and the students is the relation of father and children. He does not describe the exercises at which Bishop (John) Timon was present in all his humility, in detail, but merely points out that certain men were outstanding, namely Messers, O'Brien, Connolly, Fleming, C. McManus, Bloomer, Scott, Driscoll, and a certain Mr. Barry from Boston who showed up well. They did justice to themselves and to their orations. Mr. J. P. Murphy endeavored to instruct in the secrets of the Irish language, fully convincing us that the old Celtic tongue has lost nothing of its power by its transposition to America. The Bishop closed the exercises with an address to the students and teachers.

I-1-n - A.L.S. - - (initials) - 3pp. - 4to. - {4}


1866 July 1
Sorin, FatherE(dward) C.S.C.: Notre Dame, (Indiana)
 to (Orestes A. Brownson: Eliz(abeth, New Jersey)

Sorin states that he will have to await the Superior's return home, who is due any day, before answering the latter part of Brownson's letter. Brownson's manuscript has not come back as yet and Father can find no copy of it around and asks Brownson to send a duplicate and if not Father will have to writ to the Cardinal for the original. Were Father to advise in regard to omitting the cardinal's letter, he would rather leave it as is. Father suggests it would be better to hold it and use it later to better advantage, because the first is practically an attack against Brownson, that they would see in it a victory which Father does not want them to have. The Committee liked the latter part of Brownson's essay work the best. "Virtue" was not very appropriate when applied to maternity of B. V. M. so Father made some changes. The Bishop who gave a speech on May 31, was pleased that Brownson was a regular contributor. July 2 the retreat begins after which Father may have to sail for Europe and wants Brownson to pray for him and all.

I-4-c - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {1}


1866 July 2
Monahan: Utica, (New York)
 to (James Alphonsus) McMaster: New York, New York

The writer sends a couple of articles which he thinks McMaster might print. The Jesuit corrects somewhat the miscellany (reprinted in the Truth Teller) and in it Bishop (Benedict) Fenwick gives his account of the Council of 1829. He asks McMaster to preserve the articles, which he may not print. He is busy as a bee arranging his "Museum" in all its departments; much material he has left with Fr. McClellan and some in Yorkville and New York City. His hardest task is to arrange and sort the gems, treasures, and curiosities. He has not arranged with Donahue about printing. The general title of 10 or more volumes will be as you printed it,… "Monahan's American Catholic Museum". Every work will have under this its special title (for instance: "Gems") and be sold seperately. All the proposed departments are rapidly getting into order. "Summaries of Controversies" is most difficult, requiring much study, though he has been at it for 10 years. For this work he has the controversy between H. W. Beecher's father and Bishop Fenwick prepared and is awaiting D. Corcoran (the "Splendid Rebel) who has promised him a copy of it which McClellan informs he will forward soon. His "Theology" would be incomplete without that: "On the Apocrypha". McClellan sent him all the "Bulletins" about the Catacombs which will be included under the "Summary". Besides the Summaries, the "Portfolios", "reminiscences", "rare and precious reprints" will not be neglected.

I-1-n - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {4}


1866 Jul. 2
Gaudet, O.M.I., Father A(uguste): Brownsville, (Texas)
 to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Upon Gaudet's return from New Orleans Mother St. Ange, (V.I.) said that she was going to withdraw their money. Gaudet told her that he was going to notify (Odin). This morning Gaudet offered her what (Odin) had on hand; she did not think it proper to accept it. (Odin) is to hold what he has, $750 and whatever he can return at once. When they need it Gaudet will notify him a month or more in advance. Even if the paper falls to 75 cents (Odin) can have it exchanged through Mr. Lombard.

VI-2-l - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 12mo. - {3}


1866 Jul. 2
Gonellaz, Father H(yacinth): Houma, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.: New Orleans, Louisiana)

As he will probably not get to the city soon he sends (Odin) his statement of the church receipts for the first half of 1866. Total income was $1100. He owes (Odin) $82. As Father G(ilbert) Raymond owes Gonellaz some money he can pay the $82; he will write (Raymond) about it.

VI-2-l - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 12mo. - {2}


1866 Jul. 2
Prelà, Dr. Bénoit: Bastia, (Corsica)
 to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.: New Orleans, Louisiana)

He can never thank (Odin) enough for the news he gave him about Jules Francois Serpentini of Bastia. In his first letter, (Odin) told that Serpentini, called the old Corsican, lived in Calcasieu and in (Odin)'s last letter dated May 15, 1865 he told of his death. However, the French and Italian consuls say that he still lives in Calcasieu near Lake Charles and has a large family. In his uncertainty Prelà wrote again but no doubt (Odin)'s numerous duties kept him from replying. Prelà wrote to (Dominic) Meynis, Secretary of the Propagation of the Faith, who wrote that a fundamental rule of the Association did not allow him to interfere in affairs not pertaining to their work. Prelà asks (Odin) to let him know whether Serpentini is dead or alive. If he is dead (Odin) is to let him know the contents of the will.

VI-2-1 - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 12mo. - {3}


1866 Jul. 2
St. Ange, (V.I.), Sister: Brownsville, (Texas)
 to Archbishop John Mary Odin, C.M. of: New Orleans, Louisiana)

On June 17, Mother Ste. Claire (V.I.) and her little colony of 8 persons arrived at Brownsville. Four Sisters (of the Incarnate Word) died of the yellow fever; two at Vera Cruz and two at Tampico. Last week St. Ange received a letter from Mr. Harrison of New Orleans in which he demands 5 days demurrage. Harrison or the captain of the schooner must have forgotten the promise he made to Mr. McCann that there would be nothing to pay for those days. Captain Brown seeing that all the wood could not be taken at one time asked the captain of the schooner about a charge and when the answer was no he left what he could not take. Mr. Corbat also had promised McCann that all was paid. St. Ange has just received (Odin)'s letter. She has not as yet authorized anyone to receive the sum which according to Father A(uguste) Gaudet is at their disposition.

VI-2-l - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {8}


1866 July 3
McCloskey, John,: A(rch)b(isho)p of New York: New York (City)
 to Orestes A. Brownson: (Elizabeth, New Jersey)

The letter alluded to by Brownson's correspondence was received by Bishop (Patrick N.) Lynch a few days before his leaving for Charleston on Monday last. McCloskey feels Lynch has answered the letter. The Archbishop relates an unpleasant incident of a year age when he gave a letter of introduction to a Southern gentleman going to Rio de Janeiro. This man assailed the American government in the presence of the Brazilian Emperor and government officials. As a result, the Archbishop is not very prone to write letters of introduction.

I-4-c - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {2}


1866 Jul. 4
Anstaett, Father J(oseph): Galveston, (Texas)
 to Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.): New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Anstaett has to have another half cask of white wine for Father (John B.) Bellaclas. He has written to Mr. Cavaroc and is sending the probable cost with (James P.) Nash. Father (Joseph) Quérat left Brest on February 15 and arrived at Vera Cruz on April 25. He left 6 Sisters (of the Incarnate Word) there, among them Sister Ste. Claire, (V.I.). She is recovering but four died. Quérat had the yellow fever himself and had to stop at Bagdad. Father (John Claude) Neraz had to stop at Tampico with 6 others of the Sisters stricken with the fever. Only one arrived with Quérat at Brownsville; the eight others will arrive later.

VI-2-1 - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 12mo. - {8}


1866 Jul. 4
(Elder,) William Henry, Bishop of: Natchez, (Mississippi)
 to Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.): New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Odin's letter of June 15 reached him in due time. In May (Elder) received a letter from the Cardinal dated April 14 acknowledging receipt of his letter concerning the candidates for Little Rock. (Elder quotes from this letter in Latin). Since then (Elder) has seen in the Telegraph that Father (Edward) Fitzgerald has received the appointment. Has he declined? (Elder) has heard from (Odin) that the financial affairs of Little Rock had been well managed. Father (John) Scollard of Jackson seems to be very annoyed at Father (Henry) Picherit's going into Louisiana, even offering to attend Amite City regularly. If (Odin) authorized Picherit he is to inform Scollard. Scollard also complained that Father Charles (Vanqueckelberge), in passing through Bayou Sara on his way home from Woodville, spoke injuriously about him in public. Father Charles says this is a mistake. (Elder) advised Scollard to refer the matter to (Odin). They are getting deeply perplexed with their asylums and schools. Funds for building the Boys' Asylum will be available next January and April. The difficulty is to feed both boys and girls. The Protestants always assisted at their Fairs and (Elder) never checked assisting at theirs. The missionaries said it was not lawful. It seemed to (Elder) to be his duty to support the missionaries by a public assertion of what they had said. In a small place like this might it be lawful to contribute to the temporal wants of a Protestant asylum? (Odin) is to let (Elder) know when he returns to New Orleans. If he can arrange with his building, he will go to Baltimore some time before the Council in September, perhaps in August. He would like to see (Odin) before he goes.

VI-2-l - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 4to. - {6}


1866 July 4
Lemonnier, C.S.C., Father A(ugustus): Notre Dame, Indiana
 to James F. Edwards: (Toledo, Ohio)

Lemonnier thinks of Edwards with a sad heart because he has not written to him. He hopes Edwards will be so kind as to send him a token of friendship. The days have been long because of his absence. He begs the Blessed Mother to protect him. He expects to go to St. Louis soon, but hopes Edwards will go with him.

XI-1-a - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 12mo. - {1}


1866 Jul. 5
(Kenrick), Peter Richard, Archbishop of: St. Louis, (Missouri):
 to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.: New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Kenrick) will not fail to urge Father J(oseph) Melcher, who directs the Ursulines, to recommend to them (Odin)'s application for a branch of their Community. It is a cloistered Community; although they have a school for externs the boarding school is their specific object. The Ladies are highly educated and most of them come from Landshut in Bavaria. Since their first introduction into St. Louis in 1848 by Melcher they have been exclusively under his care. (Kenrick) hopes to see (Odin) at the Plenary Council. He lately visited the Barrens and confirmed 464 persons there a few weeks ago. The College (St. Mary's Preparatory Seminary) is to be transferred to Cape Girardeau next September. He has suggested to Father S(tephen) V. Ryan to make the Barrens a retreat house for clergymen deprived of faculties. He appeared to like the idea and promised to write to Paris for permission.

VI-2-l - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 12mo. - {5}


1866 July 5
Young, Father N(icholas) R.: Kenton, Ohio
 to Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell): of (Cincinnati, Ohio)

He thanks Purcell for the Ciborium. He has received several visits from Catholics living in the towns of the county asking to have Mass as soon as convenient. Father (Joseph) Dwenger writes that he cannot come to say Mass for the Germans but that he will take up the matter with the Superior of his Order. There is great discontent among the Germans but still there is no open hostility. They have concluded to contract for finishing the church. Mr. Crowly has rented him a small house near the Church. His sister is coming to stay with him.

II-5-c - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 12mo. - {3}


1866 Jul. 6
Buffard, Father S(tephen): San Antonio, (Texas)
 to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Buffard had a good chance to give (Odin)'s interests to Father (Francis Bouchu) Bouchut; he refused, saying that he wanted to take them in going to France. His health is restored. Father (J.A.) Faure wrote July 4, two days after seeing his native country. Emilian (Wendel, O.S.B.) received a letter from his superior who saw Bishop (Claude Mary) Dubuis in Rome. On the 9th he will see the German priests and brothers. The Polish of Panna Maria are no longer satisfied with their priest because on Corpus Christi he consumed the Host after the three o'clock procession. They say he is not a priest and they no longer want him. If they knew his birthplace in Poland they would write, but he conceals it. At the convent all are well; two German novices have been there for some days. The new construction is going on in part; the summer heat has shown the necessity of a change in the plans. The chapel which was to face west will be brought around to the northeast opposite Mr. Walker's little house. Fathers Sarry, Chaland, Farge, Gaillet and Emilian are well. The people of San Antonio expected the cholera but there is none. The Negroes are misbehaving frightfully; they dress like rich lords.

VI-2-l - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 12mo. - {9}


1866 Jul. 6
Jacquet, Father C(laude): Lapacudiére, (France)
 to Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.): N(ew) O(rleans, Louisiana)

He wishes to leave the Diocese of Galveston and has Bishop (Claude Mary) Dubuis' promise that he will not refuse the necessary freedom if he enters Odin's diocese. Jacquet would be very happy to serve once more under Odin's jurisdiction.

VI-2-l - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 12mo. - {2}


1866 July 6
Spalding, M(artin) J., Archbishop of: Baltimore, (Maryland)
 to (Archbishop John Baptist Purcell): of (Cincinnati, Ohio)

All doubts as to the genuineness of Mr. R. Murphy's mission as agent of Papal Loan have vanished. He has written in the Mirror endorsing the mission. Duncan, Sherman and Co. have endorsed him to Archbishop (John) McCloskey as the agent of Blound and Co. of Paris.

II-5-c - A.L.S. - 1p. - 16to. - {3}


1866 Jul. 8
Gutton, Father Ph(ilibert): Pointe Coupée, Fausse Riviere, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Gutton gives an account of the receipts of the parish since the first of January. The cemetery is now ready. The fences are solid. A drainage ditch runs all around it, 21 arpents in all. The receipts of the church were $759, those of the cemetery, $206. The expenditures for the cemetery were $482.40 leaving a balance of $482.60. He sees no way of repairing the church; in time there will be the third note which will also demand sacrifice.

VI-2-l - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {2}


1866 Jul. 9
Hanley, W(illiam) B.: Suspension Bridge, New York
 to Archbishop John Mary Odin, (C.M.): New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

He received Odin's letter of June 28. He thanks him for having received him into custody again. He is sorry he cannot just now comply with Odin's request. The Superior is not expected to return for two or three weeks. As soon as he does Hanley will solicit him to write Odin. Odin owes not one picayune to this institution on Hanley's account. A year here would be of immense benefit to Hanley.

VI-2-l - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 12mo. - {1}


1866 Jul. 9
Paret, Father J(oseph) M(ichael): (German Coast, Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Paret spent part of last Friday at F(rancis) Bougère's with Mr. Thiberge, the architect who will go to (New Orleans) Sunday evening to buy the materials for the church. In spite of all efforts at St. Charles and St. John Baptist they have been unable to procure them. Thiberge has agreed to build the church for $4500. Paret will try to see (Odin) the first of next week. If (Odin) is not there whom should Paret see to get the money for the lumber and wages. Digging for the foundation will begin a week from Thursday. Paret would like the favor of blessing the first stone of this Our Lady of the Rosary Church as on this feast day he said his first Mass. (Odin) would do well to let Paret know when Bougère can bring the contract. Bougère is a terrible man; Paret does not have any confidence in the family. The uncle seems to be a greater promiser than a giver. His property is to be sold to Chauvin and Company. Paret's subscription has started. It seems he will be able to round out $4500 in cash with (Odin)'s subscription of $1500 and the $3,000 from Mr. Henriette. P.S. Paret presumes that (Odin) now has news of Father Rousselon; he hopes that his health has improved. Paret asks for a dispensation for E.D. Sellers and Marie Lauve. They are orphans.

VI-2-1 - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 4to. - {7}


1866 Jul. 9
(Several, O.S.U.), Sister St. Pierre: Opelousas, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.: New Orleans, Louisiana)

They were happy to hear from Father (Gilbert) Raymond that they will soon receive (Odin)'s blessing from his own hand. They must have the loan of a little money for urgent repairs to the house. They are sorry to be obliged to borrow as they have not yet paid what they borrowed during the war. Their school brought scarcely enough to live on this year. Raymond said that they could give no guarantee for the $2,000 they are going to borrow. Sister counts on asking Archbishop Purcell's brother to take a mortgage on the Convent and not repaying for ten years. If it is true that they cannot offer a guarantee, she will not dare to talk to him. Several pupils have left to go elsewhere saying that there was no local support, etc.

VI-2-l - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 12mo. - {3}


1866 July 9
Sumner, Henry: Newbury, C. H. So(uth) Ca(rolina)
 to O(restes) A. Brownson: Elizabeth, N(ew) J(ersey)

Summer received Brownson's letter on the sixth of July. On the same day he received word that his brother, A. G. Summer, had died. Summer could not be with him when he died since he was too poor. His brother had the best of medical care. He wishes Brownson to inform the Archbishop (John) (McCloskey) of his brother's death. Summer had hoped that his brother would have looked after his (Henry's) family when he died. Brownson's views on the negro coincide with Summer's. He has read cursorily Brownson's "American Republic". He had a copy of "Brownson's Essays" and "Balmes' Fundamental Philosophy", translation by Brownson's son, but when General Kilpatrick's raiders set fire to his home, all was lost. He would like to have the Archbishop of New York open his letters to Bishop (Patrick) Lynch. He sympathizes with Brownson's losses during the war. Summer requests an answer.

P.S. His brother leaves a wife who is pregnant, an aged mother, two brothers, and single sister, The brother was married in September, 1865.

I-4-c - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to - {3}


1866 July 9
(Timon), John Bishop of Buffalo: Buffalo, New York
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: Cincinnati, Ohio

Father C(aspar) H. Borgess, formerly assistant priest in Purcell's Cathedral but now with the Franciscans in the diocese of Buffalo, has applied to Timon for a mission. Timon asks for information concerning Borgess' antecedents.

II-5-c - A.L.S. - 1pg. - 12mo. - {3}


1866 Jul. 10
Ménard, Father Ch(arle)s M.: Thibodaux, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.: New Orleans, Louisiana)

He encloses $22, $2 for a dispensation and $20 for the Propagation of the Faith. The Sisters are sending a letter for Thomas Layton and $56.50, the first collection for the Archconfraternity of St. Peter, P.S. Ménard supposes that Mr. Rocheraux has carried out his confidential mission.

VI-2-l - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 16mo. - {4}


1866 Jul. 10
Rousselon, Father S(tephen): Lyons, (France)
 to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.: New Orleans, Louisiana)

He received (Odin's) letter of June 7 on the vigil of St. Peter. What he writes today is the same as two weeks ago, that is that his health is improving very slowly. He still cannot leave his room except the 2 or 3 times someone has taken him in a carriage to see the improvements in the city since 10 years ago. He has had a visit from Father (Anthony) Thèves whom he did not expect to meet here. He has no doubt written to (Odin) about his pension. (Odin) is not to send him anything; Rousselon will pay himself. What sad news about Mr. Henriette; Rousselon is sorry especially for Father (Joseph Michael) Paret and Mrs. Henriette. On his arrival Rousselon sent the two letters he had for Paret's father. (Odin) no doubt has heard of the new unexpected coup; yesterday they talked of war, today all is about peace. Here as well as in the United States there were fears of war about Rousselon's friends the Fr(ench?). But Rousselon reassured them there was nothing to fear; they have just learned that they were run aground(?) in Canada. That numerous First Communion of Rousselon's little children rejoiced his heart; (Odin) is to thank Father (Gilbert) Raymond. Whatever the time of Rousselon's return, (Odin) must think seriously of replacing him for he will be unable to resume his work. A little room in a corner will be all he needs, and that not for long. Bishop (Claude Marie) Dubuis did not return from Rome until July 7 tired and ill. But he has accepted Confirmations and even ordinations so it will be July 16 before they go to Vichy. He said that (Odin)'s affairs were going well in Rome and that Cardinal (Alexander) Barnabo was determined to finish off the dissidents who had written to Ireland for support of their cause in Rome. The newspapers say that neither Italy or Prussia wish to accept the peace. Has old Poncet finished the lampshade(?) in the lower courtyard. Rousselon's brother sends his respects.

VI-2-1 - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 12mo. - {7}


1866 Jul. 10
Vallée, Father R(éné): Villeplate, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Last night Vallée received (Odin's) letter of July 3. (Odin)'s orders put him in a predicament. He is not well just now and the trip to New Orleans could only indispose him further. Also it is impossible to pay the workmen at the presbytery, then pay off $500 which he borrowed. If (Odin) prefers to settle everything as of now, rather than wait, Vallée will come to receive (Odin)'s orders. But it would be wrong to leave before settling the business of this house he has had built.

VI-2-l - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 4to. - {2}


1866 July 11
Young, Father N(icholas) R.: Kenton, Ohio
 to Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell): of (Cincinnati, Ohio)

Purcell's fatherly letter has brought him much comfort. His sister will be with him in about a week and they will do what they can for the dear ones. He will let Purcell know how he progresses with the Germans. He will make an effort to study German as Purcell suggests.

II-5-c - A.L.S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {1}


1866 July 12
Monahan: Utica, (New York)
 to (James Alphonsus) McMaster: New York, New York

The writer sends a couple of articles which he thinks McMaster might print. The Jesuit corrects somewhat the miscellany (reprinted in the Truth Teller) and in it Bishop (Benedict) Fenwick gives his account of the Council of 1829. He asks McMaster to preserve the articles, which he may not print. He is busy as a bee arranging his "Museum" in all its departments; much material he has left with Fr. McClellan and some in Yorkville and New York City. His hardest task is to arrange and sort the gems, treasures, and curiosities. He has not arranged with Donahue about printing. The general title of 10 or more volumes will be as you printed it … "Monahan's American Catholic Museum". Every work will have under this its special title (for instance: "Gems") and be sold seperately. All the proposed departments are rapidly getting into order. "Summaries of Controversies" is most difficult, requiring much study, though he has been at it for 10 years. For this work he has the controversy between H. W. Beecher's father and Bishop Fenwick prepared and is awaiting D. Corcoran (the "Splendid Rebel) who has promised him a copy of it which McClellan informs he will forward soon. His "Theology" would be incomplete without that: "On the Apocrypha". McClellan sent him all the "Bulletins" about the Catacombs which will be included under the "Summary". Besides the Summaries, the "Portfolios", "reminiscences", "rare and precious reprints" will not be neglected.

I-1-n - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {4}


1866 July 12
Dwenger, (C. PP.S.), Father Joseph: Minster, (Ohio)
 to Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell: of Cincinnati, Ohio

He has just returned from Himmelgarden where he went at the invitation of Father Joseph Albrecht. Albrecht is steadfast in his opinion that hoops are a mortal sin; he does not understand the wrong he does by resisting his bishop. Dwenger tried to make him submit. He wants Dwenger to see Purcell about his troubles, with one of his trustees, Mr. Jacob Anthony. Albrecht said he would submit to Purcell but wanted the privilege to put down the hoops, Purcell may be able to influence Anthony who has influence over Albrecht. Albrecht lives with six German brothers who left with him. In another house are a dozen Sisters who went with him. Dwenger encloses a horrible petition signed by the people of St. Joseph's. (Note: the enclosed petition in German with a translation asks for Father Joseph Albrecht. They would rather tear down the church than to accept another.)

II-5-c - A.L.S. - 3pp. & 2pp. - 8vo. - - 4to. - {3}


1866 July 12
Fitzgerald, Father Edward: Columbus, (Ohio)
 to Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell): of (Cincinnati, Ohio)

He has learned nothing further of the Little Rock appointment. The foundation of the new church was very bad and they had to lay down several feet of concrete before commencing to put down the stone. He encloses Purcell's note to J.W. Brown for the first house purchased for the Sisters of the Good Shepherd.

II-5-c - A.L.S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {2}


1866 July 12
Smith, A. Harvey: Detroit, (Michigan)
 to Bishop P(eter) P(aul) Lefevere: (Detroit, Michigan)

Dr. Smith encloses his account for services rendered to Lefevere, and encloses also an order to pay Father G(ustave) Limpens $50 toward a new church. As his physician, Smith leaves Lefevere in good health; he thanks Lefevere for his patience during the long months required for the work.

III-2-k - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 12mo. - {2}


1866 Jul. 12
Veyrat, Father C(yprian): Paincourtville, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Sylvain Barras who is to be married the 26th asks that the ceremony take place at the home of his fiancée which is only 2 miles from Assumption Church. Barras has been a widower for 5 or 6 months.

VI-2-l - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {2}


1866 Jul. 14
Dénéce, Father J(oh)n M(ary) J(osep)h: Petit Caillou, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.: New Orleans, Louisiana)

He received (Odin's) letter on July 9. He thanks him for sending the intentions. His chapel is finished; last Sunday he sang the first High Mass. He would have liked to enlarge his chapel but he must always pay for it himself. He hopes to have his presbytery up in two months. The lumber is all ready but he cannot get a workman. Everyone is in the fields; the harvest will be magnificient. (P.S.) (Odin) is to notify him a month in advance so that he can prepare for Confirmation.

VI-2-l - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - folio - {2}


1866 Jul. 14
Lamont, Father Ja(me)s: Walsall, England
 to Father (Stephen Rousselon) Roussilon: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

If (Rousselon) requires the services of another priest, Lamont begs him to write. He speaks French and should go well provided with high testimonials.

VI-2-l - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 16mo. - {1}


1866 Jul. 14
Paret, Father J(oseph) M(ichael): St. Charles, (German Coast, Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Paret wrote the first of the week. If (Odin) has not replied he is to do so by the bearer of this letter. His subscriptions are going well. Lacking a horse and carriage he makes all his trips on foot. It will probably take 3 weeks or a month and for longer distances by way of the railroad of Opelousas he does not know when he will finish. He has had great disputes with the donor of the land. He claims that Paret, the architect, and (Odin) are making fun of him. He would like to make a gold mine(?) out of this church. He charges $4 a day for the cart and 1 piastres for the man who drives it. Everyone urges Paret to suspend the work until the donor gives a good title; otherwise he may impose burdensome conditions. The bearer of this letter is the son of Mr. Prosper who with Mr. Henriette was crushed by the Jackson railroad; he can tell (Odin) more. Paret thanks (Odin) for sending on his letters; his father also sends his thanks and hopes his days will be lengthened enough to see them again.

VI-2-l - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {3}


1866 Jul. 14
St. Cyr, P(auline) de: Pougues les eaux, (France)
 to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.: New Orleans, Louisiana)

It is a month since they arrived in France (Hyacinthe) de St. Cyr had bronchitis which kept him in bed for a week and the last week of June was spent in numerous details in order to leave Paris as soon as possible. St. Cyr's health has benefitted from the water but she is the opposite; she experienced many trials in America. She hopes after her stay here she will be as good as before. When (Odin) receives this letter vacations will have begun and they will see their children. Beginning August 9 they will spend this time at Bagnères de Bigorre. Charles is to take his exams at Tarbes, a quarter of an hour away. The Madames of the Sacred Heart were delighted with their daughters. Zoé made her First Communion. Mary continues to head her class. P(auline) has had no word from Bishop (Claude Marie) Dubuis. She heard through Bishop Buquet that he had had a good trip. Political events may make him modify his plans. "The war in Italy, Austria, and Germany may inconvenience him. Her courage fails when she thinks that alltheir sons want to become soldiers. Their trip was good and they crossed in 9 days and 9 hours, leaving on June 2 they were in Paris on the 12th. In New York they went to Sacred Heart and were astonished at the elegance of that establishment. Mr. St. Cyr sends his respects. She gives their Paris address; they will be at Nice until October 15.

VI-2-l - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 12mo. - {3}


1866 Jul. 15
Hanley, W(illaim) B.: Suspension Bridge, N(ew) Y(ork)
 to Archbishop John Mary Odin, (C.M.): New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

The Superior having just arrived, Hanley presented him with Odin's letter. He says that as Hanley has been there in the capacity of a Brother, he could not advise him to carry on his studies there. He things it would tempt some Brothers to do the same. Should Odin wish him to continue his studies, Hanley must go to some other seminary such as Ellicott's Mills or elsewhere. P.S. He thinks he knows Latin enough to carry on studies in philosophy and theology.

- A.L.S. -


 On the same paper: 

(1866 Jul.15)
Rice, C.M., Father Rob(er)t E.V.: (Suspension Bridge, New York)
 to (Archbishop John Mary Odin, C.M.: New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Hanley) came here to enter the community as a lay-brother. Two months have elapsed and he desires to return to his former purpose. It will be necessary for him to go elsewhere to continue his studies.

- A. Note S. -


VI-2-l - A.L.S., A. Note S. - 3pp. - 12mo. - {2}


1866 Jul. 16
Bacon, David W., Bishop of: Portland, (Maine)
 to Bishop (Francis P.) McFarland of Hartford: (Providence, Rhode Island)

McFarland's sympathizing letter of July 10 has been received. He thanks him for the kind offer which appears to be the best plan. He leaves the matter entirely to McFarland who can set the best time for the collection.

I-1-b - A.L.S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {2}


1866 Jul. 16
Semmes, R.: Mobile, Alabama
 to Rich(ar)d H(enry) Clarke: (New York, New York)

Semmes has just received the Vanderbilt Bond from Europe and he sends a copy enclosed to Clarke. The bond is legal in every way but its descriptio personae of the payee. There being no President of the Confederate States could the bond be sued upon? If the bond could be taken into chancery, there would be no difficulty in recovery. Semmes wants to know if they could sue in the name of Jefferson Davis who would as payee be a nominal plaintiff. There would be no question who was meant to be payee of the bond. The suit should be brought to the "use of the United States and the captors" as the North claimed all property owned by the Confederate States. The case would be in the court of admiralty. Semmes cites numerous cases. If the United States discontinued any interest in the case, they could continue alone. But if it was better to make a sale of the bond with a view to a foreign proceeding, could a purchaser be found in New York? He suggests that Clarke consult (Charles) O'Conor. Semmes would hold himself to the terms mentioned if a suit was determined upon: the attorneys would get one-third of the amount received from the captors - the captors to be put at no expense, in case of failure. As to his personal status, Semmes' court is still closed by Federal bayonets. The President proclaimed with one breath the Southern States had full possession of their rights; and with another breath he shut up state courts and prohibited state judges from performing their functions, although they were both eligible under the Constitutions of the United States and of the States. The constitutional amendments before the legislatures of the states would make it impossible for them to be truly represented in Congress in that generation. He has written to Mr. Dennison of Pennsylvania as Clarke suggests. Semmes raises the question of the new ammendment to the Constitution. The United States mail steamer "Ariel", commanded by S.G. Jones, was captured cargo intact on the high seas as a prize of war by the Confederate States steamer of war, Alabama, R. Semmes, Commander, on or about December 2, 1862. For the benefit of himself, Cornelius Vanderbilt, the owner of the steamer, and the owners of the cargo, Jones signed a bond to save the ship and cargo. The bond promised to pay, within 30 days of the conclusion of the war between the States, to the President of the Confederacy and his successors, $138,000, the value of the steamer and prize money, and $123,000 for the cargo of the "Ariel". Signed by S.G. Jones and witnessed Dec. 9, 1862 by W.B. Smith Commander's Clerk.

I-2-n - A.L.S. - 6pp. - 4to. - {5}


1866 Jul. 16
Spalding, M(artin) J(ohn), Archbishop: Baltimore, (Maryland)
 to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.): New Orleans, (Louisiana)

He has received (Odin)'s conclusion of the Titulus; it will be of great use. The matter has grown on them so that they scarcely know where to stop. Spalding wishes to make a Corpus Juris Canonici which may be used in their seminaries. It will fill probably 200 pages. (Odin) is to send copies of the enclosed circulars to his suffragans begging them to attend promptly to the matter of episcopal candidates. Spalding has been so edified with the condescension of his older brother that he will calculate on their indulgence towards his poor efforts to prepare matter for their consideration. He will expect (Odin)'s Concio which had better be printed in quarto, about 2 pages, 100 copies. (Note on back): This letter was left out of the package of circulars by mistake.

VI-2-l - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {1}


1866 July 16
Spalding, M(artin) J., Archbishop of: Baltimore, (Maryland)
 to Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell): of Cin(cinnati, Ohio)

He asks Purcell to send copies of an enclosed circular to his suffragans calling their attention to the weighty matter referred to. They will have many new bishoprics to found and the persons to be recommended should be well considered in advance of the Council. The work of preparation for the Council was a bigger job than he had suspected. The exposition to be presented to the Fathers will equal 300 pages 8vo.

II-5-c - A.L.S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {1}


1866 July 17
Elder, William Henry, Bishop of: Natchez, (Mississippi)
 to Archbishop J(ohn) B(aptist) Purcell: of Cincinnati, (Ohio)

If the appointment of Father Edward Fitzgerald as Bishop of Little Rock is certain, Purcell is to hand an enclosed letter to Fitzgerald. Cardinal Barnabo said the appointment had been made and the Bulls sent to the Archbishop of New Orleans. To date he has not received them.

II-5-c - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {2}


1866 Jul. 17
Larnaudie, S.J., Father F(rederick): Spring Hill (Alabama)
 to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.: New Orleans, Louisiana)

The interests of his parish oblige him to again have recourse to (Odin). He sent, with the bonds of the church, a letter from Mrs. Michel which explained her intentions in making the gift. His successor will need this letter, Larnaudie asks (Odin) to send it, or a copy, to Father (Cyril) Delacroix. Larnaudie learns with pleasure that his successor is very successful. The former pastor could do in time of war, he was a bit too "rough" in time of peace.

VI-2-l - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 12mo. - {3}


1866 Jul. 19
Hendricken, Father Thomas F.: Waterbury, Conn(ecticut)
 to Bishop F(rancis) P. McFarland (of Hartford: Providence, Rhode Island)

McFarland is notified that the regular meeting of the clergy of the New Haven Conference District will be held at the residence of Father T. Synnott of Bridgeport, Thursday, July 26, 1866.

I-1-b - A.L.S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {2}


1866 Jul. 19
(Odin), John Mary, Archbishop of: New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to 
The Clergy (of the Archdiocese ofNew Orleans, Louisiana)

The Second National Council of Bishops of the United States will meet at Baltimore October 7 to 21. From August 15 to October 21, the Veni Creator is to be sung every Sunday at Benediction. At Mass every day the prayer of the Holy Spirit is to be added to the prayers of the day. The pontifical government has issued a public subscription loan. The Apostolic Nuncio of France has written to express the desire of the Holy Father that this be brought to the knowledge of the people of by the pastors. This has nothing in common with the Archconfraternity of St. Peter recently established and which is an entirely charitable association.

VI-2-l - Printed L. - (French) - 3pp. - 8vo. - {3}


1866 Jul. 19
Scollard, Father J(ohn) Jackson, L(ouisian)a:
 to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.: New Orleans, Louisiana)

There is a Father P(eter) W. McMohan going about here trying to cause trouble in the congregation. He is said to have given irreparable scandal. Father Rousselon being away, Scollard thought (Odin) should be informed of the kind of man he is represented to be, particularly as he represents that he has permission from (Odin) to say Mass.

VI-2-l - A.L.S. - (French) - 1p. - 4to. - {2}


1866 Jul. 20
Kennedy, Michael: Grattan, (Michigan)
 to Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefevere: (Detroit, Michigan)

Kennedy pleads with Lefevere not to remove Father (Henry) Rievers and to ignore the false accusations contained in a letter sent him. As one of the oldest members of the congregation he has never found a priest who performs his duties better than Rievers. None of the congregation, except the demons that sent it, knew about it. This "long tail family" are always doing mischief to the German and Irish priests. Father Shelly (Nicholas Stehle?) told Kennedy of a man who had received 18 bushels of wheat to swear falsely. Many people are praying for Lefevere to retain Rievers. Kennedy brought the first priest to Grattan 22 years ago.

III-2-k - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 12mo. - {4}


1866 July 21
Spalding, M(artin) J., Archbishop of: Baltimore, (Maryland)
 to Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell): of (Cincinnati, Ohio)

He intended Purcell should preach on the 2nd Sunday. They may have the Requiem Mass on one of the Thursdays but he has as yet invited no one to preach. Spalding will take pleasure in receiving and attaching due weight to the suggestions of good Father (F. X.) Weninger. He would like to see the original of the reply of the Congregation of the Propagation of the Faith to Purcell's letter on solemn vows. He has thought of appointing F. O'Connor first Promotor of the Council.

II-5-c - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 16to. - {2}


1866 July 22
Young, Father N(icholas) R.: Kenton, Ohio
 to Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell): of (Cincinnati, Ohio)

Charles Collins prays for the removal of an impediment. His wife was unbaptized when married, later baptized by immersion. The woman is quite disposed to the Church and will follow her husband into the Church.

II-5-c - A.L.S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {1}


1866 Jul. 23
Gonellaz, Father H(yacinth): Houma, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.: New Orleans, Louisiana)

He received (Odin's) letter announcing his pastoral visit. He sent Father (John Mary) Dénecé a copy and on his reply all will be ready in Caillou as well as here for Confirmation. The best way of writing to Dénecé is to address the letters to Gonellaz. He has a box at the post office. He is grateful for the news of Father Rousselon.

VI-2-l - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 12mo. - {2}


1866 Jul. 23
Griffin, Mary: Fort Valley, Georgia
 to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.: New Orleans, Louisiana)

The desire she still has of obtaining a situation in a French family has emboldened her to trouble (Odin) again. She passed through New Orleans a few weeks ago on her way here to visit her brother. Her stay was so short she could not see (Odin). She would be glad to fill the situation of an English teacher in a French family. If required to teach guitar she can do so as she received instructions from Henry Worrall, the celebrated guitarist. She could teach piano. She is dependent on her brother or sister for a home.

VI-2-l - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 12mo. - {2}


1866 Jul. 23
Johnson, Caroline: New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to (Archbishop John Mary Odin, C.M.: New Orleans, Louisiana)

By the request of Lucien Adams, a recorder of the Fourth District, she writes in behalf of the bearer of this letter, Philomine Joseph, a young person of good family who has been robbed by the rascality of an uncle of every cent her mother left her. She lost her mother years ago and her father a year and a half ago. Johnson found her sick at one of her friends who died of the same fever Philomine had. Johnson appeals to (Odin) to assist by making a little collection for her. If she could get some clothes she could find some one to take her for her food; she is a beautiful seamstress. (Note in Odin's hand) Philomine Joseph Suarez.

VI-2-l - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {4}


1866 July 23
Scanlon, John: Harrisonburg, ( )
 to J(ames) A(lphonsus) McMaster: New York, New York

The writer thanks McMaster for 15 copies of the Journal received through Rev. Joseph Bixio, and states that the citizens of the town are well pleased with them and the majority of them endorse the writer in what he has said. The writer says he has an affadavit of respectable men who have heard him (?) make the expression that McMaster's paper was a dirty lying sheet and that he was a substitute Broker. The writer understands that this man is going to give in a hard piece to a black Republican paper in town called the American Union, against McMaster's paper, and that he will inform McMaster when it appears. When that man writes McMaster, concerning Scanlon, McMaster is to let him know.

I-1-n - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {1}


1866 Jul. 24
Harnais, Father M(athurin): Buras, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Odin told Harnais not to break with the counsellors but to call a meeting and collect. Harnais saw C(eles)tin Bulot who in January set out with T. Rayas to collect and pay the carpenter. Bulot cannot do so at present but will come to get Harnais to go collecting with him in two weeks. Last Wednesday Mr. Viard, the carpenter, asked for money; Harnais told him there was none. Harnais called a meeting; no one came. What should Harnais do, withdraw the papers in the hands of Bulot who up to now has been treasurer, let them pay their carpenter as they wish, cast them aside and get out as best he can? Besides the expenditures for the church, which with his $200 subscription amount to $1200, Harnais has had to buy the materials to build a sacristy which will serve as lodging. As the river goes down, at least $200 will be needed to repair the levee. Harnais is surprised that Odin has so little confidence in his priests and wishes to impose impious governors on them when he so often complains of the trustees at the Cathedral.

VI-2-l - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {5}


1866 July 24
(Odin), J(ohn) N., Archbishop of: New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop J(ohn) B(aptist) Purcell: of Cincinnati, (Ohio)

The see of Little Rock has been so long vacant that he is happy to see it filled. The choice made by the Holy See seems to give great satisfaction to all. Purcell should forward the Bulls as soon as possible and urge the newly appointed Bishop to accept. Father (Stephen) Rousselon left on April 15 in a bad state of health; he writes that he is recovering slowly.

II-5-c - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {2}


1866 Jul. 26
Nash, James P.: Galveston, (Texas)
 to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.: New Orleans, Louisiana)

After his visit to New Orleans, he found family and friends all in good health. The trip was accomplished in 36 hours. The receding view of New Orleans makes the traveler see that it is eminently Catholic from the lofty spires. He asks (Odin) to thank the priests who received him with such attention, especially Father J. Hayden, the priests at St. Vincent Seminary, and Fathers Moynahan and Sheehan. He wrote Father T. Bermingham containing a small offering for his mission directed to (Odin)'s care. (Nathan) Smith acknowledged (Odin)'s favor with tears; he will soon be in his new house. He has rented his cottage for $40 gold and received six months rent in advance. Nash would like to know how (Thomas) O'Donnell's health is at present.

VI-2-l - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 4to. - {4}


1866 Jul. 29
Ch(arles) Francis, (S.M., Brother): Dayton, (Ohio)
 to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.: New Orleans, Louisiana)

They arrived yesterday at Cincinnati at 4 o'clock and at 5 Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell had received (Odin)'s letters. Their trip was short; they made the journey from New Orleans to Dayton in less than four days. (Brother?) Beyrer joins in thanking (Odin) for his care of them.

VI-2-l - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 12mo. - {3}


1866 Jul. 29
Dénecé, Father J(oh)n M(ary) J(osep)h: Petit Caillou, (Louisiana)
 to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.: New Orleans, Louisiana)

Father (Hyacinth) Gonellaz has let him know when (Odin) will visit Dénecé's little chapel which is far from being finished. He hopes also to show him his rectory which he is having built now. He will also show him the chasubles he has bought for Petit-Caillou and Terrebonne. Dénecé hopes that (Odin)'s presence will dispel prejudices and encourage the good people. The dances here last into Sunday morning. In Caillou they have built 3 or 4 places where they sell liquor during Mass and where there is always money for drinking but none for the Church. Burials are often made without letting Denece know. As this is a new mission, there is no cemetery and the dead are taken to Houma or Thibodeaux. Marriages are also taking place without the nuptial blessing. Some also are interested in spiritism. Dénecé has made a little resume which (Odin) can keep for the day of Confirmation so that he can speak of them. (Odin) could also mention the fee and fix the limits of the missions. He would like to have the two Bayous entire. Gonellaz has no right to complain; he gets more money for his pews alone than Dénecé gets in all. (Dénecé gives amounts in dollars). He would like to be rid of Canal. (Odin) could encourage the people of Terresbonne to build the large chapel they plan. The reason people are so little disposed to give is because they saw Father (Charles Henry de Boutelou) St. Aubin go away with the subscription for building the church at Houma and saw Father (Francis) Tasset take away what he pleased. Gonellaz told that Tasset gave him everything; this was false. All Dénecé has is new. Tomorrow Dénecé leaves on mission. He hopes to have more than 400 for Confirmation.

VI-2-l - A.L.S. - (French) - 7pp. - folio & 12mo. - {7}


1866 Jul. 29
Purcell, J(ohn) B(aptist), Archbishop of: Cincinnati, (Ohio)
 to Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.): New Orleans, (Louisiana)

The Christian Brothers of Mary yesterday delivered Odin's letter of the 24th and that for the Bishop-Elect (Edward Fitzgerald) of Little Rock with the "Mandatum" Apostolic for his consecration. The Catholics and many Protestants of Columbus have been moving heaven and earth to retain him but Purcell presumes he will bow to the yoke and labor in Odin's province. He will be a serious loss to Purcell. As he is engaged in building a new church in Columbus he may not go South until after the coming Council in Baltimore. Archbishop (Peter) Richard Kenrick) of St. Louis whose health is said not to have been very good of late, has gone to the seaside with the Bishop of Nashville. Why cannot Odin come up and take a little needful repose with them? The papers had an account of a Sister of the Good Shepherd who jumped from a railroad car in motion about 40 miles from Cincinnati on the way from Angers with another Sister destined for here. She was not injured and is now in her convent, apparently sane. She is a sister to a Sister Seraphina, (R.G.S.) in this city. Purcell is glad that Father (Stephen) Rousselon is likely to return to Odin improved in health in the fall. Could Odin not obtain two good French priests for Purcell?

VI-2-l - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 12mo. - {7}


1866 July 29
Spalding, M(artin) J., Archbishop of: Baltimore, (Maryland)
 to Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell): of (Cincinnati, Ohio)

He thanks Purcell for sending the Roman letter which will be useful. He had heard nothing of that Plenary Council at Rome. Father (Francis X.) Weninger's suggestion will be duly examined.

II-5-c - A.L.S. - 1p. - 16to. - {2}


1866 Jul. 31
(Elder), William Henry, Bishop of: Natchez, (Mississippi)
 to Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.): New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Odin's letter of July 24 gave (Elder) great pleasure. He had already written a pressing letter to Bishop-Elect (Edward Fitzgerald) not to make difficulties. He enclosed it to Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell. (Elder) encloses copies of an article he had sent to their paper here. They had published a notice from the Crescent, half complimentary and more than half sneering. He has sent a copy to (Thomas) Layton. Father (Henry) Picherit writes that Father (John) Scollard must have been misinformed; his letter is written in a poor hand but (Elder) had best enclose it as it is (no enclosure).

VI-2-l - A.L.S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {6}