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1871 January 1
Dean, Thorina (Brownson): East Galway, N(ew) Y(ork)
 to (Orestes A. Brownson): (Elizabeth, New Jersey)

She acknowledges Brownson's letter with the enclosure which she thinks is too large and is glad Henry resigned from the army. The cold weather is not so good for her system. A letter was received from Daphne (Ludington) which stated they were all well and are moving in a house built by Benjamin but she has not heard from Daniel. She mentions the death of certain friends. Sarah and husband and babe and William are all well. Orestes and Ellen send their love to Brownson.

I-4-e - A.L.S. - 2pp. {2}


(1871) Jan. 1,
"Subscriber": Canton, O(hio)
 to (James Alphonsus McMaster): (New York, New York)

The writer endeavored to find someone better able to write than he, but failing to find anyone, has undertaken to write himself. St. John's Parish in Canton, Ohio, includes over a thousand souls, over whom F(ather) F. Berthalette is pastor. Since he came about two years ago he has endeared himself to all. To show their gratitude to him, the congregation met in the new church, which is not yet completed on New Years Day (1871), and a gold watch was presented to Father Berthalette by Mr. A. Lynch, Esq. He was surprised by this testimonial of the love of his congregation, who, in turn, looked upon him with new confidence and reverence.

I-1-o - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 16mo. - {2}


1871 Jan. 1
Dwenger, C.PP. S., Father Jos(eph): New Richmond, (Ohio)
 to Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell): (of Cincinnati, Ohio)

He wishes (Purcell) a Happy New Year. He has started the mission here, but does not yet know what the state of the congregation is. The election of officers of the St. Peter's Society passed off quietly. The offices of the society heretofore had acted not only in affairs concerning the society, but also these of the church and congregation. Now, however, they represent only about two-thirds of the congregation, some of whom are not practical Catholics. It is a mistake that Father (H ) Riekens had no committee at all and kept the books himself. Dwenger published the laws of the diocese with regard to a church committee and told them that the priest would no longer have the books of the church and that a regular committee would be appointed according to (Purcell's) instructions. He will wait until he has heard from (Purcell) before determining whether the officers of the St. Peter's society should act as councilmen or whether they should be elected according to the rules of the diocese. The latter is the best, he thinks. He will be in Cincinnati next week to report in person.

II-5-e - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 12mo. - {2}


1871 Jan. 1
Webb, Arch: Louisville, Ky.
 to Ja(me)s A(lphonsus) McMaster: New York, New York

Webb sends $1.25 as an offering to the Pope, from five members of his family. He expresses his regrets at the size of the offering but will repeat it once a month as long as the Pope is suffering.

I-1-c - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {1}


1871 Jan. 2
Lemonnier, C.S.C., Father A(ugustus): Notre Dame, Indiana
 to James F. Edwards: (Toledo, Ohio)

He sends his wishes for the new year. Father (Charles) Willandre (C.S.C.) (provincial of Canada) is here with Father (Patrick J.) Colovin (C.S.C.). Father (Thomas) V. (Angier C.S.C.) will probably go to Galveston as superior of the new college there. He heard Mme. Nillsson sing in Chicago. The two study halls have been beautifully grained. Bro. Alban, C.S.C. displays a great deal of taste and activity. He would like to go to Toledo. Is it true that Mary is about to be married?

XI-1-a - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {5}


1871 Jan. 2
McCloskey, W(illiam), Bishop of: Louisville, (Kentucky)
 to Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell: of Cincinnati, (Ohio)

There is a person here who professes to be a Chaldean and a convert and who also says he is a Bishop-elect, and has collected in France for four years. He has papers to prove this and they seem to be all right, but McCloskey thought it prudent to write Purcell and ask him if he knew anything against the Rt. Rev. Joseph George, as he calls himself. If he does, McCloskey asks that he telegraph at once, otherwise he will wait for his letter. He believes the Archbishop of St. Louis (Peter R. Kenrick) is at home.

II-5-e - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {2}


1871 Jan. 3
Janssens, Father F.: Richmond, V(irgini)a
 to Archbishop J(ohn) B(aptist) Purcell: Cincinnati, Ohio

The Bishop (John McGill) is still failing every day. He has sold for Purcell 6500 Va. consolidated bonds at 57 to bring a net figure of $3482.34. He enclosed a check on New York for that amount. Please acknowledge receipt. The bonds enclosed could not be sold unless Purcell signed them. One requires his signature before a Notary Public. One could not be funded as the amount is below $100. Besides the bonds, the Bishop has in his possession 20 shares on the Domat Swamp Canal belonging to Purcell. Dr. Behan has offered to sell them for Purcell. What should he do?

II-5-e - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 16to. - {2}


1871 Jan. 3
Purser, Geo(rge) H.: New York City, (New York)
 to J(ames) A(lphonsus) McMaster: (New York, New York)

McMaster is requested to attend a meeting of the Commissioners in the matter of widening of Broome Street, on Wednesday, Jan. 4.

I-1-o - A.L.S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {1}


1871 Jan. 5
Patrizi, C(onstantine) Cardinal: Rome, (Papal States)
 to Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell: Cincinnati, (Ohio)

Patrizi acknowledges Purcell's letter of Sept. 16 to the Congregation of the Propaganda in which he explained the action of his vicar-general (Father Edward Purcell) regarding the condemnation of the Fenians decreed by the Sacred Congregation of the Inquisition, Jan. 12, 1870, with the clause that it would lack its effect until the American prelates should announce it. Purcell asserted that this delay seemed to him to have been imposed partly because the American bishops were at that time in Rome, and partly because grave evils were feared if the decree were promulgated without consultation with the bishops. This opinion having been submitted to the Sacred Congregation, the Congregation easily saw that such a theory could not be approved since in the decree there was not a question of a new law to be announced but merely a declaration of the fact of condemnation of the Apostolic See. Thus, there was no need of promulgation for it to have effect, but merely that it be known. Thus, Purcell had no power of exempting any one from the force of the decree which said that whoever gave his name to the forbidden society must withdraw it if he wished to avoid the penalties imposed by the sacred Constitutions. Purcell is to act accordingly in this kind of business.

II-5-e - L.S. - (Latin) - 2pp. - 8vo. - {3}


1871 Jan. 6
Gross, C.SS.R., Father W(illia)m H.: New York, (New York)
 to Bishop F(rancis) P. McFarland of: Hartford, (Connecticut)

The bearer, Miss Camilla A. Rhodes, is a convert who has suffered the numerous trials of a New England convert to Catholicism and has been for a long time one of Gross's penitents.

I-1-c - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {2}


1871 Jan. 7
(Brownson, Orestes A.): Eliz(abeth, New Jersey)
 to H(enry) F. Brownson: Detroit, Mich(igan)

Brownson congratulates Henry on his freedom. He has no fears of his steady application to his profession and is sure that by diligence Henry will succeed. Brownson approves of Henry going into partnership with his brother-in-law, to whom Brownson sends his regards. The gas fixtures will be sent as soon as Brownson can get someone to pack them. The boy can hardly go up town to get someone and Henry's mother, though better, cannot go out yet. She has had a severe attack of bronchitis. Brownson cannot walk that far and they have no girls. Brownson does not think he can get them off before Monday or Tuesday and is afraid he will not be able to visit Henry much before spring. He is just recovering from his Boston trip and cannot leave there at present. His love to Fifine and the children.

III-3-a - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {1}


1871 Jan. 7
(Dupanloup), F(elix) Bishop of Orleans: Orleans, (France)
 to (Archbishop John Baptist Purcell): (Cincinnati, Ohio)

(Dupanloup) has not heard from Purcell for a long time, in fact, since (Purcell) left Rome. Monseigneur(Karl Joseph von)Hefele has written to him twice stating that no one has asked him or any of his colleagues anything about the Council. He asks if this is true also of Purcell. In France (Dupanloup) knows of two bishops who were told indirectly by a layman, a business man, that, if they did not explicityly adhere, they would have a relatively difficult time obtaining certain marriage dispensations, which are not accorded so easily. He asks if anything like this has happened to Purcell or his colleagues. He begs Purcell to write him the news. P.S. He asks him to send the answer under the care of the Bishop of St. Gall, who will see that it comes to him.

II-5-e - A.L.S. - (French) - 2pp. - 8vo. - {2}


1871 Jan. 9
Brownson, O(restes) A.: Eliz(abeth, New Jersey)
 to H(enry) F. Brownson: Detroit, Mich(igan)

Henry's mother and Brownson have concluded that the gas fixtures are not worth the expense of sending. They were damaged in the moving from N. York. The Brownsons have thought it best to send 50 dollars toward meeting the expense of purchasing new ones. Henry is to regard it as a wedding present as yesterday was the anniversary of his marriage. Brownson advises (Henry) not to use gas for light. Brownson much prefers kerosene. It makes a better and steadier light, is far less hurtful to the eyes and is far cheaper. Henry's mother thinks it costs one third as much as gas and they have never had an accident from it, and like it much better in every ways. Henry's mother had a girl come Saturday. She herself is much better. Anna (Brownson) has returned to Boston and the Brownsons have fallen into their usual routine. Brownson is not sure when he will visit (Henry) but will give him notice. The Brownsons send their love to all.

III-3-a - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {1}


1871 Jan. 10
Deschamps, V(ictor) A(ugustin) Archbishop of Malines: Malines, (Belgium)
 to (Martin John Spalding, Archbishop of Baltimore): (Baltimore, Maryland)

By the time this letter reaches him (Spalding) will have received the letter in which Deschamps acknowledges the reception of the documents concerning the council of Baltimore. Yesterday the documents caused the glorification of America at Malines where Belgian bishops were assembled with the papal nuncio. It is necessary that the movement continue and grow. It seems that Pope Pius IX is against the continuation of the council anywhere than at Rome. He hopes that the Pope lives so that a conclave will not be necessary at Rome in these times. P.S. He intends soon to write to Father (Anthont) Konings C.S.S.R.

XI-1-a - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 12mo. - (French) - {1}


1871 Jan. 10
Lamy, John B., Bishop of Santa Fe: Santa Fe, New Mexico
 to Archbishop J(ohn) B(aptist) Purcell: of Cincinnati, (Ohio)

He thanks Purcell for the kindness shown to his nephew Anthony upon his ordination. He hopes Anthony will make a good missionary. The Sisters of Charity are all well. Besides their orphans, they also keep a school for small boys. The Sisters of Loretto probably will face a lawsuit over a legacy of $20,000 left them by a Mexican nun who died last summer. Her relatives have determined to contest her will. Two of their best lawyers have agreed to prosecute the suit, requiring nothing in fees in case the suit is decided against them. He has authorized the sisters to bring the suit. He asks to be remembered to Father E(dward) Purcell.

II-5-e - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 12mo. - {2}


1871 Jan. 10
Purcell, J(ohn) B(aptist) Archbishop of: (Cincinnati, Ohio)
 to Mrs. Lydia Potter:

He is unable to subscribe to the views expressed by Father (Silas M.) Chatard with reference to the expediency of Mrs. Potter investing her generous gift of $5,000 to the American College, Rome. Under present conditions, he should be unwilling to send a student to Rome. He is also unwilling that the interest of the sum should accrue to the College without advantage to this archdiocese. He has already paid more than $5,200 for the good of the College and has derived no benefit from it. Mr. Springer generously gave $1,000 for the maintenance of a student in the College for three years, and much of the capital and interest of that sum is lost to the diocese. He has not failed to speak his mind on the subject of the rules of the College to Chatard and to dissent from his views. Cardinal Barnabo said positively that the Holy Father would never give up the fee of the College. There are no other hands in Rome to whom Purcell would like to entrust its property. They have a great seminary in Cincinnati, whose professors are as learned as any in Rome, two having been educated in Rome and carried off the highest degrees, but not in the American College. One that took his degree after Purcell had paid for him for 4 years left the seminary against his will and against right and duty. Chatard knows him. Purcell has spent $40,000 on the Cincinnati seminary and is now preparing to build a costly chapel for it. Therefore, he would suggest that the $5,000 be applied here at home for the education of a student of the diocese of Mrs. Potter's own choice, and where she can see the results of her generosity with her own eyes and to her special edification and consolation. Mrs. Potter may send this to Chatard, for Purcell does not have secrets from him or anyone concerned with the matter, which touches the interest of religion in this diocese. Several bishops who did not like the management of the College, declared they would send no more students to it and the Holy Father expressed to a dozen of them together his own dissatisfaction with it.

(Letter of Purcell's returned without note or comment by Chatard.)

II-5-e - A.L.S. - 7pp. - 12mo. - {3}


1871 Jan. 11
Borgess, C(aspar) H., Bishop of: Detroit, (Michigan)
 to Archbishop J(ohn) B(aptist) Purcell: (of Cincinnati, Ohio)

He thanks Purcell for his letter of Dec. 30 and asks him to accept a most cordial return of the good wishes he offered. He knows that Purcell is aware that Borgess is much interested in the diocese. Nevertheless, he recalls the good old times when so much cordiality was shown in the family circle. He feels sure that Purcell's brother (Father Edward Purcell) will apologize for him. Forty Hours devotion was held in the Cathedral three days before Christmas and attendance was good, considering weather conditions, as it was six degrees below zero. He gave Communion to many on Christmas morning at the 8:30 Mass and many more received at the 5:00 High Mass. The same devotion was began last Friday in St. Ann's, the French Church, where Borgess sang the High Mass and was Celebrant at the procession of the Blessed Sacrament that morning, and in the evening of the following Sunday, after preaching a long sermon to an attentive audience. Preparations are being made for a Protest in this city. Until Borgess stirred them up, they all kept quiet. Miss Marianne Desnoyers was married yesterday by Father G(ustavus) Limpens and left for her future home, Pittsburgh. Last evening they had a pleasant Clerical party at Mrs. Van Dyke's given in honor of her son, Father E(rnest) Van Dyke. The trouble about the settlement of the claims relative to the property of the French church will be more favorable to them than he before feared. But he feels that the property itself will not be a benefit to the Diocese. He will explain in person. He wishes Purcell and to all a Happy New Year.

II-5-e - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 12mo. - {3}


1871 Jan. 11
Pius IX, Pope: Rome, (Papal States)
 to (Archbishop John Baptist Purcell): (Cincinnati, Ohio)

Pope Pius acknowledges (Purcell's) letter of Dec. 5, 1870 in which he declared his adherence with sincere mind and full faith in the decrees of the fourth session of the Vatican Council. The declaration is the more pleasing to the Pope and the Holy See because it refutes and corrects the statements of the press. He accepts this declaration with praise and assures (Purcell) that his charity towards him has been greatly increased by it. Since he is not ignorant of the sorrow of soul with which Purcell was affected at the bold attacks on the Holy See by its unfaithful children, he does not doubt but that (Purcell), with the faithful, will offer fervent prayers to God and show his zeal in the defense of the cause of justice. The Pope prays for Purcell and his flock and as a pledge of his affection gives his apostolic benediction to him and to his flock.

II-5-e - L.S. - (Latin) - 1p. - 4to. - {2}


1871 Jan. 13
Elder, William Henry, Bishop of Natchez: Canton, Mississippi
 to Archbishop J(ohn) B(aptist) Purcell: of Cincinnati, (Ohio)

He asks to make use of Purcell's permission through a proxy. Mrs. Gordon has better prospects than ever before of obtaining a church at Woodville. Their pastor, Father (Philip) Huber is willing to devote himself to the work of collecting and of building. A large portion has already been raised in Woodville and in the Diocese. His second plea is for himself, since a large part of his debts contracted for educating priests last year and for their travelling expenses remain unpaid. Even some of the previous year's debts are not paid. He also has other debts for school buildings, etc., which he wanted to pay out of his allocations from the Papacy. They are attempting to find some means to raise funds in the diocese. These must be very slender at first, but he hopes they will increase. Perhaps Purcell is suffering from the same embarrasment. Father Huber is not one to press or insist, and he appeals to those who feel able to do a little for others without hurting their own responsibilities. The priests are ready to cooperate and are compensating him for the outlay he made for the articles brought back from Rome. This will help, but it will not nearly reach the required amount. He congratulates Purcell on his protest in behalf of the Holy Father. He asks Purcell's opinion of Bishop (Richard V.) Whelan's proposal to call on our government. He thinks it wise, for even if no attention is paid it by the government, it will declare the truth and justice. Their own protest to the capital at Jackson brings out Whelan's views, even though they are few in numbers. He wishes Purcell and his brother (Father Edward Purcell) a Happy New Year. P.S.—Please address him at the Catholic Church, Vicksburgh, Mississippi.

II-5-e - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 12mo. - {3}


1871 Jan. 13
Genolin, Father L(ouis): Liberty, (Texas)
 to J(ames) A(lphonsus) McMaster: (New York, New York)

He had Father (E.) Buffard send his subscription because Genolin did not have time to write. He hopes to send subscriptions for some American Catholics and others from Liberty. Some Protestants receive the Banner of Light and in the issue of January 7 there was a joking reference to Father (Isaac) Hecker of New York. He asks that McMaster reply to this attack on the Catholic Church in her troubles because Genolin's lack of knowledge of English handicaps him, and because McMaster is the best defender he knows. The Banner of Light is an exponent of the spiritual Philosophy of the 19th century, published in Boston. He thought a little article might help to counteract the prejudiced minds of those who read this dishonest paper.

I-1-o - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {3}


1871 Jan. 14
Barnabo, Al(exander) Cardinal Prefect: Rome, (Papal States)
 to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell: of Cincinnati, (Ohio)

Barnabo says that Purcell knows that complaints have been made concerning the manner of acting of Bishop William McCloskey of Louisville, especially in regards to temporal matters. Purcell also knows that Barnabo presented the matter to McCloskey when he was in Rome for the Council so that McCloskey could explain himself, as he did explain. However, while on the one hand the complaints were explained away, on the other hand new complaints have been received so that Barnabo feels that he must find some new way to get at the real situation. Purcell can understand that the best way is to have some one go in person and investigate and then report. This burden he places on Purcell. First however, Barnabo wants to know if Purcell has any objection to this. If he has, another bishop of the province would be appointed. Great caution and prudence must be used in this matter, especially since there still remains the difficulty between McCloskey and Archbishop (Martin J. Spalding), the former bishop. Consequently, whether Purcell undertakes the task himself or designates another, another bishop should be added, not because Barnabo sees any trace of prejudice, but to remove any doubt in the minds of those who have made complaint. Whatever Purcell decides to do, Barnabo asks him to write to him giving his decision.

II-5-e - L.S. - (Latin) - 2pp. - 8vo. - {3}


(1871) Jan. 15,
Cassidy, M(ary) A.: Camden, N(ew) J(ersey)
 to (James Alphonsus) McMaster: (New York, New York)

She is sending ($3.00) for a year's subscription to the Journal, and asks that it and the 1871 back numbers be sent to Mrs. Frank Drexel of Philadelphia. She has been trying to find subscribers, but the Citizen and the Irish American have been in the field before her and few people can afford two papers. Father Byrne was disappointed at not having seen McMaster, but he had been summoned by the Bishop. He is grateful for McMaster's appreciation of his church, and McMaster's article will be kept to use against the critics of the Church of the Immaculate Conception. Miss Cassidy met an Irish priest from Dublin, F(athe)r Hogan, who reports that during the sitting of the Council every number of the Freeman was read eagerly because of its advocating an immediate definition of the Papal Infallibility dogma. She asks McMaster to tell Mrs. McMaster that if she ever gets to New York she looks forward to sitting at the McMaster fireside, where she and McMaster can discuss Bishop Butler, regarding whom she is still heterodox. She sends regards from her Mother and Mr. Jenks, who, together with her, desire they could do more for the Freeman.

I-1-o - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 12mo. - {1}


1871 Jan. 15
Peter, Sarah: Cincinnati, (Ohio)
 to (James Alphonsus) McMaster: (New York, New York)

She is grateful for the consolation that McMaster's writing give her. She wishes to thank him for herself and for the many thousands of Catholics who are appreciative of McMaster's brave spirit. She is thankful that McMaster supports their courage in this period of chastisement and knows that God will allow it to be turned to His greater glory. She agrees with McMaster that the letters of Miss (Ella B.) Edes are the best they have and should be preserved for posterity. Reading the accounts in the Journal of expressions of faith and loyalty in the distant points of the country, Lockport, N. Y. and Nashville, Tenn., She is happy that the Catholics in this country and in Europe are waiting only for the authoritave signal to write their words in noble deeds. P.S. She was tempted to add her contribution to the Holy Father to McMaster's list, but thought it unfair to the good Jesuits who are doing all they can in the same cause in Cincinnati.

I-1-o - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 12mo. - {2}


1871 Jan. 16
McMaster, Ja(me)s A(lphonsus): New York, (New York)
 to 

He received the $20 and drew to the order of the sender's son a bill of exchange on a banking house in Brussells, Bilgium through the house of Mali & Co. N(ew) Y(ork). Mali is the Belgian Consul Gen(eral) and a New York banker. McMaster sent the bill of exchange to Petit Seminaire, the matter of writing letters. The Bishop Promised to say a Mass for the intention that he should overcome this habits but he has not improved.

I-2-d - A.L. incomplete - 2pp. - 8vo. - {10}


1871 Jan. 17
Murray, Hugh W.: Wolfe Island, (Canada) ?
 to James A(lphonsus) McMaster: (New York, New York)

He plans to give a few lectures in New York and other cities on the events in Rome in September and asks McMaster if such a project would take in New York. His object is to keep up the attention of Catholics upon the Roman question and to use the proceeds from the lectures to build a church on Wolfe Island for Irish Catholics. He asks that McMaster keep this letter a secret. He asks for a reply as early as possible.

I-1-c - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {1}


1871 Jan. 18
Perché, N(apoleon) J(oseph), Archbishop of: New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Cardinal: (Rome, Italy)

Since in his diocese there are four men who stand out by their good example, their faith, piety and devotion to the Holy See, Perché would like his Holiness Pius IX to grant them some order of knighthood for which he feels that they are suitable. He lists the four. Thomas Layton, senior, a head of the Bank of the South who has worked hard in the collection of funds to be sent to the Holy Father, and was a promotor in the demonstrations of loyalty to the Pope. Secondly, Peter Thomas Layton, junior, son of the other who studied medicine with success in Paris for four years and who has been admired for his open profession of his Catholic faith. He served with Ozanam in caring for the wounded soldiers in the pontifical army against the invaders of the Papal States. Third, Alexius Robert, a capable, lawyer who has served for many years as a consul for the papal states in New Orleans, and has been a promotor of demonstrations in favor of the Pope. Fourth, George Thomas d'Aquin, who belongs to the family of the angelic doctor. From his tender years he has been religious and zealous for the study of letters, philosophy and mathematics. He has made two trips to the Holy Land, one with some Frenchmen on which he was made a knight of the Holy Sepulcher, and another in which he was made a knight commander since he was the leader of the pilgrimage. In Rome he was admitted to membership in the papal Zouaves, and fought until the last day. If the Holy Father sees fit to recognize these four men the diocese will be pleased. (Apparently a first draft).

VI-2-o - A.L.S. - (Latin) - 3pp. - 8vo. - {4}


1871 Jan. 21
McGill, John, Bishop of Richmond: Richmond, V(irgini)a
 to Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell: Cincinnati, (Ohio)

No arrangement has been made as yet by him with the executors in regard to the disposition of the estate of James H. Behan, since one legacy to a Mr. Taylor of England, whose residence they have not been able to discover, and the payment of expenses for bringing back Mr. Behan's remains is yet to be settled. Since receiving Purcell's letter with Bishop (Edward) Fitzgerald's (of Little Rock) relinquishment, he has received no others with the exception of Bishop (John H.) Luers (of Fort Wayne), which was not the document desired. He has not written to any others himself, and does not know how many more relinquishments Purcell has received. He does not like to act upon the discretionary power granted in Behan's codicil, but would rather do so after the voluntary relinquishment, before adjusting the legacies of the former stock holders. Did Purcell write to all on the list McGill sent, including Abp. (Francis N.) Blanchet of Oregon, Abp. (John) McCloskey of New York and Abp. (Peter R.) Kenrick of St. Louis? He does not think the Hospital of St. Vincent de Paul, Norfolk, will consent, although he has not spoken to the sisters on the subject. He expects to meet the executees shortly when they will determine what sum is yet to be disposed, and what is to be done in the two points referred to in the letter. P.S.—Please excuse blots as he has no time to copy.

II-5-e - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 12mo. - {4}


1871 Jan. 21
Robertson, H(arrison): Danville, V(irgini)a
 to (James Alphonsus McMaster): New York City, (New York)

He asks if the Father I Munroe who delivered a discourse recently in New York is the same I. Munroe who was a nephew of Ex. Pres. Munroe, a Captain in the U. S. Army, resigned about 1857, was connected with the Journal. He was a friend of Robertson's and was reported killed in action near Harper's Ferry during the War. If it is the same man, he would be grateful if McMaster would send his address.

I-1-o - A.L.S. (card enclosed) - 1p. - 12mo. - {1}


1871 Jan. 24
Fagan, Father Tho(ma)s:
Seminary of St. Francis, Milwaukee, (Wisconsin)
 to (James Alphonsus McMaster): (New York, New York)

Since some doubt exists whether the Oratio de Spiritu should still be said in the Mass, he states that according to a declaration of the Vicar General of His Holiness, Cardinal Patrizi, made to the clergy of Rome Oct. 28, 1870, the oratio imperata and the Miss de Spiritu Sancto on Thursday were no longer obligatory. Neither the Oratio de Spiritu Sancto nor the Oratio pro Papa can now be said unless prescribed by the Ordinary of the Diocese.

I-1-o - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {1}


1871 Jan. 25
Young, Father N(icholas) R(aymond): Bellefontaine, O(hio)
 to Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell): (Cincinnati, Ohio)

As he expects Purcell to visit them during the year, he invites him in good time so as to be ready for his visit. He has no parochial school, making instruction of the children that much harder. He wishes to have that requisite of pastoral care, which he thinks he has fervently at heart and only lack of means to maintain it cheeks him. Will it be convenient for Purcell to visit Bellefontaine June 18? He can have the children ready for confirmation by that time. They are rough and wild, but he thinks they are pure. At that time he will ask Purcell to grant him a few weeks vacation, in order that he may accompany his sister to their old home in Maryland. The financial report as required of each priest, as noticed in the Catholic Telegraph of Jan. 5, is easy for him to give. The annual income of St. Patrick's Church, Bellefontaine, is $700, and the debt is about $600. A residence house has been erected during the past year; the buildings and grounds are in good condition. The missions in west Liberty bring in about $50 a year, where the debt on the church property is about $900, besides the amount of the loaned by Mr. J. Nash and Father Edward Purcell. A portion of the property is now rented, so as to bring in about $900 in five years. Degraff (Logan County) brings in $50 a year, there is no debt and the church is in good condition. Everything will be submitted to Purcell on his visit. He was in North Lewisburg when Purcell passed through Bellefontaine. His sister is well and they ask Purcell's blessing.

II-5-e - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 12mo. - {2}


1871 Jan. 27
Freitag, C.SS.R., Father Aug(ustine) M.: Annapolis (Maryland)
 to James A(lphonsus) McMaster: (New York, New York)

He has been intending to write to McMaster for some time. From Sept. to Nov. he was under a physician's care, but is fully recovered. They had 48 Masses Christmas day; Freitag offered the Midnight Mass for McMaster and his family. McMaster's articles in the Freeman are filling the hearts of the young men with love for the Church. McMaster will reap a rich harvest from the seed he has sown. They will offer a Solemn High Mass next Sunday for the Pope. Freitag has been appointed rector of the institution, and Father (Nicholas) Yaeckel has been sent to St. Alphonsus', Baltimore, and Father (Joseph) Wissel to Boston. He asks prayers that he may perform his duty well. He enclosed a portrait of Jos(eph) (Updegraff), a student at the seminary and a grandson of Gen. (Finny) who died at Ilcheten in December. He wishes McMaster and his family a Happy New Year and asks the prayers of the children.

I-1-o - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 12mo. - {3}


1871 Jan. 28
Hecker, (Father) I(saac) T.: N(ew) Y(ork) (City), (New York)
 to Orestes A. Brownson: (Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Father Hecker has seen the Archbishop (John McCloskey of New York about Senator Wilson's article in the Atlantic. "The political question is one which strikes at the genus of our political system." The educational question strikes a blow at Religion and at Catholicity. Secretary Boutwell tells "us" the church is too incompetent to give an adequate education. "Education is required of man in order to be in harmony with the laws promulgated by God. Let the state what it requires to make good citizens and make that compulsory, if it pleases." They talk about Prussia but "it would aid us in getting our own children to our schools." Father Hecker believes Wilson is at the head. Father Hecker has enclosed some material which he hopes will be a subject of an article, by Brownson, in the April number of the Catholic World.

I-4-e - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 12mo. - {3}


1871 Jan. 28
Darr, George: Notre Dame, Indiana
 to James F. Edwards: (Toledo, Ohio)

He was surprised to hear that Edwards spent a lonesome night at South Bend. He was honored with the second leading part in the exhibition. A party of young ladies from Niles visited them today. The boys acted fearfully. Father (William) Corby was obliged to drive them away.

XI-1-a - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {1}


1871 Jan. 28
McGill, John, Bishop of Richmond: Richmond, V(irgini)a
 to Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell: of Cincinnati, (Ohio)

He received Purcell's letter with the five relinquishments and yesterday he wrote to Abp. (John) McCloskey (of New York) and Bishop (James F.) Wood (of Philadelphia) and expects an answer from them soon. He thinks the Bishop of Oregon (Francis N. Blanchet) has received his legacy in stocks, so it will not be necessary to write to him. He will find out for sure from Dr. Fitzgibbons of Norfolk. McGill's health is the same, except for a slight cold. Did the Abp. of New Orleans (Napoleon J. Perche) or Bishop (C. M.) Dubuis of Texas get the legacy to Bishop (J.M.) Odin? He is very anxious to get the matter settled as soon as possible. Fitzgibbon has brought to McGill's attention the case of Peggy Jaspar, one of (James) Behan's servants, who was given a legacy of stocks worth $2500 of the Farmers Bank of Virginia, now entirely worthless. They think it would be well to do something for her since that would probably be what Behan wanted. He asks Purcell's opinion.

II-5-e - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 12mo. - {4}


1871 Jan. 29
Persico, Ignatius, Bishop of Savannah: Savannah, G(eorgi)a
 to (James Alphonsus) McMaster: (New York, New York)

He acknowledged McMaster's letter of Jan. 17 with the check for $200.00 for a votive Mass in honor of St. Joseph. He is grateful for McMaster's work for the Christian Brothers. He shall take the advice of the clergy on the occasion of the Synod which will be held Feb. 9 and let McMaster know regarding the Franciscan Brothers. The clergy retreat will be held from Feb. 1 to 9 and Bishop (Michael) O'Connor will will conduct it. Every congregation in the diocese has passed resolutions protesting against the sacriligious occupation of the Papal Territory. God will bless McMaster's good work for religion's and the Pope's behalf. Persico continues to offer his prayers for McMaster and his family. He sends regards to Mrs. McMaster and the children.

I-1-o - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {2}


1871 (Jan. 29)
Weninger, S. J., Father F(rancis) X.: (Cincinnati, Ohio)
 to (James Alphonsus) McMaster: (New York, New York)

He asks why McMaster does not give notice to Weninger's missionary movements. He could understand this when giving missions to the German and French population, but now that he is on the Pacific Coast preaching to the English congregations from San Diego to Vancouver Island, he wonders at McMaster's lack of interest. The Catholic Sentinel and the Mirror had several articles about the men of those missions, but McMaster did not even make use of the article Weninger sent upon his return from the Oregon and Washington Territories. Weninger worked for 23 years to encourage missions among the Germans and has succeeded, since a German Province of Jesuits was established in Buffalo for that purpose. He does not mean to reproach McMaster, but to call his attention to the fact. He only asks that McMaster act according to his own best judgment and for the good of the souls.

I-1-o - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 12mo. - {2}


1871 Jan. 29
Kress, Father J(ohn) D.: Reading, Ohio
 to Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell): (of Cincinnati, Ohio)

Every second day he receives a letter from Ripley (Ohio) begging him to come visit them again and stay 2 or 3 months so that the congregation will not go to ruin. If Purcell wishes him to go there and will give Father (John C.) Albrink another assistant he is willing to leave. He knows it is a hard task, but his health is good now, and perhaps after he gets the congregation in order it will be easier to find a priest for Ripley. He asks Purcell not to mention this to Father Albrink as it might cause ill feeling. The Ripley people have always been very kind to him. The Arnheim people also sent him word to come to Arnheim when he goes to Ripley again.

II-5-e - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {2}


1871 Jan. 30
Brownson, O(restes) A.: Eliz(abeth), N(ew) J(ersey)
 to (Father) I(saac) T. Hecker: New York, (New York)

Brownson has received Hecker's letter. In it Hecker does not say whether the archbishop (John McCloskey of New York) permits the question in its political aspect to be taken or not. Brownson wishes to treat it as repugnant to the genius of our political institutions and destructive of the federal element of our government. It is easy, from Wilson, to ascertain the purpose and plan of the Evangelicals. It is evident to Brownson that the purpose is to outlaw the Church. The plan of proceeding is to absorb all legislation touching the rights of persons and conscience in Congress, to make, education national and compulsory. He has an article more than half written on the origin of civilization, reviewing Sir John Lubbock. Brownson would like to have Father (Augustine F.) Hewit read the manuscript before it goes to printers.

I-4-g - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {1}


 (Photostat, Paulist Archives) 

1871 Jan. 30
Brownson, S(arah) H.: Elizabeth, (N.J.)
 to Henry (F. Brownson): (Detroit, Michigan)

Mrs. Brownson thanks Henry for his congratulations upon her 67th birthday and is grateful she has been spared so long, although she regrets her life has been no better. She is glad Henry has left the Army and is pleasantly situated, and especially because Fifine is such a good wife. Henry's father's health is as usual. He returned from Boston pleased with his visit. Anna (Brownson) came back with him and stayed two or three weeks. (Anna) has much improved. Her father lives in Cambridge and his income is $7,000 a year. (Brownson) has been to New York and stayed two or three days since his return and expects to visit Henry immediately after Easter. Mrs. Brownson would like to visit Henry but cannot. She would not feel satisfied without visiting Dubuque also. Dr. Brown was here a few days ago. It is a month since he returned from Rome. Bishop (John) McCloskey has accepted him for a Priest and he is going to St. Louis. (Brown) told the Brownsons about his visit to Rome and his experiences there. Mrs. Brownson sends Henry and Fifine a miraculous medal given Henry by Monsignor (Robert) Seton. The first volume of William Seton's book the "Charter Oak" is out and the Brownsons have a copy.

III-3-a - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 12mo. - {2}


1871 Jan. 30
Hecker, (Father) I(saac) T.: N(ew) Y(ork) (City), (New York)
 to O(restes) A. Brownson: (Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Father Hecker is sorry Brownson could not come to dine with Dr. Marshall and others, again, it would have been a good opportunity for their coming to a satisfactory understanding. Father Hecker hopes Brownson will continue to write on questions which concern the Catholics in refutation of the enemies of the Church and in directing the young Catholic mind in judging and acting in the midst of existing difficulties. He would promote to the greatest degree Catholic interest, give the highest satisfaction to the hierarchy and interest most of the readers of the magazine. Since Father Hecker is in close contact with the readers he is better able to judge the reaction and satisfaction expressed by the readers of the Catholic World. Before Brownson leaves this great field of doing good and gives up the privilege of leading and directing the Catholic mind is a matter of most serious consideration in the presence of God. Father Hecker has never known Brownson to shrink from what he considered his duty and whatever may Brownson's course be, their friendship shall not be affected.

I-4-e - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 12mo. - {1}


1871 Jan. 31
Anwander, C.SS.R., Father Thad(deus): Balt(imore), (Maryland)
 to (James Alphonsus McMaster): (New York, New York)

He sends a little volume treating on the miraculous Image of Our Lady of Perpetual Succor and asks McMaster's Criticism. The book is a translation and has been condemned by many as being outrageously bad English. Not considering themselves competent judges in the matter, they could neither speak for or against the further sale of the copies still on hand. They therefore ask for Brownson's sincere and impartial opinion as to whether the book should be suppressed or the remaining copies sold. He sends respects to Brownson's family.

I-1-o - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {1}