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1879 March
Cincinnati Herald:

Clippings dealing with the financial difficulties of Archbishop John B. Purcell of Cincinnati, disclosing amounts owed by the Archbishop, solutions as to repayment as offered by readers, etc.

II-5-g - Newspaper clippings - 9 columns {1}


(1879) (March)
Howe, R(ose):
 to Father D(aniel) E. Hudson, C.S.C.: Notre Dame, Ind(iana)

Miss Howe wonders if Hudson is aware that someone has corrected her contributions at will, but she does not believe Hudson knows of it as he has always been so liberal. She would like Hudson to put a stop to it. They weakened the effect of a moral which her sister wished to make very strong. Her sister spoke of the Archbishop of Munich as Gregorins. She translated the title from a pastoral address which she will bring with her to show to Hudson. She realizes that they are fallible as her sister works hard and she herself is caused a great deal of care being ill, and therefore a mistake could creep into a manuscript, but she would perceive her mistake as soon as it was presented to her. With regards to "My Aunt Winifred" she was charmed to see it so well divided in the Ave Maria, and with the poem of St. Joseph at the end of the first chapter. In the Mar. 24 issue she read her contribution that she wrote while she was ill and after reading it she could not believe it and asked her sister if it was possible that she wrote the article. She looked over her own manuscript and found that it differed from what appeared in the Ave Maria. The sentence contains no slang and every word is ladylike so why should it be changed. She describes her childhood days when she and her sister used to attend an Irish church, and how they used to watch the Irish women. Miss Howe and her sister are in the seventh generation from James Howe who came over on the Mayflower. Their father was of unadulterated old New England stock, so she is not actuated by malice. Their friends in Chicago are mostly Now Englanders. Miss Howe describes the Missal and rosary conversation in the present installment. It is a translation from a sermon preached by a lovely Jesuit priest in the spring of 1873, in the church of the Jesuits, Rue De Levres, in Paris. The conversation will be taken up again and Aunt Winifred will prove that she is opposed to introducing any method of prayer. The persecution suffered by Miss Bachet it what gave her the idea. Mother Angela (Gillespie) and Father (Edward) Sorin know Miss Bachet to be highly educated. She has Bishop (Thomas) Foley for a confessor.

X-2-e - A.L.S. - 8pp. - crown - - 8 vo. - {4}


1879 March 1
Dickinson, Don M.: Detroit, Mich(igan)
 to H(enry) F. Brownson: (Detroit, Michigan)

Dickinson asks Henry to meet a few friends of J, Logan Chipman at Dickinson's office tonight at 7 to 8 o'clock, to discuss (Chipman's) candidacy for the Superior Court Judgeship Mr. Chipman will be there.

II-3-a - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {1}


1879 Mar. 1
Freeman's Journal: New York, (New York)

Pastoral letter of Archbishop Michael Augustine Corrigan on Christian education, permission for more frequent benedictions, Marriage, nuptial mass, mixed marriages, burying the dead, Peter-Pence.

I-1-e - Newspaper Clipping - 4 columns - folio - {1}


(18)79 Mar. 1
Joerger, D. D., Father M. J.: Jefferson, Wis(consin)
 to James A(lphonsus) McMaster: (New York, New York)

Joerger unites his condolences with those of the many friends of McMaster, for the insult he has received from Bishop (Peter Joseph Baltes) of Alton, (Illinois).

I-2-c - A.L.S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {1}


(18)79 Mar. 1
Kuhls, Father Ant(hony): Wyandotte, Kan(sas)
 to (James Alphonsus) McMaster: (New York, New York)

Kuhls, writings from St. Mary's Church at the request of several priests, calls McMaster's attention to the words, "in patience, the virtue of the saints is proved." McMaster is now 59 and must double his crosses in order to shorten his a purgatory. His crown will be greater now that his cross is heavier. This interdict of (Bishop Peter Joseph Baltes) has done a great deal of good for the Freeman's Journal and the paper will be valued all the more for it, as well as McMaster himself. There are many readers who feel just as badly about it as McMaster himself does and the whole thing reminds Kuhle of the words from Holy Scripture, "He was crucified among thieves."

I-2-c - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {1}


1879 Mar. 2,
Baltes, P(eter) J(oseph), Bishop of Alton (Illinois): Alton, Illinois
 to James (Alphonsus) McMaster: New York, New York

McMaster has most probably seen and read parts of Balte's Pastoral of Feb(ruary) 23, (1879), of those papers proscribed on the list, McMaster's paper is the only one having the sympathy of Baltes and of his priests. At Rome the previous summer, Baltes found that McMaster had many warm friends there but they found the same general faults in him which Baltes finds. Several of McMaster's best friends asked Baltes to meet McMaster and remonstrate with him on these faults but Baltes could not answer them on this because he is not acquainted with McMaster, and had no idea how such remonstrances would be received. Baltes will tell McMaster the rest of this if they ever meet each other. The object of this letter is to try to bring about a reconciliation between McMaster and those who have disapproved of his course in relation to the Bishops of the U.S. If this end is not accomplished it will be because McMaster does not wish it, but if the course of the paper is changed in this regard McMaster will become the favorite editor of the Bishops. The approbation of Cardinal (John) McCloskey may even be secured for the paper, and if Baltes was assured that a trip by him to New York would gain this end, he would undertake that trip even though he has no other business in the East during the winter. He asks that none of the contents of the letter be published and that it be burned if McMaster does not admire the proposal. P.S. A clergy man has just informed Baltes that Cardinal McCloskey has already approved the Freeman's Journal and so the difficulty can be easily settled. (McMaster notes on the back of this letter that Bishop Baltes was totally mistaken in his statement and that his conduct was disapproved by Card(inal) Simooni, Prefect of Propagand(a). This notation is initialed by McMaster).

I-2-c - A.L. - 3pp. - 8vo. - {1}


1879 Mar. 2
Howe, Frances R. Bailley Homestead: (Chesterton, Indiana)
 to Father D(aniel) E. Hudson, C.S.C.: (Notre Dame, Indiana)

Miss Howe encloses a pamphlet written by Father Hermit sent by the Superior of the Camaldolensi at Naples. She placed strips of paper between the pages containing the list of indulgences attached to the Rosary of Our Lord when the beads have been given by the Camaldolensi. The paragraphs enclosed in brackets are those where Mass privileges are mentioned. Miss Howe asks Hudson to take care of her book and return it. She believes that O.S.B. books are just as incontrovertible as S.J. books. In regard to the quotation from the work of A. Maurel, S.J., she does not think it had due observation of the context and it was hurriedly written. There are indulgences attached to hearing Mass under certain conditions, but those conditions are so easy to perform that it is almost impossible to hear Mass without gaining an indulgence. One of the sisters of St. Mary's of the Woods has in her possession a black letter edition of a work written two centuries ago by Father Mueller on indulgences. It consists chiefly of how to make indulgences applicable to the souls in Purgatory and contains a number of ways by which indulgences can be gained by hearing Mass. But it must be remembered that hardly a Church in Italy is without a privileged altar where all seek to hear Mass. Miss Howe's sister Rose Howe is very ill and life is dispaired by everyone who sees her. She writes this letter for her, and says that there have been many forgeries of indulgences but this case has nothing to do with that.

X-2-e - A.L.S. - 4 pp. - 8vo. - {3}


1879 Mar. 2
Scravendyke, Mrs. Lucie G.: Philadelphia, (Pennsylvania)
 to Father D(aniel) E. Hudson, C.S.C.: (Notre Dame, Indiana)

Mrs. Scravendyke reminds that she sent him a story, called an "Easter Story", in July to be printed in the Ave Maria around Easter time. She wants Hudson to let her know if he can manage to publish it the Sunday preceding Easter. She hopes her suggestion will meet with his approval.

X-2-e - A.L.S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {1}


(1879) Mar 2
(Taylor, Sister) M(ary) Magdalene: (London, England)
 to Father (Daniel E.) Hudson, (C.S.C.): (Notre Dame, Indiana)

The reason Hudson has not received the remainder of "The Apostle of the Sacred Heart" is because some interesting matter has been found concerning him in the archives of the House of Lords. She is sending some lines for a feast in Lent. Her story will probably appear in England in complete form so as to preserver the copyright. She is expecting Mother Angela (Gillespie) to stay there. Notre Dame is waiting for her. Sister M. Magdalene does not know where she is.

X-2-e - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 32 mo. - {2}


(18)79 March 3
Chambodut, Father L.C.M. V(icar) G(eneral),: Galveston, (Texas)
 to James A(lphonsus) McMaster: (New York, New York)

Chambodut commends McMaster on his recent troubles (with Bishop Peter Joseph Baltes of Alton, Illinois) and sympathizes with him in his humiliation. He hopes that McMaster's good work will continue and sends $10 in subscription fees for the Freeman's Journal.

I-2-c - A.L.S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {1}


(1879) Mar. 3
Emery, S(usan) L.: Dorchester, Mass(achusetts)
 to Father (Daniel E. Hudson, C.S.C.): (Notre Dame, Indiana)

Enclosed is a story in verse founded on one of the narratives contained in "The Glories of Marry." There has not been many of that type in the Ave Maria. She sends two copies and Hudson may take the one he likes best. The one on white paper has two more stanzas than the other. Miss Emery wishes Our Lady would conquer her. She has been reading Father Faber's "Growth in Holiness" and it nearly makes her cryout in despair and revolt against struggle, but not against Our Lady. Now she knows it is the real and true church.

X-2-e - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 32mo. - {1}


1879 Mar. 5
Tissot, Judge A.L.: New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Verified copy of the last will and testament of Father Cornelius Moynihan, dated November 14, 1867, and leaving his real estates to the Parish of St. Peter and Paul, and to his nephew, Father Jeremiah Moynihan, Junior, his library, and manuscripts. He wishes his furniture and safe to be sold at auction and the proceeds given to his sister, Mrs. Ellen Lucy. To the Dominican Sisters of Dryades Street he leaves a note on St. John Baptist Church for $5,000 to enable them to pay a note drawn by them for a debt due to the church. To the Parish of St. Peter and Paul he leaves $5000 which it owes him with the interest accruing from the year 1862 to be set apart as a fund for the gratuitous education in the parish school of poor children of the parish. He constitutes Father John D. Flanagan and Father M(ichael) Coughlan sole executors. Filed: March 5, 1879.

VI-3-a - A.D.S. (Copy) - 4pp. - folio - {8}


1879 March 6
Connelly, Tho(ma)s A.: Grand Rapids, Mich(igan)
 to Ja(me)s A(lphonsus) McMaster: (New York, New York)

Connelly sends $50 which he has collected since leaving Bay City. Since the action of Bishop (Peter Joseph) Baltes, (of Alton, Illinois) has been publicized, Connelly has been asked by many subscribers to express their sympathy. Everyone condemns the action. One German priest who Connelly mentioned the matter to, referring to it as a mistake on the part of Baltes, exclaimed that "mistake" was a charitable word and that "gross stupidity" would better express it. The readers of the Journal all have this same general feeling. Father (Th.) Rafter and Father (M. H.) Schaeken, both of Bay City, (Michigan) expressed their sympathies and their intention to work for the Freeman's Journal in any way they could. Money is scarce in this section but there is every indication of an improvement in all businesses during the spring. The people have very economical tendencies and many of those approached for subscriptions complain of the hard times or the great number of papers in circulation. Connelly enjoyed the Editorial notice concerning Maurice F(rancis) Egan. It is a pity that Catholic Journalism cannot support the brilliant mind of such a truly Catholic gentleman. Mr. Tello is having a hard struggle conducting the Universe by himself, since he is deprived, due to limited means, of proper editorial and mechanical assistance. From Grand Rapids Connelly will go to Grand Haven, them across Lake Michigan to Milwaukee where he will cover a few Wisconsin towns during the coming week.

I-2-c - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {2}


1879 March 6
Markey, J. K.: Plantersville, Texas
 to James A(lphonsus) McMaster: New York, New York

He does not live in the Diocese of Alton for which he thanks God.

I-2-c - A.L.S. - 1p. - 16mo. - {1}


1879 Mar. 6
Murray, John O'Kane: Brooklyn, L.I., (New York)
 to Father Daniel E. Hudson, C.S.C.: Notre Dame, Indiana

Murray requests the present circulation of the Ave Maria as he is making some changes in the plates of his History and wants the Ave Maria to appear as correct as possible.

X-2-e - A.L.S. (Postcard) - {1}


1879 Mar. 6
Starr, E(liza) A(llen): (Chicago, Illinois)
 to F(athe)r (Daniel E.) Hudson, (CSC): (Notre Dame, Indiana)

Enclosed are two articles and Hudson should take his choice between them and mail the other one without delay. Something that Hudson said about her articles for the Children's Department got her thinking that the articles required too much culture. If all these slanders on the Catholic people are true, then we should go to work and give our children this Christian culture which has so much to do with the understanding of the religion, enriched by 1800 years of prayer, turned into poetry and music. It is not plausible that our children cannot be made to understand what is in the mouths of Protestants. Protestant writers have been bringing changes in their subjects. They have taken poetry of Catholic times and told it in Protestant measure. Hudson must pardon this outburst, but let her address the children as those who desire culture. Our people are sorrowfully in want of culture and the way to cure this is to familiarize their minds with the subjects, put a higher standard of culture before them and wean them from the love of riches. She was urged to do this type of article in Rome and by her confessor, Monsignor (Silas M.) Chatard. Hudson should not forget her in his St. Joseph devotion.

X-2-e - A.L.S. - 4pp. - crown - - 8 vo. - {2}


(1879) Mar. 6
(Taylor), Sister Mary Magdalene: Rome, (Italy)
 to Father (Daniel E.) Hudson, (C.S.C.): (Notre Dame, Indiana)

The account of a convent is enclosed. She is now in Rome and will probably surprise Hudson by her new home. Some lines describing places she visited are also enclosed. She has read many accounts of Rome in the Ave Maria and she feels shy to offer her impression of the eternal city, but everyone observes from a different point of view. She thinks an account of her visit to the Vatican would be interesting. She advises Hudson to address all his letters to her to London as their stay in Rome will not be long.

X-2-e - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8 vo. - {1}


1879 March 7
Scanlan, James: Canandaigua, New York
 to (James Alphonsus McMaster): New York, (New York)

Scanlan sends $1. for the Peter's Pence fund for the Pope and also $3. for his subscription to the Freeman's Journal.

I-2-c - A.L.S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {1}


1879 March 7
Statz, W(illia)m: Terre Haute, Indiana
 to (James Alphonsus) McMaster: (New York, New York)

Statz sends $1 for the Peter's Fence fund for Pope Leo (XIII).

I-2-c - A.L.S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {1}


1879 Mar. 7
Stockton, (California)
 to Father (Daniel E. Hudson, C.S.C.): (Notre Dame, Indiana)

He tells Hudson that he went to Mr. F. Corby about the back number for Mrs. Rattigen but he did not send them. He tells Hudson that the water of Lourdes has done a great deal of good already and asks Hudson to thank the Immaculate Mother of God for the favors.

X-2-e - A.L. (Incomplete) - 2pp. - crown - - 8 vo - {1}


1879 Mar. 8
Callista, B.V.M., Sister Mary: Cascade, Iowa
 to James A(lphonsus) McMaster: (New York, New York)

Sister Callista sends $2. for the Freeman's Journal. She has seen a notice of the unexpected cross given McMaster by (Bishop Peter Joseph Baltes) and assures him all will be well when that person sees his mistake. On May 25, Sister Callista has been 22 years a religious. During this time she has met as many as 1000 priests and a few Bishops, and whenever any topic of note arises, all of these always turn to the opinion of the Journal in the question, since the paper tries to get at the right side of all questions. She promises to aid the Indiana Fund as soon as possible.

I-2-c - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 12mo. - {1}


1879 Mar. 8
Holloway, Mrs. E. B.: Shelbyville, Illinois
 to (James Alphonsus) McMaster: New York, New York

Mrs. Holloway writes to have her subscription to the Freeman's Journal cancelled. She hopes that Bishop (Peter Joseph Baltes) will soon see fit to withdraw his prohibition since she already misses the Journal like she would a lost friend. P.S. She believes her debts are paid for the paper, but if she is in arrears, she wishes to know the amount.

I-2-c - A.L.S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {1}


1879 Mar. 9
Keiley, Father Benj(amin) J.: New Castle, Del(aware)
 to (James Alphonsus McMaster): (New York, New York)

Bishop (Peter Joseph) Baltes is attempting to secure the approval of all the Bishops in the country for his pastoral, which he intends to send to Rome. Keiley suggests that McMaster obtain the aid of Bishop (Thomas A.) Becker, of (Wilmington, Delaware). Bishop Becker has already expressed his surprise that the Freeman's Journal should be classed with the World Watchman. Becker will aid McMaster in anything he sends to Rome. The Pastoral of Baltes is injudicious and scandalous and each priest of the diocese should register a protest against it.

I-2-c - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {4}


1879 Mar. 10
Takken, Father W(illiam): Holland Town, (Wisconsin)
 to James A(lphonsus) McMaster: New York, (New York)

Takken sends $6. for the Freeman's Journal. He intended to send the fee earlier and was roused into doing it by the notice in the Freeman of the censure of the paper by Bishop (Peter Joseph Baltes) of Alton, (Illinois). His approval lies entirely behind McMaster. The previous week several of the priests of the diocese of Green Bay, (Wisconsin) at the funeral of Father (Albert) Wub(b)els of Little Chute, (Wis.) agreed that McMaster and his principles should be endorsed, and Father (Ferdinand) Tanguay even secured some new subscribers among them. These priests all encourage McMaster to continue his fight. Takken's parish of English farmers already subscribe to the Catholic Citizen of Father (George L.) Willard, or else he could get more Journal subscribers among them.

I-2-c - A.L.S. - 3pp. - 12mo. - {2}


1879 Mar. 10
Tyler, Geo(rge) N.: Taylorsville, Texas
 to J(ames) F. Edwards: (Notre Dame, Indiana)

He has a picture of his brother, (Right Reverend William Tyler) the late Bishop of Hartford and Providence, Rhode Island. The picture of the Bishop was taken after his death. There is no one to take photographs in Taylorsville since the great fire of Feb. 25, which destroyed nearly all the main business section. He will go to Austin to have a picture of the Bishop taken. The Bishop who died in 1849 was five years younger than Tyler who is now 79 years old.

XI-1-b - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {3}


1879 Mar. 11
Carroll, John L.: Vandalia, Ill.
 to James A(lphonsus) McMaster: New York, New York

Since he has to stop the Journal, he wishes to pay his bill. Father Quitter desires to have his Journal stopped also.

I-2-c - A.L.S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {1}


1879 Mar. 11
Ives, Edward B.: Fort Leavenworth, Ka(nsa)s
 To (Father Daniel E. Hudson, C.S.C.): (Notre Dame, Indiana)

Ives thanks Hudson for the periodicals he sent. Ives has been busy moving which accounts for the delay in writing. He has read the papers that Hudson sent and so has his mother, as well as many soldiers. Ives trusts that this circulating of Catholic papers among the men of his company may sew the seed of conversion among many men who are not of his faith. His mother sends her thanks and regards to Hudson.

X-2-e - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {1}


1879 Mar. 11
Piet, John B.:
Kelly, Piet & Co. Baltimore, (Maryland)
 To Father (Daniel E.) Hudson, (C.S.C.): Notre Dame, Indiana

Piet has received Hudson's letter of March 6. He informs Hudson that his partner has died and he is having trouble getting business adjusted. He has sent the Dublin Review for January and will send the Inner Life of Lacordaiye in a few days. Piet hopes to have matters organized soon.

X-2-e - A.L.S. - 2pp. - crown - - 8 vo - {1}


1879 Mar. 12
Bisel, Martha A.: Meyresdale,
 to James A(lphonsus) McMaster: (New York, New York)

Mrs. Bisel encloses $2. for the Peter's Pence fund for the Pope, contributed by herself and her daughter, Mrs. Mattie A. Blough. She asks that McMaster inform her through his paper if Catholics may have balls on St. Patrick's day, with feasting and drinking. She belongs to the Baltimore diocese and not to the Pittsburgh diocese, but such things are being done there.

I-2-c - A.L.S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {1}


1879 Mar. 12
F., P.:
 to (James Alphonsus McMaster): (New York, New York)

P. F. asks McMaster to publish in the Freeman's Journal, the remarks on the New England Journal of Education, which he encloses, (enclosure not present). A very unfair attack was made on the schools, and the clergy of the Church. P. F. answers the last part of the attack, leaving the rest to some future occasion. He is confident McMaster will bear himself worthily in his conflict with His Lordship (Bishop Peter Joseph Baltes, Alton, Illinois) and gives McMaster his sympathies in the affair.

I-2-c - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {2}


1879 Mar. 12
Meany, Mary L.: Philad(elphi)a, P(ennsylvani)a
 to Father D(aniel) E. Hudson, C.S.C.: (Notre Dame, Indiana)

Mary L. Meany expresses gratitude to Hudson for the ten dollars she received from him and for the graces of the last few weeks which she is sure are a result of his prayers. She explains why his prayers were so highly valued. When she first spoke of the order of the Immaculate Conception to her confessor, the Encyclical of Pio Nono regarding secret orders seemed to show her that she was to have an active part in the struggle between the Church and those secret orders. Her confessor and other priests offered the Mass in order to obtain special graces for her. She did not understand her future work then but now she does and asks Hudson for help to undertake the work against the secret orders. She received an inspiration and with the money Hudson sent her begins a magazine called St. Patrick. She asks Hudson to advance $50.00 to her for what she will write for the Ave Maria this year as well as the next, so that she can carry on her crusade.

X-2-e - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8 vo - {1}


1879 Mar. 13
New York Observer:

Denouncement of the Freeman's Journal and the New York Tablet for their lack of news concerning Archbishop John B. Purcell's financial obligations and a satiric ridicule of them.

II-5-g - Newspaper clipping - 4 columns {3}


1879 Mar. 14
Cronin, Father Pat(ric)k: Buffalo, (New York)
 to James Alphonsus McMaster: New York, New York

Cronin thanks McMaster for his generous notice and for the many kindnesses shown him in the past. He believes McMaster is a little too severe on his substitute Father (Edward) Kelly (Kelly), who feels the remarks keenly. McMaster's treatment of the terrible mistake made against him by Bishop (Peter Joseph) Baltes of (Alton, Illinois) has gained him thousands of friends. The interdict will soon be published in the Freeman's for the benefit of his subscribers.

I-2-c - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {1}


1879 March 14
Hamon S. J. Father Edw(ard): Quebec, (Canada)
 to H(enry F.) Brownson: Detroit, Michigan)

Father Hamon was very happy to be able to accept Henry's invitation to conduct a retreat in Detroit. He will be free at the beginning of May and very probably can go after Easter. He can postpone a mission he is to have preached at Beanport near. Quebec the April 20 or 30 if the priest at Detroit is determined to have the retreat at this time. Hamon will await a letter about the time. He shall be very happy to renew his old acquaitance with Henry and to recall with him their memories of France and old friends. He is also delighted at the opportunity to meet Henry's children of whom Henry spoke to him at Montreal when they met so unexpectly. Hamon is therefore greatly pleased to accept the invitation. He would like to have Father (J) Raynel come with him but if not he could take a priest from here to accompany him. All is arranged for the best. He would have been on the islands of St. Viene Miquelon near Newfoundland (Canada) this lent. Fortunately the St. Viene appointment has been postponed for the following lent. Hamon will expect a letter from Detroit for a final settlement.

III-3-a - A.L.S. - (French) - 4pp. - 12mo. - {1}


1879 Mar. 14
Lloyd, Jane G.: S(ain)t Louis, (Missouri)
 to Father D(aniel) E. Hudson, (C.S.C.): (Notre Dame, Indiana)

Miss Lloyd sends a poem to be published from her late aunt's writings. The grand aunt of the girl upon whose death the poem was written is a subscriber to the Ave Maria. P.S. She also wants to know if Hudson received the manuscript that she sent in September.

X-2-e - A.L.S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {1}


1879 Mar. 15
French, (Rev.) S. J.: Houghton, Mich(igan)
 to (Father Daniel E. Hudson, C.S.C.): (Notre Dame, Indiana)

French found Hudson's letter and package awaiting him when he arrived at his semipolar home. He is looking for the crucifix and tells Hudson that the best way to send packages is by mail and that express is very expensive to that remote place. He almost wishes that Hudson was a victim of hay fever so he could compel him to seek the same climate as he. The commercial world is indebted to the Jesuits for the discovery of that copper region. It would be a pleasure to show Hudson around this region as one of his friends has a yacht. French then describes the country around him. The article on Cardinal Manning is being read by all of his friends and all are enjoying it. He is leading an extremely lonely life and Mrs. French will not be back from Rhode Island until May.

X-2-e - A.L.S. - 4pp. - crown - - 8 vo - {1}


1879 Mar. 15
O'Rourke, P. T.: Fort Wayne, Ind(iana)
 to Ja(me)s A(lphonsus) McMaster: (New York, New York)

O'Rourke has been a steady reader and subscriber to the Freeman's Journal for 18 years but lately he has lost contact with McMaster. O'Rourke declares his friendship for McMaster in the conflict with Bishop (Peter Joseph) Baltes. The Bishops realize that this country is not enjoying an age of faith and the little faith that is left should not be weakened by ignorant and senseless tyrannical acts. The Catholics in this country are on an average with any country in the world. In a country such as this, the religious leaders should have special care in their lives that they act so that everyone will respect them. When, However, these leaders prove to be very poor managers they lose much of the respect due to them. It is very well for a Bishop to out off people from the Sacraments but this power should be exercised very carefully or more harm can be done to the faith than Col. Ingersol could do in a year. O'Rourke does not know Bishop Baltes but he has seen similar men in the West. During the (Civil) War, O'Rourke was agent for a Catholic paper which disagreed with a Bishop and because of this, a neighboring Bishop withdrew his subscription to the paper. The Vicar General of that diocese, however, began to take the paper. This shows that a Catholic can stand up for his rights. In the past 20 years the Freeman's Journal has done more to convince American Catholics and non-Catholics that they can be free men than any paper of Baltes would be able to do. Bishop (John) Hughes, following the able minds of the Church in this country for 50 years, has labored to show that the Catholic Church is not an enemy of civil liberty, but Baltes, by a stroke of his pen, is undoing what has been done. Many Catholics have nothing but harsh words for Baltes and if other Bishops could hear these opinions, they would seek a way to suppress him. In all of the controversy, McMaster has stood firm and has not stooped to name-calling or any other regrettable means and this is a great example to the Church of the country. Being a convert with extraordinary faith of a convert, McMaster will be surprised at this attitude the people take, but O'Rourke attributes this to his belief that the Bishops of the East are true gentlemen, whereas they are not always so in the West. He knows McMaster will not thank him for many of his harsh words about the Bishop, but they have been written only because he dislikes to see the Freeman's Journal prohibited anywhere. The remarks are not for publication and perhaps the whole letter should be consigned to a waste-basket since O'Rourke would not want his own Bishop to think there was anything personal meant by them.

I-2-c - A.L.S. - 12pp. - 12mo. - {3}


1879 Mar. 15
Wood, Mrs. Julia A.A. (Minnie May Lee): El Paso, Ill(inoi)s
 to Father D(aniel) E. Hudson, C.S.C.: (Notre Dame, Indiana)

Mrs. Wood has enclosed a poem entitled "The Annunciation". Miss Starr advised her to send it and said that it would be better if Hudson patronized home talent more than so much from abroad. She is writing verses for her own pleasure and sends this one as an offering. A priest wrote commending her on some of her verses in the Ave Maria. If they please anyone she is pleased to send them abroad. She thanks Hudson for the Magazine. (The poem is enclosed.)

X-2-e - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 18mo. - {2}


(1879) Mar. 17
Emery, Susan L.: Dorchester, (Massachusetts)
 to Father (Daniel E. Hudson, C.S.C.): (Notre Dame, Indiana)

Miss Emery thanks Hudson for his letter and returns the manuscripts with the alterations and Hudson may alter it more if necessary, and correct any work of hers if he chooses to. The fourth anniversary of her reception into the church will be St. Joseph's day. St. Joseph and Our Lady have been very good to her. She asks Hudson to pray for her entire conversion as she has great spiritual needs. St. Joseph's day is her day and Our Lady is her mother's and she asks Hudson to pray that Our Lady will make Miss Emery what she wants her to be very soon. She hopes Hudson is better.

X-2-e - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 8vo. - {1}


1879 Mar. 17
Fagan, Father Tho(ma)s: St. Francis, Wis(consin)
 to J(ames) A(lphonsus) McMaster: (New York, New York)

Fagan cannot consent to the publication of Cardinal (John) Simeoni's letter, since it is a private letter and is not intended for publication. The portion Fagan already published is sufficient and conclusive in the obligation or dispensation of wax candles. He calls attention to a mistake made in the Freeman's Journal of (Mar.) 8th, in reference to the appointment of Father (John) McMullen as administrator by Bishop (Thomas) Foley, (of Chicago, Illinois). The lamented Bishop had full authority to appoint such an administrator as can be seen in the records of the Second Plenary Council of Baltimore, pages 67 and 68, Decrees 96 and 97, under de Episcopis. Fagan regrets the late action of Bishop (Peter Joseph) Baltes, (of Alton, Illinois) in connection with McMaster's valuable Journal and hopes Baltes will soon see his error and make amends.

I-2-c - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {5}


1879 Mar. 17
Holloway, Mrs. E.B.: Shelbyville, Illinois
 to Father D(aniel) E. Hudson, (C.S.C.): (Notre Dame, Indiana)

She is sending a book for children to Hudson. Two of the stories have appeared in the Young Catholic. A notice of a Child's book "The Wonderful Wood" would be a favor. She requests a copy of the Ave Maria as she wrote for one before but never received it.

X-2-e - A.L.S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {1}


1879 Mar. 17
Robot, O.S.B., Father Isidore: Atoka, Indian Territory
 to J(ames) (Alphonsus) McMaster: (New York, New York)

Robot has acknowledged McMaster's last two receipts amounting to $98, and also the Confidentials from the C(atholic) I(ndian) Bureau. He is very sorry because of the trouble caused McMaster in the diocese of Alton, (Illinois), and rejoiced upon reading the humble expression of submission to ecclesiastical authority. He hopes that the contest will end in favor of McMaster and his paper, which is so necessary in such times of childishness and cowardice. He encloses a letter (not present) from Washington, D. C., which he submits just as it is and without comment. He has not received any word from or concerning the Indian Bureau for a long time.

I-2-c - A.L.S. - app. - 8vo. - {2}


1879 Mar. 18
Gilmour, B(isho)p R(ichard), B(isho)p of C(leveland): Cleveland, O(hio)
 to Father D(aniel) E. Hudson, C.S.C.: (Notre Dame, Indiana)

Gilmour is very obliged for the letter received from Hudson on his pastoral. There is a little awkwardness under the heading of marriages as a natural contract. Hudson is to wait for his correction. Gilmour welcomes Hudson to Cleveland at any time.

X-2-e - A.L.S. - 2pp. - crown - - 8 vo. - {1}


1879 March 18
Sassel, Father J. P.: Washington, Indiana
 to (James Alphonsus) McMaster: New York, New York

Sassel is a German priest, but offers his entire sympathy to McMaster for the hasty step taken by Bishop (Peter Joseph) Baltes of Alton. He compares this action with that of a thunderbolt which strikes a Catholic church steeple, but cautions McMaster against firing up in his indignation. It is better to let the storm harm the steeple and to pass away leaving the steeple partly burned. Many happenings in the West have repercussions in the East, but the East is competent to take care of them. He encourages McMaster in the controversy and tells him to proceed fearlessly in subduing it.

I-2-c - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {1}


1879 Mar. 19
Dallas, A(lexander) I.: Fort Supply, Ind(ian) Territory
 to Father D(aniel) E. Hudson, C.S.C.: Notre Dame, Ind(iana)

Dallas has received Hudson's letters and papers. He has been saving some time for writing for Hudson but he has been busy with court martials trying three officers for misconduct. He is glad none of them belong to his regiment. They are to have Father Ferdinand Wolf, O.S.B., there the latter part of the month to say Mass enroute to Fort Elliot and on his return. He thanks Hudson for saying Mass for the late Mrs. de Frondat.

X-2-e - A.L.S. - 3pp. - crown - - 8 vo. - {1}


1879 Mar. 19
Lambing, (Father) A(ndrew) A.: Pittsburgh, (Pennsylvania)
 to Father (Daniel E.) Hudson, (C.S.C.): (Notre Dame, Indiana)

Lambing advises Hudson to change the mailing of the Ave Maria as he has now moved into his new house by the side of the church. He tells Hudson that some advertisement has been given on his two books and does not think this announcement is too early. He would like a few days of repose at Notre Dame. P.S. The cover of his "Mixed Marriages" is very neat.

X-2-e - A.L.S. - 1p. - 4to. - {1}


1879 Mar. 19
Mahar, Father T(homas) F.: Cleveland, (Ohio)
 to James A(lphonsus) McMaster: (New York, New York)

Mahar asks McMaster to republish the tests for olive oil which he recently published. The secretary of the diocese (Father George F. Hauck) has received a quantity of oil from Oscar Tauragna and this oil seems to stand the test McMaster recently spoke of. Mahar believes that McMaster has once alluded unfavorably to Tauragna and so he asks that another evaluation be printed which secretaries and chancellors may refer to.

I-2-c - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {1}


(1879) Mar. 20
Notre Dame, Sisters of: San Jose, Cal(ifornia)
 to Father (Daniel E. Hudson, C.S.C.): (Notre Dame, Indiana)

The sister writing the letter asks Hudson for his prayers for one of their deceased sisters. Her obituary is enclosed and it has already been published in the San Jose Pioneer but that paper is not read by Catholics. Many of her friends would welcome it in a Catholic surrounding.

X-2-e - A.L.S. - 1 p. - 18 mo. - {1}


1879 Mar. 20
Wendling, Geo(rge) R.: Chicago, (Illinois)
 to Father D(aniel) E. Hudson, C.S.C.: Notre Dame, Ind(iana)

Wendling thanks Hudson for the book he sent to him. Through carelessness it was delayed enroute. He is going to read the book carefully as it is on a subject he has been thinking upon for some time.

X-2-e - A.L.S. - 1p. - royal 8 vo. - {1}


1879 Mar. 21
Ebner, O.S.B., Father Claude: Fort Totten, D(akota) T(erritory)
 to Father (Daniel E. Hudson, C.S.C.): (Notre Dame, Indiana)

He sends Hudson some articles which are not ready for press which Hudson is to fix for the Ave Maria to do justice to the Indians and to the Religion. He believes that God will hear the prayer of an Indian child before those of white children. He wants to show that the gifts for the Indian Missions are useful and not thrown away and wants Hudson to send extra copies of the edition that contains this article. Hudson is given thanks for the items from the sacristy that were mailed to Ebner, but there are many things he still needs for the divine service.

X-2-e - A.L.S. - 3pp. - crown - - 8 vo. - {1}


1879 Mar. 22
Freeman's Journal: New York, (New York)

Laying of the corner-stone of St. Vincent's School, New Orleans, by Vicar-General (G.A.) Rouxel. Addresses by Father (Hyacinthe) Mignot and Father (Benedict) Neithart.

I-1-e - Newspaper Clipping - - 2 columns - - folio - {4}


1879 Mar. 24
Dallas, A(lexander) I.: (New York, New York)
 to Father D(aniel) E. Hudson, C.S.C.: (Notre Dame, Indiana)

If Hudson thinks the remarks about the President and his appointing power had better be omitted, Dallas wants them cut out. He is nervous for fear he has gone too close to the mark.

X-2-e - A.L.S. - 1p. - crown - - 8 vo. - {1}


1879 Mar. 24
Egan, Maurice F(rancis): Philadelphia, (Pennsylvania)
 to Father D(aniel) E. Hudson, C.S.C.: Notre Dame, Ind(iana)

Egan Jokingly says there is no use in feeling blue. He is very thankful for the kindness Hudson and other Catholic editors have given him but does not know what he has done to deserve such kindness. He did his best which was not much. Egan sends along a sonnet and his regards to (James. F.) Edwards.

X-2-e - A.L.S. - 1p. - royal 8 vo. - {1}


1879 Mar. 24
Kent, Charles: (Kensington, England)
 to Father D(aniel) E. Hudson, C.S.C.: (Notre Dame, Indiana)

Kent is sending some lines that one of his daughters has written describing one of the most devotional moments of the year in their Carmelite Church.

X-2-e - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8 vo. - {1}


1879 Mar. 25
Raymond, Father G(ilbert): New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop F(rancis) X(avier) Leray: Natchitoches, (Louisiana)

Raymond is sending Leray several copies in English and in French of the letter of the Sovereign Pontiff on the subject of the Jubilee; if Leray wishes he may distribute them among the priests of his diocese. Everything had already been printed when Father (Gustave A. Rouxel) Rouxell received Leray's last letter. The Administration of the Finances (of the Diocese of Louisiana) is at the moment a bit embarrassed about paying a mortgage, the holder of which has given notice that he will have the houses sold. Raymond is glad that he is no longer burdened with these financial questions. Leray himself has had some losses which must have been heavy as his diocese (of Natchitoches) is even poorer (than New Orleans). Leray said in his letter to Raymond that he would be in New Orleans from April 6 to May 20. A good many pastors have already designated the days they desire to have Confirmation for their churches. In the letter he recently wrote Rouxel, Leray says that he will arrive on the 14th. This may be a lapse of the pen. They have a seminarian in minor orders to be ordained. If Leray meant that he would arrive on the 4th, he could ordain him sub-deacon on the 5th.

VI-3-a - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 8vo. - {4}


1879 Mar. 25
Rouxel, Father G(ustave) A.: New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop F(rancis) X(avier) Leray: (Natchitoches, Louisiana)

Rouxel thinks Leray must have been distracted in saying he would arrive on April 14. He is sure he meant the 4th. Otherwise, they will be in a sad situation in regard to the Holy Oils for Holy Thursday. The time specified for the Jubilee is so near that Father (Gilbert) Raymond and he, assisted by the archiepiscopal council, believed they should promulgate the letter of the Holy Father. There is a copy of the promulgation adjoined. The affairs of the Bank of the South are going badly. There was great clamor against (Thomas) Layton. Rouxel sent him Leray's letter, but by a decision of the judge today he is no longer liquidator of the bank. Raymond told him this morning that Mr. Poursine had done all he could to withdraw Leray's deposit, but Rouxel fears it was too late. (Attached is a clipping on the conditions for gaining the indulgence of the Jubilee).

VI-3-a - A.L.S. - (French) - 3pp. - 4to. - {4}


1879 Mar. 25
Sestini, S.J., Father B.: Woodstock, Maryland
 to J(ames) (Alphonsus) McMaster: (New York, New York)

Sestini, writing from the College of the Sacred Heart, sends McMaster $1 for the Peter's Pence fund for the Pope.

I-2-c - A.L.S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {1}


1879 Mar. 26
Hutchison, W(illia)m J.M.: Bath, England
 to Father (Daniel E.) Hudson, (C.S.C.): (Notre Dame, Indiana)

Hutchison thanks Hudson for the supply of prayers to the Blessed Lord that Hudson sent to him and sends Hudson some English stamps. He hopes that the use of this beautiful prayer brings many people nearer to God. He enjoyed the Ave Maria. Hutchison was afflicted with Roman fever in 1876 and still sees no prospect of improvement. He has been confined to bed for the last four months with an infection of the spinal cord, but he hopes to recover. He thanks Hudson for some newspapers. John Pius is preparing for his First Communion. P.S. His last hurried journey to Rome to Pope Pius IX's funeral made his health worse.

X-2-e - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 16mo. - {1}


1879 Mar. 26
Layton, Thomas: New Orleans, (Louisiana)
 to Bishop (Francis Xavier) Leray: Natchitoches, (Louisiana)

In reply to Leray's favor of the 20th, Layton encloses (no enclosure) a transcript of his account. At present there are much confusion and conflict of interests growing out of the disaster which has fallen upon the Southern Bank. If the appeal to Washington in the Bond case be uninterrupted the opinion of Judge Campbell and of most lawyers is that the Supreme Court would decide favorably to the Bank. In this event the creditors will be paid in full and the stockholders will realize a respectable return. He will do all in his power to premote Leray's interests.

VI-3-a - A.L.S. - 1p. - 4to. - {3}


1879 Mar. 26
Willard, Father Geo(rge) L.: Milwaukee, Wisconsin
 to (James Alphonsus) McMaster: (New York, New York)

Doubtless, McMaster will receive a cablegram concerning the appointments of Bishops to the United States, and when he does, Willard requests him to telegraph him the name of the man appointed as Coadjutor to the Archbishop of Milwaukee, (Wisconsin). This is the only information he asks by telegraph. He gives his address as being Editor of the Catholic Citizen, Milwaukee, (Wisconsin). During the coming summer, Willard intends to come to New York to see McMaster.

I-2-c - A.L.S. - 1p. - 12mo. - {1}


1879 Mar. 26
Willard, Father George L.: St. Francis, Wisconsin
 to (James Alphonsus) McMaster): (New York, New York)

Willard most sincerely means these lines in a spirit of gratitude and sympathy, without any exaggeration. In regards to the controversy between McMaster and Bishop (Peter Joseph) Baltes (of Alton, Illinois), Willard was tempted to come out boldly and say some sharp things but took counsel from some priests, who are also McMaster's friends. Principally Father (Thomas) Fagan, who reminded him of their local difficulties with the Dutch. Baltes is a chosen representative of the Dutch but means nothing to the German spirit in wisconsin. After the funeral of Bishop (Henry Damian) Jun(c)ker, the German priests assembled in the schoolhouse and framed a petition to Rome asking that a German Bishop be appointed successor. They feared that the learned Coadjutor of St. Louis, (Missouri), (Patrick John) Ryan, would be appointed instead. Rome was probably influenced by this and appointed Baltes. Father Theodore Brucner, Rector of Pio Nono College, who was one of these German priests in Alton told this to Willard himself. McMaster seems to have struck the key note when he blamed the nationality angle in Baltes. Their policy is to favor the Dutch first and then the Catholic Religion. Willard has many things to say but is strongly advised not to speak in his paper as yet. He has offered Mass that God will guide McMaster's remarks in the question and thanks him for the policy he has so far pursued. Willard is a convert to the Faith but would not believe that any Catholic priest could be so unchristian as to seek revenge, until this had been shown him by the actions of the German priests. The worst among them is Father (I.) Wapolhorst and the professors of the seminary. Father Fagan has been turned out of the seminary because they imagine he wrote some articles appearing in several newspapers. Fagan knows the writer of the articles, but will not disclose him. He has a much better education than Wapelhorst and is too high minded to engage in such actions. These men treat Fagan just as Baltes is treating McMaster. Willard signs himself as editor of the Catholic Citizen.

I-2-c - A.L.S. - 4pp. - 12mo. - {5}


1879 Mar 27
Waylen, Elizabeth: Philad(elphia), P(ennsylvani)a
 to Father (Daniel E. Hudson, C.S.C.): (Notre Dame, Indiana)

An original tale is enclosed that has been taken from the editor of the Lamp to be offered to Hudson. She expects a small sum for it but she realizes that Catholic magazines cannot pay much.

X-2-e - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 12mo. - {1}


(1879) Mar. 28
O'Meara, Kathleen: (Paris, France ? )
 to Father (Daniel E. Hudson, C.S.C.): (Notre Dame, Indiana)

Miss O'Meara acknowledges the 15 received from Hudson. She would like Hudson to bring out the sketch of Mother Teresa before "The Battle of Connemara" as many Sisters of Mercy are waiting to see it. She is aware of the fact that arrangements may already be made. She asks Hudson to be remembered in his prayers.

X-2-e - A.L.S. - 2pp. - 16 mo - {1}


1879 Mar. 31
Baltes, P(eter) J(oseph), (Bishop of Alton, Ill(inois): Alton, Ill(inois)
 to Ja(me)s (Alphonsus) McMaster: (New York, New York)

Bishop Baltes informs McMaster that whoever reported to him that he, Baltes, had called on the Bishops of the U.S. for approval of his Pastoral, has reported a falsehood. He wrote to some Bishops to hear their views on the subject and this was only done after he received flattering letters from most of them. He does not recollect having mentioned McMaster in any of these letters and his only purpose was to secure answering letters which he could send to Rome to counteract letters which the editor of the Watchman and other St. Louis clergymen had sent to Rome against him. As far as Baltes knows McMaster has not made any comments upon the Pastoral nor did he think that McMaster would. None of the letters Baltes received have been sent to Rome. They are all yet in his possession. Baltes has not been condemned by any tribunal nor has he made or has he any reason to make an appeal to Rome. His Pastoral must be left to stand entirely upon its own merits. It is painful that he has been attacked by newspapers but even more painful that he be misunderstood and misrepresented by his brethren. The remarks which McMaster makes about nationality have been unprovoked by Baltes, and they lead him to suspect the honesty of McMaster's motives. After reading the appendix, Baltes sent him, he should have corrected his mistake and the injury done to Baltes, who bears no personal ill-will against McMaster. Baltes has gone more than half way in the matter, but McMaster will not meet him. Indeed, Baltes intends to celebrate his next Mass for McMaster, hoping that he will always be guided by honesty and truth and will be converted and do much good while he (McMaster) yet lives. P.S. Baltes proposes to McMaster that if McMaster will print the statement of apology and retraction he has prepared, the interdict on the paper will be lifted. He asks that a copy of the Journal in which this statement appears be sent to him and the interdict will be immediately removed in the form of a letter sent to McMaster which he may publish if he wishes. If McMaster does not print the apology, Baltes hopes they will part on peaceful terms and expects all offensive language against him to cease. This communication is to be kept strictly confidential.

I-2-c - A.L.S. - 6pp. - 12mo. - {1}


1879 Mar. 31
Finney, John D.: St. Louis, M(iss)o(uri)
 to W(illia)m J. Onahan: Chicago, Ill(inoi)s

Finney writes a letter of introduction for Thomas Francis Meagher's son, of the same name, who has become an actor.

IX-1-a - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8vo. - {1}


1879 Mar. 31
Lambing, (Father) A(ndrew) A.: Pittsburgh, (Pennsylvania)
 to Father (Daniel E.) Hudson, (C.S.C.): (Notre Dame, Indiana)

Lambing has looked over the proof and finds it correct but has made some additions to the text to strengthen his argument. He tells Hudson that he is enjoying good health and is nearly situated in his new home.

X-2-e - A.L.S. - 1p. - 8 vo. - {1}