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Calendar: 1833


(1833) ( ) 16

Montgomery, Father S(tephen) H.
(Cincinnati, Ohio)

to Father Frederick Rese
(of Cincinnati, Ohio)

Speaking of trouble of that morning and of dissension among the clergy, he did not want to enter the controversy upon his arrival, but Rese had insisted upon his attempts at reconciliating the two parties. He has not taken part with either Father (Anthony) Ganilh or M.P. Cassilly, nor against the Sisters of Charity. He wants the matter investigated. He feels not guilty, although he failed to go to Detroit. He did not try to start an asylum in opposition to the one already existing.

II-4-e A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
4


(1833)

(Anduze, Father Matthew B.)
(Iberville, Louisiana)

(Draft) With power of attorney from Bishop (Leo Raymond) De Neckere, Anduze, heir to the estate of Father (Paul de) St. Pierre as pastor of Iberville, was commissioned to acquire the College of Iberville to be afterwards transferred to the Bishop of New Orleans; the cost not to exceed $4500 for the large college (College of St. Gabriel, Iberville, Louisiana) and $500 for the house of the small college. The Bishop was to reimburse Anduze for these buildings and for their furniture and repairs and to pay interest on these advances at 10%. Anduze carried out the wishes of the Bishop but not being able to settle because of the Bishop's death, Fathers A(nthony) Blanc and A. (Pierre) Ladaviere, (S.J.), administrators, will receive the transfer of these buildings and pay the interest. But if Anduze should leave Iberville all money from the St. Pierre estate will be deducted and will be the responsibility of the future pastor who has the right of its use according to St. Pierre's will.

V-4-d A. Draft (French) 2pp. 4to.
5


1833-1841

Boheme, Father Ghislain T.

Register of Baptisms and Marriages: Dayton, (Ohio), 1833; Mission de la Cote St. Paul, Michigan, 1833 with names of the people, 1834, 1835, 1836, 1837, 1838, 1839, 1840, 1841. Also for the Mission of Anse Creuse, (Michigan), 1833, 1834, 1835, 1836, 1837, 1838, 1839, 1840, 1841. Also for La Riviere aux Hurons, (Michigan), 1833, 1834, 1835, 1836, 1837, 1838, 1839, 1840, 1841. Also for Mission de la Riviere Ste. Claire, (Michigan) for 1833, 1836, 1837, 1838, 1839, 1840, 1841. Also in the book is a list of the tax for the tithes. A list of an appeal from L'Anse Creuse, also for the Pariosse St. Paul. A Christmas verse, some scripture texts. There is also a list in the back of those who received the sacraments in Fort Wayne in 1833.

III-2-n Book (French) 19mm. x 12mm. pages not numbered
6


(1833)

Kenrick, Francis Patrick, Bp. of Arath
(Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)

to Bishop elect John Baptist (Purcell)
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Having received notification of Purcell's appointment he hastens to congratulate him. Wants to know what he has heard from Rome - Wonders why the Bulls did not come with the letter of the Bishop of Charleston (John England) - Makes fun of the Roman deliberateness. Wants to know Purcell's mind on youths in the seminary. (Letter apparently incomplete).

II-4-e A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo. (Latin)


(1833) ( )

Kenrick, Francis Patrick, Bishop of Arath
Philadelphia

to Father Frederick Rese
Cincinnati, Ohio

Kenrick gives permission for the Poor Clares to establish a convent in Detroit. The nuns should not believe the Countess so easily. Their condition is not to be complained of in every respect. He is sorry that he cannot provide for their spiritual welfare but he will consider with pleasure any means to better their condition. Because of Rese's care of the Germans of Pittsburgh, he will accept the subject that rese offers because he has been recommended to Rese. He thinks that the man should be ordained in Philadelphia because there is no bishop of Cincinnati, but he leaves the matter to Rese. Father (Francis) Guth who labors so well in Philadelphia has written to Strasburg to secure some fellow countrymen to work in the diocese of Philadelphia. Bishop (John) England wrote to Kenrick on Jan. 14 that he did not know what the Holy See would do for Cincinnati. He said that it is very probable that a bishop will be appointed for Detroit. England is sure of the necessity of a Provincial Council for the growing church and Kenrick is willing to join him for a union of the bishops for similar measures. If some plan for the election of bishops is not drawn up, there is danger of trouble with laymen and priests and of schism. What has happened in Kentucky proves that a bishop must rely on his own likes. Rese will do well to suggest to the Sacred Congregation the need of episcopal councils. The "famous prelate" (England) tells Kenrick that the alms of the Leopoldine Association were distributed before his arrival in Vienna; 25,000 to Cincinnati and 15,000 florins to Baltimore. The rest of the dioceses have been deprived of funds. He does not complain and is thankful for the previous kindnesses of Rese but he understands that the reason for the deprivation of other dioceses was their failure to disclose the disposition of the funds already received. For this reason he tells Rese what he has done with his funds. The greatest part until now, he has kept at his own disposal. He has received 3 seminarians and keeps them in his own house. He has given 150 florins to young Balfe whom he sent to Rome. He gave 600 florins to the "Master of the Retreat" which he fears is lost. 200 florins he sent to his brother who was to come to the missions of Pennsylvania but which he will return since he is not coming. He spent 125 florins for the erection of an orphanage. He has promised 100 scudi to St. Michaels. With figures for these he shows a balance of 390 florins for the care of the three seminarians.

III-2-g A.L.S. (Italian) 3pp. 8vo.
9


(1833)

Lichtenberg, (Mr.) Karl Anton
(Vienna, Austria)

to Bishop Frederick Rese
Detroit, (Michigan)

Lichtenberg congratulates Rese for his election to the episcopal office. The enclosed second writing is to inform those who are responsible for the distribution of this year's money that 2000 florins were sent to Rese, and that the clause: "this money must be used in Michigan and Northwest" can be left out, because this has been done at the last but one shipment of 15000 florins of which 13000 florins were for Rese and 2000 florins for Baraga. Lichtenberg has also made arrangements with the bank house Arnstein and Eskeles that the money for Rese should be paid to him at Detroit. The money distribution was decided before the news of the creation of a new diocese came to the office. The 32000 florins were divided as follows: Mobile 10,000 fl., Boston 5,000 fl., Charleston 10,000 fl., St. Louis 5,000 fl., to Rese as administrator of Michigan and the Northwest, 2,000 fl. Of these only 1495. 30 fl. should be delivered to Rese, the rest of 504. 30 is to be given to Father Frederick Baraga. These 32,000 florins were remitted on the 20th of the month before, from Vienna through London-New York. Thinking of the great need of the new diocese, Lichtenberg feels very badly that the money supply for the missions is decreasing constantly and on the other hand the continuance of the income of the (Leopoldine Association) depends entirely on the penny donations of the common people. They have lost interest, and their fervor could only be roused again by news which would inform them of the good fruits of their sacrifices. Especially little has been done in this regard by Cincinnati which was supplied almost exclusively by those donors. If new life should be given to the aging association, Rese is the only one who can do it. Rese's new diocese is so large and so much could be done for the spreading of the faith that rese would have material to move the hearts of the people and receive new donations. Again Lichtenberg asks Rese and his missionaries to make it their duty to send interesting reports to the association. The Austrian empire counts over 22,270,000 Catholic inhabitants, if every one of these, with an exception of 1/5 penniless one, could be induced to give for a year their weekly 2 cents membership fee, then 17,775,000 contributors would bring in a capital of 15,405,000 florins in one year and the annual interest of this capital would be 670,250 florins which is a sum that would satisfy America three times more than all the donations of the last 4 years. Among the Austrian Catholics are 50,000 clergymen, their contributions alone would amount to a yearly 37,904.34 fl. but this year even laymen and clergy together did not bring in such a sum. This little example shows that there is a big field from which more abundant fruit could be gained than has been the case in the past. Rese should not wait until it is too late, he should immediately describe the number and situations of the different churches, their names and the names of the missionaries and priests, the geographical location and extensions of the missions, the different kinds of inhabitants and their wants. Rese should ask the people in his reports to help him and give frequent accounts of the result of the donations. If he does this earthly help will not be lacking. In order to reach the masses it is necessary to give them at times varied, even piquant reports. Bishop (John) England has given a good basis for a further systematical information service with his manuscript. This was also used in the publication of the 6th official report, which is included in this letter. The question is now which of the 11 dioceses of America will receive most of the funds, for the donors have taken the liberty to decide themselves to whom the funds should be given. This attitude is shown in the appendix of the last report in which 500 florins were designated to Baraga, because he has gained their sympathy by his reports. Father (Andreas) Viszoczky, the Hungarian hopes that Rese will take him for his new diocese. Many of Rese's admirers sent their congratulations and good wishes to him. No. 335-313.

III-2-g A.L.S. (German) 2pp. folio
10


1833

(Purcell, Bishop-elect John Baptist)
Conawago, (Pennsylvania)

Notes on his retreat before consecration as bishop of Cincinnati containing his daily program, lists of scripture to be read and notes of meditations on the character and office of bishops.

II-4-o A. notes 4pp. 12mo.
0


1833 Jan. 3

(Rosati), Joseph, Bishop of St. Louis
Nazareth, (Kentucky

to Father John Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens), M(iss)o(uri)

There are two Sisters of Loretto here who will assist the schools in the diocese. Sister Leocadia, (S.L.) is an excellent teacher and Mother Agnes (Hart, S.L.) will make a perfect mistress of novices. For the present they can give no others. Brother Charles will accompany them to Bethlehem and bring back to Loretto the precious remains of their founder, Father (Charles) Nerinckx. Brother has made the box himself, being an excellent carpenter. Timon knows the reason for (Rosati)'s trip to Kentucky. They have persuaded Bishop (Benedict Joseph) Flaget to resume the administration of his see, from which he had resigned. Rome has been asked to appoint him the new Bishop of Bardstown. Bishop (John Baptist) David has resigned. Bishop (Guy Ignatius) Chabrat has been named coadjutor. (Rosati) will return next week; he will go straight to St. Louis.
(P.S.) He found the copies of Rodriguez in English, which were lost. The Sisters will bring them; Timon is to keep the ones for his convents and give the others to the seminary.

IV-3-i A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
9


1833 Jan. 6

Wilkinson, W.V.(?)
( )

to Father (John Brands, C.M.) Prantz
(Barrens, Missouri)

This will be handed to (Brands) by Mr. Capeheart, an old gentleman residing near Wilkinson. He is extremely poor, with a wife and 3 or 4 children. He is a good saddler and shoemaker. He would do all of (Brands)'s shoemaking much cheaper and take any kind provision for pay.

IV-3-i A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
2


1833 Jan. 9

(Flaget), Benedict Joseph, Bishop of Bardstown
Bardstown, Kentucky

to Father Frederick Rese, Administrator of
Cincinnati, Ohio

Rese expresses surprise in not being called to examine the two German students. Bishop Rosati arriving with a German priest - The examination was held. People of Louisville can support only one. As to his resignation he had asked for Chabrat to give confirmation and for other work - The Holy Father refused since there were already two bishops. David was made bishop and Chabrat coadjutor. Turmoil followed and Rosati acts ad mediator - Offers four propositions including the resignation of Bishop David and Flaget's reacceptance. In his difficulties asks for Rese's prayers, praising him for founding the Leopoldine Association.
(Added note) Has received note from Bishop England suggesting plan for obtaining Irish priests for the missions and complaining of the lack of Provincial Councils.

II-4-e A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo. (French)


1833 Jan. 15

Ripley, Geo(rge)
Boston, (Massachusetts)

to O(restes) A. Brownson
Walpole, N(ew) H(ampshire)

As acting editor of the Christian Register he thanks Brownson for his valuable communications. He is attempting to improve the Register. Nothing can be better than Brownson's articles which are pithy, lucid and direct -- just what is needed for a religious newspaper.

I-3-c A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
1


1833 Jan. 23

Young, Father, N(icholas) D.
Somerset, Ohio

to Father Frederick Rese, Administrator
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Has received letters authorizing him to draw $60 for the Rehoboth Church but a more authoritative document is required. Is glad that Mr. White has gone for the body of Bishop Fenwick - Hears there is trouble in Kentucky. Opened Rehoboth Church Jan. 8th - Does not know the whereabouts of Mr. Kundig - Wishes that Bishop Rosati would visit him while in the diocese.
P.S. Continues to visit all the missions except Mt. Vernon - Wants news of Father S.H. Montgomery - Will Bishop Flaget oppose his secularization?

II-4-e A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.


1833 Jan. 25

Bernadin, J., Felix Tala, and M. Beauregard
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

to Bishop (Leon Raymond De Neckere, C.M.
New Orleans), Louisiana

The legislator in the act of incorporation of St. Louis Parish recognized two distinct and separate authorities. He gave the church-wardens the power to regulate the administration of the property, revenue, and all other temporal affairs of the Church but he also wished to have the Catholic religion preserved in all its purity. However, the wardens need advice and believe they would be lacking in their duty if they did not consult (De Neckere). Can they, without becoming involved in spiritual matters, have the disposal of the fee for burials other than in favor of the pastor or curates? Can they appoint an officer, who in the absence of the pastor, would be custodian of the register of births and marriages, records which Catholics need, and could such an officer make extracts from these registers? The name of Patrick Mullaghan is written on the first page of the letter.

V-4-d A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
5


1833 Jan. 25

Duplessis, W.F.C., L. Daunoy, Jos. M. Kennedy, H. Pedesclaux, Marguilliers

New Orleans, Louisiana

The legislator in the act of incorporation of St. Louis Parish recognized two distinct and separate authorities. He gave the church wardens the power to regulate the administration of the property, revenue, and all other temporal affairs of the Church but he also wished to have the Catholic religion preserved in all its purity. However, the wardens need advice and believe they would be lacking in their duty if they did not consult (De Neckere). Can they, without becoming involved in spiritual matters, have the disposal of the fee for burials other than in favor of the pastor or curates? Can they appoint an officer, who in the absence of the pastor, would be custodian of the register of births and marriages, records which Catholics need and could such an officer make extracts from these registers? The name of J. DeRuyter appears on the third page of the letter.

V-4-d A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
6


1833 Jan. 28

Baraga, (Father Frederick)
L'Arbre Croche, (Michigan)

to Father (Vincent Francis) Badin
of Detroit (Michigan)

Father Baraga asks Badin to answer him several questions which have worried him quite a bit.
1) What has happened to the church bell which was to be recast in Detroit and which Baraga hoped to get before the winter,
2) Has Father (Frederick) Rese arrived in Detroit and what arrangements has Badin made with him: Has he paid Badin what Badin loaned Baraga and has Rese received Baraga's letter from Mackinaw.
3) What has Badin arranged with Steavens and Desnoyers concerning Baraga's bill.
4) Is Miss (Elizabeth) Williams still willing to come to L'Arbre Croche to teach. Baraga knows she could do fine work. Baraga would of course pay for her trip.

III-2-g A.L.S. (French) 1p. 8vo.
4


1833 Feb. 4

(Rosati, C.M.), Bishop Joseph
St. Louis, (Missouri)

to Father John Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens), M(iss)o(uri)

(Rosati) regrets Mr. McClosky's departure and is afflicted by Mr. Herlihy's illness. He is sure that Mr. Courtin's trip to New Orleans will have the same effect that Bundy's had the year before. But if he insists on going it is clear that it is a pretext to abandon his vocation. In that case it is useless and dangerous to refuse. They are far from seeing the day of a native clergy. They must have recourse to Europe.
P.S. Timon is to watch over the subject of whom (Rosati) expressed fears when it comes to a matter of sending him into a Congregation. If Timon gets wind of the least thing he is to write (Rosati) and even recall him through Father (John Baptist) Tornatore, (C.M.).

IV-3-i A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
6


1833 Feb. 7

(Flaget), Benedict Joseph, Bishop of Bardstown
Bardstown, Kentucky

to Father Frederick Rese, Administrator of
Cincinnati, Ohio

Tells Rese to quiet his conscience about jurisdiction in Indiana. Proposes that Bishop David give all Rese's priests powers of his diocese and Rese to all David's priests. Speaks of a young German whom Rese mentioned - Would ordain him for Cincinnati if he would also take care of the Germans in Indiana. Asks about the giving of Holy Orders to companion of Father S. T. B(adin).

II-4-e A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 8vo.


1833 Feb. 7

Smith, Hannah
Scott Cou(n)t(y), (Benton, Missouri)

to Father (John) Timon, (C.M.)
Perryville, M(iss)o(uri)

She has a long time delayed sending her daughter to the monastery, waiting for the coming of her son who is now daily expected. Should he not be here before the last of this month, she will thankfully accept Timon's kind offer to wait for their tuition money until she gets the returns for her tobacco. She wishes to send four of her daughters and to place them under his guidance and care. Mr. Davis has been harassing her ever since he took out letters of administration; the suit comes on Monday in the Circuit Court for the debt of $675 she owes the estate. If her tobacco sells at a tolerable price, she will have from $800 to $1,000 to pay it with. She has now in Orleans 9 hogsheads since June and has no returns as yet. Davis prays the Court to give an execution immediately; he is about to pocket all the proceeds of personal property for his administrationship, (etc.). Colonel Ranney says that it is altogether illegal. She wrote to her son last week but is fearful he will not be in time to save her land. Could Timon see Mr. Scott and get his opinion; she would be glad to have Scott attend to her business. Davis has taken every advantage of her; he brings in as a set off the crop she made the year after her husband's death. She must be at $200 expense toward keeping the family or enter into a lawsuit. Timon is to pray for her and to present her respects to Father Odin and beg his prayers. She asks to be remembered to Mother Benedict and the Sisters. She will endeavor to come up to make her Easter, if not with her daughters.

IV-3-i A.L.S. 4pp. folio
5


1833 Feb. 9

Bocot, St(ep)hen
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

On motion of F(rancisco?) Bermudez, resolved that a committee of three members headed by (?) Father Louis Moni be appointed:
1. to talk with Bishop (Leo Raymond De Neckere) about enlarging and repairing the Cathedral of St. Louis;
2. to ask the Bishop for an English preacher;
3. to ask the Bishop to open a school for poor children, to be supported by the fabrique, 3000 piastres to be paid per semester. The members composing this committee are Bermudez, Hugue Pedesclaux, and Moni, the pastor. Copied from the minutes book.

V-4-d A.D.S. (French) 1p. 4to.
4


1833 Feb. 10

Maury, Everiste
Port Gibson, Mississippi

to Father Frederick Rese, Administrator of
Cincinnati, Ohio

Speaks of being installed in a hotel in Port Gibson, where he gives music lessons on the piano - Is cheerful about the prospects - Seems to like his new situation. Plenty of good cheer - Lots to eat and drink - dances, balls, and invitations - Evidently the people are hospitable. Complains of lack of a church.

II-4-e A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo. (Italian)


1833 Feb. 11

Henni, Father John M.
Canton, Ohio

to Father Frederick Rese, Administrator of
Cincinnati, Ohio

Complains that Rese has not sent some promised books - Mentions a priest being sent to Wooster, (Ohio) - Has heard that Rese will visit Canton on way from Detroit - In postscript gives directions for getting information about Margaret Dellery - Gives directions for the sending of Mr. Vande Weyer's trunk.

II-4-e A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo. (Italian and English)


1833 Feb. 14

Baraga, (Father) Frederick
L'Arbre Croche (Michigan)

to Father (Frederick) Rese
Cincinnati, Ohio

Father Rese's letter of December 8, 1832 brought to Father Baraga a great deal of consolation and joy, but also much astonishment and worry. Consolation and joy because Rese has promised help and support to the mission---astonishment because a relative of Baraga wants to come from Austria to the mission and worry because Mr. Lichtenberg intends to visit the mission. He implores Rese to prevent such a visit. Furthermore, Baraga wants to know who exactly the person from Austria is that wants to come and when she intends to arrive, also who is going to be Bishop of Cincinnati, and of Detroit. He thanks Rese for the $100 intended for the mission school teacher, which he will receive through Mr. Abbott in Mackinaw, and for the beautiful Ordo which Rese had sent him. Baraga is very happy to receive so much money and church paraments(?) from Austria. He begs Rese to send it to him as soon as it arrives, for he is in great need of it. Since his return from Detroit he does not possess even a penny as Rese can see for himself when he comes to the mission in spring.

P.S. Baraga asks for a Supplementum Diocesis Baltimorensis which Rese should bring along when he comes in spring. Frater Salesius (Aloysius Schuh) who lives in Arbre-Croche, binds books for the Indians and takes care of the smithy, wants to be remembered to Rese and to his (Redemptorist) brethren in Cincinnati. He would like to receive a letter from Father Francis X. Tschenihen. When Rese comes to Arbre-Croche he will be quite satisfied, because he will find a well equipped school, a smithy, a bookbinder's workshop, a carpenter shop, etc. Baraga begs Rese to write to the War Department that it should not cease to support the mission; the money is well utilized. He also begs rese to bring personally the 1100 florins which have been sent to Baraga from his native country, also the church-paraments and writings, so that nothing might get lost; except if a very safe opportunity to go to Mackinaw should happen to arise.

III-2-g A.L.S. (German) 2pp. 4to.
4


1833 Feb. 16

Tucker, H(ilary)
(Rome, Italy)

to Father John Timon, (C.M.)
Perryville, Missouri

Tucker is conscious that he has been rather neglectful in answering Timon's letters. Timon's last came 58 days after date. Now that the carnival has given them two days of vacation, he will send all the news. From external appearances the political state of the popedom is ameliorating. Father (August) Jeanjean has been in Rome since December 25 at the Propaganda and tucker passes an hour with him every day. Jeanjean is engaged with the Prefect of Propaganda, Cardinal Pedicini and Monsignor Castracane, the secretary, giving them information about the Church in the United States. Jeanjean is not only learned but also warmly attached to the American people and constitution. He will soon go to Naples on a visit to Bishop (Joseph Rosati?)'s brother. Bishop (John) England has been in Rome nearly two months. He made the funeral oration of (Charles) Carroll in this city. On Christmas Tucker saw the pope celebrate for the first time in St. Peter's. Tucker has not seen a great number of the rarities of Rome as he will remain here a long time and is in no hurry. The number of students in their college is 89; 10 are Americans. Tucker is now studying philosophy and mathematics. He expects soon to be called on to take the oath of allegiance which imposes very strict obligations. On the 26th a consistory is to be held in which a bishop for Cincinnati will be elected; two are proposed, Fathers (Peter) Kenny, (S.J.) and (John) Hughes of Philadelphia. It is now contemplated here to do something for the salvation of the Indians and (St. Louis) Diocese is to be the center of all efforts. Most probably the Jesuits will be in charge. Tucker hears that great numbers of Germans continue to arrive. In the College there is a Hollander who is willing to go to America. Two or three more Germans will shortly be priests and desire to go to America. Tucker wishes Timon could send him the Catholic Repository, not so much for himself as for the rector, Count (Charles) Reisach who would (go) to America if he could be spared here. Tucker sends respects to Fathers Tornatore, Odin, Paquin and all of his fellow students. Timon is to tell Charles that Tucker hopes he will persevere and be ready for the mission when Tucker returns. He expects to hear of Louis (Tucker) being established parish priest by the next (letter). Tucker sends his respects to the Sisters and in a particular manner to Sister Agnes and to his family and friends. It is rumored here that a separation is about to take place in the United States but he does not believe it.

IV-3-i A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
12


1833 Feb. 18

Baraga (Father) Frederick
L'Arbre Croche (Michigan)

to Father (Vincent Francis) Badin
Detroit, (Michigan)

Father Baraga is still concerned about the relative who wants to come to L'Arbre Croche in order to devote her life to the Indians of this mission. If she should really come she would have to teach school with Madame Fisher, therefore he asks Father Badin to tell Miss (Elizabeth) Williams not to come to the mission. When he had engaged her he did not know of this other person. Again he asks to be informed as to who is going to be Bishop of Cincinnati, or Bishop of Detroit. He also inquires how Father (V.) Badin's brother is. If Father Badin wants some more Indian books which Baraga had printed, he will send them.

III-2-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 8vo
4


1833 Feb. 22

Dahmen, C.M., Father (Fr(ancis) Xav(ier)
Ste. Genevieve, (Missouri)

to Father (John) Timon, (C.M.)
Barrens, (Missouri)

Dahmen has talked to Mr. Scott; it is impossible for him to undertake this affair because of all the business with estates in this district. Dahmen is too ill, he must go to Doctor Linn. He begs Timon to come to him.
P.S. He has just heard that (Ferdinand) Rozier's son is to come to Perry-Ville tomorrow so instead of sending this letter by express he will probably send it by young Rozier.

IV-3-i A.L.S. (French) 2pp. folio
4


1833 Feb. 23

Dahmen, C.M., Father Fr(ancis) Xav(ier)
Ste. Genevieve, (Missouri)

to Father (John) Timon, (C.M.)
Barrens, (Missouri)

Dahmen wrote yesterday. He saw a caricature yesterday in which two men with extraordinary faces met; one said to the other, "Did it rain tomorrow?" The other replied, "Yes, it was."

IV-3-i A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
1


1833 Feb. 25

(Flaget), Benedict Joseph, Bishop of Bardstown
Bardstown, Kentucky

to Father Frederick Rese, Administrator
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Has received letter from Detroit indicating that he is legatee and executor of Father Richard's will. His property is for the Bishop of Detroit when appointed - Does not wish to mix in the affairs of another diocese - Asks rese how to proceed - Richard's debts greater than his resources. He is not now Bishop of Bardstown and is willing to give the job to Bishop (John) David now bishop.

II-4-e A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.


1833 Feb. 28

Peirce, Isaac B.
Trenton, (New York)

to O(restes) A. Brownson
Walpole, New Hampshire

He rejoices that Brownson is happy and comfortably settled. He will be glad to see Brownson this spring in Trenton. He hopes to see Brownson;s book. He hears that the Unitarians are too deep in the error of Protestants in making a mere book the text and standard of infallibility. He looks upon the error of the Protestants in making the Bible the standard of infallibility to be as pernicious as that of the Roman Church in placing it in an assembly of ecclesiastics. He has preached two sermons on this subject and would like the opportunity to use it in the College Chapel at Cambridge. He wishes to see (William E.) Channing's last volume of Sermons. He has suffered much by being a disciple of (Joseph) Priestly. He would much rather believe in all the fancies of Immanuel Swedenborg than again believe in the resurrection of the body.

I-3-e A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
1


1833 Mar. 5

Baraga (Father) Frederick
L'Arbre Croche (Michigan)

to Father (Frederick) Rese
(Cincinnati, Ohio)


Father Baraga is still worried about the relative who intends to come to devote her life to the mission. He had received a letter from his older sister in which she wrote that it is the younger sister who is coming and that the Bishop gave her the permission to come. Baraga is quite distressed about that, because she knows no French and will never be able to learn it well. She will be very unhappy. Baraga wrote to her immediately not to come. If she gets the letter before she left, Baraga is sure she will not come. His older sister (Amalia Baraga) also informed him in the same letter that many beautiful and practical articles are being sent to him from Laibach (Jugoslavia). Baraga implores Rese again most seriously to let him have everything, because his relations have bought these things from their own money. Also Baraga wants all the money that was collected for him in Laibach (Jugoslavia). Baraga is willing to pay all the freight bills, which are due to him. But if the goods should not come over Cincinnati, then that precaution is unnecessary. Baraga entreats Rese again to be sure and come in spring as he has many things to discuss, which cannot be discussed in letters.
P.S. Written on April 20, Baraga says that he could not send the letter when he wrote it. He is able now to send it to Mackinac. He doubts whether this letter will still reach Rese in Cincinnati.

III-2-g A.L.S. (German) 2pp. 8vo.
3


1833 Mar. 5

Boullier, C.M., Father J(ohn)
St(e). Genevieve, (Missouri)

to Father (John) Timon, (C.M.)
Barrens, M(iss)o(uri)

Timon will receive by the bearer the 75 cents for the book he sent Boullier. He has not yet seen Dr. Sergeant and cannot tell whether he wants his as a loan or not. Since Boullier saw timon he has been reflecting on establishing a nunnery at Old Mines. He thinks the sooner the better if they could get the approbation of the Bishop. He has spread everywhere that they would have a female school next Easter. The house Boullier has rented for them will be liable to be paid only when they come. He does not know whether Mr. Hibbard is willing to wait so long for his rent. If they were at Old Mines, Boullier in going down would bring all their provisions. Though Boullier will be absent only one month, they could get along for the little time he will stay in New Orleans. He thanks Timon for the permission he got from the Superior.

IV-3-i A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
4


1833 Mar. 5

(De Neckere, C.M.), Leo (Raymond), Bishop of N(ew) O(rleans)
St. Michael, (Louisiana)

to Father J(ohn) Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens), M(iss)o(uri)

Some six or seven weeks ago he sent Father (Peter J.) Verhaegen, (S.J.) $40 as intentions for Masses. He desires to know whether they reached Timon. Father (Constantine) Maenhaut gave Timon's sister, Mrs. Douglas, $50 and observed to (De Neckere) afterwards that he intended them as intentions of Masses to be acquitted by Timon. (De Neckere) was not able when Mrs. Douglas applied to him for assistance, to afford her any and he accepted some $20 or $25 upon condition that a number of Masses would satisfy for it. (De Neckere) will now keep 20 intentions and asks Timon to accept the 30 intentions remaining. Mr. Douglas intended to move across the lake where he thought brighter prospects offered. Timon will have learned of the death of Father (Joseph) Tichitoli, (C.M.) on February 27 after 17 days of a severe illness of which Father (Francis) Cel(l)ini, (C.M.) will tell the particulars.
(P.S.) He sends remembrances to the Superior, Father Tornatore, to Fathers Odin, Paquin, Brandts, and in a peculiar way to Olivier.

IV-3-i A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
7


1833 Mar. 6

Boullier, (C.M.), Father J(ohn)
St(e). genevieve, (Missouri)

to Father (John) Timon (C.M.)
Barrens, M(iss)o(uri)

The bearer is a Miss Huff of the Mines who came over yesterday. Boullier had spoken to Timon of her desire to go to the convent, and probably become a nun. As she lived nearly 12 miles from the Mines, Boullier saw her only 2 or 3 times. From what he heard she has very good dispositions and comes in spite of her relations who did not want her to become a Catholic. Timon had told Boullier that he would receive her in the Barrens. She got here with her brother. Boullier had written by Mr. Ziegler yesterday, sending Timon 75 cents, the amount of "Difficulties to Faber's Rome"(?) and asked Timon to let the nuns (Sisters of Loretto) come over at the Mines at Easter.

IV-3-i A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
4


1833 Mar. 7

Baraga (Father) Frederick
L'Arbre Croche (Michigan)

to Father (Frederick) Rese
(Cincinnati, Ohio)

Baraga requests Rese to allow him to begin a new mission at La Pointe, (Wisconsin). A year ago Madame (Marianne Lasaliere) Fisher had told him of this place on Lake Superior where there are many savages and some Catholics, but no priest. These people especially the savages, desire very much to have a priest because they want to be converted. They have never seen a "black robe," but several Protestant ministers have tried to convert them, with no result. For a long time he has pondered over this plan and even consulted Father (Samuel) Mazzuchelli who is his advisor, and everybody has greatly encouraged him to go to Lake Superior to open a new mission. It will cost Rese nothing but the little word "yes." The trip there, his maintenance, the building of a church, living quarters, and a schoolhouse will cost rese nothing. The name of the place is La Pointe. Five reasons motivate Baraga to go there.
1) Baraga left his country and all comforts of wealth to save souls and bring help to those who live in the wild parts of this country. In Arbre Croche almost everyone is converted and everything is in good order.
2) Baraga thinks that among all Rese's priests he would be the best one to erect a new mission, because he has wealthy and charitable relations and friends in his native country from whom he can get the means to furnish a new mission, though he had never yet written to his country for money, nevertheless, they are sending him now about 1100-1200 florins, many valuable things for the church and also paintings. Should he ever write for money, they would send thousands and thousands of florins.
3) Another advantage would be that Baraga wrote to his people in Laibach (Jugoslavia) to send him a very capable loyal and industrious man, to do housework, who can help in building the new mission.
4) Baraga wants to build a school and secure these persons who can take charge of the school. If it should be necessary to preach in English, Baraga is capable of so doing.
5) Mr. Lichtenberg wrote that Baraga's report about the mission which he sends so often to the Leopoldine Association always inspire Baraga's countrymen to new zeal for the mission. If Baraga now erects a new mission, and describes it to the patrons of the Leopoldine Association, Baraga is certain that these people will show ever still greater zeal. Baraga hopes that these five reasons will appear sufficient to Rese for the permission to go to La Pointe. Though Rese's authority may be at present limited on account of the "sede Vacante" in temporal things, Baraga believes that in spiritual things he has still the same authority. Baraga does not wish to go to the new mission the approaching spring, but the year after. But when Rese comes to Arbre Croche this spring, Baraga begs him to bring along a new priest to take his place as he wants to have enough time to train him.

III-2-g A.L.S. (German) 4pp. 12mo.
6


1833 Mar. 7

Flaget, Benedict Joseph, Bishop of Bardstown
Bardstown, Kentucky

to Father Frederick Rese
Cincinnati, Ohio

Rese will find attached the powers of attorney so that he can attend to the matters connected with the will of Father (Gabriel) Richard. Rese is to keep a strict account of his actions so that Flaget can bear the whole expense. Flaget is desirous of doing something for the Catholics of Detroit but he is sure they will excuse him for taking care of his old age since he confides their interest to one so devoted and so dear. What Rese says about the promotion of Father (Nicholas D.) Young to the dignity of provincial of the Dominicans does not surprise him. He thinks him the best man, unless one be sent from Rome, but Flaget is unwilling to believe that he is named bishop of Cincinnati, and does not desire it. If Young is provincial, Flaget hopes that he will not reside in Ohio because that would bring about the same inconveniences he had with Bishop (Edward Dominic) Fenwick and he doubts that he should support them with Young. As to Father (Simon) Brute, he gave in at the instance of Bishop (Joseph) Rosati, despite his repugnance, and presented him for Vincennes. But after Bishop (Francis Patrick) Kenrick opposed the choice, he with Kenrick wrote a letter to the Sacred Congregation asking that Brute be not appointed and another presented. That is why he doubts the nomination of Brute. He further thinks that Brute will not accept. (The enclosure is as follows): power of attorney is given by Flaget to Rese to settle the estate of Richard. Advanced in years and indifferent to temporal matters, he is not able to go to Detroit to settle the affairs of his friend Richard. Wishing to show his veneration and gratitude, he gives full powers of attorney to Rese, as administrator of Cincinnati, Michigan, and the Northwest to act for him in the legacy of Richard, declaring at the same time that he renounces the legacy if the debts surpass what he has left. If there is some property left after the payment of the debts, it is to be given for the good of St. Anne's Church in Detroit.
Signed and sealed. (In the Detroit papers)

III-2-g A.L.S. (letter in French) 3pp. 8vo.
7


1833 Mar. 8

Gregory XVI, Pope
Rome, Italy

to Father John Baptist Purcell, President of Mt. St. Mary's College
Emmitsburg

The Holy Father in the fullness of his power appoints as successor to Bishop Edward Fenwick, Father John Baptist Purcell as Bishop of Cincinnati, Ohio - Gives him the power to choose his own consecrator, and co-consecrators, the latter may be priests, provided they follow the conditions laid down in this Apostolic Letter. Signed for Cardinal Albano by A. Picchioni. On the back of the Bull is the certificate of the consecration which took place in the Cathedral of Baltimore signed by Archbishop James (Whitfield), Bishop John Dubois of New York, and Bishop Francis Patrick Kenrick co-consecrators. Bishops Joseph Rosati and Frederick Rese. Dated Oct. 27, 1833.

II-4-e A.L.S. 1p. Parchment


1833 Mar. 12

Rosati, C.M., Bishop Joseph
St. Louis, (Missouri)

to Father John Timon, C.M.
(Barrens), M(iss)o(uri)

Permission for Father John (Boullier), C.M. Boullier to place the Sisters of Loretto at Old Mine(s) for a school for girls.

A.L.S. (Latin)

On the same paper:

--------
(1833 Mar. 12)

(Rosati, C.M.), Bishop Joseph
St. Louis, (Missouri)

to (Father John Timon
Barrens), M(iss)o(uri)

Here is the permission Timon asked for. (Rosati) is convinced the Mine will draw great advantages from this foundation but does Timon have enough Sisters? (Rosati) will write to Bouiller now.

A.L.S. (French)

IV-3-i A.L.S. (Latin, French) 3pp. 4to.
4
1833 Mar. 13

(Rosati), Joseph, Bp. of St. Louis
St. Louis, Missouri

to Father Frederick Rese, Administrator of
Cincinnati, Ohio

Gives as his reason for not accepting a certain Irishman into his seminary lack of certificates and deficiency in Latin. Will be glad to receive a good man (preferably German) who knows Latin. Such a one is to be sent not to the Seminary but to Mt. Mary's landing. Doubts whether Brute will accept the bishopric.

II-4-e A.L.S. (Italian) 1p. 8vo.


1833 Mar. 22

Kenedy, Jo(h)n
Baltimore, (Maryland)

to Father John Timon (C.M.)
(Barrens), Missouri

Kenedy received Timon's letter through Mr. Rozier. They were surprised to hear of James' death. Eleanor took it to heart very much. Father is well and they hope to hear of Timon's mother's recovery. A son born about three weeks ago has been christened Ambrose. The three oldest children go to school. They pay $13.50 rent for their house. Business was very slack during the winter. Eleanor had an attach of typhus fever about 6 months ago. Stereotyping three small books, The Christian's Guide, American Songster, and Letter Writer cost him about $350. Timon's cousins, Kitty Kelly, Mary Russell, Rose, and Eleanor are well except for Mrs. Russell's old complaint. John Owings sends respects. Father (Edward) Damphoux is abridging a work for Kenedy called Christian Perfection. Kenedy (lists the) books he is sending to Timon. The (bill amounts) to $100 and the box is directed care of Timothy Davis and Company. A railroad is to be commenced between Baltimore and Washington. Howard Woods is fenceless and a great portion dug away for sand; a new market place is to be where the old poor house stood. The largest hotel is finishing at the corner of Eutaw and Market Street. On Pratt Street the fronts of warehouses and stores are being replaced by granite pillars. Kenedy has a friend, Levi Taylor, a stone cutter, who endorses for him; he is an old acquaintance of Kenedy's father's. Bernard Coskery often inquires about the family as does Connolly, the button maker. Kenedy hopes Timon will come to Baltimore as he was the only junior branch of the family they were most attached to. He is glad that Mr. Daly (is well?) and that brother Owen is doing well. Timon is to ask Daly what has become of Patt Gorman or whether he got his watch. Mary Matilda thanks Timon for his kind expressions.

IV-3-i A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
13


1833 Mar. 24

(Rosati), Bishop Joseph
St. Louis, (Missouri)

to Father John Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens), M(iss)o(uri)

(Rosati) has just received a letter from Father (Victor) Paillasson who has been very ill since his return and who seems dissatisfied with what seems claimed by the Sisters (of Loretto), that is, that the property of the Convent and land be ceded to them for the reason that they could not interest themselves in an establishment which did not belong to them. (Rosati) is grieved by these obstacles to God's work. Paillasson wishes to have the title in the Bishop's name because these properties will go back not only to the Sisters but also to the Church and because the laws of this state do not recognize a corporation of Sisters. If the Sisters of Loretto could have a legal existence and own property in their own name as in Kentucky (Rosati) would not hesitate an instant to demand that in all the foundations the property be owned by the Community. So (Rosati) will follow the example of Bishop (Benedict Joseph) Flaget who before the (right?) was obtained in Kentucky, had the title of all the Convents of his Diocese in his name. The Sisters change houses, some could quit their calling; the titles would have to be renewed often. Are there not examples at the Barrens? Is there not a married woman who was formerly a superior and have not priests been overtaken by death before making a will although they had Church property? There is a striking example among the Sisters of Charity of Emmitsburg; they own only their Motherhouse but they never refuse to take an establishment which does not belong to them. Their houses multiply and they prosper.

IV-3-i A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
5


1833 Apr. 12

Chazelle, S.J., Father P(ierre)
(Lebanon, Kentucky)

to Bishop (Leo Raymond) De Neckere, (C.M.)
New Orleans, Louisiana

Chazelle received the letters of De Neckere and Father (Pierre) Ladaviere, (S.J.). It seems that God favors the work they began to think about more than 2 years ago. De Neckere has reason to rejoice over what has been done in Kentucky; it seems to Chazelle that all looks favorable for the establishment in Louisiana and that he came there to prepare to enter De Neckere's diocese. But when will they be able to begin. He sees nothing clear nor even probable, only a few facts and ideas:
1. He does not know whether they will be established by next October but it would be at least six months before they would know what they could count on;
2. Their Father General of the (Jesuits) is very well disposed towards Louisiana; Chazelle will keep him informed;
3. De Neckere offers them two sites; Iberville seems convenient at the moment although Assumption probably offers more advantages. There will be many things to consider such as the ideas of the public, the choice of the parents, local things small in themselves but sometimes of important consequences;
4. During the year, they will prepare until circumstances make known the will of God. Chazelle can permit Ladaviere to remain in De Neckere's diocese and do it gladly.

V-4-d A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
5


1833 Apr. 17

Hickey, Father John
Emmittsburg, M(arylan)d

to Bishop Leo (Raymond) De Neckere
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Hickey has received De Neckere's letter concerning the hospital. Their council has concluded to send two Sisters for Sister Regina (Smith), by a packet that will sail from Baltimore in 6 or 7 days. They also propose sending on 9 Sisters (of Charity) on receiving an answer, if the doctors think that it is safe to go to New Orleans. Traveling expenses are to be sent; the salary is the same as for the Sisters of the Asylum. Hickey expects that the head Sister at the Hospital will be their present Mother who will go on to St. Louis and take two Sisters with her who will replace two others at St. Louis whom she will take with her to New Orleans in the fall or in the beginning of winter. They conceive the undertaking to be a very important and dangerous one. The management of the Hospital will be given entirely to the Sister; there will be no such things as matrons or stewards to govern the Sisters.

V-4-d A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
2


1833 Apr. 22

Rosati, Joseph, Bp. of St. Louis
St. Louis, Missouri

to Father Frederick Rese, Administrator of
Cincinnati, Ohio

In this letter borne by Mr. Rodier, Rosati says that he had heard that Rese is to be made Bishop of Detroit; that the Jesuits have prevented the nomination of Father (Peter) Kenny, (S.J.); that the Dominicans were trying to get Father (Richard Pius) Miles, (O.P.) bishop of Cincinnati - Mentions article in the "Union" of Brussells which complained that the funds from the Leopoldine Association were given to some diocese and not to others - Believes the article came from one of the neglected diocese - Bishop England in Vienna and Rome - Asks if he can expect help from the Leopoldine Association. The people of Chicago have written to him for a priest - Although that part of Illinois is under Bardstown he has sent Father (Irenaeus) St. Cyr there for a time.

II-4-e A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo. (Italian)


1833 Apr. 24

Baraga, (Father) Frederick
L'Arbre Croche (Michigan)

to Father (Vincent Francis) Badin
(Detroit, Michigan)

Baraga has answered Miss (Elizabeth) Williams' letter sincerely and asked her to show that letter to Father Badin who is her confessor. Badin will see them for himself that Baraga has done her no wrong. When Father (Frederick) Rese comes to L'arbre Croche he will decide about this matter with more assurance. Baraga reproaches Father Badin a little because he still has not answered him about the church bell which is to be recast in Detroit. He wants to know whether it is finished and when he can have it. Furthermore he wants to know all about Rese's visit in Detroit this spring, also who is going to be Bishop of Cincinnati and of Detroit, whether Mr. Lostrie is still in Detroit and all the news that might be of interest to Baraga. Mrs. (Marianne) Fisher wants to be remembered in Father Badin's prayers.

III-2-g A.L.S. (French) 1p. 8vo.
4


1833 Apr. 27

(Neckere), Leo De, Bishop of New Orleans
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

to (Bishop-elect John Baptist Purcell)
of Cincinnati, Ohio

(De Neckere) has recently written to (Purcell) congratulating him on his promotion to the see of Cincinnati. He sends this through Father (Stephen H. Montgomery who is returning to Cincinnati and asks information about a Frenchman named Sanpoix (?) who after a legitimate marriage has obtained a divorce and now seeks to marry a Louisiana girl Angela Lanaux. (De Neckere) desires to have information from the priest who performed the first ceremony about the marriage. The man is about 40 years of age.

II-4-e A.L.S. (Latin) 1p. 8vo.
1


1833 Apr. 29

Passerat, C.SS.R., Father Jos(eph)
(Vienna, Austria)

to Father Frederick rese
(Cincinnati, Ohio)

Since it is the intention of Rese and of the leaders of the Leopoldine Association to establish a house for (Redemptorists) missionaries and since Green Bay is in no way connected with that design, Passerat has written to his confreres to accept possession of the house at Detroit, and to apply to that purpose the 5000 florins which the leaders of the Association have added to the 1000 florins they had already destined for them. From the letters he has received, Passerat believes that Father Simon Saenderl has shown himself a mediocre missionary among the Indians. He asks Rese then to have him erect a house for their community in Detroit or wherever else is suitable. This he says, will be best for the salvation of souls. In Austria this will be more agreeable to the Leopoldine Association and to the diocese of Cincinnati also. Passerat has several confreres who wish to go to the American missions if Rese has need of them. Saenderl is to join his two confreres at Detroit and Passerat promises to give further aid to the diocese of Cincinnati.

III-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 8vo.
5


1833 Apr. 29

Brute, Father Simon Gabriel
Mt. St. Mary's, Emmitsburg, Md.

to Father John Baptist Purcell
Bp. elect of Cincinnati, Ohio

Gives his first thoughts about his appointment as bishop - advises him for his own self - advises him to do what he can for the college while he remains, staying there until commencement. Is sorry that Bishop Rese has been removed from the diocese, because of his great knowledge of the diocese.

II-4-e A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.


1833 Apr. 29

(Brute), Father Simon
(Mt. St. Mary's, Emmitsburg, Maryland)

to (Bishop-elect John Baptist Purcell)
(Emmitsburg, Maryland)

(Brute) writes to (Purcell) his thoughts on the appointment of (Purcell) to the see of Cincinnati. For himself he urges various pious thoughts and the reading of St. Paul's epistle to Timothy. He also urges him to do what he can in the remaining time for the College. He is sorry to see Rome take away so soon Bishop (Frederick) Rese who had after Bishop (Edward Fenwick) the main knowledge of the diocese.

II-4-e A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
2


1833 May 3

Henni, Father John M.
Canton, Ohio

to Father Frederick Rese, Administrator
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Henni asks a dispensation from impediment of consanguinity in favor of John Metzger and Catherine Goodman. Reminds Rese that the same dispensation was granted previously.

A.L.S. 1p. 8vo. (Latin)

Added letter to the same.
Announces death of his brother in Europe - Third death in family in 2 years - Hopes Rese will come to Canton soon to consult him.
P.S. Mentions again trouble between Fathers DeRaymaker and Van de Weyer - jealousy.

II-4-e A.L.S. (Italian) 8vo.


1833 May 4

Probsting, (Father)
Oldenburg, (Germany)

to Father Frederick Rese
Cincinnati, Ohio

Probsting received Father Rese's letter of Dec. 6, (1832) in Jan. 1833. He copied the letter 3 times and sent a copy to Munster, Osnabrueck and Paderborn. There the letters were copied again and sent all over Westphalia. However he omitted that part of the letter where Bishop (Benedict Joseph Flaget) of Kentucky is astonished about the poor knowledge of Latin of the two Theologians, because the people of Germany do not need to know that, Probsting thought. But nevertheless he left that passage where Father Rese doubted of their acceptance by the Bishop of Kentucky. Someone who showed Rese's letter in a village was threatened with a beating, because it did not agree with their own ideas. Others said that the letter was a swindle. Rese can judge from that, that the people will not listen to him but will emigrate to America. From Probsting's parish a sister of (Mr. Joseph Ferneding) wants to come to America and her brother asked Probsting to write to Rese on account of her. It has been a great blow to the family that the theological student, Ferneding was not accepted by Rese. His brother cried when he heard it. Nam his married sister wants to emigrate with her family. She will have 2000 Obalers left to buy land in America. If therefore Ferneding cannot find a place as a student of divinity or as a teacher then he can live with that family or with a younger sister who also wants to come to America and who had always sent him a few 100 Thalers. She may have 500-600 Thalers and according to Mr. ferneding's account is a good cook, young and modest. This young girl will devote herself to her brother if he is not accepted for anything in the Seminary or wherever Rese intends to place him and if he needs her help. Probsting regrets that the student Ferneding has no special talents but he liked him for his engaging manners. He never was informed about his general knowledge. He begs Rese in the name of the family to advise and console the young man. A young seminarist, born in Paderborn, county Marsk, who had studied with great success in the seminary in Munster is thinking of becoming a missionary. He will be ordained in a few days and intends to go to America as soon as he can. He asked for more news about Father Rese, so Probsting sent him Rese's letter and advised him to assure himself first of Rese's acceptance. But he may decide to become a Jesuit, like another young priest from this district, who received certain information about America on his way from Baltimore to Cincinnati. Probsting asks rese to send him a letter, in which he advises all young priests who want to become missionaries to enter the Jesuit order. This may help to give recognition again to an institution which has suffered so long through defamation and which even now has not regained its prestige. Such an advice would bring young people of the best quality again to this order, should they want novices, while in Germany they cannot find a position because they have an abundance.
P.S. Probsting asks Rese's pardon because the letter has been written in such a hurry. The man who will deliver this letter is sitting next to him.

III-2-g A.L.S. (German) 4pp. 4to.
4


1833 May 5

Rozier, Ferdinand
Ste. Genevieve, (Missouri)

At a meeting of the inhabitants of Ste. Genevieve to take measures to obtain a branch of (St. Mary's) College of Perry County, Rozier was called to preside and Felix Vallé appointed secretary. On motion of Col(onel) J.B. Bossier a committee of three was appointed to wait on the principals of the College: Rozier, Barthelemy St. Gemme, and Vallé.

L.S.

Attached to the above:

--------
1833 May 8

(Timon, C.M., Father John
Barrens, Missouri)

The principals of St. Mary's College thank the citizens of Ste. Genevieve for the confidence their request implies. At the same time they humbly request the citizens to excuse them from making at this time any demand.

IV-3-i L.S., A. Draft 2pp. 4to. & 12mo.
5


1833 May 14

(England, Bishop John)
Rome, (Italy)

to Father James J. Mullon
(Cincinnati, Ohio)

Probably the same packet which takes this will also convey to Father (John Baptist) Purcell his appointment for the diocese of Cincinnati, comprising the State of Ohio. It was arranged Sunday evening after various delays. England congratulates Mullon and the Diocese upon it, as England knew Purcell well. England suggests to Mullon, to write to Purcell immediately to secure his acceptance, as it is likely efforts will be made to urge his resignation. Such a step now would probably produce results which would do an injury not to be repaired for a century. (Fathers John Joseph) Hughes, (John Baptist) Purcell with (Peter) Kennedy were on the first list. Another was sent with the names of (Stephen) Dubuisson, marked as the best choice, and (William) McSherry. The general of the Jesuits objected to his three Michaleens. The Cardinal chose Purcell believing him to be the one most likely to serve and not wishing just now to take Hughes from Philadelphia. (Father Frederick) Rese had been named for Detroit, upon Bishop (Edward) Fenwick's letter and the Pope's knowledge of him. Without stating knowledge of the fact Mullon may urge the propriety and necessity of Provincial councils; the Pope has directed the Propaganda to write to the Archbishop that it is his wish they should be held. Mullon may be assured that their administration will be greatly improved by Rome.
P.S. Mullon can share this with Rese. Nothing has been done yet about Vincennes.

II-5-h A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
8
Photostatic copy from the Archives of the College of Mt. St. Joseph, Delhi, Ohio).


1833 May 18

Pedicini, Maurus Cardinal Prefect
Rome, (Papal States)

to Bishop-elect Frederick Rese
of Detroit, Michigan (Territory)

In a general meeting of the Sacred Congregation of the Propaganda of Feb. 25, 1833, held before Pope Gregory XVI. it was decided that the province of Michigan and the Northwest which hitherto has been under the administration of the Bishop of Cincinnati, would be erected into its own diocese with its see at Detroit, as suffragan to the Archdiocese of Baltimore. The Apostolic Brief erecting the see is included with this letter. Also by the vote of the Congregation and the Holy Father, Rese was named to be the first bishop, and his letters of nomination, and a rescript of his faculties are also included with this letter. For the rest, Rese is to seek consecration as soon as possible, and take over the administration of the new diocese. Pedicini adds his own good wishes for the new bishop and his new diocese. Signed by Angelo Mai as secretary no. 1.

III-2-g D.S. (Latin) 1p. 8vo.
2


1833 May 23

Crosley, Jr., and Addison Brown, Walpole Town Congregational Society
Walpole, N(ew) H(ampshire)

to Rev. O(restes) A. Brownson
(Walpole, New Hampshire)

At an ecclesiastical council convened by this society and attended by delegates from other branches, a letter in Latin to Brownson by the group was read as well as his letter of acceptance to the position of Gospel Minister. Satisfactory testimonials were produced of the Moral Character of Rev. O. A. Brownson. The council then voted to proceed to the exercises of installation.

I-3-e A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
3


1833 May 23

Henni, Father John M(artin)
Canton, Ohio

to Father Frederick Rese, Administrator
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Discusses mistake made in the application for a marriage dispensation - Speaks of Father Reymaker collecting money because of orders from Father (Nicholas D.) Young. Rese seems to have written to Father (Martin) Kundig about him - He has not asked to go until next year. Speaks of his reasons, his indebtedness to his uncle and the need of others of the family of the money he owed his uncle - Asks that Father Kundig go to Cleveland in his stead - His only consolation has been in the report that Rese is to be bishop. Will tell the rest by word.
P.S. His uncle's view about the debt.

II-4-e A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo. (German)


1833 May 24

Speth, Canon B.
Munich, Freising

to Bishop Frederick Rese
Cincinnati, Ohio

Mr. Stemler, who is a personal acquaintance of Bishop rese, is bringing this letter to Rese. Speth thanks the Bishop for the letter and its enclosures dated New York May 17, 1832 which Speth had received on July 23, 1832 through the Leopoldine Association. He is very happy that the money for the missions has been duly received, over which there had been a great deal of suspense. This was also the reason that the funds were held back, because the only information Speth could give was not satisfactory to the people. But since the arrival of Rese's letter and the enclosed reports, which were immediately given to the editorial office of a theological periodical, everything is going well again. Speth also asked the Leopoldine Association for copies of the continuation of those first reports which told of the progress of the missions and which he would like to distribute among the clergy to rouse them to new donations. In this way Speth hopes to collect again a big sum of money which will be sent again through the bank Hottinguer and Co. in Paris or if Rese prefers, through the Leopoldine Association. Speth is very happy that Rese has been so successful in spreading the faith. That the late Bishop (Edward D.) Fenwick of Cincinnati did not receive a letter of thanks from the King of Bavaria has its only reason in the still complicated government affairs. Speth had heard of Bishop Fenwicks' death through Mr. Stimlet and is sorry that the Bishop did not have the joy of seeing the fruits of his labors. But Speth hopes that Rese, put in Fenwick's place, will have a longer life and become a second St. Paul, and that he will be supported by many brave assistants so that he will be able to see his greatest desire fulfilled, namely to start a seminary soon. Speth is ready to help Rese as much as he can.

III-2-g A.L.S. (German) 2pp. 8vo.
3


1833 (May 26)

Boheme, G(hislain) T.
Dayton, Ohio

to Father Frederick Rese, Administrator
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Speaks of the visit of Mr. Aughenback of Fort Wayne, (Ind.), who has sacrificed his time to teach the young there. The Catholics of Fort Wayne need a chance to make their Easter duty. Asks that he be made vicar to Father (S.T.) Badin, who is vicar of Bardstown, so that he can take care of them before going into Michigan. Points out the need of priests there.

A.L.S. 2pp. 16to. (French)


1833 Jun. 6

Dupont-Poursat, Bishop Peter
Coutances, (France)

John Stephen Blin acolyte of Champrepur, received the subdiaconate. Signed by Lesplus-Dupre, vicar general and Michet(?), secretary.

V-4-d Printed form S. 1p. 4to.
1


1833 Jun. 12

Morrison, Robert
Kaskaskia, (Illinois)

to Father John Timon (C.M.)
Barrens, M(iss)o(uri)

Mrs. Morrison's anxiety on her son's account, from the report of the cholera at Timon's place, induces Morrison to send for him. He hopes Timon will therefore let him return home with bearer hereof. He can go back again when the alarm is over.

IV-3-i A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
1


1833 Jun. 14

Timon (C.M.), Father J(ohn)
(Barrens, Missouri)

to W(illia)m Morrison
Kaskaskia, Illinois

Morrison wished Timon to mark by the return of Bishop (Joseph Rosati, C.M.) the time when Timon could send the piano. As the bishop has just returned from Fredericktown and as he will stay here for a few days, Timon sends an earlier answer. He wishes some person for the ladies would have seen the instrument. He will send the piano on June 18. The ladies will receive it in the same state it was in when bought at St. Louis and at the same price. The transportation from St. Louis to Kaskaskia should be added. Timon presents his compliments to Morrison's lady and family and to Mother Agnes (Brent, V.H.M.) and family in whose success Morrison so generously interests himself.

IV-3-i A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
3


1833 Jun. 26

Morrison, W(illia)m
Kaskaskia, (Illinois)

to Father (John) Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens, Missouri)

Late last evening the piano arrived, a little broken by the motion of the cart. They expect the repairs can be made here. Morrison has acknowledged the receipt of the piano in behalf of Mother Agnes (Brent, V.H.M.) to whom it belongs.

IV-3-i A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
2


1833 Jul. 6

Casey, John and And(re)w (Casey)
Potosi, (Missouri)

to Father John Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens), M(iss)o(uri)

They received Timon's letter yesterday. They can loan him $1500 for one year. For security, they authorize Timon to see that they are secured, that is all they require. The money is ready at any moment and if convenient they would prefer that Timon himself come in order to see the progress of their church. Messrs. Redie(?) and Manning have done a great deal of work and intend to go home in the course of two weeks or so. All friends here and at Old Mines are well; they have not had the cholera here yet.

IV-3-i A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
4


1833 Jul. 9

(De Neckere), C.M., Bishop Leon
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

to Father J(ohn) Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens), Missouri

He is sad to announce that Father (Simon) Richard, vicar general of this diocese, died on July 3. He left a will in which the Convent of the Barrens became an heir as follows: To the Sisters of (Loretto) 1436 gourdes with the obligation to pray often for the repose of his soul and those of his parents. The money is in bonds but it will not take long to cash them as soon as (De Neckere) has them. He is anxious for Timon to have it as he knows he has need of it. In the same will there is another article regarding St. Mary's of the Barrens: 200 piastres for Masses for Richard's soul. Since it is difficult to send checks (De Neckere) asks Timon to tell him how he can send him $50 for as many Masses as Timon can say for (De Neckere)'s intention. If Timon can draw on him through (Ferdinand?) Rozier in business with Mr. Mager here, he could shorten the task. New Orleans is healthy at present.

IV-3-i A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
5


1833 Jul. 12

Tucker, L(ouis)
St. Louis, (Missouri)

to Father J(ohn) Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens), M(iss)o(uri)

After leaving the sem(inary) they went to Kaskaskia; after three days they started for St. Louis. From the O'Hara settlement, they went to the English settlement and passed the night at Mr. Newsome's. Bishop (Joseph) Rosati was unwell, their horse was sick, but they got to Belleville. They dined at Governor (John) Re(y)nolds' who lent them a horse. Arrived at St. Louis the Bishop was taken sick; today he has relapsed. Here every day someone falls victim to the epidemic. Among Catholics of note who have died lately are Mr. Higgans and Mrs. Murphy. Among the Protestants was Mrs. Cocks, daughter of Dr. Favia(?). A murder was committed here by poison; the perpetrator took $24 from his victim and threw him into a well. Timon is to inform Sister Agnes (Brent?) that Tucker is here. He would like news of all and from the different establishments of their good Sister.

IV-3-i A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
9


1833 Jul. 13

Pedicini, C(arolo) M., Cardinal Prefect
Rome (Papal States)

to Bishop Frederick Rese
Detroit, Michigan (Territory)

With sorrow Pedicini announces the death of William Maccatebinessi of the Ottawa tribe of Arbro Croche (Michigan), sent by Rese to Rome and received as a student at the Collegio Urbano some time ago. He is said to have suffered an unfortunate accident in America in which a wheel passed over his chest. On the morning of June 25, an artery in his chest broke, and weakened by the loss of blood he died. Pedicini notifies Rese at the request of the deceased and asks him prudently to tell the parents of the young man and those others who may be concerned. He tells Rese to stress the accident phase of the death so that the parents of the American youths at the Collegio Urbano will not be distressed Angelo Mai signs as secretary no. 2.

III-2-g L.S. (Italian) 1p. 8vo.
3


1833 Jul. 14

Passerat, C.SS.R., Father Jo(seph)
(Vienna, Austria)

to Bishop (Frederick Rese)
Detroit, (Michigan Territory)

Passerat felicitates Rese on his elevation to the episcopacy. The news has been happily received by his confreres but has not astonished him, because Bishop (Edward Dominic Fenwick's) confidence in him made known to the Holy Father his excellent qualities. They pray that he will meet with success. Passerat recommends to him the Redemptorists in his diocese as he is their bishop and the master of the plan for which they crossed the sea. He asks first of all for information on their actual position as he is uneasy. He does not know even if the letters he has sent to Rese or to his confreres have arrived. He does not know where to find Father (Francis X.) Tschen(h)ens. Although the Leopoldine Association and the Congregation intended to establish a permanent mission establishment in America, they do not see that their confrerers have that essential end in view. He asks Rese to second him in this matter. For his part he will second Rese's interests with the Leopoldine Association, which will be edified to find a house of an Austrian congregation established in America. Passerat does not pretend at all that they are to be supported by the diocese, since he has many things to send them, once they establish a center. He begs Rese to honor him with an answer.

III-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 8vo.
3


1833 Jul. 19

G(anilh), Father A(nthony)
Bardstown, K(entuck)y

to Father Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

Blanc's letter pleased him very much, he feared he had lost Blanc's friendship. He always had believed that Father (Frederick) Rese, by some intrigue, had lessened his respectability. The judgment could be false but it is not rash. Ganilh has returned to Bardstown for a rest. A long time ago he made his peace with the Bishop (Benedict Joseph Flaget) who chooses to forget the sins of his youth. He was to be a professor of Spanish at the College but Ganilh fears he could not agree with the faculty about honorariums. He was beginning to have a reputation at Cincinnati as a language teacher but the clergy there have fallen into such discredit that he was heartbroken. If God sends them soon a vigorous and devoted bishop they will go far. Ganilh has been informed that Father (Guy Ignatius) Chabrat has received his bulls and Ganilh expected to act as his master of ceremonies but he has been cruelly disappointed. The affair seems deferred and one cannot tell when it will be renewed. It seems that the bulls of Rese and Father (John Baptist) Purcell are held up on the way. As to the latter one cannot guess who presented him. It is not the Archbishop or the older priests of the province. One wonders also at the long delay of Bishop (John) England especially since he is being kept at Rome to explain the ceremonies of the Church! The death of Father (Benedict Richard is a great misfortune in Blanc's diocese; he told Bishops David and Flaget about it. About a month ago Father (M.B.) Anduze wrote Ganilh a letter in which he said that he desired to have Ganilh with him without explaining why and referring him to Father (James J.?) Mullon for further information. Since Mullon is Ganilh's mortal enemy he is not going to go to him for information. Ganilh wrote Anduze asking him whether he wanted him for the ministry or for teaching. Ganilh had never seen Anduze's writing so in order to eliminate any surprise on the part of his enemies he asked him to authenticate his letter through Blanc. This may have offended Anduze. Blanc is to explain that Ganilh is surrounded by wicked people and must take precautions. If Ganilh cannot make an arrangement with the members of the faculty he will spend his time with Chabrat who lives in Ganilh's old congregation of Holy Cross and at intervals he will serve as assistant to Father Depard (David Deparq) at Holy Mary at Rolling Fork. The clergy of Kentucky are very respectable. Ganilh had the cholera and was near death. Good Mr. Hazeltine gave him calomel. Cholera has made great ravages in Kentucky.
P.S. There is a French priest here as superior of the seminary, named Father (Charles H.) de Luynes; he is a real prodigy. He and Father (Ignatius A.) Reynolds are the two advisors of the bishop and Chabrat bears his disappointment with edifying resignation. The Jesuits will probably succeed.

V-4-d A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
13


1833 Jul. 24

Anduze, Father M.B.
Iberville, Louisiana

to Bishop (Leo Raymond De Neckere, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Anduze thinks Father (Benedict?) Richard's illness was enough to keep De Neckere from writing. Sickness has almost disappeared at Iberville and Anduze would never have returned to the village if the unfortunate business of the Michaud estate had let him. (Adolphe) Seghers has been in Plaquemine twice in the two weeks to bring things to an end. It has been decided that Judge Dalton would ratify Mr. Petit's list and when it comes to the payments Anduze will be named trustee and when it comes to the loans of the college he will have only to present his bills. This is Seghers' advice and Anduze thinks it is wise. Anduze would like (de Neckere) to send Jacques back to him, then they could put everything in order and be finished in good time. On the 29th he hopes to be able to obtain a double judgment of the ratification of the list and Anduze's appointment to the trusteeship. Against the time when (de Neckere) will be coming to Iberville, Anduze will prepare several for Confirmation. Anduze hopes Father richard will remember them before God. Anduze asks to be remembered to Father (Anthony) Blanc.

V-4-d A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
5


(1833) (Jul. 27)

Borgna, (C.M.), Father Ph(ilip), John M'Evoy and P. Walsh
St. Louis, Missouri

Religious error stalks abroad; to stay it they have formed themselves into a body under the title of Western Catholic Association. Their doctrines can be extensively propagated by the press; they entreat assistance. The Shepherd of the Valley, in consequence of slender patronage, must cease unless more efficient means are adopted for its continuance. This paper can be edited weekly for $3 a year provided 600 subscribers can be obtained.

(Printed Circular)

On the same paper is written:

--------
1833 Jul. 27

Borgna, (C.M.), Father Ph(ilip)
(St. Louis, Missouri)

to Father (John) Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens, Missouri)

Father (Lewis) Le Clerc died on July 24; his funeral was the same day at 6 P.M. His remains were taken to Sacred Heart Convent and buried in a tomb on their property. Father (Joseph Anthony) Lutz is worn out; the doctor says it is his liver. Borgna has written to Father (Francis) Cellini, (C.M.); Borgna begged him to come to St. Louis as soon as possible. Four days ago he went down to the College. He is not in bed but so feeble he can rarely say Mass. Timon's father (James Timon) almost had an attack of cholera; he is better. Marguerite (Timon?) is slightly ill but it is her fault - always a child, always imprudent. Sickness is lessening. Le Clerc also had some cholera symptoms. Madame Octavie is dead; she is a saint(?); she will pray for this mission.
P.S. Borgna has need of some rest; he will take it at Timon's.

IV-3-i Printed circular (English); A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
11


1833 Jul. 28

Mullon, (Father) James J.
Cincinnati, (Ohio)

to Bishop J(ohn) B(aptist) Purcell
Emmitsburg, Maryland

This morning's mail brought Mullon the enclosed from Bishop John England; and in conjunction with him, Mullon asks Purcell for the good of our holy religion to accept the Bishopric of Cincinnati. Things in Cincinnati are in a dreadful state at present owing to Father (Frederick) Rese's want of energy and disposition to evade difficulties very imaginary. He asks Purcell, when he accepts, to notify Mullon, that Mullon may make the necessary arrangements for continuing the college which never could be re-opened with respect, with the present numbers. Its prospects are fair and even flattering: but Mullon entreats Purcell for its support to use his efforts to send four or five efficient exemplary young men to assist in the duties of it. The present, with the exception of three are everything but what one would expect to see in Seminarians. Mullon writes with haste and with a heart beating for the accomplishment of what he now sees so happily begun.
P.S. Please preserve this letter as the Bishop has made some remarks in the sequel he does not want expressed.

II-5-h A.L.S. 1p. 4to.
3

(Photostatic copy from the Archives of the College of Mt. St. Joseph, Delhi, Ohio).


1833 (July 31)

Brute, Father S(imon Gabriel)
Mt. St. Mary's College, Emmitsburg, Maryland

to Bishop-elect John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Offers his acknowledgements of Purcell's election, and his encouragement to him and to Bishop rese. Promises prayers for Purcell and the diocese, and counsels him to pray also.

II-4-e A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo. (French)


1833 (July 31)

Brute, Father S(imon)
(Mt. St. Mary's, Emmitsburg, Maryland)

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, (Ohio)

Brute writes to Purcell urging him now that he has accepted his bulls to go forth to his new diocese of the west to carry on with Bishop (Frederick) Rese the work to which they have been called. He speaks of the new dignity of the bishop and says that for the first time he has prayed for him at Mass as a bishop.

II-4-e A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 8vo.
2


1833 Jul. 31

Seghers, Adolphe
(Donaldsonville, Louisiana)

to Bishop Leo (Raymond) de Neckere
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Seghers received de Neckere's letter of June 30 at the beginning of this month. He is pleased that de Neckere was satisfied with the sale of the library of their deceased friend, Father Joseph Tichitoli for $485 payable in March 1834. Seghers sends an important item found among Tichitoli's papers; it is a donation of 1000arpents of land made by Father Bernardo de Deva to Mr. Bigeschi for the establishment of a Jesuit house or of a house for the Congregation of the Missions. This document should remain with the diocese; it would be well for Bigeschi to transfer his rights to the bishop of Louisiana.

V-4-d A.L.S. (French) 2pp. folio
6


(1833) Aug. 1

Brute, Father Simon William
(Mt. St. Mary's, Emmitsburg, Maryland

to Bishop-(Elect John Baptist Purcell)
(Cincinnati, Ohio)

Brute acknowledges (Purcell's) letter and his words of praise. There is nothing precipitate in (Purcell's) acceptance of the episcopate since he has listened to the commands of his superiors -- the Holy Father and Propaganda. Even (Archbishop James Whitfield) approved while regretting the loss of (Purcell's services, as also do Bishop (John) Dubois and Father John Hickey. (Purcell) must place his trust in God.

II-4-e A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4vo.
2


1833 Aug. 3

Casey, John and And(re)w (Casey)
Potosi, (Missouri)

to Father John Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens), M(iss)o(uri)

From Timon's letter, received today by the hands of Owen Timon, it appears that by the advice of the superior, Timon has concluded not to accept the money on account of their limiting him to the term of one year. Timon can have a loan for two years; the security they leave to his own management. Interest will be charged only from the time Timon receives the money. They hope he will pay them a visit.

IV-3-i A.L.S. 2pp. folio
3


1833 Aug. 12

Anduze, Father M.B.
Iberville, (Louisiana)

to Bishop Leon (Raymond) de Neckere
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Some time ago Anduze wrote two letters about the state of affairs of the two estates. Anduze was named trustee replacing Mr. Petit. He wishes they could straighten out the affairs of the college. Mr. Potier has squared off his accounts and Anduze has found that he owed $412.41 which Anduze has reduced to $217.41. If de Neckere would advance this sum in settlement of the account between Anduze and de Neckere he would greatly oblige Potier and Anduze.

V-4-d A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
2


1833 Aug. 13

Cellini, (C.M.), Father F(rancis)
Fredericktown, (Missouri)

to Father J(ohn) Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens, Missouri)

It seems to Cellini that Timon sends this establishment some of those subjects whom he does not like to have nearby. Miss Penn from Valena is in charge of the house, and no less trouble for Cellini; so it will be with Miss L. Jacques. He thinks the house is already in debt and probably hopes to have many scholars this winter, and maybe never. Such equivocal subjects ought never to be received, much less to be sent to a house so far from the Mississippi, where it is so difficult to send them away when their whim (moves) them to leave. Cellini was at a loss a few weeks ago when Miss Penn would go away to town immediately. He was obliged not to use his authority but also to threaten her with punishment. His only hope is that he soon will be free. He will write to the Bishop to send Father (Louis) Tucker, or any other, and Cellini will retire elsewhere. Timon is the Superior of this neighborhood, and may dispose at his pleasure. Cellini exhorts Timon to come to see him before he leaves this place.

IV-3-i A.L.S. 2pp. folio
4


1833 Aug. 19

Anduze, Father M.B.
Iberville, (Louisiana)

to Bishop Leo (Raymond) de Neckere
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

This is the third letter Anduze has written to De Neckere. In the two preceding ones he informed him that Mr. Potier has turned over the accounts and that the list has been ratified. There are two bills: $1170 for the furniture in February 1831 and $1189 for the purchase of the college August 10, 1833. As a creditor he would have only a dividend of the $4000 which at 40% would give him only $1600. Therefore on the advice of (Adolphe) Seghers he asked for the trusteeship relinquished by Mr. Petit so that he would not have to pay these debts immediately. He desires above all that they work out the affairs of the college together.

V-4-d A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
3


1833 Aug. 28

(Rosati, C.M.), Bishop Joseph
St. Louis, (Missouri)

to Father J(ohn) Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens), M(iss)o(uri)

(Rosati) thanks God that He inspired the saintly (Father Benedict) Richard to make the Convent at Bethlehem, (Sisters of Loretto) his heir. (Rosati) has just received a letter from Mr. Mitchell and his father-in-law who hope to have from Kentucky, at least two Sisters of Loretto and ask for one from the Barrens to establish a convent in Missouri near Fort Le(a)venworth. (Rosati) must go now to receive the last breath of Mr. Mullanphy to whom he has administered all the sacraments.

IV-3-i A.L.S. (french) 2pp. 4to.
5


1833 Aug. 31

Anduze, Father M(atthew) B.
Iberville, (Louisiana)

to Bishop Leo (Raymond) de Neckere
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

This is the fourth letter Anduze has written to inform de Neckere about the two estates and ask for some solution but has received no reply. He has written to Father (Charles) Delacroix who has just replied that de Neckere3e had left his house to go to Father (Ve. Modeste) Mina's and then to the city. Anduze repeats that not being able to pay the $2410 already overdue on the College (of St. Gabriel) he has been obliged to take care of the estate on which are $14,000 in debts and on which a dividend of 25% is to be paid. He would like to know where he stands concerning the college; he is going to put his own furniture up for sale to settle his affaIrs. (Ms. is torn here) ... to receive from Father (Paul de?) St. Pierre, (O.Carm.). He constantly gets news from New Orleans that his confreres are trying to destroy his reputation and that they fear his return but Anduze loves peace more than money. He asks the Bishop to take charge of the college building as he can make no further advances. If Father (Pierre) Ladaviere, (S.J.), for is society or for himself, would only give a definitive answer, de Neckere could know what to do. If Anduze had known that Father (Pierre) Chazel(l)e, (S.J.) would not put foot on it, Anduze would have been more agreeable. He repeats he would like to end all connection with the college. He would like to have Jacques with him.

V-4-d A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
8


(1833) (Sep.)

(Kinzie, John H.?)
Prairie Du Chien, (Wisconsin)

to George Porter, Governor
of Detroit, (Michigan Territory)

Annexed is a speech by Whirling Thunder on behalf of the Winnebago Indians which is not more than reasonable. Many of them have become Catholics and bid fair to become good members of society. (Unsigned copy. The annexed speech of Whirling Thunder follows): By the treaty of last fall (1832), they are to have a school established at Prairie Du Chien. Most of the nation are on the Barrebault River and are anxious for the school. Many of them have become Catholics and are anxious to become civilized through the exertions of Father (Samuel) Mazzuchelli. They hope that the President will grant their prayers and permit their children to be educated by Father Mazzuchelli in the Catholic persuasion. Until lately, they had no one to teach them the word of God and now, seeing the light, they want Father Mazzuchelli to remain with them and to have their school, and it is in the power of the President to grant them this aid. (On the same page is another petition as follows):

--------
1833 Sep.

Pokagan, Chief, and others
Pokagan Village, (Michigan Territory)

to the President of the United States

They, the chiefs of the Pottawatomies on the Saint Joseph reservation, say that the missionary station formerly occupied by Mr. (Isaac) McCoy, although the President's agent opposed them and occupied the mission and said that he had commanded him to do so, has been vacated by him at their request so that they could have real black gowns to educate their children and speak of the Great Spirit. They ask, therefore, that the mission be given to the Catholic priest, as they have always intended. This request comes from their hearts. Signed by the mark of Pokagan, Wassuto, Noakota, Sanguinai, and Ribio.

III-2-g Copy of documents 2pp. 4to.
7


1833 Sep. 4

Dahmen, C.M., Father F(rancis) X(avier)
Ste. Genevieve, (Missouri)

to Father J(ohn) Timon, (C.M.)
Barrens, (Missouri)

Father (Francis) Cellini, (C.M.) told him to have himself bled at the beginning of September. The weather has been so hot that he did not dare and now he is so weak that he does not dare. Could Timon not come next Saturday? Dahmen hopes the superior will let him come.

IV-3-i A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 8vo.
2


1833 Sep. 7

Tucker, H(ilary)
College of the Propaganda, (Rome, Italy)

to (Father John Timon, C.M.
Barrens, Missouri)

It has been more than a month since Tucker received Timon's letter of May 17. He scarcely has words to express to all, especially to his fellow student, his pleasure at the marks of their esteem. George (A. Hamilton) is now almost perfectly well. They are on the eve of going to pass the vacations at their country villa at Tivoli. For the last two months Tucker has not been in good health; all foreigners find themselves debilitated in this climate. Tucker knows nothing of the affairs of the Lazzarites(!) (Vincentians) here as he has not been to see them for 6 months. But Timon's order has of late sustained no inconsiderable loss but the Church at large has gained what they lost. On July 28 five sons of St. Vincent were promoted to bishoprics in the kingdom of Naples. On August 25 Cardinal Mattei died; he had been a cardinal only three months. Last Wednesday, Martin John Spalding publicly sustained seventy-one theses in the presence of Cardinals Pedicini and Castracane. He acquitted himself of the task to the entire satisfaction of all present. Yesterday they had the distribution of premiums; the gold premium was taken by John Ryan of Halifax. Joseph Balffe of Philadelphia took three premiums. The ensuing year Tucker will study Moral Theology, Ethics, Ecclesiastical History, and Hebrew. Timon is to remember Tucker to Sister Agnes (Brent, V.H.M.) and all others; he has before him the prospectus of the new Academy at Kaskaskia. The Sisters of the Visitation are peculiarly adapted to the people of the country. Timon is to send Tucker the Shephard of the Valley if he has an occasion. He has seen a considerable report of the Philadelphia controversy but would be pleased to see the whole of it. Timon is to give his respects to Tucker's father, brothers, and families. Father Odin has no reason of complaint of Tucker for not writing oftener to him.

On the same paper:

--------
1833 (Sep. 7)

Tucker, H(ilary)
(Rome, Italy)

to The Young Gentlemen of St. Mary's Seminary
(Barrens, Missouri)

Tucker was much affected at learning by a letter from Timon that they all still cherish a tender remembrance for him. He would prefer to pass his vacation on the banks of the Mississippi as in times of old. In looking back he cannot refrain from poetical language but he is a declared enemy of poets although Mr. Robira is one. (He describes Propaganda College for them, its resident dignitaries, its divisions of students, his view of the city and St. Peter's, the order of their day, their clothing, and his sightseeing trips). Tucker is sorry to hear that the diocese is deprived of the labors of Mr. Rapier; religion will reap the advantage of his talents. He sends his esteem to Fathers Tornatore, Odin, Paquin, Brands, Loisel, the Brothers, others, especially Father Boullier, if they can. He takes each by the hand, Messrs. Roche, Robira, Cotter, Coustin, (name indecipherable, Van?), Morison, Charles, Henry, Joseph Elder.

IV 3 i A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
11


1833 Sep. 15

Agaud, Miel (Noel?)
Mayor of Cherbourg

to William Seton
Lieutenant aboard the American Vessel, Delaware

A passport to the Interior valid for one year delivered to William Seton, on demand of Mr. Liais, Consul of the United States at Cherbourg, and notifying civil and military authorities to allow Seton to pass and go about freely from Cherbourg, department of the
Manche to Paris, Department of the Seine. This passport gives a description of Seton According to age, height, color of eyes, hair, eyebrows, etc.

II-1-a D.S. (French) 1p. 4to.
1


1833 Sep. 18

Blanc, Father Ant(hony)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

to Father (John) Timon, C.M.
Barrens, Missouri

This day he will put on board the Missourian a box addressed to Timon, containing some clothes and linen of the late Father (Benedict) Richard. Some of them may still serve in the seminary. Since the melancholy event that has befallen them. Blanc has received Timon's two letters to their late beloved Bishop (Leo Raymond De Neckere, C.M.). Timon's draft of $50 will be attended to in its proper time. Blanc will respect richard's intentions as to his legacy and, as soon as he received the money will divide it to the pro rata of each, the Sisters (of Loretto?) and the Seminary.
P.S. His respects to Father Olivier and the others.

IV-3-i A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
4


1833 Sep. 27

Brasseur, Father (J. J.)
Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)

to Father (Anthony Blanc)
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Brasseur has just received Blanc's letter of September 21. He was told to stop at Ascension or Assumption but found no letter at either place. Father (D) L(')host(e) let Brasseur have his horse, not being able to put it on the boat Brasseur had to go up the coast on horseback. He was weak and the weather was bad and that is why he was detained 3 1/2 days with Father (August) De Angelis. Then he was stopped by funeral services for Bishop (Leo Raymond de Neckere) which were held in each parish. He did not arrive in Baton Rouge until September 18. He saw Mr. Bonnecaze the same day. The next day Brasseur went to the church which is filled with debris. All the church goods have been taken over to the rectory which also needs repairs. The church wardens met the same day and decided to have repairs made on the church and rectory. Brasseur is saying Mass in the rectory; it will be next Sunday before he can say it publicly. There is no real sacristan, only an old Spaniard who rings the bell, etc. He would like to have someone who could sing; he has thought of Mr. Vaulangre. They propose to build him a house and if he wanted to give piano and voice lessons, they promise to find him 12 or 15. He wants (Blanc) to get him an english ritual; possibly Vaulangre could bring the Holy Oils. He is staying in one of Mrs. Legendre's houses across the street from the Protestant church. He has just seen Mr. Flaget who says they can arrange for his board. He finds these gentlemen well disposed towards him and the good of religion. As to the schedule, Brasseur finds it very different from the note Father (Hercules) Brassac sent him. He cannot accept the 90 Masses (Blanc) offered him. Delhoste sold him the horse for 160 int(entions) and he has received some from Brassac so he will have at least 7 or 8 a month. When the Bishop proposed that Brasseur learn English, (de Neckere) promised to pay all expenses. When Brasseur went from Iberville to New Orleans to embark for St. Louis the Bishop was absent; Father Al(oysius) Moni lent him $75. Father (Benedict ?) Richard wanted him to return this to Moni saying he would give it to him himself and that the bishop was responsible. Brasseur did not do this, thinking it was enough that he and the Bishop knew. But Brasseur is still accountable to Moni for the $75 plus $90 to the (Congregation of) the Mission for board and the $40 (Blanc) gave him for his passage which mounts up to $165. He wasted his time at the Barrens where he was supposed to learn English. Bishop (Joseph) Rosati wanted Brasseur at St. Louis and he is at Baton Rouge only through obedience. But is he can pay the $165 himself then the question of his position will change. He will be happy to return whence he came and to bring the consolations of religion to those who die every day without a priest. (Blanc) is the only one who can decide the question. There is still time to break his bargain with Delhoste and return his horse.

V-4-d A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
10


1833 Sep. 28

Mollevaut, Father M. (S.S.S.)
La Solitude, Issy, France

to Bishop-elect John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Received Purcell's letter of August 24th announcing his choice by the Pontiff as Bishop of Cincinnati. Thanks God and prays for Purcell. Recalls his instructions in pastoral care in Paris and Issy - Recommends the continuance of his religious exercises citing the example of other bishops. Has recommended Purcell to the prayers of certain priests. Has offered Mass for Purcell - thanks him for his observations about Mr. Whelan.

II-4-e A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo. (French)


1833 Sep. 30

(Brute), Father Simon
(Mt. St. Mary's, Emmitsburg, Maryland)

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, (Ohio)

Brute writes Purcell some thought on his consecration as bishop quoting from the scriptures and from the fathers on the dignity of his new office.

II-4-e A.L. 5pp. 8vo.
1


1833 Sep. 30

(Rosati, C.M.), Joseph, Bishop of St. Louis
Cincinnati, (Ohio)

to Father John Timon, (C.M.)
Barrens, M(iss)o(uri)

So far their journey could not have been wished better. They will proceed on today or tomorrow. He thinks he has found a master of music who will visit Timon's college. He can teach the violin and clarinet, is a German and a Catholic, has a family and appears to be a very good man. If they allowed him to build a log house and make a garden, he would be able to support his family. Perhaps the house where Valerie lived would answer. (Rosati) will speak to a German organ maker and send him to the Seminary and to St. Louis. They might have floored, plastered, and enclosed that room which is intended for the purpose. Timon has no doubt heard of the great loss which the American Church has sustained. Where shall they find another (Bishop Leo Raymond) De Neckere? Regards to all, especially to the Superior and Father Olivier.

IV-3-i A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
2


1833 Oct. 1

Purcell, John Baptist, Bishop elect of Cincinnati
Conewago, Pennsylvania

Notes for his retreat for episcopal consecration, containing outline of the days exercises - references for scripture reading and meditations upon the nature of the episcopal office.

II-4-e D. 4pp. 16to.


1833 Oct. 2

Baraga, (Father) Frederick
Mission St. Maria a la Grande-Riviere, (Michigan)

to Father (Vincent Francis) Badin
Detroit (Michigan)

Baraga received Father (V.) Badin's letter of August 26 on October 1st. He thanks him for sending him the church bell but he thanks him especially in the name of all the Indians of L'Arbre croche who are very happy to hear their bell again. Upon the advice of the bookbinder-Brother (Alois Schuh)-Baraga had not sent the pages which are missing from the Ottawa books to Father (V.) Badin, but once he had sent 40 bound Ottawa books to Father (Louis) Deseille and another time 10 more. Baraga advises Badin to send the incomplete books which were left to Father (Simon) Sanderl in L'arbre croche or to ask once more for the missing pages. Baraga asks Badin to buy for him a box of candles and have them sent to him.
P.S. Baraga had heard from Mr. Ant. Campeau that a young man from Detroit, called Boissonau, wants to come to work for him. Baraga accepts his service and advises him to take the stage-coach to Gull-prairie and from there a horse or walk.
2nd Postscript Baraga asks Father Badin to send the box with the candles to Mr. Dorer and Jones, they will pack it in the boat which goes to Mr. Campeau and one of Mrs. Campeau's people will bring the money to Father (V.) Badin.

III-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 8vo.
7


1833 Oct. 2

Mina, Father Ve. M(odest)e
(Edgard, Louisiana)

to Father Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Mina has a case which puzzles him, it seems to be an impediment of affinity. Jacques Troncler son of the first marriage of the late Jacques Troncler and Jeanne Denvir, married to Marianne Desnoyers, who after the death of her husband married Francois Webre of which marriage was born Ursin Webre who wishes to marry Carmelite Haydel born likewise of the marriage between Alphonse Haydel and the late Marie Troncler, daughter of the above deceased Jacques Troncler and Isabelle Le-Roux his second wife. Mina asks for this dispensation and also another which the late Bishop (Leo Raymond de Neckere) granted orally August 18 to Jean Baptiste Dubourg and Marie N. Chauvin.

V-4-d A.L.S. (French) 4to. 2pp.
13


1833 Oct. 11

Anduze, Father M(atthew) B.
Iberville, (Louisiana)

to Father Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Anduze still does not know too much about his accounts and asks Blanc to tell him what he owes Father (August) Jeanjean. Anduze has recent data on the account of Father (Benedict?) Richard: his power of attorney to make a settlement. As for Brigite (Gallois)'s account, she is on the list for $180, 18 months at $10 a month. But he does not know hoe he can pay the dividends. For ready money he has had to take a note for $1170: for 1/3 spent for the purchase of (St. Gabriel's) College $1289 and for Mr. Manheaut's (Father Charles Maenhaut?) account $723, a total of $2182. Blanc can see why he longs for the arrangement he made with Bishop (Leon Raymond de Neckere that he would take the college and pay all the expenses at 10% interest and that Anduze would pay the price of the college to the (Eugene) Michaud estate. The bishop asked him to wait to arrange it; he promised to come to Iberville; unfortunately his death confuses everything, Blanc will find in the Bishop's desk the original document; de Neckere said he had talked to Blanc about it and that as soon as he had time he would send Blanc or come himself to Iberville to see what Anduze had bought and what things were taken for Anduze's own use that would be subtracted from the $1170 against him according to the listing of Mr. S. Petit. As to the position of the diocese it needs a man like Bayard without fear and without reproach. Anduze believes that Blanc, Jeanjean or Bishop (Michael) Portier would be equally suitable. Blanc can recall the unhappy dioceses of the time of the Korens and Thomases. As for the collect Anduze used what he thought best. He awaits Blanc's orders.

V-4-d A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
10


1833 Oct. 12

Peirce, Isaac B.
Trenton, (New York)

to O(restes) A. Brownson
Walpole, New Hampshire

Brownson's letter of July 22 gave him great pleasure. Mr. Grost in his magazine has made some ill-natured remarks toward Brownson. The charge is that Brownson requested Mr. L. to take a cup of tea with him. Peirce is persuaded to say that both Grost and himself and thousands of others have both dined and taken tea with men whom they did not esteem honest, or immaculate. Jesus and Socrates both associated with sinners. His church building is fast going to ruin due to lack of paint. His followers have no energy and meetings are thinly attended. He asked: Can this result from our doctrine? His object in preaching is to lay before his hearers the Divine spirit of Religion: to present to them the holy and invaluable essence of it; to have less to do with the leaves and more with the fruit of the tree of life. With him Protestantism is as absurd as Popery, the setting up of Scriptures as the standard of infallibility is man's own work. The more he becomes acquainted with their writings, the less reasonable, appears to me, is the opinion, that there ever was such a pure period of Christianity, as Unitarian writers contend for and represent. He comments on Brownson's Essay on Faith and works. It is his desire to set up a small periodical: -- to be entitled "The Banner of Theophilantrophy," where he can set forth Religion in its Divine sufficiency.

I-3-e A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
1


1833 Oct. 15

Anduze, Father M(atthew) B.
Iberville, (Louisiana)

to Father Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

When Anduze last wrote he did not think of the fact that Father B(ernard) Permoli has 200 and some piastres which Blanc could use to pay Brigite Gallois $180. Anduze would like to know what is going to become of the college. It would be a shame to leave such an important building as a total loss. As to what goes back to Father (August) Jeanjean he has not much to base it on but he knows he gave him a bank draft for $65, that there is still $25 to pay. The best way could be to send the accounts and he could straighten it out. Brigite should give him a receipt as trustee for the estate of Eugene Michaud. Anduze plans to come to the city with the first cold weather. Blanc is to try to persuade Father (D.) De L'hos(te?) not to write any more. Blanc will have seen in the Abeille the piece in which they say that the author of such impertinences being known, they advise him to keep still if he does not want to be exposed in spite of the respectable character he is clothed in. Why does he want to make enemies for them? What does he want from Dawson? He wishes to appear as a clever man and he is nothing but a plagiarist. There are some imbeciles who think that since the death of their bishop Delh(o)ste expresses the opinions of Blanc who is a saboteur for the Dawson party. Del'h(oste) is denounced by all his confreres and ridiculed by friends of Dawson. Anduze has read in the Shepherd (of the Valley) of the deaths of Mr. Mulumphy (John Mullanphy?) and Me. Octavie. Mr. Lawless wrote to tell of de Neckere's death and that Bishop (Joseph) Rosati was in Baltimore with Father (John) Odin who has to go to Europe on business. Anduze would like to know when Jeanjean is coming.

V-4-d A.L.S. (French) 4pp. cut 4to.
9


1833 Oct. 15

Wathen, J.R.
Cape Girardeau, (Missouri)

to Father Jo(h)n Timon, (C.M.)
Perryville, M(iss)o(uri)

As the Daugherty house is vacant Wathen recommends that some one have the use of the house who would take care of it. Dr. Mason and his wife would be a careful occupant. Mason would want it only a few months as he is about building near there. He is not willing to pay the rent that Mr. Skeel had been paying. What would Timon's terms be?

IV-3-i A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
4


1833 Oct. 16

Blanc, Father Ant(hony)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

to Father (John) Timon, (C.M.)
Barrens, Missouri

Timon must have received the key of a trunk which, having been left on the levee here by the clerk of the steamboat, has been found since by the police and sent to Timon by the Chester. Blanc now has some money from the estate of Father (Benedict) Richard, to be distributed among the legatees. Timon may draw on Blanc, for the seminary, for $100 to be said in Masses, as Bishop (De Neckere) had advised. $100 more will remain due. Timon may draw for $400 for the Sisters (of Loretto). Father (J.F. Brasseur says that he was indebted to the seminary for $50 which he thought they would have to pay themselves. Last winter Blanc paid Father (Joseph) Paquin, (C.M.) $100 for board and tuition. Their $50 appears to be for clothing, etc. The seminary is not in good circumstances but they have never been in arrears. The $50 will be paid by the bishopric. Sickness was decreasing but strangers are flocking in and fall sick in numbers.
P.S. Everything regarding Richard's estate has been settled in good faith; the court has taken their cognizance of it. It will be prudent not to speak loud of it. Probably the balance of the legacies to the Sisters will not be paid before August 1834. Blanc has just received a letter from Richard's principal debtor who says she has a letter from Richard allowing her until 1835 to liquidate herself with him. Blanc expects to be able to send the $100 due the Seminary before Spring.
(P.S.) October 18: Blanc has just received Timon's letter of September 29. He is sorry of the ill fate of Timon's draft on Mr. Major. Blanc was prepared to pay it; he does not know who Major is. Father Maenhaut knows no more about him.

IV-3-i A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
6


1833 Oct. 20

Odin, C.M., Father J(ohn) M(ary)
Baltimore, (Maryland)

to Father (John) Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens), M(iss)o(uri)

Odin returned from Washington yesterday. He was pleased to see the Capital of the United States. Georgetown College is remarkable for size, location, and cleanliness. Father (Thomas) Mulledy accompanied Odin everywhere. Odin met Father (August) Jeanjean just arriving from New York. A priest from Lyons accompanied Jeanjean; he is destined to open a Seminary in Louisiana. Everybody had expected to salute Jeanjean as Bishop of the Indians, but they have been disappointed, Jeanjean remonstrated on the impracticality of it and the Pope acceded. He is to see what could be done. Timon will see Jeanjean at the Seminary before he returns to Louisiana. Father Boué is anxious to visit their seminary. All the Bishops have arrived except Bishop (Benedict Joseph) Flaget who will not come and Bishop (Michael) Portier who is expected hourly. The council will convene shortly. They do not know as yet what will be discussed. It appears that it will be the appointment of new bishops and the limits of the dioceses. The Bishop of Philadelphia (Henry Conwell) arrived yesterday. It appears that he is opposed to Bishop (Francis Patrick) Kenrick and that he is unwilling to relinquish the administration of his see. He is quite blind; he must be led. Odin has seen (John?) Kenedy and Timon's sister. Odin will go again tomorrow to pay the money he brought from Washington. Odin sends respects to Fathers Tornatore, Olivier, Paquin, Wiseman, Brands, and Loisel.

IV-3-i A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
11


1833 Oct. 24

( )
Frederickto(w)n, (Missouri)

to Father (John) Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens), M(iss)o(uri)

Having learned that school will reconvene about the first of November he sends his stepson Antoine Pratt as a pupil. He wishes him to learn English, arithmetic, geography and whatever is necessary.

IV-3-i A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
2


1833 Oct. 25

Alford, G.G.
New Madrid, (Missouri)

to Father (John) Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens), M9Iss)o(uri)

Timon will receive the bearer, Frederick B. Lewis, the nephew of Mrs. Alford, into his seminary. He comes in company with the sons of Messrs.Watson Laforge, Delaroche, and Mosely. He is 15, has been raised in Arkansas by his step-father Colonel Walker; Alford believes Timon will find his disposition and habits to be good. Alford wishes him to study reading, writing, and arithmetic; he desires that the boy understand geography and the use of maps. Probably the boy will remain in the Seminary a year or more. Alford sends $50 by him as so much of a tuition fee, the balance to be forwarded in due time.
P.S. Mrs. Alford's mother is quite sick.

IV-3-i A.L.S. 3pp. folio
6


1833 Oct. 27

Brands, (C.M.), Father John
Cape Girardeau, (Missouri)

The little colony arrived here yesterday. Their school is increasing. Brands saw Timon's sister, Mrs. Douglas, last Tuesday. She had been very ill the night before. About 25 miles below here the boat sank but everything was saved and put in the Alton which just happened to come. Brands will send more details with Father(?) Cotter.

IV-3-i A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
3


1833 Nov. 12

Dubois, John, Bishop of New York
New York, N.Y.

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

A letter recommending a Mr. Coppiner to Bishop Purcell on the grounds of Irish parentage and French birth.

II-4-e A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.


1833 Nov. 15

Tucker, Father L(ouis)
St. Louis, (Missouri)

to Father J(ohn) Timon, (C.M.)
Barrens, M(iss)o(uri)

Tucker has learned from Timon's father Timon's discharge from the care of the Sisters (of Loretto). He is truly grieved for it; he feels that if they are not assisted through their great difficulties they will scarcely be able to prosper. Tucker does not mistrust the good will of Father (John) Brands, (C.M.) but he fears that as to the temporal, Brands is not sufficiently versed in the true economy of the world. Tucker hopes God will not abandon a work which until now has done so much good. Father (Francis) Cellini, (C.M.) spent about ten days here. He left this place three days before the Feast of All Saints and did not reach St. Michael's until Wednesday after the feast. Cellini said he would return as soon as Bishop (Joseph Rosati, C.M.) arrived from his journey, and that he would not go back anymore. If Cellini does, Tucker expects that he will immediately take Cellini's place. The Bishop states that he will not be here until about Christmas. Father (August) Jeanjean has arrived from Europe and will accompany him home. Mr Horne(?) visited here, he appears firm in his faith. He came to Mass accompanied by his wife and sister. (James) Timon's family is well. Madam (Mary) Smith is very well satisfied with her new home. Tucker sends respects to his brother Charles (Tucker), Sister Agnes, and all his fellow students.

IV-3-i A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
11


1833 Nov. 16

Estany, C.M., Father Eudald
LaSalle, (Illinois)

to Father J(ohn) Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens), M(iss)o(uri)

Estany asks Timon to take so great a weight off his shoulders and to leave him in a place of simple subject.

IV-3-i A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
1


1833 Nov. 16

Hickey, (Father) J(ohn)
(Emmitsburg, Maryland)

to (Bishop John Baptist Purcell)
(Cincinnati, Ohio)

Hickey profits by the hands of Bishop Rese to write. Purcell's diocese, Hickey trusts, will be a rich crown and a plentiful and productive field in God's Church. Hickey heard by young Shorb, who passed Purcell at Frederick, that dear Victoria was on the point of death. Hickey hopes Our Lord's will is to spare her, and that the rest of Vide Poche (?) will restore her. If she is well enough to travel and there is good opportunity perhaps it will be better to send her on with Sister Fanny before Bishop (Joseph) Rosati gets to Purcell. When convenience allows Purcell to remit the $200 he is to send a draft on Hickey's Bank in Baltimore or Philadelphia or New York. He sends respects to Fathers (William) Mullon, Collins, etc. He sends respects also to the father and to the 3 daughters -- the Reilies.

II-5-h A.L.S. 1p. 4to.
2


1833 Nov. 16

Rese, Frederick, Bp. of Detroit
Fredericktown, Maryland

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Hopes that Purcell arrived safely - Yesterday they returned here from (Mt. St. Mary's) with Bishop (Benedict) Fenwick, Father McSherry, and Mr. J. Hickey. This morning Bishop Rosati, Mr. Jeanjean, Mr. Hickey and Mr. Ouvernes went to Emmitsburg, Md. Thursday on their return all will go to Cincinnati. Tells Purcell to keep Mr. (Joshue) Young there and summon Mr. (Anthony) Ganihl if necessary for settling Bishop Fenwick's will - Cannot remain in Cincinnati long. Directs Purcell to see what Mr. Cassilly intends to do.

II-4-e A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.


1833 Nov. 23

(Montgomery, Charles P., Father)
Zanesville, Ohio

(to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio)

Expresses pleasure in the presence of Purcell in Ohio. Asks: 1. advice on case of desire for marriage between a Catholic and one not baptized with danger of attempted civil marriage.
2. What is the practice regarding those who turn Protestant when they return?
3. What about those married by squire who wish to return?
4. What about parents who sanction such marriages?
Has been there five months and finds difficulties and poverty. Bishop Fenwick had promised $50 toward an organ. Begins a list of subscribers to the Catholic Telegraph. (Last part of the letter missing).

II-4-e A.L. 2pp. 8vo.


1833 Nov. 27

Baraga (Father) Frederick
Rapids of Grand-River (Michigan)

to the Bishop (Frederick) Rese
Detroit, (Michigan)

Baraga expresses his worry about the fate of the Indians who live in Grand-River. The Bishop sent him to Grand-River expressly to establish a mission on the border of the Indian territory. Accordingly, Baraga had begun to build this mission on Indian territory. The lumber for the priest's house and schoolhouse is already cut and delivered to the place which Baraga chose for his mission. The workmen were ready to begin their work but Baraga stopped them because he had heard that the Indian land, that is the land from Grand-River to Mackinaw, would be sold soon to the government, and that the Indians would have to leave. If a church and a mission house were built on Indian territory, it might be that everything the Indians had built, would, after some years, fall into the hands of the Americans. Baraga does not know what to do. People advise him to establish his mission on the American side and Mr. Campeau would sell him a piece of land that would be big enough for his mission, but on the other hand Bishop Rese had given him different orders and besides it might hinder the conversion of the Indians. Baraga begs the Bishop to get for himself all the information on this subject and to go to the Governor himself and ask exactly when it is intended to make a treaty with the Indians here. And again Baraga begs the Bishop to decide only after he had gathered all the information and to communicate his decision to him immediately by post. Baraga intends to do exactly that what the Bishop had decided and to undertake nothing until he hears from the Bishop. Baraga quotes in Latin from the writings of St. Clement, and Thomas à Kempis, and in French from I. Regis. 15, 23 about obedience to the Bishop.
P.S.-----Baraga asks the Bishop to write to him either in French or in English.

III-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
2


1833 Dec. 7

Brasseur, Father J(ohn) F.
Baton, Rouge, (Louisiana)

to Father Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Mr. Brunot, a lawyer of Baton Rouge and Norbert Trahan of West Baton Rouge wish to have a dispensation to marry during Advent. Trahan wishes to marry Seraphine Landrye; the principal reason for marrying before the end of the year is to be able to benefit from the will of Mr. Podras. Brunot wishes to marry Sophie Johns. She is a Catholic but Brunot, although of Catholic parents has never practiced his religion and seems to be known as a Protestant. He asks if he shall assist at this marriage as a priest in surplice and stole and say the formula, etc. or as a witness. They are without a sacristan. In the meantime they have an old Spaniard who does the job. Brasseur has taught three children for the choir but they would like a sacristan who could sing. Madame D? Belieu(?) is ill and wishes permission to have Mass said in her house one time.

V-4-d A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
7


1833 Dec. 7

Montgomery, Father Charles P.
Zanesville, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Has forwarded a letter Nov. 23rd but received no answer 0 Is anxious to hear from Purcell because all want a visit from the Bishop - Wants to know what faculties the traveling missionaries have in regard to celebrating Masses in private houses.

II-4-e A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.


1833 Dec. 9

David, John B.M., of Mauricastro
St. Joseph's Seminary, Bardstown, Ky

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Begs pardon for forgetting to answer Purcell's inquiry about a certain note by Father (John) McElroy containing names of merchants of Wheeling to whom has been entrusted a box for Father (Peter) Chazelle, and two for Purcell by Mr. Gambrel of Frederick (Maryland) - found the note on his return to Kentucky. Bishop Flaget sorry for absence during Purcell's visit to the seminary - Bishop Rosati and his company came Sunday and left the next. Horses hired by Flaget for their trip to Loretto (Ky) ran away and must be paid for by the Bishop. Sends regards to his friends and to the Sisters (of Charity) at the asylum.

II-4-e A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.


1833 Dec. 12

Anduze, Father M. B.
Iberville, (Louisiana)

to Father A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

On his trip to New Orleans Anduze talked to Blanc about his affairs about the college with Bishop (Leon) de Neckere. An agreement, signed by de Neckere, had been drawn up and dated June 24, 1832 at St. James:
1. The college was to be bought in Anduze's name, to be turned over to de Neckere as soon as possible;
2. That Anduze would turn over the big college for $4500 and the little college for $500;
3. That Anduze was to make the payments out of funds provided by the estate of Father (Paul de) St. Pierre, (O.Carm.);
4. That de Neckere would assume the responsibility of paying the outlay at 10% interest;
5. That de Neckere agree to take all the purchases made by Anduze from the Michaud estate for the use of the college at the price set by Mr. (?) Petit, who drew up the inventory with 10% interest;
6. That he pay all the accounts of the college with 10% interest. The last time Anduze saw the Bishop all was agreed to their mutual satisfaction if the second departure of Father (Louis) Moni for Springhill had not thrown the presbytery into a sort of anarchy and obliged Anduze to seek peace at Iberville. Anduze cannot stand the uncertainty any longer. He has already paid $3000 for the college, furniture, repairs, etc. There must be some arrangement made for the building now vacant for four years. Anduze does not look forward happily to presenting the new bishop with his claims.

V-4-d A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
6


1833 Dec. 15

Langton, Jer(e)m(ia)h
Bardstown, (Kentucky)

to Father John Timon, (C.M.)
Perryville, Missouri

The time since Langton left St. Mary's is so short he has few remarks to make. (Patrick) Ratigan and he arrived a few days ago; they resume studies next Monday. This is a beautiful place but the love of the seminary in which he made his first step is not easily effaced. Timon's interest has made a lasting impression.
P.S. If Timon would write it would give much pleasure.

IV-3-i A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
2


1833 Dec. 17

(David), Bishop John B(aptist) M(ary, S.S.)
St. Joseph's Seminary, (Bardstown, Kentucky)

to Father (John) Timon, (C.M.)
Barrens, Missouri

Two young men who have studied at the Barrens arrived three days ago on foot from Louisville to be admitted here. Their testimonials are favorable but past experience has proved the necessity of not being too precipitate. They are Patrick Ratigan and Jeremiah Langton. Bishop Flaget asked David to write and he himself will write to Bishop Rosati. The reason of their change is their health although this climate is not very different from Missouri. (David) wishes to know about their dispositions and talents. They labor here under great difficulties; they have 11 seminarians who are under a young priest (David) ordained last September, Father (George A.M. Elder?) whose extreme diffidence obliges (David) to assume the title of Superior and give him the title of Director. (David) performs some of the functions but the weakness of his lungs will not permit him to do it constantly. Father (Anthony) Ganilh, who teaches four hours in the College, gives a lesson in theology to 3 or 4 young men. Father (William E.) Clark will begin to give lessons in logic after Christmas. (David) is not without hopes of some good priests from Europe. He understands that many who think the storm is approaching wish to shelter themselves in this happy country. (David) sends respects to Father (Donatien) Olivier; (David) has not forgotten the dinner he gave (David) at his brother's table about 1783 with the fish he caught in the forest of Sautron.

IV-3-i A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
8


1833 Dec. 17

Horstmann, Father J(ames) W(illiam)
Stallowstown, Ohio

to (Father Edward T. Collins)
Dayton, Ohio

Father Horstmann has been requested by the German settlers at Stallowstown to hold services there Christmas. He is approved by the Bishop of Cincinnati (Purcell), but lack of vestments etc. He asks Father Collins for the loan of these vestments. Other names on the paper are Magreto, Leister Schneider, John Henry Josman, Gorman.

II-4-e A.L.S. 1p. 8vo. (Latin)


1833 Dec. 19

Peirce, Isaac B.
Trenton, (New York)

to O(restes) A. Brownson
Walpole, New Hampshire

He received Brownson's letter of the 18 of October. Benjamin Constant has been quoted by the R(hode) I(sland) paper as being an Infidel. He wishes to go by stage from Troy or Albany to see Brownson and would like to know the distance and the fare. Among his followers there is a disposition to remove to the west. Some have gone to Ohio and others will go. Among this number are the best and firmest supporters. He has a strong desire to relinquish the ministry and do something else for a livelihood. His plan is to locate in or near a village and open a school with his two oldest daughters who will be qualified to teach. He is not satisfied to remain where he is now especially when his people are expecting to move. He wonders why Brownson had not sent to him, his (Brownson's) Review of Whiteman's (Bernard Whitman) Letters.

I-3-e A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
1


1833 Dec. 21

Ballard, Henry E., Commanding U.S. Ship of the Line United States Ship Delaware
Fort Mahon

to Lieutenant William Seton
U.S. Ship Delaware

Seton is ordered to proceed to Barcelona on the American brig Franklin and thence to Paris where he is to deliver certain of the dispatches entrusted to him to "Edward Livingston, envoy extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary at the court of Saint Cloud. He is then to return to America via the Havre and deliver the other dispatches entrusted to him to the Secretary of the Navy. (Note on outside, written by Robert Seton, dated 1873: Robert says that in 1856 he brought from the lumber room of the cottage or farmhouse Cragdon a print of the Delaware with the autographs of its commanders Lithographed underneath it. He left it at Carlsruke, Germany).

II-1-a A.L.S. 1p. 4to.
4


1833 Dec. 21

Dupont-Poursat, Bishop Peter
Coutances, (France)

Dupont-Poursat ordained to the diaconate John Stephen Blin of the parish of Champrepur. Signed by Lesplu-Dupre as vicar general and Michel as secretary.

V-4-d D.S. (Latin) 1p. 4vo.
3


1833 Dec. 24

Young, Father N(icholas) D.
Somerset, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Young forgot to tell Purcell of new church in (Perry) County, to take care of those living too far from the two other churches. Bishop Fenwick had given his approbation and promised $100. The Church is ready and asks for the necessary delegation to bless it, etc. Return journey tedious. Mrs. Pine's daughter well - Parishioners expected Purcell to come with him - Hopes the Bishop will visit the diocese for the jubilees - Young is celebrating the jubilee later in the spring - Approves an article on Bishop rese in the Catholic Telegraph of which he also speaks.

II-4-e A.L.S. 3pp. 16to.


1833 Dec. 26

Collins, Father Edward T.
Dayton, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell of
Cincinnati, Ohio

Speaks his great gratification at receiving the Bishop's letter, especially about the jubilee - The season and the scattered condition of the congregation suggest a delay of the celebration of the jubilee until the opening of the spring. Will make every effort to visit Stallowtown, (Ohio) after the holydays - An Irishman on the canal near Troy wants him to baptize his child. Speaks of German families there - Some of these families have been to Mass at Dayton - The congregation after ten months counts about 200. Was surprised to learn that the Germans of Dayton has asked for a German priest, since they could not support him and further lack the proper dispositions. He has already explained to them the impossibility of Purcell's supplying their request - Has visit Urbanna and Mackachac, (Ohio).

II-4-e A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.


1833 Dec. 26

Dahmen, C.M., Father Fr(ancis) Xav(ier)
Ste. Genevieve, (Missouri)

to Father (John) Timon, (C.M.)
Barrens, (Missouri)

Dahmen presents Mr. Voelker, a German speaking only his own language. Having recently come from Europe he desires to settle somewhere here. From what Dahmen knows he is of a wealthy background; his family is living meanwhile in Ste. Genevieve. While he is not of their faith, Dahmen knows he will be treated well.

IV-3-i A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
2


1833 Dec. 26

David, John B.M., Bp. of Mauricastro
St. Joseph's Seminary, Bardstown, Ky.

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

In answer to Purcell's letter of the 20th he is sorry, if he is responsible for a delay in a shipment from Frederick, (Md.) and hopes Father (John) McElroy was less forgetful. Purcell can consider his fatigue from the journey as a foretaste of his diocesan work - Sorry he could not rest before going to Louisville - News travels fast to Mt. St. Mary's Emmitsburg - Intends to write Cornelia about an extract in her cousins letter - Mentions the illness of Sister Victoria, of the Sisters of Charity at the asylum. Hopes for the faculties of Vicar General from Purcell.
P.S. Gives a remedy for Sister Victoria seen in the Shepherd of the Valley.

II-4-e A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.


1833 Dec. 26

(Whitman, Bernard)
Waltham, (Massachusetts)

to O(restes) A. Brownson
Walpole, New Hampshire

He has received and printed Brownson's article which he recommends very highly. The only objection to Brownson's article is that it is far above other articles and above the intelligence of the readers. He requests Brownson to write for him a series of familiar letters on the Workingman's party. Brownson's letters in the Register have been well liked. Brownson can do more than anyone else to produce the desired results.

I-3-e A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
1


1833 Dec. 27

Doutreluingne, C.M., Father J. P(eter)
Cahokias, (Illinois)

to Father J(ohn) Timon, (C.M.)
Barrens, Missouri

Doutreluingne is very displeased to have to inform Timon of Robert's bad disposition. He deserves to be punished in order to learn submission and respect. They say he has never done anything except what he pleased. It was difficult to keep him from leaving last Thursday; he wants to take the coach to Cascaskias next Tuesday. Doutreluingne has engaged a young Frenchman, about 17 or 18, to work and to take care of the church. He will pay him 3 piastres a month in the winter and four in the summer, and buy his clothes. If Timon thinks it right to send Robert back he will receive him willingly since his parents gave Doutreluingne authority to correct him. Timon will recall that he gave Doutreluingne 10 masses when he was at Ste. Genevieve. He has said only two and fears he will not be able to say the others and asks Timon to take them back along with 25 others.
P.S. Doutreluingne asked (Robert) to wait until he receives Timon's reply. He said he would.

IV-3-i A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
2


1833 Dec. 27

Odin, C.M., Father J(ohn) M(ary)
Paris, (France)

to Father John Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens), M(iss)o(uri)

In his last letter to their Superior, Father (John Baptist) Tornatore (C.M.), Odin promised to write to Timon. He had to visit their seminary at Amiens and college at Mont Didier at the request of their Superior General. The seminary of Amiens was built by the (Vincentians) some time before the French Revolution. It is superior to any of the kind in France. It accommodates 300 students. It surpasses everything even at Lyons. Odin spoke a great deal to the Bishop of Amiens, the priests, and students, about America and to the Sisters of Charity, who have five beautiful houses in that city. All their confreres at Amiens wish to see the American province united to and depending from their house in Paris. then they will be assisted and strengthened. Their college at Mont Didier is numerous and flourishing. They follow the American plan of education. Odin addressed the young men and spoke about America. There are two houses of Sisters of Charity at Mont Didier. Today a letter came from the seminary of St. Flour saying that many young seminarians wish to go to America. There are 23 novices at present. Father Etienne, (C.M.) has written to Spain and Poland for some members. In Europe they knew nothing of America but the scandals of Louisiana and many of their confreres who asked to go to America refused because of the dangers apprehended in this country. Odin has removed the bad impression. Etienne told him that if they gave $1000 a year he would train young men and as soon as they made their vows they would be sent (to America). Odin told Etienne he was sure all would agree and promised the yearly sum. Odin relates a circumstance three years ago during the novena of St. Vincent de Paul. A Sister of Charity on going every day to their house saw the heart of St. Vincent and heard a voice saying that he was exceedingly grieved by the evils of France. After the novena a voice told her that St. Vincent was a little consoled. This Sister also had a vision of the Blessed Virgin telling her to have a medal struck (the Miraculous Medal). After 18 months the Sister's confessor spoke to the Archbishop. The medal has been struck and wonderful conversions and cures have been obtained. Father Aladèle, the confessor, related the whole story to Odin. Father Boullangier, the Superior of the house, was miraculously cured by that instrument of devotion. (The page is cut off here). ... would please them better than to see some of them among the Indians. Affairs in France and Europe seem to be in a deplorable condition. The fear of a dreadful war is entertained everywhere. Sundays are spent in a shocking way in Paris. The Archbishop of Paris made a beautiful sermon to raise funds for the orphans whose parents died of the cholera. Those children are all under the care of their Sisters of Charity. Odin sends his compliments to Fathers Tornatore, Olivier, Paquin, Wiseman, Loisel, Brands, and to all the seminarians and students at the college, and to the Brothers and Sisters.

IV-3-i A.L.S. 8pp. 4to.
8


1833 Dec. 30

Lowe, James
Putney, (Vermont?)

to (Orestes A. Brownson
Walpole, N.H.)

Lowe certifies that the banns of marriage between Horan Reynolds of Putney and Betsy Lane of Walpole, N.H. have been published on Dec. 29.

I-3-e A.D.S. 1p. 12mo.
3