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Calendar: 1837

1837 ( )

( )
( )

to Father John Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens), M(iss)o(uri)

He asks Timon to let him and Armand Pellerin make a little retreat or at least give them permission to go and confess themselves because they are plunged into everlasting misery. They know they have offended God and before ( ) goes to Louisiana he would wish to get his soul clean. If it were not for giving his beloved mother so much pain he would not be so sorry, but he is sure she will be desolated. Timon took him back once but he did not want to stay; he did not know what he was doing. He will perhaps die in this miserable state. (Manuscript torn here. Crossed out): "Rev. Mr. Raho 1837." (In pencil in another hand): Manuel Lopez.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
4


1837 ( ) 27

Boullier, C.M., Father J(ohn)
Cape Girardeau, (Missouri)

to Father (John) Timon, (C.M.)
Barrens, M(iss)o(uri)

He sends by Father (John) Odin, (C.M.) a note of $50 on one of the Mississippi banks. Timon is to try to pass it on as soon as convenient and not to receive any as all the banks of that state do not stand on good footing. Fathers (John) Rosti, (C.M.) and (Benedict Roux?) are sick. Work for the church and at the farm goes slowly. A kind of preacher came a few days ago and is going to supersede Mr. Concannon in his school. Mr. Morton has left Mr. Lappin. Last Sunday Zeno Leyton got beastly drunk with $30 raised by selling wood to steamboats; Boullier surmises the wood came from their land. It is high time to finish with Mr. Ménard and have the land surveyed. Timon is to come tomorrow week and stay next Sunday week. He is to bring at least the $520(?) Boullier gave to Father (Francis) Cellini, (C.M.), and to send the wagon.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
10


1837

Gunne (?) A., Collector
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Receipt for 1837 taxes for 52 piastres on Square 48, $50,000 and two slaves.

V-4-f Receipt S. (French) 2pp. 32mo.
1


(1837)

Jamey, Father V(ictor)
(Barrens, Missouri)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Bishop (Joseph) Rosati who has been there for a week is less surprised than distressed on learning of Blanc's illness and all the seminarians share Jamey's worry. the Bishop ordained 11 yesterday: 2 priests, 4 deacons, 2 subdeacons and 3 to minor orders. The day was complete when (John) Escoffier added to this true joy the most tremendous distraction, the bishop said, that he had experienced in more than 40 years. Escoffier, bearing the ewer, ascended the steps of the throne and there he lost his footing and fell, throwing the water in the bishop's face. The bishop broke into an irrepressible laugh. Father (John) Timon, (C.M.) leaves tomorrow for Parish where his Superior General has called him. Timon wanted Jamey to accompany him as far as Cincinnati and as Jamey realizes that it will help his English, he has consented. They will stay several days at Cape (Girardeau?) to wait for a good boat. Rosati advises Timon to go on to Rome and Jamey thinks he will. Mr. (Joseph) Evrard(?) is a little withdrawn, not ill but weak. Jamey hopes he will be a good priest; he seems to have an excellent disposition. Jamey thinks he will arrive in New Orleans between the first and the tenth of September and if he does not go to Barrettown he will arrive sooner. Jamey preached in English a week ago and the students understood him very well they said. Jamey repeats that he will go anywhere Blanc sends him, to Alveolus, to Baton Rouge, or Natchitoches or even to the Cathedral.
P.S. He sends his respects to Jeanjean. Rosati sends his regards.

V-4-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
5


(1837?)

Jamey, Father Vict(or)
(New Orleans, Louisiana?)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Jamey has just been told that Blanc is very anxious to finish with Miss (Marie Jeanne) Aliquot. Everything is arranged, because of the $2000 to be paid her when she leaves the house, she has no claim in right or law. The demand she is now making for the Community (Ursulines?) to pay its debts deserves no consideration. Jamey believes that Blanc should have answered these demands by telling the woman to deal with those who were party to them. She knows they have not forgotten the theft of a receipt for $5000(?) signed by Miss Arnaud. Madame St. Etienne from whom she took it remembers it well. This lady regrets selling her house and wishes to wear out the nuns to make them give it back to her so that she can get six times as much for it. Having attained this end she will continue to justify herself in the eyes of the colored people (Negroes), to impute all wrongs to Blanc, as she did last year. Whether they keep this establishment depends on Blanc alone. Jamey has done nothing in the matter except with the advice of Father (Auguste) Jeanjean. Jamey has not been unsuccessful in delivering Blanc from certain sorrows. The return of Sister St. Francis (de Sales, Aliquot, R.U., Felicité Aliquot?) who could now, if she insisted, leave the house without any scandal, and the destroying of the confusion at St. Claude (Sisters of Mount Carmel?) are just about the results of the affair in question. However, Jamey does not doubt that Blanc regards with disfavor the part Jamey has taken. What Blanc said the other day with regard to the land at Lafayette confirms this thought. That is why Jamey has just burned all the notes he had taken regarding this land. He is going to countermand the carts he had asked for to take the bricks at Miss Brunner's and if Blanc wishes to appoint a priest for St. Clause, Jamey will go there today for the last time. If Blanc requires it he will serve there until Good Shepherd Sunday after which he will beg Blanc to give him another post if he will allow him to remain in his diocese. This is not the result of dissatisfaction but of three years' observations. He had already given some of them before Blanc's trip.

V-4-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
12


1837 Jan 2

Hughes, Father John
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Sends greetings of the season. Wonders if it is delightful to be a bishop. Had thought of it last year when proposed for Pittsburgh. The division of the diocese has been postponed. A.V.G. to be sent to Pittsburgh. Bishop Kenrick popular. Notices that Purcell is likely to be involved in controversy with Campbell and sympathizes with Purcell in what he must suffer in recriminations. Has sent Father Thienpont money for the Telegraph. Asks about Major Dugan's legacy. Speaks of orphan asylums. Asks about Bishop Bruté, noting his writings against Dr. Channing in the Telegraph. Presbyterians including Breckenridge and Miller engaged in religious quarrel, thus fulfilling Hughes' prediction. Few converts in Philadelphia but the church is gaining in esteem. Bishop England arrived in New York with five Ursuline nuns, and is in good health despite fatigue and disappointment.
P.S. Greetings from Gartland.

II-4-f 4pp. 8vo.
8


1837 Jan 3

Portier, (Michael), Bishop of Mobile
Mobile, Alabama

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Acknowledges Purcell's but says the recommendation of the organist and organ came too late as he had ordered one in New York. When he sees Purcell in Baltimore he will tell how he offended Archbishop (Samuel) Eccleston). Has two questions for the Provincial Council:
1. The division of the province;
2. Profession of religious not yet 21.
Asks if Father O'Meara has left Purcell's diocese.

II-4-f A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
5


1837 Jan 5

Mazzuchelli, O.P., Father Samuel
Galena, Illinois

to Bishop Frederic(k) Rese
(Detroit, Michigan)

The last word he received from Rese was dated February 26, 1836. The long silence does not please him. If he is in disgrace he asks the Bishop to rebuke him. He is the same man he was 5 and 6 years ago, 30 years and 2 months old. The vexations of the years '34 and '35 gave way to peace. His reputation there is as good as Rese would wish him to have. Jesus still uses him as a very improper instrument. What he told Rese about the churches has become a fact as Rese can see in the press. The prudence that he may have needed in times past seems now to guide him. For the first time since his ordination ha has written to the Superior General. Father (Nicholas D.) Young, O.P. has never written him. Last November he went on a visit to St. Louis and met the Bishop. Rese has promised Mazzuchelli a visit but want of time has probably prevented the visit. The Bishop (Joseph Rosati) has the same excuse. Mazzuchelli asks Rese to pity a priest 300 miles from a bishop and 200 miles from a priest. Should the Holy See decide to erect Wisconsin Territory and the Northwest into a diocese much good could be accomplished. Bishop Rosati is of that opinion. Mazzuchelli believes that a new diocese is indispensable since the population is going to the West, so that West of the Mississippi will also soon be a diocese of itself.

III-2-g A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
3


1837 Jan 6

(Rosati), Joseph, Bishop of St. Louis
St. Louis, (Missouri)

to Father John Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens), Missouri

(James) Timon has remitted the $150 paid to him by (Father Jos.) Paquin, (C.M.) and John Timon's draft in favor of the organ maker has been paid. Mr. Bogy is not in St. Louis; he was married to Miss Pelagie Pratt in New York a fortnight ago. (Rosati) thinks Bogy intends to spend a year or two there. So Timon's father cannot present Timon's account to Bogy. Rosati has not yet seen Mr. Pitcher. They passed a very happy Christmas. (Rosati) officiated at the first Mass. There were about 200 communions, without including those of the college, upwards of eighty, those of the hospital and convent, among them several men and some converts, a physician and a U(nited) S(tates) Officer. Next day (Rosati) ordained (John Peter) Fisher deacon. On St. John's Day (Rosati) gave the habit to four young ladies at the Convent (of the Religious of the Sacred Heart) where there are now 10 novices, 7 professed, 50 boarders, 25 orphans and a very large day school. On New Year's Day he ordained Fisher priest. Next day he went to Florissant, to receive the profession of a religious but she was 15 days short of the age required for the profession. But he had the pleasure of visiting the novitiate of the Jesuits and the convent. All this was quite pleasing, as much as the good accounts Timon gave in his last letter, and has done much to revive (Rosati's) spirits. Everything here is extremely dear: corn, $1 a bushel; butter, 50 cents a pound; coal, 37 cents a bushel. (Rosati) has to pay $2,000 and has not yet found the money. Mr. Leon is going to New Orleans; (Rosati) must settle with him. Mr. Willplait has left them; he is in Cincinnati. (Rosati) has received a letter from (Michael) Guilbride in Pittsburgh; he is uneasy about his oath. Timon's father told (Rosati) that Father Timon will do well to keep his corn and vinegar until spring. (Rosati) wrote some time ago to Father Timon requesting him if possible to give the retreat to the Sisters of Charity; he is to let (Rosati) know if it will be in his power when the weather is milder and the navigation free.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
11


1837 Jan 7

Propaganda, Sacra Congregation de Fide L., Archbishop of Ephesus, by Apostolic Nuncio at
Vienna

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Has been promoted to the place of Cardinal Ostini as Apostolic nuncio to Vienna. Received Purcell['s of November 9 yesterday. Acknowledges Purcell's statement of the receipt of funds from Cardinal Ostini July 29, 1836 by Mr. Schwarz, also that Bishop Rese of Detroit concurs in the plan of the Sacred Congregation for the distribution of the Johannes Baptista Joffroy fund. The new fruits from May 7, to November 7, 151.12 florins he sends with this letter by Mr. Schwarz. Adds that the Bishop of Vienna as president of the Leopoldine Association has allotted to Cincinnati the sum of 4,000 florins.

II-4-f L.S. 2pp. 8vo. (Latin)
5


1837 Jan 10

Cousin, V(ictor) J.
( ), France

to O(restes) A. Brownson

( )

Cousin thanks Brownson for the flattering letter he sent him. Cousin foresees a great future for philosophy in America through the media of Christianity and Liberty. Since his trip in Holland, he has been pressed in the work. In France, he assures Brownson, philosophy always meets opposition, but this condition is not harmful -- there were never more factions than "now." He claims Brownson must not be acquainted with his last work. He sends Brownson the posthumous works of M. de Biran the introduction of which is similar to that of the "Fragmens." He urges Brownson to read this work. Although its form is bad, the content is rich. He wishes Brownson to give M. Henry the pamphlet. He assures Brownson of his support and that of his friends in regard to the "Nouvelle revue" about which Brownson is thinking. When Cousin receives the first copy, he will have it announced. Courage and hope will establish philosophy in America, he tells Brownson. Cousin admits he knew Mr. Channing, but wishes to know who are the best professors of philosophy here and what works do they use. He also wishes Brownson to return the enclosed biography to Mr. Linberg. He states the preface to the second edition of the "Fragmens" created a discussion which is still going on (1837). He wonders if America knows of his latest works on Aristotle. He is busy at present on a great work on the philosophy of the Middle Ages.
P.S. He wishes to be remembered to Mr. Everett if he is still in Boston.

I-3-e A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
1


1827 Jan 10

Saenderl, (C.SS.R.), Father Simon
Arbre Croche, (Michigan)

to Bishop (Frederick Rese)
(Detroit, Michigan)

(Augustine) Hamelin has been in Arbre Croche since fall 1836. He has charge of the school, which he keeps regularly. The English school is quite favored by the Indians as they are very interested in the English language. During the day, he teaches the boys and girls, in the evening until midnight he instructs young men who show great interest in the school. Hamelin has given up entirely the idea of becoming a priest, it is in vain to speak to him about it, and to remind him of his oath to the Propaganda. He wants to marry, but Saenderl hesitates about it on account of this oath. A dispensation from the Propaganda takes time, but seems to be the only thing to do. Margarite is an Indian, so is Hamelin. They both like the carefree life of the Indians. If Indians could ever return from heaven, they would want to become Indians again. Saenderl has already written 26 sermons in the Chippeway language and within a year he could have a whole volume of sermons ready in which he intends to treat the most interesting truths of our faith according to the Indian way of thinking. If there would be a possibility of having it published, there should be no difficulty as one can count on a considerable demand. However the books would have to be sold in Mackinaw, Green Bay, and St. Mary's. The Indians have plenty of money and are glad to pay for something they want to read. Their little book does not satisfy them anymore. Even the numerous half-breeds will buy such books. Saenderl is trying to learn the Chippeway language because it is the official and diplomatic language among all the Indians and the means of communication between the different tribes. An educated Indian must speak Chippeway as an educated German must master French. The books could even be sold in Canada among the Chippeway Indians there. A priest lives in Coldwater. Father (Joseph) Prost, C.SS.R. roams around in rochester. When the year 1837 has ended Prost will probably be convinced that the regular observance of the rules (of his order) either in part or totally is impossible, especially when the situation in the Southern states is as it is now and the ministering of the faith is so turbulent. To live according to their rule could only be possible in the west among the Indians. The numerous Chippeway Indians in the Wisconsin Territory, and the Mississippi etc. are ready to be converted. A new foundation among them would be easier than in Ohio or New York where such a project is looked upon as a folly. Time will eventually destroy these illusions.
P.S. The Redemptorists in Vienna cannot come to any decision because Prost has turned their heads again. Saenderl has written to Vienna and told them of the impossibility of a foundation in Ohio and New York. He advised them to follow the example of the Jesuits and to go among the Indians of Wisconsin or on the Mississippi where there is a place for agriculture. There would be no collision with others, no unfavorable conditions. If Rese is of the same opinion as Saenderl, then Rese should write it to Vienna and put their heads right again.

II-2-g A.L.S. (German) 2pp. 4to.
6


1837 Jan 12

Brands, C.M., Father J(ohn)
Old Mines, (Missouri)

to Father John Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens), M(iss)o(uri)

When last at the Seminary Brands forgot to mention three things:
1. He wishes to have for Mrs. Lamarque a French prayer of which there are plenty at New Orleans.
2. Whether the Masses he received from the parishioners of Perry C(oun)ty have been taken care of.
3. Last summer he found among his papers an old account of about $80 received from Bishop (Joseph Rosati), 8 or 10 dollars of which were to be given to Mr. Morrison of Kaskaskias. This was in 1833. Brands does not know whether Father (Joseph) Paquin, (C.M.) ever received notice of this and supposes that Paquin has never given any credit for this because Morrison left the college suddenly for fear of cholera. It seems that Father (Peter J.) Doutreluingne, (C.M.) and (Antonio Palleli) Palleli cannot agree. Brands does not know how they will make out without Pallelli; their scanty revenues hardly allowing the hiring of a servant. Doutreluingne is rather harsh when Palleli makes some proposal about the affairs of the kitchen, etc. Brands does not like to interfere. Next Sunday Brands has appointed a mission at Valle's Mines where he expects to have a smart congregation of Protestants. In two weeks he must go to Big River, (Missouri) to instruct a whole family. Mrs. McClanahan is preparing herself for her first Communion; Brands will do his best to get her brother Malachias too. Timon is to tell Mother Agnes (Hart, S.L.? not to rely on the girl of whom Brands spoke; her father is unwilling to send her and for reasons Brands approves.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
11


1837 Jan 13

Clancy, William, bp. coad. Charleston
Charleston, South Carolina

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Received Purcell's of December 29 - Has felt surprised that Purcell did not welcome him sooner to America - Has asked the Cardinal prefect, with the knowledge of Bishop (John) England to be transferred since there is not enough work in Charleston for two bishops - As to John McSwiney, at Carlow he made a favorable impression but decided not to take orders - Does not know why the Bishop of Kingston ordained him deacon but not priest - Advises caution in accepting him although believes he would be a good teacher in a seminary - Promises prayer for Purcell in his controversy with Campbell, but does not believe in the value of such affairs - Bishop England expected hourly from Haiti.

II-4-f A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
5


1837 Jan 13

McDonough, James A.O.
St. Louis, (Missouri)

to Father John Timon, (C.M.)
Barrens, (Missouri)

McDonough expected as answer from Timon, his uncle, prescribing something for the relief of his eyes. Is it possible that human skill is so limited that no cure is available? Were Timon aware of the mortification McDonough endures he would strive to do something for him. He is thankful for what Timon has done, although not crowned with success. He urges Timon to further exertions and prayers.
P.S. Weakness seems the sole cause of this inflammation.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
1


1837 Jan 13

(Rosati), Bishop Joseph
St. Louis, (Missouri)

to Father John Timon, (C.M.)

He received this morning Timon's Dec(ember) 14 letter. Timon has done well to write to the parents of the boarders; they cannot be surprised at his raising the prices. But (Rosati) is surprised to read in the paper Timon enclosed that (Rosati) had slighted and spoken contemptuously of the community of (the Sisters of L(oretto?) The poor creature must have dreamed it. If Timon has any occasion to speak with her, (Rosati) requests him to tell her she is certainly mistaken. The Sisters of Charity of Emmetsburg teach every kind of person, poor and rich and receive compensation from those able to give it. Besides the young ladies' boarding school of their mother house, St. Joseph, they have at present several other boarding schools in eastern cities, so that this would not be an obstacle for establishing them at the Cape. The only difficulty would be to obtain a sufficient number from St. Joseph. (Rosati) wants five in St. Louis but cannot yet obtain them. Timon will have received the circular letter for Lent. (Rosati) desires a list of all the priests residing at the Seminary, marking those who belong to the (Vincentians) and the novices, a list of seminarians and what orders they have; a list of novices, brothers, etc. and all others who reside in other missions or houses. He would like a similar list from the Monastery and wishes to know the numbers of their boarders and of those of the College. (Rosati) has been told that Father (Philip) Borgna has gone to New Orleans and has written someone from there. (Rosati) will see Timon with pleasure when the latter comes to St. Louis. Then the Sisters of Charity will make their retreat. He has received letters from Hilary (M. Tucker) and George (Alexander Hamilton); they are well and doing also very well.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
7


1837 Jan 15

Timon, James
St. Louis, (Missouri)

to Father John Timon, (C.M.)
Barrens, M(iss)o(uri)

James feels duty bound to write again, although his frequency may make him seem troublesome. Only Friday did he receive John's letter of Dec(ember) 17. He thanks him for the care taken about the mortgage; they have not yet advertised the property. He asks Timon to let him know how much interest is due and when and whether any has been paid since the suit was commenced. He waited on the firm of Tabor, Shaw, and Tatum about the base(?). The firm is changed to Glasgo etc., Taber having sold out. ( ) Shaw is on(?) to the eastward. His partner Tatum says that on his arrival the affair will be adjusted so that if the base is not found they will pay the amount as the bill of lading is sufficient evidence. The shoes were sent immediately with a letter in care of Mr. Pratt. James spoke to the Walshes about the candles but fears it will be long before they can be sent. Regarding the plans, John will have had his letter long ago. The one Mariavello(?) was preparing to send would have been a sorry bargain. The Walshes have taken in as a partner Mr. Patterson who is married to one of the Higginses. James wishes John would forget the Ames affair. It will be a very safe business for anyone who has money to spare. Poor Margaret is wrestling with a small female school on the hill in the house of a decent French family. She has two little rooms and has 8 or 10 scholars at $4(?) per quarter and likely to increase. She has altered for the better, particularly in humility. James has clothed her, provided her with benches, bed, bedding, firewood, and perhaps to the amount of $50. she does some little sewing for Lucy and is as obliging as possible. James caught a cold about two months ago which is not likely to quit him.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
12


1837 Jan 16

Young, O.P., Father N(icholas) D.
Lancaster, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

The Dominican sisters at Somerset authorized him to say that they will accept the girl mentioned to them by Mr. Storer. Miss Wood's health not so good. Sisters say it would be better for her to return home in the spring. Has received faculties through Father Alliman. Has frequent use for dispensations. Mrs. (Thomas) Ewing recovering from severe illness, aided by prayers of her children especially Philemon. The time for his release from the provincialship of the Dominicans is near. There will be a general chapter of the community at St. Rose, (Kentucky) shortly after Easter. Thinks Father (Richard Pius) Miles most fit and will work for his election. A letter from the Superior General allows them also to divide the members between St. Rose's and St. Joseph's at Somerset, (Ohio). Has foreseen difficulties at his removal. Father Jarboe wrote that Father S(tephen) H. Montgomery told Father Reynolds at Louisville, that he did not intend ever to submit to the order. Young warns that unless Father Montgomery be quiet, the Dominicans might make some disclosures. Had written that they had secured a lot in Lancaster, but finds that a man has failed to keep his promises. Have another in view.

II-4-f A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
10


1837 Jan 22

O'Reilly, Father John V.
Friendsville, P(ennsylvani)a

to Father John Timon, (C.M.)
Barrens, Missouri

The Barrens is as dear as the day he parted from it. He wrote two letters, one to Father (John) Odin,(C.M.), the other to John Cotter, but has had no answer. All he ever heard was the death of Father (Francis) Simoni(n, C.M.?) at which he was much affected, knowing what an acquisition he was to the community. O'Reilly's congregation contains about 200 families, all Irish, two churches 8 miles apart. The other is 50 miles distant, contains 32 families, 18 of which are German, most of whom speak English. In the congregation in which he resides, there are not five who are of age who will not fulfill their duty. There are neither lawsuits nor drunkenness here. O'Reilly is to attend the other church only 4 times a year. He cannot help it, having to attend 40 miles of public works. He need never dread sick calls at night; it is a most healthy country. The woods are falling fast. The greater part of the settlers are new and poor, but industrious. Those who have been here 9 or 10 years have made $150 to $250 from butter, to say nothing of wool, beef, and pork. The Yankees are alarmed; they wish to sell their farms as they cannot be bosses. They have not troubled O'Reilly since the first Sunday when he turned them out of doors, letting them know they should not come if they would not conform to the custom of the place. O'Reilly wishes Odin to secure for him two sets of candlesticks and crosses and $20 worth of beads. There is in the community a very pious unmarried man about 40 who would join the Congregation if accepted. O'Reilly asks for prayers especially those of Father (John Baptist) Tornatore, (C.M.) and the Sisters of Loretto. He is within 40 miles of a priest; they visit alternately. His health is excellent.
P.S. What happened to Father (Peter Richard) Donnel(l)y? Will Mr. Hays send a certificate that O'Reilly had declared his intention of becoming a citizen.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
9


1837 Jan 24

Boullier, C.M., Father J(ohn)
Cape Girardeau, (Missouri)

to Father J(ohn) Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens), M(iss)o(uri)

James (Hutchins) Hurtchins is going to the Barrens and quitting work for them. By the same opportunity Boullier also sends Robert. The other workman who was working by the cord has left also. They are destitute of hands and were Timon able to send one or two, Dorey(?) and Bill(?), it would be of great advantage. Boullier gave Timon's letter to Mr. Miles yesterday. Miles finds Father (Joseph V.) Wiseman's conduct in that affair very hard; he has several letters of his sister requesting him to collect that money and thinks it much more than $40. Miles will write to Timon about it. Boullier goes tomorrow to New Madrid, (Missouri). Timon is not to forget to send by the return of the horses and hands the plat of the town.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
5


1837 Jan 24

Tschenhenss, C.SS.R., Father Francis X.
Tiffin, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Acknowledges Purcell's containing a certain answer - Has had some difficulties - Is pleased that Father (Emanual) Thinepont [Thienpont] is returning to settle the debts. Has written for the books at Dayton and when they come will apply sum to payment of Mrs. Quinn. As to candidates for the Redemptorists, can receive none before a year and then only those who are ready for theology - Frequent mixed marriages have caused him scruples about what should be done - Asks for directories and almanac for 1837 and English ritual - He and Father (Peter C.) Czakert blessed church - Has trouble with plans for building priests's house - Blessed graveyard and desires to charge $4 for adults, $2 for children but some object. English speaking people object to building priest's house until they can get an English speaking priest - Asks terms of Purcell's agreement with his Order and their jurisdiction - Has authorized a family to have charge of the choir - Goes first Sunday to McCutchenville, three Sundays at Tiffin, fifth Sunday at Lower Sandusky - Preaches in German - Question of keeping collection, etc.

II-4-f A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
8


1837 Jan 26

Young, Joshue M., Mt. St. Mary's College
Emmitsburg, Maryland

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Writes to make Purcell aware of his return to the Mountain since Mr. Byrne has already informed him of the departure. When he went to Baltimore to consult Father Louis Deloul, he found a difficulty in the fact that he had left during Father Thomas Butler's absence. To avoid embarrassment to Father Deloul because of the strained relations between the two institutions and on the advice of the Archbishop, he returned to the Mountain. Has taken up his former life at least until Father Butler's return, likely after Easter. Affairs there in curious condition. F. McCaffrey died, Father Hoskyns buried at Baltimore. Small pox in neighborhood. Father Sourin absent.

II-4-f A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
5


1837 Jan 27

Saenderl, (C.SS.R.), Father Simon
Arbre Croche, (Michigan)

to Bishop (Frederick Rese)
(Detroit, Michigan)

Hoping that Bishop Rese has the authority from Rome to give a special marriage permission, Saenderl asks for two dispensations for marriages in the third degree. The reason for this request is the absolute lack of girls. As the young people here are so limited in their number, and closely related they have no other choice than either to marry in the third degree or to remain single which for the Indians is a rather disagreeable thing. The Indians themselves do not favor such marriages, but they are an absolute necessity. Saenderl wants an answer soon. $400.00 was stolen in Mackinaw from the chief in Middletown, not the old chief of La Croix. Someone saw the thief, a half breed, with the box in the woods, but either it was the fear or the knowledge that Indians cannot hope to find much justice before a court of white men or that he did not know what to do, he let the man go free. Concerning Brother Aloys Schub there will be no difficulty in bringing him back to Arbre Croche or somewhere else, if his appointment can be accomplished, of which Saenderl is quite doubtful. If Rese could be so fortunate to get some money from the government in order to have books published for the Indians, no money could be applied in a better way. Saenderl wonders if not a part of the money destined for unnecessary mechanics could be used for that purpose. Even if Father (Frederick) Baraga's catechism is being printed now, this is a book one reads once, then it becomes boring. The Indians as well as the white people want something interesting to read. If Saenderl could have printed this work of one year, it would comprise 8 volumes, but that costs money. Saenderl told Rese before, that he expects a great demand for them as the Indians have money. However there will be difficulties if the government does not contribute some money.

III-2-g A.L.S. (German) 2pp. 8vo.
4


1837 Jan 29

St. Mary's College, Students of
Barrens, (Missouri)

to Father John Timon, (C.M.)
Barrens, Missouri

Since the establishment of this college, people have almost always complained that it teaches languages, science, wisdom, etc., and refuses to teach music. Almost all colleges in the United States teach music and it is regarded as useful and even necessary. St. Louis and Em(m)itsburg do so and yet produce men as great as this College does. They do not intend that all should study music, but only those judged capable. They ask Timon to bring them a good musician who know violin, clarinet, flute.
(Signed by) J. Gustave Landry, J. Théodule Landry, Adolphe Landry, John Vallée, Felix Rosier, P.M. Choteau, Jules Charlet, Charles Gregoire, Charles Pratte, Narcisse Landry, T. Michon, Terance J. Landry, Armand Pellerin, Henry Duffel, W(illia)m Barkley, Arthur Daquin, Octave Vives, Hypolite Vives, Jacob Liemberger, Amedée Menard.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
22


1837 Jan 30

Basualdi, J.
Bardstown, K(entuck)y

to Father J(ohn) Timon, (C.M.)
Barrens, Missouri

On the 25th St. Joseph's (College) was destroyed by fire about noon. The yard was filled with people from town before the institution knew. It took place from a chimney. Only the clothes were saved. The two wings were saved which now serve as shelter and studies continue herein. Basualdi is here yet for had he received a letter, he would be in New Orleans. Perhaps he will go in a few weeks.
(P.S.) He sends respects to Fathers Paquin, Tornatore, Rolando, and Wiseman. Basualdi reckons that most of his fellow students are gone from St. Mary's (College, Barrens, Missouri)/ If there are any, he sends remembrances particularly to the Landries, Dufours, Michon, F. Signous(?), etc.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
3


1837 Feb 1

Horstmann, J. William, Father
Occawa, Putnam County, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Asks for a dispensation for two Catholics who have been living in a putative marriage for 7 years and have 5 children who are second degree equal consanguinity - Gives as reason chance of helping other family in same condition and danger of scandal by separation.

II-4-f A.L.S. 1p. 8vo. (Latin)


(1837) Feb 3

Prost, (C.SS.R.), (Father) Joseph
Rochester, (New York)

to Bishop (Frederick Rese)
(Detroit, Michigan)

Prost had received a letter from his Superior General of Vienna (Joseph Passerat) C.SS.R. dated November 18, 1836 in which he is informed that Rese had made a complaint against the Redemptorists to the Leopoldine Association. The chief points of the charge are unknown to Prost. He reports to Rese that his brethren received an order from Vienna to leave the diocese immediately.

III-2-g A.L.S. (German) 1p. 8vo.
4


1837 Feb 7

(Eccleston), Archbishop Samuel
Baltimore, (Maryland)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Eccleston) was led to believe that Blanc would pass through Baltimore on his way to New Orleans but conjecturing from a notice in the "Ami de la Religion" that he sailed directly for there, he sends this letter. Although Blanc has not adopted the Province of Baltimore, (Eccleston) trusts that he will see Blanc at the opening of the (Provincial) Council (of Baltimore, 1837) and invites him to assist. The Council will open the Third Sunday after Easter. The following points have been proposed for deliberation:
1. Enforcing of the Decrees of the first Provincial Council.
2. Erection of the See of Pittsburg [Pittsburgh].
3. Expediency of a nomination for Richmond.
4. Immunities of ecclesiastical and religious persons.
5. Ordaining Sub Titulo Missionis.
6. Publication of a Ritual.
7. Accountability of clergymen collecting money.
8. Conditions of regular or other ecclesiastical communities to acquire Church property.
9. Establishment of a printing press.
10. Asylum for aged clergymen.
11. Measures relative to anti-Catholic excitement.
12. Uniformity of rules of fasting and abstinence.
13. Celebrating of Festivals of Obligation on Sundays.
14. Abuses of Trusteeism.
15. Quid statuendum de ancillis.
(Eccleston) trusts Blanc will arrive in Baltimore several days before the Synod.
(P.S. Eccleston) will send a condensed duplicate of this to prevent accident.

V-4-f A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
2


1837 Feb 8

Kenrick, Francis Patrick, bishop of Arath
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Congratulates Purcell on his triumph in controversy and suggests that the book be published in the East - Asks 5 copies if this is done - Archbishop (Samuel Eccleston) renews his request that Kenrick go to New York, having been urged to settle that problem by Rome - Kenrick proposes that Bishop (John) England come to Philadelphia, Father (John) Hughes be made Bishop of Pittsburgh and Bishop (William) Clancy of Charleston, though he prefers that Bishop England should go to New York had not Bishop (John) Dubois protested - England causes Kenrick to turn from New York and Bishop Simon Bruté thinks New York would not suit him, and he expects to stay at Philadelphia - Believes Hughes would rather remain also and that is why he withdrew his name - Suggests that they borrow from Ireland, mentioning Father Patrick Carew of Maynooth, Father William Meagher of Dublin and Father Patrick Byrne, dean of Carlow - Is aware of objections to these men but confident that they would be prudent and humble - If England does not care for New York, Father Meagher would be best for that see - Hopes to see Purcell at the Council - (Part of page cut off after this).

II-4-f A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
13


1837 Feb 8

Young, O.P., Father N(icholas) D.
St. Joseph's, Somerset, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Received Purcell's of 26th of last month. Is happy at Purcell's victory in controversy. Had thought Purcell should have given the job of answering to another, but since the event is glad that he was mistaken. will undertake the sell copies of the controversy when published. Is satisfied that Father S(teven) H. Mont(gomery) will not give occasion for the Dominicans to explain his present position towards the order. Fears that Father (A.C.) Alliman will give Purcell trouble. According to Purcell's instructions he did not restrict his faculties. when Young was away, instead of obeying order, he left Lancaster, and forced a couple to go elsewhere to be married and has not returned. Alliman, he says, cannot be depended upon in his accounts of the missions. Asks that Purcell reprimand him. Has secured a beautiful lot in Lancaster for $400. Asks that Father (Thomas) Martin be given a testimonial for collecting.
P.S. A deacon named McSweeney was at Lancaster and Columbus attacking the bishop and saying he was going to Bihsop England or Bishop Rese. Suggests a warning against him. Has heard that the College of the Propaganda is under the Jesuits, which he hopes will be beneficial to religion.

II-4-f A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
8


1837 Feb 9

(Eccleston), S(amuel) Archbishop Baltimore
Baltimore, Maryland

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Tells Purcell that besides the points enclosed, there will be other points to be discussed in the Provincial Council (of 1837), which could not be formally proposed; the business at New York, permanent location of pastors. Fears the Detroit will be subject to investigation. Confirms Purcell's charges against one person, have been confirmed by his own observation in Baltimore. Would like to settle the matter secretly. Is happy that even Protestant papers carry testimonies of Purcell's triumph in his controversy etc.
P.S. Bishop (John) Dubois after considerable delay has sent in his questions but not one syllable about the coadjutorship. The Prefect of the (Congregation of) the Propaganda urges Eccleston to write to Rome on this subject.

II-4-f A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
7


1837 Feb 11

Point, S.J., Father (Nicholas)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

to Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Point came to New Orleans to offer their services but learning that (Blanc's ship may still be at sea in March, Father (Auguste) Jeanjean thought Point could be of some use at Grand Coteau; Point is to go there tomorrow. The College of (St. Gabriel), Iberville should be in proportion to the needs and material prosperity growing so marvelously in this country. They should build solidly under the following conditions:
1. It should be well situated.
2. It should be built on land that will not be contested and will be extensive. The college should be free of debt.
3. It should be well-arranged. This would facilitate supervision and lessen personnel.
4. It should be well kept. It should be at the level of the better colleges.
5. Once established it should support itself and grow large enough to accommodate two or three hundred students.

Point does not think it to advantage or even possible to open the College unless there is some resource he does not know about. Here are some reasons for his opinion:
1. The college is too far from the center of large population.
2. The union of the church with the college would be dependent on the caprice of the trustees.
3. The judgment which concedes the income of the six arpents of church land on which the college is built is subject to revision.
4. Point still does not know the exact amount of income left from the estate of Father (Paul de) Saint-Pierre; he doubts if it will cover the amount the college owes Father (Matthew Bernard) Anduze.
5. The college, if repaired, will be large enough for only a teacher, who, like Father (Eugene) Michaud, has room for 3 or 4 professors and 60 students.
6. It would take about 8000 piastres for repairs and furnishings, plus 6 or 7000 for running expenses for six months.
7. Granting 60 students and 20 personnel the receipts would be far from meeting the expenses.
8. The college is unlikely to grow and if it did, it would cost as much as to build a new one.

Point submits these consideration; whatever Blanc thinks best, they will do their duty to concur.

V-4-f A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
6


1837 Feb 11

Young, O.P., Father N(icholas) D.
Lancaster, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Must again trouble Purcell about Father (A.G.) Alliman who has not returned, but left Sapp's Settlement apparently for Canton, having bough himself a horse. Feels that he cannot tolerate him any longer and asks that Purcell write him to go to Danville. Mr. Sapp is in Lancaster and says that they can start the church. Fears that Father Alliman has done damage there. Is making contracts for the church at Lancaster, and asks Purcell to suggest a plan and an architect. Hears that the sectarian paper gives the victory to Campbell, but this will only serve to convince of their dishonesty.

II-4-f A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
5


1837 Feb 13

Montgomery, O.P., Father Charles P.
Zanesville, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

No doubt Purcell is grieved at the situation at St. Dominic's, Guernsey County, (Ohio). At the earnest request of Father (James) Reid he visited them and brought back Mr. and Mrs. Jeffries to the church. Believes Father Reid can do little in that quarter, because the people are disaffected towards him. Money for Telegraph. All are anxiously awaiting the "Great Debate." Could sell copies there. Congregation well.

II-4-f A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
4


1837 Feb 16

Kane, Felicité
Kaskaskia, (Illinois)

to Father (John) Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens), Missouri

She sends her son Elias (Kane) to Timon and wishes him prepared for West Point. She wishes Timon to furnish Elias with bed clothing since his stay will be so short. she will visit Timon shortly and settle for Elias' expenses. She is much troubled and thinks a little of his good advice will make her feel better and more reconciled to her miserable situation. Timon is to remember her to Father Oliver and Wiseman and all.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
2


1837 Feb 16

(Rosati), Bishop Joseph
St. Louis, (Missouri)

to Father John Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens), M(iss)o(uri)

(Rosati) is delighted with Timon's report in his last letter. He thanks him for the mission of New Madrid, (Missouri) and hopes that Father (John) Boullier, (C.M.) will continue there until Providence will dispose otherwise. He will be pleased to see Fathers (Joseph) Giustiniani, (C.M.) and(Hector) Figari, (C.M.), but he must have at least another who can sing. Perhaps Father (Francis) Simonin, (C.M.) or someone like Father (Bartholomew) Rol(l)ando, (C.M.?) who has never seen St. Louis, can come. They should be here before Palm Sunday. (Rosati) has just finished the retreat for the Sisters. He also gives instruction to the Sisters at the Hospital and another at the Asylum. But his financial affairs worry him. (Rosati) has just received from Rome, permission to establish the feast of Ste. Philomene; he has determined upon the first Sunday of September. One more patroness for the diocese. They must dedicate a chapel to her in the new church. (Rosati) will communicate to Mr. Leon the part of Timon's letter which regards him. Yesterday (Rosati) was called to see Captain Wilkinson at the home of Mr. Darby. Wilkinson was very ill and did not want to die without baptism. (Rosati) baptized him and this morning he seemed a little better. In a week he will be able to go back. Father (Peter J.) Doutreluingne, (C.M.) left here yesterday evening. He was going to stay overnight at Vide-Poche and expected to arrive this evening at (Old) Mine(s) but the roads are bad. (Rosati) wants to know if the Catholics of Apple Creek, (Missouri) were included in the number given (Father Blaise) Raho, (C.M.). (Father Francis B. Jamison is doing much good here; he is going to begin a day school. They will use St. Mary's chapel which they do not need since they have the new church.

IV-3-k A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
14


(1837?) Feb 17

Jamey, Father V(ictor)
Natchitoches, (Louisiana)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Jamey hastens to reply to Blanc's letter of the 8th received just now. He is painfully surprised to learn of Blanc's plan to send back Father (Edward) d'Hauw as an invalid. If the Jesuits, the Ladies of the Sacred Heart, several priests and respectable persons had not taken care to inform Blanc about his conduct in this parish perhaps Jamey should have told how improper it was. No one is more convinced than Jamey of Father (Stephen) Rousselon's merits, but Blanc was not ignorant of the fact that on his arrival at the convent, Rousselon had never administered the Sacrament of Extreme Unction; and why did he leave Father (Joseph) Evrard at the convent while sending D'Hauw here to regain his health? Jamey assures Blanc that the steamboat that brings D'Hauw here will take Jamey back to New Orleans. Jamey is very distressed at the turn taken by the St. Claude house (Congregation of Our Lady of Mt. Carmel). Jamey hopes that by the time Blanc arrives the church at Cloutierville will be under way but above all that the cemetery will be enclosed like that at Campti. Only a vestige of the fence is left. The people of Bayou Pierre have also taken up a subscription to build a chapel. The place they have chosen is the one indicated by Blanc's brother (Father Jean-Baptiste Blanc) and is now the center of the new parish of Cadeaux(?) of whose incorporation Blanc was informed several days ago. Meeting points or stations are absolutely necessary in parishes like this to do some good. This parish has a double claim on Blanc because of the zeal of his brother.

V-4-f A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
9


1837 Feb 17

Point, S.J., Father N(icholas)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Note for the Bishop (Anthony Blanc). The offers seem very favorable. They could do much good by exercising their ministry in Louisiana but a college is their realm. Several things must be decided about the College (of St. Gabriel) at Iberville or another. There would be no positive guarantee of success as has already been pointed out. The expenses of repairs, furnishings, land, etc. would be over and above the $4000 the Society would have to pay back to the (Father Paul de) Saint-Pierre estate. On the assumption of another establishment and another subscription they would ask of Blanc only what he has offered in Article 7 of the agreement and to match the unselfishness which prevailed in the agreement between the Bishop and the Father General, they will offer what was offered in the second article of the agreement. (Blanc) will see that much as they desire to be of use in the diocese they must protect themselves. It seems necessary
1) that (Blanc) let them know his decision before leaving for Baltimore,
2) if he is too busy, to put it in the hands of Father (August) Jeanjean,
3) or to let them negotiate with those who make the best offers.

V-4-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
4


1837 Feb 19

Armand, Father
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

On February 19, 1837 Armand married Marie Philomene, servant of Mrs. Mossy to Henry Smith, servant of Mr. Toussaint with the consent of the two masters and of J(oh)n Mossy and Mrs. Toussaint in the presence of Mossy, Miss Celina and several others.
Signed with the marks of the couple and by Mossy and Marie Coudrain.

V-4-f A.D.S. (French) 1p. folio
3


1837 Feb 21

Bayer, Father Benedict
Pittsburgh, (Pennsylvania)

to Bishop (Frederick Rese)
Detroit, Michigan

Father Bayer had reported to Rese on February 17, that Sister Victoria (De Seille) will not show him the letter she had received from Rome, nor will she allow him to see the other Sisters until she received an answer from Bishop (Francis P.) Kenrick, after which he can enter upon his duties. Bishop Kenrick gave his opinion about (Sister) Victoria's questions in a letter to Mr. O'Reilly, in which he orders Bayer to administer the sacraments in the house where they are staying and he gave him extensive power to act according to his good judgment. Bayer went to (Sister) Victoria on the 20th, with an exact copy of that letter, but (Father) (Adrien) Vanderweger would not let him in. When Bayer began to read to them the letter of Bishop Kenrick, the Sister present was ordered to leave immediately, and when he read the passage where the Bishop repeated the Suspension of (Father) Vanderweger, this Father made so much noise that even his confidante (Sister) Victoria should not hear and understand it. Then Bayer asked (Sister) Victoria if she would now show him the letter from Rome, but she and (Father) Vanderwager [Vanderweger] answered no. Bayer wanted to see two Sisters to acquaint them with the wishes of Bishop Kenrick, but the answer was again no, asserting that she, (Sister) Victoria, is the Superior and only she has the right to tell the others what she sees fit to let them know, Bayer has nothing else to do or say but to administer the sacraments; besides Vanderwager said, that he had been ordered by Rome to be the spiritual director of those nuns. Bishop Kenrick has only the right to appoint a priest to administer the sacraments. Bayer replied to this that the first rule is obedience. (Sister) Victoria is a nun like all the other nuns and if she does not want to obey then Bayer felt he had nothing there to do anymore. He told them that they are full of intrigues, lies and disobedience and he left the house. He wrote to Bishop Kenrick immediately, telling him that these two persons are possessed of a devil, that he can find nothing but lies, intrigues and even a devilish silence to sneer at the bishops and the church. They complain to Rome about the bishops, about withholding the sacraments from them, yet they do not allow a priest to visit them because they are afraid the other sisters might also hear the truth. These Sisters are to be pitied they are held in slavish ignorance by fear and terror, the more so as Vanderwager who has been suspended by the Church, is probably still acting as their priest. People have blamed Rese that he has been too severe, but Bayer blames him that he has been too indulgent. If Rese would have separated these two deceitful intriguers from the others, by sending Vanderwager over the Black Sea, (Sister) Victoria over the Atlantic ocean, there would have never been such a terrible scandal. Even now this is the only way to save the other Sisters, the prestige of the bishops, and the welfare of the church. Rese should write to the Holy Father, that he should not be deceived by these two deceitful appellants, but to be most severe with them and end their diabolical behavior.

III-2-g A.L.S. (German) 3pp. 8vo.
3


1837 Feb 21

(Eccleston), Archbishop Samuel
Baltimore, (Maryland)

to Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Eccleston) sent (Blanc) a list of the questions to be laid before the Provincial Council (of Baltimore, 1837) on April 16. He now encloses a duplicate (no enclosure). Besides the points therein, matters of great moment to the whole American Church will probably become subjects of deliberation. Although (Eccleston) thinks that, so shortly after his arrival (Blanc) will find some inconvenience in attending, still he believes it will be greatly to his advantage to meet his brother prelates.

V-4-f A.L.S. 1p. 4to.
2


1837 Feb 22

Dahmen, C.M., Father Fr(ancis) Xav(ier)
Ste. Genevieve, (Missouri)

to Father J(ohn) Timon, (C.M.)
Barrens, M(iss)o(uri)

They have had much illness and it continues; this has prevented Dahmen from going to the Seminary as he planned. He is going now to see three sick persons. Brother is not at this moment at the house and Dahmen does not know if he will see him before he leaves. Dahmen and Father (Joseph) Mignard, (C.M.) are well. Mignard planned several times to visit the Seminary but new illness always prevented him. Dahmen will go as soon as the illness ceases.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
2


1837 Feb 23

Boullier, C.M., Father J(ohn)
St. Genevieve, (Missouri)

to Father J(ohn) Timon, (C.M.)
Barrens, M(iss)o(uri)

Boullier is told that Clement Detch(mendy) left (Old) Mines some days ago and must be at his mill now. Boullier is going there this morning. In case Clement had gone yesterday to the Barrens, Timon is to tell him that Boullier will wait for him until next sunday at St. Genevieve and to come directly from the Barrens there tomorrow or Saturday. Boullier inquired of Doctor Shaw for that diamond; Shaw has sold it.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
3


1837 Feb 24

Doutreluingne, C.M., Father P(eter) J.
St. Joachim, (Old Mines, Missouri)

to Father (John) Timon, (C.M.)
Barrens, M(iss)o(uri)

(Antonio) Palleli left here this morning. He has made many apologies but Doutreluingne does not know if they are sincere. Something makes Doutreluingne doubt it. What adds to h is doubt is that in leaving Palleli took two blankets or a double blanket which Father (John) Boullier, (C.M.) had left for the use of the house. Doutreluingne does not believe he has taken them to sell them; he asks Timon to look after this matter if he sees Palleli so that they do not lose them. They have much need of them when someone comes. Etienne Roussin has given Mr. Lamarque all the money he owed Boullier.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
5


1837 Feb 25

Baraga, (Father) Fred(erick)
Lyon, (France)

to Bishop frederick Rese
Detroit, (Michigan)

The printing of Baraga's Indian books is finished and they were printed in two dialects: in Ottawa and Chippewa. Baraga received 2408 francs for them. The council of Association of the Propagation of Faith consented to pay the expenses and may also pay the bookbinder which will amount to about 1300 francs. If the council does not pay for them, he will try to have them done somewhere else. In Detroit, the printing of these books would cost at least $1200. The members of the council are satisfied with the books and so is Baraga. He hopes that a great spiritual benefit will come out of it as five Indian tribes will be able to read these books, namely the Ottawas, Chippewas, Pottowatomies, Manominic, and the Algonquins. The German manuscript about the manners and customs of the Indians is translated into French and already in print. Baraga hopes to bring a few copies to the Bishop on his return to the states. The Austrian embassy sent the manuscript to the Leopoldine Association (Vienna). Baraga's Sister Antoinette (Baraga) intends to go back with Baraga to take charge of the school in his mission for the rest of her life. She is already in Paris, waiting for Baraga's return from Rome and Vienna. He is very happy about it. He left Paris on February 21, and arrived in Lyon on the 24th. He made the acquaintance of Bishop Fleming of New Foundland who is on his way to Rome and very happy to have met Baraga, as the Bishop knows neither French nor Italian and had consequently great difficulties traveling through Europe.

III-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp.
4


1837 Feb 25

(Blanc), Ant(hony), Bishop of New Orleans
New Orleans, Louisiana

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Returned the 20th after successful journey - Brought back five Jesuit fathers, one novice and two lay brothers, three Ladies of the Sacred Heart, and five Ursulines, besides one clergyman and three seminarians. Had intended to settle the Jesuits at Iberville but several places have preference. Is waiting for the superior to return from Grand Coteau before he decides. Father (Henry D.) Juncker is returning in better health. Father Vogler is useless though better, since the people saw him in his insanity. Father Juncker brings Purcell the chalice which Blanc purchased for him - Bishop (Michael) Portier leaves Mobile for St. Augustine and thence to Baltimore in a few days. Since he cannot leave then Blanc proposes to come up the river and go with Purcell to the Provincial Council. The time chosen is not to Blanc's and Portier's advantage. Has seen the list of proposed questions.

II-4-f A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
12


1837 Feb 25

(Rosati), Bishop Joseph
St. Louis, (Missouri)

to Father John Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens), Missouri

(Rosati) has just received a letter of the Archbishop; the Council will be opened on the third Sunday after Easter. (Rosati) must leave St. Louis for Baltimore on Easter Monday. All provincial superiors of Communities are invited. Will Timon come? (Rosati) wishes to see Timon before going, he will be at Kaskaskia March 7 and remain there only a day or two. Timon could meet him there, unless he prefers to come to St. Louis. Timon is to send Fathers Giustiniana, etc., before Palm Sunday. (on the address side): "before the subscribing witnesses who sign."

IV-3-k A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
1


1837 Mar

Pierz, Father Francois
Sault (St. Marie, Michigan)

to (Bishop Frederick Rese)
of (Detroit, Michigan)

Father Pierz received from Mackinac a package containing 18 English and French books, which are very welcome to his school children. He supposes that the Bishop had sent him the package and he thanks him for it. He received also a letter from a good friend from Europe dated November 16, 1835 in which is mentioned the shipment of a little box, marked P. no. 451, 9 pounds with different presents to the Indians, but he has not yet received it. He hopes it is on the big ship which is to arrive in a few days. The Bishop should attend to it if he hears about it. He also asks the Bishop about his belongings whose loss he feels more strongly every day. He begs him to inquire about them at the place where it was stated that they have been burned. Pierz would gladly pay for any expenses connected with it. He also would like to receive an early reply to his letter of March 15, 1837. The enclosed letter with the $2 is to be given to that gardner. In Sault St. Marie the warm weather has only now begun, but on Lake Superior there is still ice which is beginning to break. The mission is doing fairly well, but Pierz does not have that consolation with the Canadians as he had with his Indians of last year. He expects daily the carpenter from Lacroix and hopes to start soon with building of the church. The people in Sault suffer of hunger, for they have nothing else but a few fishes to eat. There are no provisions here anymore. Therefore every one is waiting with great longing for the ships which bring the provisions.

III-2-g A.L.S. (German) 3pp. 8vo.
2


(1837)? (Mar ?)

(Saenderl, Father Simon)
(Arbre Croche, Michigan)

to (Bishop Frederick Rese)
(Detroit, Michigan)

Postscript: (Saenderl) asks (Rese) to convey to the Vicar General (Father Francis Vincent Badin) his great gratitude for the assigned subsidy. With it he can buy the most necessary things and the permanency of the church in Green Bay is assured. (Saenderl) repeats that the Redemptorists will not be a burden to the Bishop. (Saenderl) is not yet able to give the desired information about the civilizing of the Indians as they have not yet assembled, they were fishing all over the country and are now occupied in the forests with sugar manufacture, which lasts until the middle of April. The Indian free school in Green Bay can only be held regularly in the summer, when the Indians are together again. (Saenderl) thinks there is a progress in the civilization of the Indians which is furthered by the intercourse and association with the white people, with whom they gradually coalesce. Many have given up their nomadic life and have settled down to an industrious, domestic life. Ahead of all the tribes are the Chippeway Indians, because the Menominee, who are usually known as the "fals" have until lately resisted all efforts of civilization and christianity. But it seems a new period has begun for this tribe, because their most honored chief and his wife asked (Saenderl) to become converts. After they had received instructions, they were baptized two weeks ago and now a number of this tribe are taking instructions and are to be baptized at Easter. If the government is willing to do something for the Indians, the Menominee should be considered first, especially if the treaty which the governor of Detroit has concluded with them, is going to be confirmed by the Congress. According to that treaty the Menominee are ceding a large tract of land to the government for which they receive a yearly payment. The aforementioned head chief lives with a great number of his tribe in Grand Kakalin, 18 English miles away on the Fox River, where now the Indians of New York are settled. But these later ones will be transferred by the government to the other side of Lake Winnebago, as their present land is being offered for sale. These two facts could bring about a new Catholic parish in Grand Kakalin which could easily be done with the cooperation of the Catholics already settled there, and if the government is willing to do something for the Menominee. (Saenderl) had visited the place during the winter and liked it very much. In Spring he will be able to give a detailed description. It is strange that the three Protestant ministers, though they have well endowed mission houses in Green Bay, fox River and Grand Kakalin, have not yet been able to baptize one Indian, while great numbers are converted to the Catholic faith.

III-2-g Postscript (Letter missing) 2pp. 8vo.
2


1837 Mar 3

Nozo, C.M., Father J(ohn) Baptist
Paris, (France)

to Father (John) Timon, C.M.
Barrens, (Missouri)

Nozo saw with consolation the departure of the three young confrères (Vincentians) from Italy who wish to share the work in America. Nozo is told that Timon is undertaking a new enterprise at Cape Girardeau, (Missouri). Nozo urges him not to undertake too much, nor to increase his debts. Nozo knows Timon intends to do all he can to continue (St. Mary's) College (Barrens, Missouri). Nozo notes with sorrow that many confrères and especially Father (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.) manifested, at first, sentiments so opposed to those they have today and have compromised Nozo into taking measures which afterwards they forced him to renounce. Moreover, the promise Nozo made to support ten seminarians of the diocese of St. Louis was made only under the supposition that the college would be suppressed. In the contrary case, it will be necessary to make other arrangement which are not too onerous for the mission although the most favor possible for Bishop (Joseph) Rosati. If Timon still intends to come to France, Nozo gives notice that he may be absent from Paris from Pentecost to August 15. Timon is to tell Father (John Baptist)) Tornatore, (C.M.) that, although his last letter contains useful information, Nozo has noted that his excessive zeal for the college has inspired him with sentiments hardly conformable to Christian charity in regard to those confrères who do not share his opinion.

IV-3-k A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
7


1837 Mar 4

(Rosati), Bishop Joseph
St. Louis, (Missouri)

to Father John Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens), M(iss)o(uri)

(Rosati) will see Timon in Kaskaskias next week; he will leave St. Louis next Monday. He cannot remain more than a day. He will have the powers and faculties copied for Timon by (Joseph) Giustiniani, (C.M.) but (Rosati) would prefer that Timon come to Baltimore.
(P.S.) Seven paters and aves should be said for the happy issue of the Council.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
2


1837 Mar 6

Paquin, C.M., Father Joseph
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

to Father J(ohn) Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens, Missouri)

Paquin arrived yesterday after a long trip. He will leave this week for the coast. Some have already spoken about placing a child in Timon's college but Paquin fears there will not be many. Bishop (Anthony) Blanc, who arrived two weeks ago, is thinking of establishing a college. Paquin is sending by the Vendelia, in care of J(osep)h Pratte, a cask of white Mass wine; Paquin had Mr. Bolotte choose it. Last night some felons entered the Cathedral and stole an ostensorium and a ciborium with consecrated hosts and other object valued at $300 to $400. Paquin saw Father (Victor Jamey?) Jamais who said he would talk to the Ursulines and he thinks they will take the orphan girl Timon told Paquin about. But Jamais thinks it will not be so easy to get the $200 that Father (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.) lent to Miss Jacob since she arrived at the Ursulines already in ill health and seems about to die. Paquin adds to the cask of wine, three boxes of fresh chestnuts. Timon is to tell Odin that Paquin saw Mr. Duplessis who told him that he was almost certain that the sum from the inheritance of Pierre Galière had been paid and sent from France. Paquin will see Mr. Seghers who has the power of attorney which Odin brought from France.

IV-3-k A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
11


1837 Mar 6

Skeel, Dr. Sam(ue)l
Herculaneum, M(iss)o(uri)

to Father (John) Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens), M(iss)o(uri)

Since his return from Virginia Skeel has not been able to send for Lee (Skeel) until now because of an epidemic. He found his friends in Virginia enjoying good health and prosperity. They were surprised to learn that Skeel was a Catholic and he had to combat their intelligence and prejudice. Bossuet's Exposition as helpful in overcoming their scruples and prejudices. He told them of Timon and they are anxious for Timon to write to them on the subject of religion. Timon is to write to James Hall, Wythe Court House, Virginia. Skeel brought a sister of Mrs. Skeel from Virginia with him. He will send Lee's tuition in a few days. He was disappointed to find that George had not been sent to Timon but if Timon and (Mr. Valle are of the same mind he will send him.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 3pp. folio
5


1837 Mar 7

Beauprez, Father P(eter) F(rancis)
Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)

to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Beauprez has just received (Blanc's) letter in which he learns with sorrow that he must put off his trip to a more suitable time. So favorable a time will never come. One cannot count on seminarians being ordained; there are always vacant place. If (Blanc) had advised postponing his trip 2 or 3 months until (Blanc's) return from the provincial council, Beauprez would have found as great a difficulty. Beauprez mad a suggestion to Father Jeanj(e)an(?) which JeanJ(e)an considered good. It was to employ one of the Jesuits since they will be at Iberville College. The College will not be re-established at once; it will take time. It is even doubtful if there will be enough students this year to keep these priests busy. (Blanc) has brought Father Maenhaut and another priest and only Opelousas is vacant and there are two at Natchitoches. (Blanc) could put Father Francais there.

V-4-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
1


1837 Mar 8

Rese, Frederick, Bishop of Detroit
Detroit, Michigan

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Has read and heard at the Archbishop's at Baltimore of Purcell's victories in controversy. Asks for a copy of Bishop Fenwick's will as drawn up in Detroit. Asks also that Purcell pay for his Telegraph and for a painting. Instructs him to tell Mr. Storer to destroy the receipt Fenwick gave him for his house and Purcell deed will be good, since he is Fenwick's successor. Has received consoling news from Washington that the affair for which he went to that city will be decided in favor of Catholics.

II-4-f A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
3


1837 Mar 9

Kenrick, Bishop Francis Patrick
Philadelphia, P(ennsylvani)a

to Bishop Anth(on)y Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Kenrick is pleased to learn from the Louisiana Advertiser of Blanc's safe arrival with his missionary band. Kenrick wishes to apprize Blanc of some measures to be submitted to the approaching (Provincial) Council (of Baltimore 1837). The erection of the See of Pittsburg appears to Kenrick to be likely to forward the interests of religion but the fear of giving any occasion to dissensions there prevents his urging his translation from Philadelphia. Father J(ohn) Hughes is so necessary at St. John's that Kenrick cannot think of parting with him. Since the coadjutorship of New York is to be filled, Kenrick proposes Father P.J. Carew, professor at Maynooth, Father W(illia)m Meagher of the Metropolitan Church, Dublin and Father P. Byrne of Carlow College for the new See. Meagher was Kenrick's friend and companion at Rome. a subject of great importance to the south and West is likely to be proposed by Bishop (Simon Gabriel Brute) of Vincennes - the erection of one or more metropolitan sees. Kenrick thinks New Orleans or St. Louis, or both should be invested with this privilege.

V-4-f A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
7


1837 Mar 10

Boullier, C.M., Father J(ohn Peter)
Cape Girardeau, (Missouri)

to Father J(ohn) Timon, (C.M.)
Barrens, M(iss)o(uri)

(Antonio) Palleli asked Boullier to write. Palleli wants Timon to try him a little longer. He promises to do well; he will work, make shoes(?) or anything. Boullier thinks it would be advisable to grant him this request.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
2


1837 Mar 12

Young, Joshue M.
Mt. St. Mary's College, Emmitsburg, Maryland

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Is happy to send a letter by Mr. Byrne. Is grateful for Purcell's of February 2, approving his return to the Mountain. Father (Thomas) Butler returned, but said nothing about his visit. Father Flaut has been ill disposed about it. Purcell will obtain information about Mt. St. Mary's from Mr. Byrne. Young does not expect to aid the missions in Ohio for some time. Should Mt. St. Mary's go down Purcell could get good subjects. Opposes the enlargement of the Cathedral in Cincinnati to care for the increased numbers. Thinks no more money should be spent there. Indicates repairs he believes necessary.

II-4-f A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
3


1837 Mar 17

Farley, Joseph
Ipswich, (Massachusetts)

to O(restes) A. Brownson
(Boston, Massachusetts)

Farley regrets having been absent when Brownson was lecturing there. He understands that his conduct was referred was referred to very disparagingly by some people in the stage with Brownson, and that some of his own townsfolk had made damaging charges against his character. He asks that Brownson give him the conversation held, and the charges made by these people, especially Mr. Miller. He deems his reputation as worth his property, and he intends to retain it undefiled.

I-3-e A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
1


1837 Mar 20

Jamey, Father V(ictor)
Natchitoches, (Louisiana)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

On the 17th a fire started in a cabin next to the church and destroyed the roof and the decorations with which )Father Jean-Baptiste Blanc) had embellished it. Nothing is left but the four walls. The parishioners seem perfectly disposed to build a new one but they would have to have $7000 and times are hard. Mr. Lecomte has offered them his big new house and they have moved there the pews and all they saved. The fire started in the belfry and if Blanc could get them a bell they would be grateful. Mr. Jourdan, the bearer of this letter will tell Blanc about this item. The day of Blanc's arrival there would have been truly a great day; now there would not be room for all in their chapel. If Blanc thinks it suitable to come he is to let Jamey know soon so that he can prepare for First Communion on the day of Confirmation. Jamey kept Blanc's letter until the arrival of Father (Edward) D'hauw and he burned it in front of him after reading it to him. The two lines about placing him somewhere where his strength would permit him to work were too clear to be misunderstood. Father (N.) Francais saw it too; it was he who urged Jamey to write to Blanc. Jourdan will give Blanc $40(?) for the Sompeyerae(?) dispensation.
(P.S.) He sends his regards to Father Jeanjean. Before going again to Bayou Pierre Jamey needs a Missal. If Blanc has no objection to coming Good Shepherd Sunday, Jamey thinks it would be good. Their looks might be painful to him but he will perhaps be consoled to see that his brother's friend has provided a better place for services than 3/4 of the churches in the diocese. The subscription for the church is going well. The trustees would like to have the opinion of Judge Martin. D'hauw could consult him or whoever Blanc would consider suitable to send to the old judge.

V-4-f A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
8


1837 Mar 20

Linn, John Joseph and others
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

to Archbishop (Samuel Eccleston) and the Bishops in Counsel
at Baltimore, (Maryland)

For themselves and the other Catholics of Texas they pray for attention from the (Provincial Council of Baltimore, 1837). They had to leave their homes in Texas, being located in the western part of the country and on the frontiers of war but as the country has been acknowledged independent by the government they expect to return soon. They return with only one regret - they will not have a priest who speaks English. They will no doubt be annoyed by sectarian preachers who roam about. They would recommend two priests that are accustomed to the western missions. With all due deference they name the following: Father James I. Mullon of New Orleans, Father robert A Abel(l) of Bardstown, Father Edward McMahon of Bardstown and Father John Timon (C.M.) of St. Louis. The Catholics live much scattered. They give a statement annexed to this (no enclosure) of the numerical population of Catholics before the Revolution and what it may be.
(Signed by): for St. Anthony de Bejar, no names; for San Patricio, John McMullen, William R. C. Hays, R. O'Boyle, Andrew a. Boyle; Robert P. Hearn for Mission de Refugio; John Linn and John Joseph Linn for (Our Lady of) Guadalupe, Victoria.

V-4-f D.S. 4pp. 4to.
7


1837 Mar 21

Baraga, (Father) Fred(erick)
Florence, (Italy)

to Bishop (frederick) Rese
Detroit, (Michigan)

Father Baraga reports to the Bishop the news about Lyon and Rome. When Mr. Didier Petit of Lyon came to paris last December, Baraga gave him everything that the Bishop had given him for Lyon. Petit promised to make the best use of it. When Baraga came to Lyon in February he expected to find everything in order and printed, but none of it was done. The members of the council (of the Association of the Propagation of the Faith) at Lyon were more interested at present in the Chinese missions than the American missions, so they did not make use of he material sent to them by the Bishop, they gave it all back to Baraga. He hopes that the Leopoldine Association in Vienna will make better use of it. Concerning the affairs in Munich, everything is in order. The council promised to make good the damage and wrong done to the Bishop. In rome, Baraga did everything the Bishop had asked him to do. He saw Cardinal Fransoni often, and he gave him without difficulty 1300 francs to have his books bound, because when he left Parish he could not obtain the assurance to receive the expenses for the binding. He also saw often the Superior General of the Franciscans who has given him a written declaration that he is of the same opinion as Baraga and the Bishop namely: that the vows of these (Sisters of St. Claire) are not simple vows and therefore cannot be dispensed. that the nuns should be repeatedly exhorted to return to obedience, and they submit themselves to the Provincial appointed by the Holy See. Cardinal Fransoni informed Baraga that Bishop (Francis Patrick) Kenrick of Philadelphia was appointed to take Bishop Rese's place. Monsignor Angelo Mai said, that the matter about the Bishop's "Doubts" will soon be decided and the decision will be forwarded to him by post. Baraga could not go to Naples because of the cholera there, every communication has been forbidden. The Bishop's letter to Mr. Eichbolger was forwarded to him through the Austrian embassy. Baraga will tell the Bishop more about Rome when he will see him, but he will write once more from Laibach.

III-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp.
8


1837 Mar 23

Purcell, Father Edward
Cin(cinnati, Ohio)

To Father J(ohn) Timon, (C.M.)
Perryville, Missouri

Purcell has forwarded at Timon's request to Cassilly and Lapin of C(ape) Girardeau 70 copies of the Controversy. (Reverend Alexander) Campbell or some of his friends have introduced a page at its conclusion without their knowledge or consent. Bishop (John Baptist Purcell) will be compelled to reply to it. He is at present in New Orleans. Father (Joseph V.) Wiseman's letter about the Spanish books has been mislaid. Wiseman should write again.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.


1837 Mar 25

Pierz, (Father) Francois
Sault (St. Marie, Michigan)

To Bishop (Frederick Rese)
of (Detroit, Michigan)

Father Pierz received from Mackinac a package containing 18 English and French books, which are very welcome to his school children. He supposes that the Bishop had sent him the package and he thanks him for it. He received also a letter from a good friend from Europe dated November 16, 1835 in which is mentioned the shipment of a little box, marked P.no. 451, 9 pounds with different presents to the Indians, but he has not yet received it. He hopes it is on the big ship which is to arrive in a few days. The Bishop should attend to it if he hears about it. He also asks the Bishop about his belongings whose loss he feels more strongly every day. He begs him to inquire about them at the place where it was stated that they have been burned. Pierz would gladly pay for any expenses connected with it. He also would like to receive an early reply to his letter of March 15, 1837. The enclosed letter with the $2 is to be given to that gardner. In Sault St. Marie the warm weather has only now begun, but on Lake Superior there is still ice which is beginning to break. The mission is doing fairly well, but Pierz does not have that consolation with the Canadians as he had with his Indians of last year. He expects daily the carpenter from Lacroix and hopes to start soon with building of the church. The people in Sault suffer of hunger, for they have nothing else but a few fishes to eat. There are no provisions here anymore. Therefore everyone is waiting with great longing for the ships which bring the provisions.

III-2-g A.L.S. (German) 3pp. 8vo.
2



1837 Mar 26

Rese, frederick, Bishop of Detroit
Detroit, Michigan

to The Parish of the Assumption
( )

Rese had left some instructions at the Church of the Assumption the Sunday before and urges the members of that parish to obey them as long as he thinks it wise and necessary. He also asks the parish to observe peace and harmony and to help support their pastor. Failing to do so, he will never send a priest again.

III-2-g A.L.S. (German) 1p. 4to.
0


1837 Mar 26

(Rosati), Bishop Joseph
St. Louis, (Missouri)

To Father John Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens), M(iss)o(uri)

(Rosati) paid $48 to (James) Timon who fulfilled all Father Timon's commissions because (Rosati) was too busy. Father (Joseph) Giustiniana, (C.M.) today said his first Mass at the hospital; Father (Hector) Figari, (C.M.) was also very useful during Holy Week. They are two excellent subjects. (Rosati) does not know what Timon told him about Sister Leocadia. Neither she nor anyone else has spoken about it. (Rosati) does not believe she will find happiness there. She should have spoken with Superiors; some rules must be made at the Council about this. (Rosati) has had a copy made for Timon of the faculties from rome. One must keep one's eyes open if strange priests come to be admitted to the diocese. There will be no difficulty if they are sent from Italy or France by someone they know or from Germany by Bishop de Reissac.

IV-3-k A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
5


1837 Mar 29

Brands, C.M., Father John
Old Mines, (Missouri)

To Father J(ohn) Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens, M(iss)o(uri)

Brands has done his best to get subscribers to the Reader and the Little Emigrant. He can dispose of 2 doz(en) of the former provided the name Catholic does not appear on the title page. Brands has sent Timon a request by way of Mrs. Delassus, for three copies of the controversy between Bishop (John Baptist) Purcell and (Reverend Alexander) Campbell. Brands wants them to expose the falsehoods of the Protestant newspapers, which a person at Valle's (Mine, Missouri) digging reads. These papers give complete victory to Campbell and assert that Purcell was obliged to own that the Catholics had many wrong secret practices and so forth. The person at the diggings has much influence and is a strongly prejudiced Methodist who will do his best to oppose any conversions. He acts the part of John Falstaff. Mrs. John Layton requests a Mass for her deceased son John Layton, Jr.. Brands renews his request to be sent to the Indian Mission with the others. Brands was ill for a while but is better now. Mrs. Horyne(?) and Mr. Maddin thank Timon for his present. Maddin accepted Brands' apology for having disappointed him.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 2pp. Folio
9



1837 Mar 23

Purcell, Father Edward
Cin(cinnati, Ohio)

To Father J(ohn) Timon, (C.M.)
Perryville, Missouri

Purcell has forwarded at Timon's request to Cassilly and Lapin of C(ape) Girardeau 70 copies of the Controversy. (Reverend Alexander) Campbell or some of his friends have introduced a page at its conclusion without their knowledge or consent. Bishop (John Baptist Purcell) will be compelled to reply to it. He is at present in New Orleans. Father (Joseph V.) Wiseman's letter bnout the Spanish books has been mislaid. Wiseman should write again.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.


1837 Mar 25

Pierz, (Father) Francois
Sault (St. Marie, Michigan)

To Bishop (Frederick Rese)
of (Detroit, Michigan)

Father Pierz received from Mackinac a package containing 18 English and French books, which are very welcome to his school children. He supposes that the Bishop had sent him the package and he thanks him for it. He received also a letter from a good friend from Europe dated November 16, 1835 in which is mentioned the shipment of a little box, marked P.no. 451, 9 pounds with different presents to the Indians, but he has not yet received it. He hopes it is on the big ship which is to arrive in a few days. The Bishop should attend to it if he hears about it. He also asks the Bishop about his belongings whose loss he feels more strongly every day. He begs him to inquire about them at the place where it was stated that they have been burned. Pierz would gladly pay for any expenses connected with it. He also would like to receive an early reply to his letter of March 15, 1837. The enclosed letter with the $2 is to be given to that gardner. In Sault St. Marie the warm weather has only now begun, but on Lake Superior there is still ice which is beginning to break. The mission is doing fairly well, but Pierz does not have that consolation with the Canadians as he had with his Indians of last year. He expects daily the carpenter from Lacroix and hopes to start soon with building of the church. The people in Sault suffer of hunger, for they have nothing else but a few fishes to eat. There are no provisions here anymore. Therefore everyone is waiting with great longing for the ships which bring the provisions.

III-2-g A.L.S. (German) 3pp. 8vo.
2



1837 Mar 26

Rese, frederick, Bishop of Detroit
Detroit, Michigan

to The Parish of the Assumption
( )

Rese had left some instructions at the Church of the Assumption the Sunday before and urges the members of that parish to obey them as long as he thinks it wise and necessary. He also asks the parish to observe peace and harmony and to help support their pastor. Failing to do so, he will never send a priest again.

III-2-g A.L.S. (German) 1p. 4to.
0


1837 Mar 26

(Rosati), Bishop Joseph
St. Louis, (Missouri)

To Father John Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens), M(iss)o(uri)

(Rosati) paid $48 to (James) Timon who fulfilled all Father Timon's commissions because (Rosati) was too busy. Father (Joseph) Giustiniana, (C.M.) today said his first Mass at the hospital; Father (Hector) Figari, (C.M.) was also very useful during Holy Week. They are two excellent subjects. (Rosati) does not know what timon told him about Sister Leocadia. Neither she nor anyone else has spoken about it. (Rosati) does not believe she will find happiness there. She should have spoken with Superiors; some rules must be made at the Council about this. (Rosati) has had a copy made for Timon of the faculties from rome. One must keep one's eyes open if strange priests come to be admitted to the diocese. There will be no difficulty if they are sent from Italy or France by someone they know or from Germany by Bishop de Reissac.

IV-3-k A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
5


1837 Mar 29

Brands, C.M., Father John
Old Mines, (Missouri)

To Father J(ohn) Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens, M(iss)o(uri)

Brands has done his best to get subscribers to the Reader and the Little Emigrant. He can dispose of 2 doz(en) of the former provided the name Catholic does not appear on the title page. Brands has sent Timon a request by way of Mrs. Delassus, for three copies of the controversy between Bishop (John Baptist) Purcell and (reverend alexander) Campbell. Brands wants them to expose the falsehoods of the Protestant newspapers, which a person at Valle's (Mine, Missouri) digging reads. These papers give complete victory to Campbell and assert that Purcell was obliged to own that the Catholics had many wrong secret practices and so forth. The person at the diggings has much influence and is a strongly prejudiced Methodist who will do his best to oppose any conversions. He acts the part of John Falstaff. Mrs. John Layton requests a Mass for her deceased son John Layton, Jr.. Brands renews his request to be sent to the Indian Mission with the others. Brands was ill for a while but is better now. Mrs. Horyne(?) and Mr. Maddin thank Timon for his present. Maddin accepted Brands' apology for having disappointed him.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 2pp. Folio
9



1837 Mar 23

Purcell, Father Edward
Cin(cinnati, Ohio)

To Father J(ohn) Timon, (C.M.)
Perryville, Missouri

Purcell has forwarded at Timon's request to Cassilly and Lapin of C(ape) Girardeau 70 copies of the Controversy. (Reverend Alexander) Campbell or some of his friends have introduced a page at its conclusion without their knowledge or consent. Bishop (John Baptist Purcell) will be compelled to reply to it. He is at present in New Orleans. Father (Joseph V.) Wiseman's letter bnout the Spanish books has been mislaid. Wiseman should write again.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.


1837 Mar 25

Pierz, (Father) Francois
Sault (St. Marie, Michigan)

To Bishop (Frederick Rese)
of (Detroit, Michigan)

Father Pierz received from Mackinac a package containing 18 English and French books, which are very welcome to his school children. He supposes that the Bishop had sent him the package and he thanks him for it. He received also a letter from a good friend from Europe dated November 16, 1835 in which is mentioned the shipment of a little box, marked P.no. 451, 9 pounds with different presents to the Indians, but he has not yet received it. He hopes it is on the big ship which is to arrive in a few days. The Bishop should attend to it if he hears about it. He also asks the Bishop about his belongings whose loss he feels more strongly every day. He begs him to inquire about them at the place where it was stated that they have been burned. Pierz would gladly pay for any expenses connected with it. He also would like to receive an early reply to his letter of March 15, 1837. The enclosed letter with the $2 is to be given to that gardner. In Sault St. Marie the warm weather has only now begun, but on Lake Superior there is still ice which is beginning to break. The mission is doing fairly well, but Pierz does not have that consolation with the Canadians as he had with his Indians of last year. He expects daily the carpenter from Lacroix and hopes to start soon with building of the church. The people in Sault suffer of hunger, for they have nothing else but a few fishes to eat. There are no provisions here anymore. Therefore everyone is waiting with great longing for the ships which bring the provisions.

III-2-g A.L.S. (German) 3pp. 8vo.
2



1837 Mar 26

Rese, frederick, Bishop of Detroit
Detroit, Michigan

to The Parish of the Assumption
( )

Rese had left some instructions at the Church of the Assumption the Sunday before and urges the members of that parish to obey them as long as he thinks it wise and necessary. He also asks the parish to observe peace and harmony and to help support their pastor. Failing to do so, he will never send a priest again.

III-2-g A.L.S. (German) 1p. 4to.
0


1837 Mar 26

(Rosati), Bishop Joseph
St. Louis, (Missouri)

To Father John Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens), M(iss)o(uri)

(Rosati) paid $48 to (James) Timon who fulfilled all Father Timon's commissions because (Rosati) was too busy. Father (Joseph) Giustiniana, (C.M.) today said his first Mass at the hospital; Father (Hector) Figari, (C.M.) was also very useful during Holy Week. They are two excellent subjects. (Rosati) does not know what timon told him about Sister Leocadia. Neither she nor anyone else has spoken about it. (Rosati) does not believe she will find happiness there. She should have spoken with Superiors; some rules must be made at the Council about this. (Rosati) has had a copy made for Timon of the faculties from rome. One must keep one's eyes open if strange priests come to be admitted to the diocese. There will be no difficulty if they are sent from Italy or France by someone they know or from Germany by Bishop de Reissac.

IV-3-k A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
5


1837 Mar 29

Brands, C.M., Father John
Old Mines, (Missouri)

To Father J(ohn) Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens, M(iss)o(uri)

Brands has done his best to get subscribers to the Reader and the Little Emigrant. He can dispose of 2 doz(en) of the former provided the name Catholic does not appear on the title page. Brands has sent Timon a request by way of Mrs. Delassus, for three copies of the controversy between Bishop (John Baptist) Purcell and (reverend alexander) Campbell. Brands wants them to expose the falsehoods of the Protestant newspapers, which a person at Valle's (Mine, Missouri) digging reads. These papers give complete victory to Campbell and assert that Purcell was obliged to own that the Catholics had many wrong secret practices and so forth. The person at the diggings has much influence and is a strongly prejudiced Methodist who will do his best to oppose any conversions. He acts the part of John Falstaff. Mrs. John Layton requests a Mass for her deceased son John Layton, Jr.. Brands renews his request to be sent to the Indian Mission with the others. Brands was ill for a while but is better now. Mrs. Horyne(?) and Mr. Maddin thank Timon for his present. Maddin accepted Brands' apology for having disappointed him.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 2pp. Folio
9



1837 Mar 23

Purcell, Father Edward
Cin(cinnati, Ohio)

To Father J(ohn) Timon, (C.M.)
Perryville, Missouri

Purcell has forwarded at Timon's request to Cassilly and Lapin of C(ape) Girardeau 70 copies of the Controversy. (Reverend Alexander) Campbell or some of his friends have introduced a page at its conclusion without their knowledge or consent. Bishop (John Baptist Purcell) will be compelled to reply to it. He is at present in New Orleans. Father (Joseph V.) Wiseman's letter bnout the Spanish books has been mislaid. Wiseman should write again.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.


1837 Mar 25

Pierz, (Father) Francois
Sault (St. Marie, Michigan)

To Bishop (Frederick Rese)
of (Detroit, Michigan)

Father Pierz received from Mackinac a package containing 18 English and French books, which are very welcome to his school children. He supposes that the Bishop had sent him the package and he thanks him for it. He received also a letter from a good friend from Europe dated November 16, 1835 in which is mentioned the shipment of a little box, marked P.no. 451, 9 pounds with different presents to the Indians, but he has not yet received it. He hopes it is on the big ship which is to arrive in a few days. The Bishop should attend to it if he hears about it. He also asks the Bishop about his belongings whose loss he feels more strongly every day. He begs him to inquire about them at the place where it was stated that they have been burned. Pierz would gladly pay for any expenses connected with it. He also would like to receive an early reply to his letter of March 15, 1837. The enclosed letter with the $2 is to be given to that gardner. In Sault St. Marie the warm weather has only now begun, but on Lake Superior there is still ice which is beginning to break. The mission is doing fairly well, but Pierz does not have that consolation with the Canadians as he had with his Indians of last year. He expects daily the carpenter from Lacroix and hopes to start soon with building of the church. The people in Sault suffer of hunger, for they have nothing else but a few fishes to eat. There are no provisions here anymore. Therefore everyone is waiting with great longing for the ships which bring the provisions.

III-2-g A.L.S. (German) 3pp. 8vo.
2



1837 Mar 26

Rese, frederick, Bishop of Detroit
Detroit, Michigan

to The Parish of the Assumption
( )

Rese had left some instructions at the Church of the Assumption the Sunday before and urges the members of that parish to obey them as long as he thinks it wise and necessary. He also asks the parish to observe peace and harmony and to help support their pastor. Failing to do so, he will never send a priest again.

III-2-g A.L.S. (German) 1p. 4to.
0


1837 Mar 26

(Rosati), Bishop Joseph
St. Louis, (Missouri)

To Father John Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens), M(iss)o(uri)

(Rosati) paid $48 to (James) Timon who fulfilled all Father Timon's commissions because (Rosati) was too busy. Father (Joseph) Giustiniana, (C.M.) today said his first Mass at the hospital; Father (Hector) Figari, (C.M.) was also very useful during Holy Week. They are two excellent subjects. (Rosati) does not know what timon told him about Sister Leocadia. Neither she nor anyone else has spoken about it. (Rosati) does not believe she will find happiness there. She should have spoken with Superiors; some rules must be made at the Council about this. (Rosati) has had a copy made for Timon of the faculties from rome. One must keep one's eyes open if strange priests come to be admitted to the diocese. There will be no difficulty if they are sent from Italy or France by someone they know or from Germany by Bishop de Reissac.

IV-3-k A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
5


1837 Mar 29

Brands, C.M., Father John
Old Mines, (Missouri)

To Father J(ohn) Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens, M(iss)o(uri)

Brands has done his best to get subscribers to the Reader and the Little Emigrant. He can dispose of 2 doz(en) of the former provided the name Catholic does not appear on the title page. Brands has sent Timon a request by way of Mrs. Delassus, for three copies of the controversy between Bishop (John Baptist) Purcell and (reverend alexander) Campbell. Brands wants them to expose the falsehoods of the Protestant newspapers, which a person at Valle's (Mine, Missouri) digging reads. These papers give complete victory to Campbell and assert that Purcell was obliged to own that the Catholics had many wrong secret practices and so forth. The person at the diggings has much influence and is a strongly prejudiced Methodist who will do his best to oppose any conversions. He acts the part of John Falstaff. Mrs. John Layton requests a Mass for her deceased son John Layton, Jr.. Brands renews his request to be sent to the Indian Mission with the others. Brands was ill for a while but is better now. Mrs. Horyne(?) and Mr. Maddin thank Timon for his present. Maddin accepted Brands apology for having disappointed him.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 2pp. Folio
9


1837 Mar 30

Gallagher, John
St. Louis, (Missouri)

to Father (John) Timon, (C.M.)
Barrens, Missouri

Gallagher lately arrived from Baltimore to make application for admission into (St. Mary's). He does not know exactly where it is located. Gallagher intends to prepare for admission into the Church. He will teach or do anything else in return for instruction. He brings recommendations from Father (Charles I.) White, assistant pastor of Baltimore Cathedral, and from Father (Virgil) Barber of Conewago, P(ennsylvani)a. Bishop (Joseph) Rosati and Father (Peter) Verh(a)egen, (S.J.) left St. Louis the day before Gallagher arrived.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 2pp. folio
5


1837 Apr 5

Dahmen, C.M., Father Fr(ancis) Xav(ier)
Ste. Genevieve, (Missouri)

to Father J(ohn) Timon, (C.M.)
Barrens, M(iss)o(uri)

Dahmen would have gone to the seminary with (Francis?) Simonin; but he was ill. What stopped him since is a marriage of two Americans which he performed yesterday. They say the rivers are very high which makes him fear he will not see Timon this week. He has 120 piastres for Timon which Louis Bogy gave him for the board of his brother Pierre (Bogy). Dahmen talked to C. Vallé, but got nothing. Next Monday he must go to Little Canada to perform a marriage . Mr. Saucier will start his school here very soon; they have assured him of 1200 piastres a year besides a house which would cost 120 piastres a year, and wood for heating.

IV-3-k A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 8vo.
6


1837 Apr 6

Paquin, C.M., Father Joseph
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

to Father J(ohn) Timon, (C.M.)
Perryville, M(iss)o(uri)

Paquin has just about finished his business; he wishes it could have gone better. He has obtained his passage and that of the children who will come with him, aboard the steamboat United States, which will leave next week. He is going to write to the people at whose houses they will stop to have their children and the sugar ready. The negress, Doll, is as good as sold. Timon has done well not to permit (Armand?) Pellerin or Mr. Faure's sons to come down because after what Paquin said to their parents they agree they should remain at the college. Two days ago thieves devastated the Church of St. John the Baptist; the loss is estimated at $800.
P.S. The three following gentlemen are to leave for the Seminary: Daniel Melony, (Thomas Cusack, and Patric(k?) Macabe.

IV-3-k A.L.S. (french) 2pp. 4to.
8


1837 Apr 8

Nozo, C.M., Father J(ean) B(aptiste)
Paris, (France)

to Father (John Timon, C.M.
Barrens, Missouri)

Nozo has just received (Timon's) letter of February 3. It gave him consolation in his anxieties over their mission in America. He has nothing but praise for the zeal of his confreres. But Nozo is sorry to see that after all the Congregation (Vincentians) has done for the Diocese of St. Louis, they have received treatment very different from what they should expect. If the circumstances have become more favorable for the continuation of (St. Mary's) College, all that is necessary is to inform him and give him time to examine them again. A bishop of the diocese to whom the Congregation has devoted itself, and who has belonged to the Congregation himself, has given reports against them. As for the college, Nozo has several times expressed himself as willing to keep it, but on condition:
1) that they are not obliged to teach those who are unwilling;
2) that the number of students cared for at the expense of the college for the diocese or seminary be fixed in just proportion;
3) that the seminary and college do not intermingle;
4) that their confreres employed at the parishes will live at least three together.
Nozo has a plan for another diocese in America: Philadelphia. He would like to place part of their foundation there because of fear of a new revolution in France. He would place in charge someone who does not like St. Louis and send others there. He would need calm and judicious men. They would establish a diocesan seminary there. He tells this to (Timon) in confidence. (Timon) is to tell him whom he might pick among (Timon's) confreres. Nozo expects (Timon) this summer to take over all the affairs of the American mission. (Timon) has said nothing about his trip. Nozo thinks he will be in Parish only during August as he is planning a trip to southern France after Pentecost.

IV-3-k A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
4


1837 Apr 9

Cazneau (?), W.L.
Boston, (Massachusetts)

to (Bishop anthony Blanc?
New Orleans, Louisiana)

The bearer, John Broderick, has been Cazneau's assistant at St. Mary's in Bond Street for nearly three years. He is a punctual, attentive, and pious young man. Cazneau signs as Sunday School teacher at St. Mary's.

V-4-f A.L.S. 1p. 4to.
2


1837 Apr 10

(Louisiana), New Orleans

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Two receipts for taxes of one piastre on two slaves and 40 piastres on islet 48, $40,000; signed by A. Cruzat, treasurer.

V-4-f Receipt S. (French) 4pp. 32mo.
2


1837 Apr 10

Wood, James F.
Cincinnati, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell, Cincinnati
Baltimore, Maryland

Acknowledges letter of Purcell from New Orleans. Speaks of his anxiety for his relatives and friends, whom he has to leave outside the Church. Compares the stories of Purcell about Arkansas with brutal incidents which he and Mr. Byrne witnessed in Cincinnati. Attended Easter services at Cathedral. Father (Edward) Collins with his penitents. Father (Stephen) Montgomery ill. Confessed to Father (Stephen) Badin. Speaks of his desire to be a priest though now prevented by his duties to his family. Sends regards to Bishop Bruté and Father Badin, and sends the regards of the Misses. Reilly and others.

II-4-f A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
5


1837 Apr 13

(Rosati), Bishop Joseph
Baltimore, (Maryland)

to Father John Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens), Missouri

John Br(o)derick wants to become a priest and is disposed to join Timon's community. He asks (Rosati) for a letter of recommendation. His testimonials are most satisfactory, and Bishop (Benedict Fenwick) approves of his vocation. (Rosati) hopes Timon will accept him.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
3


1837 Apr 14

Lucas, F(ielding, Jr.)
Bal(timore, Maryland)

to Father J(ohn) Timon, (C.M.)
Perryville, Missouri

Lucas received Timon's letter through the kindness of Bishop (Joseph) Rosati. The books wanted by Timon's friends at Kaskaskia will be forwarded soon. Lucas sees by Timon's letter that Timon's missing box has made its appearance. Lucas had already forwarded another box for Timon to Wheeling containing the articles in the annexed invoice.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
2


1837 Apr 15

Landry, Trasimon
Ascension, L(ouisian)a

to Father J(ohn) Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens), Miss(ouri)

The low price of sugar and his great expenses force Landry to call home his sons, Gustave (Landry) and Adolphe Landry. Timon is to send them by the first steamboat.

IV-3-k A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
3


1837 Apr 15

Rese, Fred(erick), Bishop of Detroit
Baltimore, Maryland

to (Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio)

Rese turns over to (Purcell) the enclosed deed of a piece of land with all rights, since the land is not in his diocese, which facts he supposes was not known by the donor when the deed was made.

II-4-f A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
3


1837 Apr 20

Donnelly, Father Peter R(ichard)
Pine Bluffs, (Arkansas)

to Father John Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens), Missouri

It has been five months since Donnelly left Timon. After six years in a seminary he considered that he was sufficiently grounded in a spiritual life to stand alone but presumption deceived him. He looks forward to spending a few weeks with Timon in September. Since his arrival, he has not gone beyond the limits of the township, nor has his fellow laborer who was called twice to perform marriages. Father (Ennemond) Dupuy had four communicants this Easter and Donnelly had five. On the 12th Donnelly baptized Mr. Taylor, a convert. The other things Donnelly has to tell will wait until he sees Timon. Donnelly's health has been fairly good except that a plank struck him on February 3. He hopes Timon will send him 70 or 80 Masses and keep the money until he comes. He sends respects to priests and brothers, Timon's sister and family and the seminarians.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
3


1837 Apr 22

Carriere, S.S., Father (Joseph)
Paris, France

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Is beginning to worry about the box of physical instruments which he addressed to Purcell last year, since Purcell has not acknowledged its receipt - Asks positive information about it - The Association of the Propagation has allotted to Cincinnati 23,590 fr. to which are added a special gift of 30 fr. He sends by boat two notes on Mr. Jourbat of Baltimore for 7539 fr., keep 81 for incidental expenses and charge M. Lhomme of Baltimore to pay the other 1600. Asks whether Purcell refers in his note to a certain M. Whelan. There is very little news that Purcell will not find in the L'ami de la religion. Would say more but the publication of his lecture beginning with that on marriage leaves him no time.

II-4-f A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo. (French)
3


1837 Apr 25

Peirce, (Isaac B.)
Trenton, (New York)

to O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Massachusetts

Peirce is alarmed not to have heard from Brownson since September 24, 1836. He fears lest he has offended Brownson in some way. He has seen from the "Register" that Brownson's book is out, but he has not seen the book. Nor has he seen "Nature"--only the review of it in the "Christian Examiner." He has much to say to Brownson on the subject of his own M.S. Hymn Book, which he thinks will please Brownson. The "Boston Reformer," having taken a political turn since Brownson ceased to be editor, no longer pleases Peirce. He asks Brownson to inquire from the publisher what charge is due on the numbers up to that whereat Brownson ceased his editorship. The views of Brownson's "Review of Victor Cousin," he will send on later. He hopes to have, sometime, Cousin's work in translation. He has been sick, as has his wife and two of the children. He hopes the Brownsons are all well.

I-3-e A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
2


1837 (Apr) 29

Boullier, C.M., Father J(ohn)
Cape Girardeau, M(iss)o(uri)

Boullier hopes this letter will reach Timon before the departure of Bill with the wagon. He forgot to mention in the note he gave to Father (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.) that he wishes
1) Timon could spare some rice and a little keg;
2) the blowing tools for the quarry;
3) 3,4, or more demijohns;
4) hosts for Mass.
Timon is not to fail to come next Saturday. He is to bring some money. Boullier hopes that Father (Joseph) Paquin, (C.M.) has succeeded in his collections. (On the letter in another hand): 28 feet of rope for well, bucket, salt for cattle, artichokes from T.(?) Layton, etc.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
4


1837 Apr 20

Carriere, S.S., Father (Joseph)
Paris, France

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Has written on the occasion of the embarking of a Canadian for New York, on the 24th, that the Association of the Propagation has allotted him 23,590 to which a special gift adds 30 fr. Of that sum M. Lhomme of Baltimore is to pay 1600, and he sent that day two notes on M. Joubert of Baltimore for 7539. 81 fr. he keeps for the journal and incidental expenses including those for the physical instruments of which he has not heard. Is pressed for time.

II-4-f A.L.S. 1p. 12mo. (French)
3


1837 May 1

Guernon, Phi., (City) Treasurer
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Receipt for 1836 taxes for 82 piastres on Islet 48 at $40,000 and two slaves. Also signed by A.J. Guirod comptroller.

V-4-f Receipt S. (French) 2pp. 32mo.
2


1837 May 5

Jeanjean, Father Aug(uste)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

to Father J(ohn) Timon, (C.M.)
Barrens, M(iss)o(uri)

Timon will see with satisfaction the arrival of the three young people sent from Rome. They arrived last night and tonight they will leave in the Saint Louis. Father (Jean Baptiste) Etienne, (C.M.), recommended that Jeanjean pay their expenses and charge it to Timon. Jeanjean pay their expenses and charge it to Timon. Jeanjean gave them $123 for their passage and other expenses. Timon is to credit this to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc's account for (J.) Evrard and Mr. Menard. They expect Blanc to return from the council in 4 or 5 days. Father (Bernard) Permoli has at last been released from his vows. Jeanjean cannot recall if he wrote by Father (Joseph) Paqu(in?), (C.M.); Jeanjean advanced $40 for the account of Father (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.); will Timon credit Blanc?

IV-3-k A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
8


1837 May 7

(Rosati), Bishop Joseph
Baltimore, (Maryland)

to Father John Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens), Missouri

(Rosati) received Timon's letter yesterday. He regrets that the boat did not stop until he arrived at Mr. Davy's. (Rosati) did not expect the establishment of St. Michael to last long. It is (Rosati's) intention to go to Bardstown on his way to St. Louis. He will take with him a copy of the approbation of the Institute (of the Sisters of Loretto). Their council closed on April 23 and on April 26 the Archbishop and almost all of the bishops took part in the consecration of the Church of St. John in Fredericktown. Father (Francis Regis) Loisel went to Canada immediately after the council and will overtake them before they return to St. Louis. Father (Peter J.) Verhaegen, (S.J.) has been with (Rosati) to St. Joseph's Valley, Mount St. Mary's College, and Georgetown and is now in Philadelphia where (Rosati) intends to go next Wednesday. They will go by canal to Pittsburgh and thence to St. Louis. Sister Francis Xavier (Love), S.C.) Superior of their Hospital, has obtained four Sisters, one for the asylum and 3 for her house. (Rosati) could not get four more for Cape Girardeau, but they recorded his request. (Rosati) was really pleased with St. Joseph's (Academy, Emmitsburg, Maryland). They have at last succeeded in making arrangements for a press of their own to print school books and books of religious instruction in Baltimore. It will shortly be in operation. The pastoral letter written by Bishop (John) England in the name of the Council will soon appear. They have all been charmed with Archbishop (Samuel Eccleston). Father (Ennemond) Dupuy writes to say that he can no longer stay in Arkansas and wishes to leave the diocese. Timon is to tell Father (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.) that the relic of St. Philomena has revived the hearts of those who have seen it; (Rosati) will deposit it in the Seminary church.
P.S. Father (Patrick) Rattigan has been ordained priest in Boston and is now in a congregation of Indians in that diocese. Father (J.) Bergeron is in Baltimore on his way to Guadeloupe.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
14


1837 May 8

Wood, James F.
Steamboat Atlanta, near Evansville, Indiana

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Regrets that duty has forced him to leave Cincinnati for New Orleans so soon after Purcell's arrival. Suggests that the Bishop visit his family and undertake their conversion from Unitarianism. Has not tried much there himself. Speaks of the story of Dives and Lazarus. He and Bishop Bruté are making slow progress, because the river is low. Will not leave New Orleans before May 25th.

II-4-f A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
3


1837 May 9

Baraga, Father Frederick
Paris, (France)

to Bishop (Frederick) Rese
Paris, (France)

Father Baraga had promised his Indians to be back at Lake Superior in 10 months so he hastens his trip as fast as he can. Besides he has accomplished the twofold purpose of his trip: to have his Indian books printed in Paris and to collect money for his mission. He is satisfied with the results. He arrived in Paris on May 8. He heard that Mr. Picot had received a letter from Bishop rese in which it is stated that the Bishop intends to leave Detroit at the end of April to come to Paris and hopes to meet Baraga somewhere in Europe, because he thought Baraga would be very grieved if he could not meet the Bishop. Baraga would like to see him, but he is very anxious to get back to his mission, therefore, he will give him all important facts in this letter. Baraga was in Rome only 10 days. He had several visits with Cardinal Fransoni, Monsignor Capacini and Monsignor (Angelo) Mai to whom he gave the notes concerning Copula liciba ot illicita. However, that matter could not be decided immediately, it will be ready at the Bishop's arrival in rome. Concerning the matter of the Sisters of St. Claire, the Father General has given his decision in the enclosed writing. Cardinal Fransoni said that the nuns are now under the jurisdiction of Bishop (Francis Patrick) Kenrick, who is their Provincial. Baraga had a special audience with the Holy Father and had made many other valuable acquaintances, but he could not visit all those whom the Bishop had enumerated in his memorandum, because of lack of time. Baraga was not in Naples on account of the cholera. In Rome he gave to a young priest the written adoption into Bishop Rese's diocese which he sealed with the official seal. This seal was made in Paris according to the Bishop's orders. The priest is a Westphalian, his name is Augustin Hohoff. Canon Ehrenhofer, who lives in all 'Anims, can give the Bishop more news about him. In Vienna, Baraga had audiences with many members of the Imperial Court, as Pepi, the maid of Canon Schmid, can testify. Miss Boissier was very good to Baraga and gave him 200 florins for the Bishop. 190 florins of it the Bishop will receive through Mr. Pilat, 10 florins he includes in the letter. But should Mr. Pilat have nothing for Baraga himself, then Baraga will take the 190 florins and give them to the Bishop when he comes back to America. Baraga recommended the writing of Abbe Joffroi to consul Schwarz, to be given to the Nuntio, whom Baraga was unable to meet at present. The Bishop will find the decision ready when he arrives in Vienna. In Vienna Baraga adopted a priest from Prague (Czechoslovakia) who has been highly recommended. His name is Clemeus Hammer; his documents are enclosed. The third priest whom Baraga adopted is (Father) Andreas Smolnikar, professor for Bible-study at Klagenfurt (Corinthia, Austria). But he has difficulties. If he can come to America it would be a fortunate thing. Mr. Meshubar in Vienna can give the Bishop more information. In Munich (Germany), Baraga visited Father Spetti, who told him that the 6000 florins which Father (John Martin) Henni should receive, are still in Munich and that no one but Bishop Rese may have them. Whether or not Mr. Spetti has sent that money already to America, Baraga does not know.
Enclosed is a letter from a Mr. Jacques Matthis, whom Baraga does not know. He leaves the decision to the Bishop. Baraga informs the Bishop that he used the seal of the diocese every time adopted someone into the Bishop's diocese. He told the people that the Bishop himself had entrusted the seal to him. This is the truth as the Bishop gave him orders to have the seal made and he said whatever Baraga will do with it, will be approved by the Bishop. All this is authenticated in the Latin document which the Bishop gave him in Detroit. Baraga wants to emphasize this so there would be no contradiction. Besides he called himself Vicar-General, as the word Vicarius occurs in the document. this has helped him a great deal in his undertakings. He also signed himself, whenever it was necessary, as Vicar-General of the Northwest Territory in North America or similar to that. Baraga is very happy to be the Bishop's Vicar-General, just as Father (Francis Vincent) Badin is Vicar-General for Michigan. In Rome Baraga promised Father Thavenet to correct several words in his Indian books and he intends to do it before he will distribute them to the Indians, as he is very anxious to have the books without mistakes. Everywhere Baraga goes, he finds people who know or didn't know Bishop Rese sending their love and greetings to him. Again Father Baraga speaks about his Indian books. He wrote and asked the Holy Father (Gregory XVI) top commission Bishop Rese so that the Bishop should see to it on his return to America that Baraga is correcting the books, or that those already distributed have been corrected. The Bishop should make a report to the Holy Father about it. Baraga had caused the approbation of the Bishop to be printed in the books to show the Canadians, and through them also the Indians, that the books were printed under the authority of the Church. Enclosed in this letter are two letters written by candidates for the missions. The Bishop should decide as he thinks best. Any other letters they will address to him c/o Father Pletz in Vienna, Austria.

III-2-g A.L.S. (German) 4pp.
11


1837 May 9

Borgna, C.M., Father Ph(ilip)
Old Mines, (Missouri)

to Father (John) Timon, (C.M.)
Barrens, M(iss)o(uri)

Borgna asks Timon to intercede with the Superior to obtain permission to stay in Old Mines. The inhabitants here at Breton, west over Mines, Richwood, etc. have asked the bishop to leave him with Father (John) Boullier, (C.M.). The Bishop in a letter to the parishioners of St. Joachim gives his approval if the Superior will consent. Four persons on behalf of the parishioners addressed a letter to Father (John Baptist) Tornatore, (C.M.), praying him to confirm the approbation of their Bishop. Borgna detests the Barrens and likes it where he is. Boullier and Borgna would try to put up a school. Mine à Breton will have Mass nearly every Sunday and the church will be finished. Borgna has been called to Gasconade County; he intends to visit the iron works of Mr. Massey. The bearer of this letter is William McCabe, son of Mrs. McKabe, a woman of the best information of this part of the country and lately converted to Catholicism. William is preparing for First Communion. Four of his sisters have been and three others will be next Sunday. Borgna sends $10 which he received from Francis Obuchon(?) paid to him by Mr. Perry. A Mr. Tayler, also owing the monastery, is willing to pay but he wishes his note. Firmin(?) Desloges is to be married to Mary Jane McHoein(?). He hopes he will make a good Catholic of her. Borgna is at war with the ministers; if Timon has some good books, he is to send it.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
12


1837 May 9

Doutreluingne, C.M., Father P(eter) J.
(Old Mines, Missouri)

to Father (John) Timon, (C.M.)
Barrens, M(iss)o(uri)

Doutreluingne began a school yesterday. Mr. Doherty is the teacher. He is to give Doherty 50 piastres a quarter, 200 a year. Doutreluingne had a cabin made for the school and he is making another for the same purpose. The school is for boys and girls. Doutreluingne believes it would be well to withdraw Father (John) Brands, (C.M.) from here as soon as possible. As Doutreluingne has built the cabins for school and has bought the mulatress he will need a little money. If Timon will permit, he will take 100 piastres of the money for the land on deposit with Mr. Lamarque. Doutreluingne hopes Timon will come soon.

IV-3-k A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
4


1837 May 10

Riley, James Watson
St. Mary's, Ohio

Riley, clerk of the Court of Common Pleas of Mercer County, testifies that on this day Father Francis Bartels, age 34, a native of Prussia appeared in Court and made oath that he intends to become a citizen of the United States, and to renounce allegiance to Frederick William III.

V-4-f A.D.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


1837 May 13

Timon, James
St. Louis, (Missouri)

to Father John Timon, (C.M.)
Barrens, (Missouri)

They are all in tolerable health. The little girl is quite satisfied and James would be only for his violent temper. Edward Walsh has a friend who has thirty-five shares of stock which he will sell at par. James has seen Hugh O'Neil. Nothing is done yet about the land. Everyone thinks it is an extravagant price. James met Cho(u)teau(?) and asked him if he had property to sell out there. He said he would sell only if he got more than the worth of it, about $1200. James hears from Walsh and a Mr. Doyle of the Cape that Owen (Timon) is going to reside there. Strange that James is not informed. John is to enclose Gill's(?) note for the land if he has it. Hyppolite Papin requests that John send his son home after the 25th. James received John's draft on Sul(l)ivan who is out of town. James has a kind of promise from Col(onel?) Rayburn about J. McDonnogh getting into the bank.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
11


1837 May 13

Tucker, Father L(ouis)
Potosi, (Missouri)

to Father J(ohn) Timon, C.M.
Barrens, M(iss)o(uri)

Tucker has been requested to ask about having a few Sisters. Augustus Jones offers 17 acres of tillable land and 24 town lots. He gave $1450 for it. Tucker thinks it very suitable but cold give no answer before hearing from Timon. If Timon intends to come he can see it judge for himself or he can write. If Timon has received the two copies of the "Lives of the Saints," Tucker can begin to pay for one of them in Masses.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
3


1837 May 14

Résé, Bishop Fred(eric)
Detroit, (Michigan)

A copy of the last will and testament of Résé, Bishop of Detroit. He appoints his vicar general, Father (Francis) Vincent Badin and Father John De Bruyn as executors of his estate. He bequeaths all to his successor in the Bishopric of Detroit. If he dies at any place within his diocese he is to be buried in Detroit. If he should die without the limits of his diocese he is to b e buried there, unless his priests or parishioners wish him to be interred amongst them. His successor is to distribute $500 amongst the poor. 1ooo Masses are to be said and $600 in alms are to be distributed amongst the priests of the diocese. His executors are to have $250. If they deem it advisable to procure the advice of professional men they are to pay for it from his estate. The witnesses, James A. Van Dyke and Bernard D. Cavanagh sign.

III-2-g Copy 4pp. folio (Copy courtesy Dr. Franz Mueller)
4


1837 May 16
Montgomery, O.P., Father Charles
Zanesville, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Has not heard from Purcell for some time. Has been in Kentucky where the Dominicansmet April 18 and elected Father Richard Pius Miles (O.P.) as successor to Father (Nicholas) D. Young. Has a young companion with him, convert but not a brilliant orator, Father George Joseph Wilson, O.P.. Mr. Cassily has moved to his brother-in-law's. Encloses money for Telegraph - Desires to hear from Purcell and to receive Mass intentions.

II-4-f A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
7


1837 May 18

Butler, Thomas, Father, Mt. St. Mary's College
Emittsburgh, Maryland

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Hopes Purcell has arrived safely - Speaks also of the death and burial of Father (Michael Hurley of Philadelphia, recounting his work in conversions - One of the Sisters of Charity Sister Beata died at Georgetown convent - Archbishop (Samuel) Eccleston expected 26th to reestablish peace - Father (Stephen Theodore) Badin there on retreat and performing spiritual exercises - Inclined to stay. Urges Purcell to consent if Badin asks to stay at the Mountain - Has not ben able to collect draft of Purcell's for William McDonald - The college is practically penniless - Asks Purcell to pay by drafts on other banks the sum including a small loan ($229.24 - Urges prayers for himself and the college.

II-4-f A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
8


1837 May 19

Kane, Maria L.
Kaskaskia, (Illinois)

to Father J(ohn) Timon, (C.M.)
Perryville, Missouri

Her mother (Felicité Kane) asks her to write to send for her brother Elias (Kane) if he can come so soon after being sick. He is to leave for West Point on June 1. Sarah(?) and Maria have been in St. Louis. Elias leaves home for so long and goes amongst strangers. Her mother will settle accounts with Timon as soon as some expected money arrives.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
3


1837 May 20

Barat, R.S.C.J, Mother (Madeleine-Sophie)
Rome, Italy

to Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Blanc's letter of March 9 reached Barat at Rome where she has been since January. She has learned of his safe crossing and thanks him for his kindness to the Religious of the Sacred Heart under his care. She is happy to learn that Blanc is satisfied with their three travelers. His kindness lightened their sorrows, especially those of Madame Pratz. As for St. Michael, Barat knew it was prospering. She is worried by the interference with the trustees and the calumnies which Madame (Julia) Bazire might have been able to avoid with more experience. Barat hopes Madame Bazire will succeed at Opelousas. It seems the climate at Grand Coteau is bad; they have already lost many subjects there. If Madame Bazire's health is going to be ruined -- she is Barat's only hope to sustain all the houses overseas come day. Several years of experience will enable her to replace Madame Eugenie (Aude) who is now inactive. If she fails, Barat has no one to replace her. One more word about the indiscretions Blanc spoke about. She did not believe them and will investigate the source. She will write to Madame Bazire to give her her true feelings; they have never changed. She has less confidence in the new Superior at St. Michael than she had in her predecessor but she will await clarification from Blanc.

V-4-f A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
7


1837 May 21

Chabrat, Guy, Coad. Bishop of Bardstown
Bardstown, Kentucky

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Received Purcell['s letter last night and communicated it to Bishop (John) David. They were grieved but from their previous knowledge of the Rev. gentleman in question (Father Stephen Montgomery?) they were not surprised at what they hear now. In their opinion he should be deprived of all faculties. Since he is in the diocese asks Purcell to announce that all faculties are withdrawn, or if Purcell suggests will write to him himself. Speaks of the reasons given by the person in question for leaving his religious obligations. No news from Bishop Flaget.
P.S. Bishop David sends regards.

II-4-f A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
5


1837 May 22

Jamey, Father Victor
Barrens, (Missouri)

to Bishop (anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

At last Jamey is beginning to learn English. Except for ten days of retreat he frittered away the rest of the month of May. What consoles him is that Father (John) Timon was there. He took them to St. Louis, Mr. Jourdan, Jr. and Jamey, going by way of Kaskaskia and finally through Cahos, and they saw nothing worth telling about except the Cathedral at St. Louis and the College. Jamey intends to remain at the Barrens until Blanc recalls him. About the Convent he has no further comments. If Blanc wishes to leave Father (Stephen) Rousselon there it seems to Jamey it would be more advantageous for the Sisters, for Blanc and for Jamey. If Jamey should go to Natchitoches, Father (James) Vandeveld(e) would come down in October and spend the winter with him. Father (John Ellet, S.J. Ellet made this proposal. If Jamey wanted this parish more than another, he would say so. But he is completely indifferent and desires only to know Blanc's wishes.

V-4-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
6


1837 May 23

Baraga, (Father) Fred(erick)
Havre, (France)

to Bishop (Frederick) Rese
Rome, Italy(?)

Baraga wrote a letter to the Bishop c/o Mr. Choiselat in Paris, (France), in which he told him about his European trip. He asks the Bishop to take charge of the distribution of his Indian books. Father Thavenet, an old missionary of the Algonkins found serious mistakes in the expressions about the Holy Eucharist. Baraga promised him that they would be corrected before they are distributed. He has already corrected a great number of them during the twelve days he has been in Havre and he will correct also all the other books. He begs the Bishop to be sure to distribute the corrected ones and to withdraw from circulation those which he had already distributed during his trip, namely, the Otchipwer Prayer Book. The book, "The Life of Jesus," has no serious mistakes in it. The books which the Bishop will withdraw can be destroyed directly, so as not to be a burden on him. If the Bishop passes through Laibach on his trip from rome to Vienna, he should stay at Mrs. (Amolia) Gressel's home, Baraga's sister, who will receive him with great joy.
P.S. Baraga's letter to the Bishop forwarded to Paris contains the explanation about the seals. The little one Baraga has, but the big one is in one of his trunks which has not yet arrived at Harve. He is very sorry about it, but he will give the big seal to the Bihsop in America.

III-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp.
2


1837 May 24

Young, O.P., Father N(icholas) D.
St. Joseph's, Somerset, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Just received Purcell's of 13th. Rejoices that Purcell had at last changed his mind in regard to Father (Stephen H. Montgomery). Purcell will have learned before this of Father (Richard Pius) Miles' election to the provincialship of the Dominicans. Father Miles will have to handle Father Montgomery. Is sorry that he did not visit Purcell on his way to Kentucky but was not inclined because of Purcell's previous views about Father Montgomery, which he regarded as against the community and Bishop Fenwick. If Bishops do not regard the privileges of religious orders they can expect scandals. Bishop (Francis Patrick) Kenrick not only refused to grant Father Montgomery secularization but said that had he known the situation, he would not have received him. Young has felt that Purcell had been influenced against the Dominicans by Montgomery. Asks Purcell if he has heard of the doing of Father (Francis DeSales) Hoffman at Canton. Understands that he has attacked the characters of Bishop Fenwick and Father (Augustine) Hill, and has dug up the latter's bones. Asks if it is true that Bishop (Frederick) Rese has resigned. Has commenced the church at Lancaster. The people would like him to be there for the laying of cornerstone.
P.S. Hopes he has not been disrespectful in what he writes.

II-4-f A.L.S. 4pp 8vo.
10


1837 May 25

Jamison, Father Fr(anci)s B.
St. Louis, (Missouri)

To Father John Timon, (C.M.)
Barrens, M(iss)o(uri)

Jamison introduces Ph(ili)p Grace, a candidate for the priesthood, who comes to Jamison well recommended. Jamison is pleased with him and hopes Timon will also be.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
2


1855 May 26

Francais, Father (Nicholas)
Charenton, (Louisiana)

to Archbishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Gustave Ambroise Callery and Emilie Clara Sigure wish to marry. They ask for a dispensation. Callery is the son of the late Ambroise Callery and Adelle sigure. Emelie is the daughter of Edouard Sigure and Gratieuse(?) Corveu)?).

VI-1-i A.L.S. (French) 1p. 4to.
7


1837 May 30

(Rosati), Bishop Joseph
St. Louis, (Missouri)

to Father John Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens), Missouri

They arrived at St. Louis last Saturday. As Joseph Pratte will leave St. Louis instantly this will be a short letter. (Rosati's) health is excellent, but (John?) Cotter is very sick. Father (Joseph A.) Lutz also as usual. Timon will receive a box of books. He is to have twenty Masses said for them. Father (Philip) Borgna is at Mount St. Mary's College. (Rosati) saw Father (Joseph V.) Wiseman's mother in Philadelphia; she is well. He also saw Mr. Kennedy, Timon's brother-in-law and his oldest daughter. Kennedy intends to settle in New York. Fathers (Peter) Verhaegen and (Francis Regis) Loisel have returned in good health.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
9


(1837) May 28

Jamey, Father V(ictor)
Natchitoches, (Louisiana)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Jamey never promised Miss Aliquot that the Sisters would pay her debts of over $2000. He never agreed to pay any of her debts without a receipt. she knew so well that the Sisters had paid everything at her discharge that she forced Mde. St. Etienne's cupboard to take the receipts out fraudulently. Miss Arnaud knows about it and if she will give a second receipt Aliquot could easily be forced to take it. Jamey agreed to settle Dr. Labbatut's accounts and a bill presented by a person of C(?) only on condition that receipts were given by him or according to his formula. Furthermore, Jamey could have given her the promise she seems to rely on only before the deed and transfer but she affirmed in the deed itself that the establishment had no debts. The subscriptions are completed and the amounts are not only sufficient for what they proposed to do but a good part of the amount at Cloutierville, is already collected. In two weeks then they will be working in his parish and if the work is not done by All Saints it will almost be. The arrival of Jamey's brother changes nothing at the end of his last letter.

V-4-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
6


1837 May 30

Dubois, John, Bishop of New York
New York, N.Y.

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Answers Purcell's of the 16th. The chasuble is safe and says that the detaining of it was a mistake. He had been informed by Father Didier Petit that he was sending such a chasuble by Bishop Bruté. When Bruté's boxes had to be opened for customs Dubois found a chasuble that seemed apart from the rest that had come from Lyons. He supposed this was the one promised and sent word of its retention to Bishop Bruté. Then he proposed to the trustees to fill out the episcopal vestments. Petit said the chasuble was Purcell's and sent another set for which the customs duties were enormous. Dubois refuses to speak of the Provincial Council (of 1837). Knows only of the refusal to give his procurator the rights which he should have received. The fire at Nyack College far from discouraging him, seems a work of providence. The people there, Dutch fanatics, were not what he wanted. He expects to sell the land and establish in another site in time to open when Nyack would have opened.

II-4-f A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
5


1837 May 31

Mioland, Father, ( ) V.G.
Lyons, (France)

to Bishop F(rederick) Rese
Detroit, (Michigan)

Mioland is pleased to announce the two councils of the Association of the Propagation have allotted for the diocese of Detroit the sum of 13,480 francs. Of that they have already given to Father (Frederick) Baraga for the printing of his book 3,808 francs and 30 centimes leaving for Rese 9,671 francs 30 centimes. Understanding that he is soon to pass through Paris they will gladly pay him there. They hope he will continue to furnish them interesti8ng notes of his mission because they are the chief means by which to keep alive the interest in the work of the Propagation. They ask that Rese fill out the forms enclosed because they will allot funds only to those dioceses which have supplied this information, so that the allotments can be justly made. They6 acknowledge Rese's letters of October 20 and November 9 of last year and are pleased at the number of conversions reported, which is a source of edification in Europe. Their joy would be complete to hear these details from the lips of the bishop himself which they hope will happen on his next voyage.
P.S. If Rese wishes to have the money before his departure for Europe he can draw for the 9,771 francs 70 centimes by thirty day draft on Benoit Coste and should give notice to the secretary of the council of his action. father Baraga visited them only a few hours in Lyons and did not give them any details of his work among the savages about which he has written so interestingly in the annals of the Leopoldine association. In his appeals to the missionaries Rese should urge them to write accounts of their work which are so interesting to the faithful in Europe. He should tell of the pain caused by their silence about their work and their history of their missions which provide the interest in the Annales.

III-2-g L.S. (French) 3pp. 8vo.
3


1837 Jun 2

Badin, Father S(tephen) T(heodore), Mt. St. Mary's College
Emmitsburg, Maryland

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Received Purcell's of May 23 and was surprised that Mr. Carneal had to lift a note of his. Believes it was a borrowing from the bank under Mr. C.'s endorsement which Purcell assumed to refund. Speaks of a controversy now going on based upon certain passages in the writings of St. Alphonsus Ligouri. Points out that the Epitome was written, not by St. Ligouri but as the book itself says by Father Dominic Mansi, O.S.D. Does not approve of the gallery plan of Mr. Montgomery. Is thankful that Father Ferdinand Kurh had success at Covington. Compliments Purcell on his resolution to admit only well recommended clergymen to his diocese. Has given Father John Vabre a package from Rome for Purcell. Speaks of Father Guth at Hagerstown, Father Borgna, Mr. Fox with the Jesuits at St. Louis.
P.S. The editor of the Catholic Almanac wants statistics early in July.
(Added Letter) to Purcell by Mr. Joshue M. Young
Young says his letter of June 8, gives his convictions on returning home. Father Badin concurs in his resolution. Remains only the Bishop's call and the necessary funds. Badin offers to advance $20 which with pay will be enough. Unless answered by July 10 will suppose Purcell consents. Expects Father Butler to supply clothes.
P.S. Father Badin insists that Purcell's previous answer is enough and he will come on the date set.

II-4-f A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo. (Letter mailed June 17 - Young's letter being written later than that of Badin, i.e. after June 8)
5


1837 Jun 2

Harrington, Brother D(aniel)
Cape Girardeau, (Missouri)

to Rev. J(ohn) Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens), M(iss)o(uri)

Luke is anxious to go to the Seminary, but he brought no clothing with him. Some of the cattle have left the swamp on account of the flies and the grey mare with colt cannot be found. He will let Luke go on to the Seminary and make inquiries about the animals. They stand in great need of Luke's assistance and have not been able to plant any new ground yet. Rains put them back, also the arrival of Father (John) Boullier, (C.M.) deprived him of John Hutchins, whom Boullier sent to look for his mare. Boullier also wanted old Harry and Harrington is left with only Dony. Harrington has not seen Tho(mas Maddock?) Madduk and Elliott since they went to the Seminary. Harrington understands that they are at work for Zeno Layton. Mr. Rodney has not yet come. Father (A.H. Gandolfo, C.M.) Gondolfi has left Timon's letter at Mr. Sandford's (Paul V. Sanford?) with other papers. They were not able to haul the wood to the River because of the weak bridge. Harrington will try to plant next week. Timon is to send Luke as quickly as possible; he is a good hand, except that he wishes to work on Sunday. Harrington told him that Timon would not suffer any of the slaves to work on Sunday.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 3pp. folio
10


1837 Jun 2

Horstmann, J. William, Father
Glandorf, Putnam County, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Purcell's and also Roman letter received - Asks that Purcell announce sufficiently the Synod to be held because of the delay in the delivery of mail - Congregation at Glandorf nearly 80 families and has a small church - Expects a larger one but is hindered by poverty - In Wapokoneta there is a church on a lot given by a non-Catholic - Hopes Purcell will attend the dedication and at the same time confirm.

II-4-f A.L.S. 1p. 8vo. (Latin)
4


1837 Jun 3

Bouchaud, R.S.C.J., Madame Eulalie de
Paris, (France)

to Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Mother (Felicite) Desmarques(t) after holding her letter to Blanc awaiting a letter from Mother General (Madeleine-Sophie Barat) which she wished to enclose, decided to post it and two days later the letter from Rome arrived. Last night, during a friendly visit to the (Religious) of the Sacred Heart, (Bishop Charles) de (Forbin) Janson told them all he could recall about Blanc. De Janson's boat had to put into port for repairs in the first part of his trip.

V-4-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 8vo.
5


1837 Jun 5

C(hanning), W.H.
New York, (New York)

To (Orestes A.) Brownson
(Chelsea, Massachusetts)

Mr. Ellis told him that he believed Brownson had some desire to come to N(ew) Y(ork). It is his desire to exchange pulpits with Brownson on the Lord's Day sometime in the near future.

I-3-e A.L.S. 2PP. 8VO.
1



1837 Jun 6

Dahmen, C.M., Father Fr(ancis) Xav(ier)
Ste. Genevieve, (Missouri)

To Father John Timon, (C.M.)
Barrens, M(iss)o(uri)

They are still working on the house which is to serve as a convent but Dahmen is a little worried. Madame Bolduc is not agreeable; Mr. Bogy has his part in having given the contract. She does not wish to accept the 200 piastres; he lacks the 600. It is feared the thing may fail. Several persons wish to furnish the convent. Dahmen would be obliged if Timon would have Father (John) Boullier, (C.M.) visit him.

IV-3-k A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 8vo.
4


1837 Jun 8

Young Joshue M., Mt. St. Mary's College
Emmitsburg, Maryland

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Having learned from father Badin that Purcell is looking for subjects and has the intention of recalling absentees, and has secured the services of Father Kure (Kuhn), desires to know Purcell's will about his own return. His remaining at the Mountain is contrary to the advice of his spiritual director, because of unsettled conditions, and because of the departure of Rev. Mr. (John) McCaffrey. Purcell has left him in some perplexity and he would like an answer to plan his vacation. Sorry to hear that Mr. Byrne has left. Mr. Fox to St. Louis. O'Neal well disposed towards Cincinnati. Father guth to Hagerstown, Father Borgna in his place, Father Badin and Hickey to Washington. Father Vabret will be along in a few days. Hopes to go with Mr. Plunkett to Cincinnati.

II-4-f A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
4


1837 Jun 10

Montgomery, (O.P.), Father Charles P.
Zanesville, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
Cincinnati, Ohio

Acknowledges Purcell's of May 10. As to Purcell's request that he visit Guernsey County, he recalls that he wrote in February that Father (James) Reid seems to be doing no good there. Cannot visit there now but if he does will inform Purcell. In answer to Purcell's inquiry he and Father (George Joseph) Wilson take their meals with Mr. J. Cassily since the departure of T. Cassily, and live in the cells at the church. There is a rumor that Purcell will visit in Zanesville in August. There is one who offers to paint an altar piece for $300, but they cannot get that much. Suggests that Purcell contribute since his predecessor had promised $60 for an organ which was not collected. The church at Taylorsville (Ohio) not any farther. Speaks of his letter of complaint on handling of Telegraph accounts, giving cases in point. Asks return letter by the bearer Mr. J. Taylor. Asks about regulations of balls, dancing, etc.

II-4-f A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
8


1837 Jun 11

Boullier, C.M., Father J(ohn)
Cape Girardeau, (Missouri)

ToFather J(ohn) Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens), M(iss)o(uri)

Boullier received Timon's letter of the 9th by Will. He has no horse and will go by boat on Wednesday next. Timon is to send his horse to Davis's landing next Thursday. Mr. Rodney was here last week and surveyed the old Cape tract they bought from Menard but he did not survey it to Boullier's satisfaction. Instead of a mile front on the river it wants 22 links(?) Of half a mile owing to some entries of Garner and Cross. They must try to have it surveyed again and extend their lines from Lorimier's tract up to Cavender's of Balt(imore?). It cost him $29.37 1/2. Most of that tract is but rock and hills and except for 100 acres is not worth paying taxes on. Boullier (gives the location of) the tract on the township map. When Bob Gibney's account was presented he laughed at it; he wants to see Timon about it. Boullier has not yet seen Mr. Lightner. Boullier received 50,000 shingles for the church. He is painting the house but means to send the painter away as he does not suit.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
8


1837 Jun 13

Young, O.P., Father N(icholas) D.
Somerset, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio)

Acknowledges Purcell's of June 5th. Regrets that the tone of the last letter offended Purcell. Had felt that Purcell was convinced that these opinions were correct. Also as regards the "electioneering letter" he thought his previous explanation was sufficient. Answers Purcell's questions to the effect that:
1. Father (Stephen H.) Montgomery after being suspended went to New Orleans, where he was received until Bishop DeNeckere found out about his fall and suspended him. Returned to Cincinnati under suspension while Bishop (Edward) Fenwick wrote to Rome to have him taken away. In the meantime, at the request of Bishop Rese, he did send him to Detroit. Montgomery refused the offer and went again to New Orleans, until Fenwick's death.
2. If Bishop Flaget petitioned for his secularization, it was contrary to his express words, Bishop Rosati petitioned without knowing the facts. Young does not know what Purcell or Brute did.
3. Denies that he consented that Purcell take Montgomery under his care until rome decided.
4. Felt that since Purcell, after seeing Fenwick's opinion, received him and gave him positions, he, Young should observe noninterference.
5. Admits that the Dominicans did not want him in their house in his impenitent state. Professes to have no malice or disrespect in what he says. Is pleased that the Bishop has taken care of Canton. Believes Father Henry Juncker will do well there. Dr. Hoffman has said that Purcell told him that the Dominicans persecuted Father Alliman. Wants Purcell to aid in controlling him. The cornerstone at Lancaster will be placed the next week.

II-4-f A.L.S. 6pp. 8vo.
15


1837 Jun 16

Doutreluingne, C.M., Father P(eter) J.
(Old Mines, Missouri)

to Father (John) Timon, (C.M.)
Barrens, M(iss)o(uri)

Messrs. Lamarque, Guilory, and Rambo made their estimate yesterday of Mr. Read's improvement. They estimated it at 475 piastres. Read set 9 months to give complete possession; it may be sooner. Doutreluingne would like to know when the Bishop will come for Confirmation. The school is beginning to do well.

IV-3-k A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 8vo.
6


1837 Jun 19

Dahmen, (C.M.), Father Fr(ancis) Xav(ier)
Ste. Genevieve, (Missouri)

To Father Joseph Paquin
Barrens, (Missouri)

Will Paquin send back with Antoine Thomure the bill which the parpenters presented to Father (John) Timon, (C.M.) and which he took with him to the seminary. He left it on his table.

IV-3-k A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 8vo.
3


1837 Jun 20

Dwyer, W(illia)m
St. Louis, (Missouri)

To Father (John) Timon, (C.M.)
(St. Louis?, Missouri)

Dwyer has a letter which Timon should give to his son Charles (Dwyer). Timon is to get Charles any clothes he wants to make him content. Dwyer will endeavor to see Timon before Timon leaves town.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 3pp. 32mo.
2


1837 Jun 20

James, J( ) A.
Harrisonville, (Missouri)

To Father J(ohn) Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens), M(iss)o(uri)

The bearer, Josiah McRoberts, is going to Timon's place for an education. He was born and raised in James' neighborhood and his character is unexceptionable.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
2


1837 Jun 24

Badin, S(tephen) T(heodore), Father
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Sends these lines by Father (John A.) Vabre - remains there so as to say Mass on Sunday - The president of Mt. St. Mary's College proposed his remaining there but he refused - Father (Philip) Borgna will take care of the seminarians since the resignation of Father Guth - Archbishop (Samuel Eccleston) spent two weeks there - Mr. (Joshue M.) Young allowed him Purcell's letters and will soon return to Cincinnati - Regrets that Mr. Byrne left Purcell as he is not the author of certain articles in the Truth Teller about Mt. St. Mary's. Regards of the feast day - Sisters of Pittsburgh, especially Sister Constantine send respects - Bishop Kenrick to confirm there tomorrow.

II-4-f A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo. (Part of letter cut off)
11


1837 Jun 26

Brands, C.M., Father J(ohn)
St. Genevieve, (Missouri)

To Father John Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens), M(iss)o(uri)

The heavy rains have obliged Brands to disobey Timon's orders. Yesterday when he crossed the (/Auxvasse?) Auvaes with difficulty, desiring to say Mass, he would have crossed the Sabine and come to the Sem(inary) but it was not yet foradable. So he has spent two days at Judge (J.S. James's. He intends to go to Old Mines tomorrow. He could have started today and forded the big river at Yankeetown but is too short of money. Brands was in hopes that Timon called him to the Sem(inary) in order to send him to some other place, because the longer he stays at the mines the least he can feel contented there for several reasons. Brands will do nothing against obedience. He will stay or leave only through obedience.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
2


1837 Jun 26

Kenrick, Bishop Francis Patrick
Pittsburgh, (Pennsylvania)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

For the See of Pittsburg Kenrick proposes these names: Father John O'Reilly, Father Thomas Heyden, Father James Ambrose Stillinger.

V-4-f A.L.S. (Latin) 2pp. 4to.
5


1837 Jun 26

Kenrick, Francis Patrick, Bishop of Arath
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Acting on the opinion of the Provincial Council of Baltimore, that a See should be erected at Pittsburgh he proposes three persons for the See, Father John O'Reilly, Father Thomas Heyden, and Father James Stillinger. Asks Purcell to send his opinions on these men to the Holy See.

II-4-f A.L.S. 1p. 8vo. (Latin)
7


1837 Jun 27

Hughes, Father John
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Would like to come to Cincinnati but feels that he is not conversant with the problem. Tells Purcell that he holds that the College of Teachers should not be given the right to introduce the Catholic Bible. In the Provincial Council there was a diversity of opinion on matters of discipline because each one has his own congregation in mind from the artificialities of city life to the places where Father (Stephen Theodore) Badin works. This difference suggests the reasons why he opposes placing the Bible as a school book under the auspices of the College of Teachers:
1. The Animosity of Protestants.
2. The fact that Protestants could lose nothing.
3. The integrity of the Catholic creed.
4. We cannot meet them on equal grounds, but must defend even the outworks of our religion.
6. There is no advantage to Catholics because evil will be done with this sanction.
7. The Bible is not a book suitable for the schools.
Asks Purcell to write again and promises to come to Cincinnati if that will improve the chances of getting legacy.
P.S. After submitting Purcell's letter about Dugan legacy to the Board, they have authorized him to come. Asks Purcell to name date before August 15, but to keep the matter quiet.

II-4-f A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
6


1837 Jun 28

Point, S.J., Father (Nicholas)
Grand Coteau, (Louisiana)

Point received Father (Auguste) Jeanjean's letter telling of Blanc's approval of what was done at Donaldsonville for the future (St. Charles) College. Enclosed with it were two letters from Grand Coteau sent through Dr. Smith. Although these offers were generous Donaldsonville had the preference if three or four conditions had been guaranteed. The state house was given over to the "jure de police" only on the express condition that it would always be used "by them" for the education of youth. "By them" could become a source of quibbling.
1. There is no mention of the right they would like to reserve to the bishop of the diocese in case they would be obliged to quit the establishment.
2. The jury wishes to reserve the right to visit the college twice a year which would seem like a lack of confidence. The certainty that present resources could not cover expenditures, the pain of not being able to restore the funds of the (Father Paul de) St. Pierre inheritance, and that remaining at Donaldson would look like recompense for former services all throw the balance to Grand Coteau. Point arrived yesterday. He talked to Mr. Smith who told him that Blanc has said it would not matter where they would establish themselves as long as it was in Louisiana. So they have decided on Grand Coteau. The principal inhabitants want them to build on church land saying that that was Bishop (Leo) de Neckere's plan. If Blanc sees no difficulty in that they think they would be held to the conditions of the meeting at Iberville so that if the church and all its revenues were combined with the college they could pay back the $4000 at $400 annually. Point hopes that Blanc will reply by return boat and that he will visit Grand Coteau.

V-4-f A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
7


1837 Jun 29

Boullier, C.M., Father J(ohn)
St. Genevieve, (Missouri)

To Father J(ohn) Timon, (C.M.)
St. Genevieve, M(iss)o(uri)

Boullier saw Mr. Walsh of St. Louis who said that (Mr. Ames?) Aimes arrived safely at St. Louis, and the other two have not arrived this morning. It would be good to hunt them about the Bottom somewhere. With the horse that Timon left him Boullier could not have crossed the Sabine to St. Genevieve.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 2pp. Folio
4


1837 Jun 29

Chabrat, Guy Ig(natius), Coad. Of Bardstown
Bardstown, Kentucky

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

On his return from visitations he found Purcell's letter. He and Bishop (John) David concur in the opinion that the lawyer may marry. Received news of Bishop Flaget, who was to leave Rome for Vienna in March. Father (Stephen) Montgomery wrote to him for faculties accusing Purcell of being quick and violent. Chabrat says he will refuse him faculties until he returns to his convent, and submits. Bishop David as usual sends regards.

II-4 -- f A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
6


1837 Jun 29

Lucas, Cha(rle)s Z.
Baltimore, (Massachusetts)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

A bill, dated December 14, 1836 owed to the Estate of James Myres, deceased, for 100 Catholic Almanacs, $19.25. The administrator having requested Lucas to collect the debts due the estate, Blanc will oblige by remitting.
(P.S.) Blanc is asked to address to the care of F(ielding) Lucas, Jr. Enclosed is a separate bill for the above, dated December 15, 1836 and receipted by Mrs. Myres.

V-4-f A.L.S. And enclosure 4pp. 4to.
3


1837 Jul 1

England, John, Bishop of Charleston
Charleston, South Carolina

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Upon return to Charleston found an invitation to address convention of Teachers at Cincinnati in October - Knows nothing of the society but supposing it not friendly to Catholics and also the one that drew Purcell into controversy sends his refusal through Purcell - He is also too far behind in time and debts to go - Asks Purcell to address the letter to the Mr. Talbott - Tells Purcell that by the Miscellany he will know that the Bishop of Orio (William Clancy) is no longer an American bishop but of the Vicariate at Demerara - Against England's judgment he had appealed to the Council for a change. England's position was:
1. He felt that Dr. Clancy could have done good work there;
2. England's pride prevented his acknowledging any dependence;
3. Because Dr. Clancy's feelings being known to him, he had asked the cardinal prefect that Clancy be transferred as soon as convenient.
This makes Bishop (Francis Patrick) Kenrick's assertion that Clancy would stay at Charleston and he go to found a Society for Foreign Missions to be a mere notion - Bishop England, free of Haiti is where he was but wiser - New York nomination well known from commencement - Archbishop (Samuel) Eccleston told him before he left Baltimore that Parsella had sent the communication, and spoke of soothing Father (John) Hughes' feelings - He did not mention the feelings of Father John Powers whom England feels was injured by whispers. Asks Purcell what he heard and who told him - Speaks of a similar attack on Purcell in which the name of Father (Stephen) Dubuisson was mentioned instead and how he saw the document which Cardinal Mai had and how it was only after repeated conferences and efforts by England that Purcell's appointment was really carried out - Has read of Purcell's controversy and believes that Purcell was in a bad way but a bad way but extricated himself.

II-4-f A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
11



1837 Jul 1

Purcell, John B(aptist), Bishop of Cincinnati
St. Martin's, Ohio

to Father (Francis) M. Masquelet
St. Martin's, Ohio

Certifies that he leaves St. Martin's farm, 300 acres to Father Masquelet for 7 years on conditions:
1. That he take care of the mission,
2. Plant a vineyard and orchard,
3. Give load of vegetable to seminary, an invalid or the female orphan asylum every year,
4. That if the priest in charge of the college to be established there desires the farm, it must be surrendered with compensation for improvements, to be decided by three judges by three chosen persons.
Added note that this is a duplicate and that the copy at St. Martin's leaves out the clause about the load of vegetables and inserts clause that he will retire from the brick house and be left 50 acres until comfortably situated elsewhere in the diocese.

II-4-f A.D.S. 3pp. 12mo.
3


1837 Jul 2

Boullier, (C.M.), Father J(ohn)
(On board the?) Tempest

to Father (John) Timon, (C.M.)
St. Genevieve, M(iss)o(uri)

Boullier saw Timon's father (James Timon) in St. Louis. (James) will be at Timon's place in a few days. Young Dinies(?) told Boullier he saw Dwyer and Seiton(?) in the streets of St. Louis. Boullier has on board those things for the mill and prefers going on to the Cape. He will be back in a few days.
(P.S.) Boullier wishes Father (Francis Xavier) Dahmen, (C.M) would come to the seminary a few days before St. Vincent's (feast) for Boullier's retreat.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
5


1837 Jul 4

Tucker, Father L(ouis)
Washington County, M(iss)o(uri)

To Father J(ohn) Timon, (C.M.)
Barrens, M(iss)o(uri)

Patrick O'Brien has asked Tucker to write. O'Brien has made up his mind to embrace the ecclesiastical state and wishes to know the conditions. He is 21 years old and a good young man. He is prepared to come immediately.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
2


1837 Jul 8

Blanc, Ant(hony), Bishop of New Orleans
Spring Hill College, Mobile, Alabama

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Explains his delay in writing by recalling sickness on trip with Purcell and his subsequent illness since his return. Is now at Spring Hill College, at Mobile, having made the change at the advice of physicians - Is better but will have to take care - Bishop (Michael) Portier is well despite his labors and has put up a wing of the college - 125 pensionnaries - The house at first built for a church - 5000 piastres borrowed the first year. Mobile also suffering from the financial distress, and the Alabama legislature has a bill giving the debtors of the banks three years in which to pay. Not so bad in Louisiana. Since his arrival there he has a letter from the superior of the Jesuits announcing the choice of the site of Grand Coteau for the college near the convent of the Ladies of the Sacred Heart. Other locations might be better for the college but this is best for religious reasons. There is also the question of choice of parishes. Has seen Purcell's sister and she is well. Urges Purcell to send any subject for the Ursulines. Has just admitted one from Cincinnati. Has sent Mr. Tamey to the Barrens to learn English - Asks if Purcell is going to Europe in the autumn.

II-4-f A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo. (French)
11


1837 Jul 9

(Bancroft, George)
Springfield, (Massachusetts)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Chelsea, Mass(achusetts)

He is glad to see Brownson again as the Champion of the rights of humanity. Brownson is grounded in the true doctrine. Brownson has the central point from which truth as applied to the political selections must radiate. In the great controversy now dividing the country, Brownson has survived his purpose of sustaining the national administration. The happiest administration is that which ejects the existing forms of society. He is confident that the present administration will accomplish all the good in its power, and because its overthrow would install slavery, corporations of mercantile privilege in the chain of States. He wants Brownson to examine the second volume of history which he is publishing.

I-3-e (Signature missing) 5pp. 8vo.
1


1837 Jul 9

Kenedy, John
New York, (New York)

To Father John Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens), Missouri

Kenedy received Timon's letter. He has not set up a bookstore here yet owing to the dullness of the times, but intends to do so in the Fall. Kenedy now publishes his prayer book, and has 500 copies at the binder's now. The plain sheep is $2 per dozen. Kenedy sends his respects to Timon's father and all the family. Kenedy arrived from Philad(elphia) about five weeks ago and occupies two upstairs rooms at the corner of Washington and Duane streets. He pays $8 a month and has five of the children with him. Isabella (Kenedy) has $2 a month taking care of children, but Kenedy intends soon to bring her home and send her to school as is Eleanor (Kenedy) and John (Kenedy) at present. Thomas (Kenedy) works in a printing office for $2 a week. As soon as Kenedy gets better acquainted here he will put his two oldest boys to trade. Kenedy is happy to hear from sister Nancy (Kenedy?) and of her prosperous situation.
P.S. Kenedy wrote to Fielding Lucas concerning an agency here. Timon's recommending Kenedy as an agent to Lucas might be in his favor or if Timon could recommend him to a friend who might go security for him it would set him up in business at once.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
7


1837 Jul 10

Anduze, Father M(atthew) B(ernard)
Iberville, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To understand the affair of Brother Romuald who wrote to Mr. Lorace (Father Mathias Loras?), to Dr. Ezeltine (Father Joseph Haseltine?) and finally to Blanc to claim now one sum, now another, it is necessary to know the history of the affair. Ezeltine asked Anduze, in Romuald's name for 480 f(rancs) which he said he had lent to Anduze through the abbot. In 1821, the Prior, Father Joseph Marie Dumand was in complete revolt against his bishop, Bishop (Louis William) Du Bourg. This Trappist, suspended, interdicted, etc., placed Du Bourg in a very critical situation. Father (Charles) Delacroix, Mother (Philippine) Duche(s)ne, (John) Mul(l)anphy and even Mr. Perdranville were involved. On a trip to Florissant with Du Bourg, Anduze took it upon himself to see Dunand and bring him back to reason, if possible. It was agreed between them that he write immediately to his bishop, reconciling himself with him and then leave for France. The prior had claims against Mullanphy and Mr. Daugherty for almost 600 piastres; Anduze took it upon himself to return these sums. He placed all these affairs in the hands of Mr. Lawless. In 1824, Anduze wrote the prior that he would soon be in France and bring him the balance. Some time after, Mr. Fleming, a merchant of Natchitoches, presented a bill of exchange drawn in favor of Mr. Hurqhuart of New Orleans for the sum of 3000 francs for a Mr. Romuald. Anduze refused it and could not make any sense of it until he recalled that Mr. De Bartirot had owed him 3000 francs. On his arrival, in France, both the prior and Father Antoine of Melleray claimed the sum Anduze had collected. As for the 400 francs paid to Father Antoine - at a dinner with the papal nuncio and the Abbot, Mr. Garibaldi presented a bill for 80 crowns. Anduze lent the Abbot this amount. Because of the rate of exchange, Anduze lost 300 francs. However, in order to do a good turn to La Trappe, Anduze consented to have Lorace arrange for a sum owed to Anduze by Mr. Dietz for money lent him for food for his wife and children. Anduze added $700 to Dietz's $200 and he thinks Brother Romuald would have been satisfied if the prior and abbot had let Anduze alone. Anduze asks Blanc not to write to Portier or Lorace about this. Blanc has promised to come and spend a few days at Iberville; Anduze has an excellent male nurse and Anduze is somewhat of a doctor himself.

V-4-f A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
18


1837 Jul 10

Young, O.P., Father N(icholas) D.
Lancaster, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Takes opportunity to send letter by Mr. Embrick. Reports that they have begun in earnest, the building of the church at Lancaster. He and two altar boys as assistants blessed the cornerstone. The basement 35 by 45, will be suitable for school and chapel. Subscriptions as yet very poor, but hopes to be able to roof the building. Present chapel too small. Father (Thomas) Martin has gone to Europe to collect and to care for business for the Dominicans. Met Bishop (Frederick) Rese on board the ship, unwilling to let anyone know of his trip. All well at St. Joseph's, Somerset. The building progresses slowly.

II-4-f A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
6


1837 Jul 11

McCaffrey, Father John, Mt. St. Mary's College
Emmitsburg, Maryland

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

He and Mr. Joshue M. Young are leaving St. Mary's. Had thought of offering himself to the diocese of Vincennes but is held back by his attachment to Archbishop (Samuel) Eccleston and duty to his own diocese, as well as possible future use at St. Mary's. Fears that the Mountain must go through a period of trial before it will prosper, because of the loss of many efficient teachers. Gives a strong recommendation to Purcell for Mr. Young. Mentions the commencement and speaks of rumors of illness of Bishop Brute. Sends regards and tells of Purcell's friends at Mt. St. Mary's, speaking of his own pain at separation.

II-4-f A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
5


1837 Jul 14

(Rosati), Bishop Joseph
St. Louis, (Missouri)

To Father John Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens), M(iss)o(uri)

(Rosati) has delayed answering Timon's letter about the marriage cases because of illness. He is thinking of proposing Timon's case and others to Rome. (Rosati) would be glad if a church were built at Grand River; but Father (John Boullier, C.M.) Boullier must be informed so that he will not be offended that Father (Louis) Tucker goes there. Timon knows that (Boullier) used to go there. (Rosati) has just received a letter from Doctor O'Dwyer. (Rosati) knew him in St. Louis. He is well educated, speaks French well, knows Latin and Greek and has successfully practiced medicine which he studied in Paris. He wishes to go to the seminary to study theology and embrace the ecclesiastical state. He offers to teach Latin, Greek, or mathematics. (Rosati) told him he would be accepted; he recommends him to Timon. He probably will arrive in two or three months. They have much sickness there; Mrs. Conway, formerly Mrs. Smith, died last week. Her child died without baptism; her husband is much grieved. They have lost 5 of the orphans at the Sisters' in several weeks.

IV-3-k A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
7


1837 Jul 16

Brown, Mary J.
Springfield, Missouri

to Father John Timon, (C.M.)
Barrens, Missouri

Brown thanks Timon for all the kindness to her and her sister. The people here are very friendly, but there are no Catholics among them. Most of them are Methodists; they are anxious to see and hear a Catholic priest preach. Col(onel) Brown wrote that a priest intended coming at the same time he did. Mary understood before she left home that the vacations would commence the first of next month. She wrote Mrs. Brown that if any of the family should visit Springfield that Mary's sister should come with them. Mr. Brown may not visit the Barrens before next summer. She sends respects to Fathers Raho, Wiseman and Odin.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
4


1837 Jul 17

Rese, F(rederick) Bishop of Detroit
(Havre, France)

To (Father Francis Vincent Badin
Detroit, Michigan)

Rese, as he has already announced, has received Badin's letters in New York. He has met at New York a Father (Thomas H.) Martin, O.P. who knew (Badin) in Kentucky, and they crossed the sea together. His boat arrived at the same time as the other boat which had set out from Havre some weeks before their arrival but he found the letters. Rese has written by Father (William) Quarter that he will have nothing to do with the convent at Pittsburgh because as Badin knows he has retransferred the property into the hands of the Mother Abbess (Sister Mary Frances Vindevoghel). He would lose his head if he paid again the debts the Mother had contracted at Pittsburgh after so much trouble. Another boat has arrived from New York on which he expects to find the Mother Abbess but perhaps she has changed her opinion. Rese will set out today for Rome from where he hopes to return within a month. Bishop (Benedict Joseph) Flaget has been well received at Vienna and Munich and is returning to America passing through Belgium. Rese sends his blessing to all his clergy and the members of his diocese whom he hopes are in good health. The bearer of this letter is a missionary Father (Frederick) Baraga. If Baraga has brought the money (Badin) would no longer be embarrasse. (Edges of manuscript destroyed).

III-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 8vo,
6


1837 Jul 20

(Smith, S.C.), Sister Regina
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Since returning from Blanc's house she has received a letter from Mother (Rose White?). She wrote on several subjects one of which is a Motherhouse distinct from St. Joseph's. Sr. Regina copies what Mother says; if the letter were Father (John) Hickey's she would send it: "As to the Motherhouse she would never consent to having her children cut off from this community. If a Bishop wished to establish a Motherhouse of Sisters of Charity they would consent on condition that their Sisters would form their Council of Mother and officers and would admit postulants. Their Sisters are always to be considered members of their house of St. Joseph's at Emmittsburg; only their Sisters would be considered foundresses of that new Motherhouse. The responsibility taken off this house would be great." Hickey wrote Regina on the same subject to which Regina replied: "Sister (Francis) Regis' sentiments respecting a second Motherhouse is that it should never be established. Sister M. Paul says that she does not wish it but that if the Superiors wish it she has no objection to be of the number, provided they put Father (Auguste) Jeanjean or one like him to see the rules are observed. Regina give her opinion when at the north; if her sentiments are different now it is because her superiors wish this second house and not because she wishes to be cut off from the house that nursed her and educated her." Regina did not communicate Hickey's letter to all, but only to Sisters Paul and Regis. If Blanc sees no objection she will send Mother's letter to the Sisters. Mother bids her to tell Sister Euphrasia to be at peace. Mother also speaks of the vows of the two novices with her and mentioned one of the young ladies proposed by Regina as a subject for the community. She had not received Regina's letter concerning the two French ladies - the answer to the other is partly favorable.

V-4-f A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
8
1837 Jul 22

Brownson, Orestes A.
Chelsea, Massachusetts

to Congregational Society
Canton, Massachusetts

Brownson is indebted to the society for $123 for interest on the notes of Rev. Henry F. Edes to Elisha White which Brownson promises to pay as rent for the house in Canton.

I-3-e A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.


1837 Jul 28

(Eccleston), Archbishop Samuel
Georgetown, (District of Columbia)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Blanc's letter of the 20th followed Eccleston here where he has been presiding at the Commencement of the College, etc. Eccleston has already written to Rome in compliance with Bishop (Francis Patrick) K(enrick's) request but not in accordance with the views suggested by him. Nothing has transpired since the council which could throw new light on the subject of the Pittsburg(h) nomination. Father (John) O'Reil(l)y was then in Baltimore and it came into the head of no one that he was eligible. (Eccleston) doubts the discretion of his recommendation so soon after his name has been blazoned in the Catholic newspapers in connection with atrocious charges. He was innocent, still (Eccleston) would like a longer interval between the false charge and the prelacy. The 2nd Provincial Council did not embrace cases like this. It was understood in the late council that if it were practical to fill Pittsburg before the next (council), its erection should be recommended to the Pope. (Eccleston) thinks it should be delayed longer until a more suitable candidate is found or the present one gives more evidence of fitness. Should the Holy See accede to Kenrick's proposition Eccleston will be the first to acknowledge its wisdom. The $200 were received.

V-4-f A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
4


1837 Aug 2

(Brute), Bishop Simon (Gabriel)
Vincennes, (Indiana)

To Father (John) Timon, (C.M.)
On his way to Cincinnati

(Brute) today received Timon's letter of July 24. He has no particular commission for Timon except to bring them a sample of what is being published in theology by Father Carriere of St. Sulpice. On the score of the satisfactory account which Timon has to give about the College, (Brute) can be pardoned for his almost indiscreet ardor for the hope, already realized;, for the future of this country. What a consolation for Bishop (Joseph) Rosati and for the (Vincentians) as well as Father d(e)Andreis and Bishop DuBourg rejoicing in heaven. (Brute) has three (ms. Is torn here) good Eudists but they are just planting the seeds of a future seminary. (manuscript is torn; translation uncertain). In Timon's stay at Paris he can see Father Houssard(?) and Father Mollevant(?) at Issy. If he goes to Rennes, (Brute)'s brother would be happy to have him, and Father Louis, superior of the Eudists at his seminary. But (Brute) asks that Timon not fail to see Madame Brute, his niece, at the Madames of the Sacred Heart.
(P.S.) Timon is to give his regards to Father Mina and Wiseman. He is to bring back facts, details, even lists of names of students.

IV-3-k A.L.S. (French) 1p. 4to.
4


1837 Aug 3

(White, S.C.), Sister Rose
Emmitsburg, M(arylan)d

to Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

They are grateful that Blanc has recovered from his severe indisposition. From the enclosed (no enclosure) Blanc will see that Father (James Ignatius) Mullon does not wish to have the Sisters of (St. Patrick's Female Orphan) Asylum any longer under his charge. Blanc is to let them know his wish - if they are to be removed to the hospital, sent home, or continued for the asylum. Blanc is to tell Sister Regina (Smith) that Madame Desmortiers and her daughter are admitted as candidates. She fears the mother will find it difficult but they may come as soon as they please bringing their baptismal certificates, $100 and clothing for their first year or $150 each if they do not wish to be troubled with bedding and clothes. Miss Caufield is also received and can come with these two ladies. The Sisters unite in their remembrance to Blanc and Father Jeanjean.

V-4-f A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
6


1837 Aug 8

Propaganda, Sacra Congregatio de Fide by L. Archbishop. Ephesus, Nuncio Apostolic
at Vienna, Austria

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Acknowledges Purcell's letter and expressions of gratitude - Congratulates Purcell on his controversy with Campbell and hopes that Purcell will have a copy of the discussion to send him - Is grieved to hear that Bishop Rese of Detroit has decided to resign - Sends through Mr. Schwarz the sum of 292.30 florins for the years fruits from the Johannes Baptista Joffroy foundation for educating clerics for Cincinnati and Detroit, as decided by Cardinal Ostini for the Sacred Congregation.

II-4-f A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo. (Latin)
5


1837 Aug 11

Chabrat, Guy Ignatius, Coad, Bishop of Bardstown
Bardstown, Kentucky

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Would have answered letter sooner but expected to send answer by Father (Stephen) Badin, whom he expected to go sooner. Father Badin took Father (Stephen) Montgomery's part pretty warmly and Chabrat left the matter with him. Father Badin as V.C. left him at Covington to exercise his ministry and undertook to settle the matter with the Dominican provincial with what success he does not know. Having no word from Bishop Flaget he is uneasy. His own health declining he is resigned to go.

II-4-f A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
8


1837 Aug 13

Langtree & O'Sullivan, (J.L.)
Washington, D.C.

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Chelsea, Massachusetts

The proposed periodical is to be democratic in the broadest significance of the word. Local and temporary subjects will be avoided as much as possible; discussion, or difference of opinion will not be admitted, as such would be contrary to the impersonality which is important to an authoritative work. The political credo will not be unalterable, since this would be ridiculous, and opposed to progress. The Literature of Theology will be acceptable, since polemics are not expected. They shall distinctly encourage and welcome contributions as Brownson suggests. Each department shall be placed under powerful, efficient minds. The real burden will fall on themselves at the start, but they wish the enterprise to stand or fall on the merits of its plans and execution.

I-3-e A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
1


1837 Aug 16

England, John, Bishop of Charleston
Charleston, South Carolina

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Excuses his failure to answer Purcell's because of the press of duties - As to the first part of Purcell's letter he expressed reluctance before an association especially outside the pulpit - Also wishes to avoid the question proposed, since he will probably remain at Charleston - He is not really free. - In the second part of his letter Purcell exposed a case for the Pauline privilege - England discusses the circumstances of the case, the possible solutions by appealing to the privilege, or to the possibility of an invalid contract: suggesting in the first case recourse to Rome especially for dispensation from the banns and interpellations. In such cases he requires confession before communion and also baptism.

II-4-f A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
3


1837 Aug 19

Paillasson, Father V(ictor)
New Madrid, (Missouri)

To [Father (John Timon, (C.M.)
(Barrens, Missouri)

This letter will be brought by Mr. Delarodarie(?) with whose services Paillasson is very well pleased. All his contracts are completed and tomorrow they will begin the preparations. He hopes within a few days to have the framework up. He cannot make it as large as he would wish as he must build a little house for himself, and fence the grounds. He thinks he will be ready for All Saints Day; he hopes Timon will neglect nothing to fulfill his word.

IV-3-k A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 8vo.
2


1837 Aug 31

(Mazenod), Bishop Charles Fortune (de)
Marseille, (France)

To Father Chandron
Plaisians par Le Buis, (France)

(Mazenod) thanks Chandron for his offer to give spiritual aid to the cholera victims of Marseille. He would take advantage of it if there were not enough priests but at present there is no lack. They are far from the deaths of 1833(?) and they hope to be able to support the calamity by themselves.

V-4-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 8vo.
1


1837 Sep 1

Martin, Father (John)
Point Coupee, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Ant(Ant(hony)) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

A(rmand?) Beauvais showed Martin Blanc's letter of August 24 which Martin read with pleasure. Since last March Martin has not been to Avoyelles; he planned to go during October to see about the church he intends to build there under the patronage of St. Paul. He will not be able to go until after Blanc's episcopal visit. Martin would never abandon the post assigned him without permission from Blanc or his representative. Martin did not answer Father (Auguste) Jeanjean's letter partly because he wished to give news about Father (John Mary William?) Guernigou, tutor in the home of A. Labry. Several days ago Beauvais told Martin that he had heard the Guernigou said Mass with a glass or goblet because he had no chalice. Last Sunday they told Martin the same thing at F(au)sse Riviere. Beauvais will write Blanc by the same mail.

V-4-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
6


1837 Sep 1

Purcell, John Baptist, Bishop of Cincinnati
Cincinnati, Ohio

to Cardinal Franzoni, Cardinal Prefect of Prop.
Rome, Italy

Relying on the Pope's munificence and the Cardinal's liberality, and as an alumnus of the College of the Propaganda Purcell presents James Frederick Wood, a convert, who aspires to the priesthood. Formerly as a capable banker he supported his mother and sisters. Purcell asks the Cardinal to receive him. He adds a casus in matrimony. A lawyer who doubts of baptism now converted. Is he held to a general confession? Twice married, one wife dead, the other divorced and uncertain whether baptized or not. Bishops David, Brute and Chabrat told that he can now marry a Catholic lady to take care of his family. Asks the Cardinal's opinion.

II-4-f A.L. 4pp. (Latin) (Copy in Purcell's hand)
2


(1837) Sep 3

Blanc, Ant(hony), Bishop of New Orleans
New Orleans, Louisiana

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Yesterday he closed a seven week visitation of his diocese. Has visited eight parishes. Despite the weather and sickness he feels satisfied. Most of the parishes need two priests instead of one. Has dedicated a new church at New Iberia, Louisiana in the Parish of St. Martin and will be attended by the Cure of that place. Stopped at St. Michels and finds that Margaret' mind is better settled. Has been invited to the consecration of Bishop Loras on December 10. Has received a letter from the Archbishop about the Provincial Council (1837), but has not read it. At St. Michael's saw a candidate that Purcell had sent. Suggests that Purcell send one for his Ursulines. Father Kiley there but promised to go on to New York. Bishop Portier has received a new clergyman who is a nephew and bears the same full name as the bishop. Many strangers in New Orleans. The bishop has handled many letters of recommendation. Mr. Moon and family have arrived and he will do as Purcell wishes. If Purcell wants thirty more intentions he should draw that much on Father Jeanjean.

II-4-g A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
4


1837 Sep 4

Wood, James Frederick
Cincinnati, Ohio

to Bishop John B. Purcell, of Cincinnati
Canton, Ohio

Speaks of his desire to get to Rome for his studies. The time of departure approaches, and he has informed his mother of his plans. Hopes his departure will aid a family conversion. Received letter from Mrs. Groesbeck at Washington and expects his return. Wood expects to be in Philadelphia or New York 1st to 5th of October. Mentioned letters of introduction. Edward Purcell to preach, Father Collins very busy. Mr. Fry has been urged to go to Philadelphia to succeed Mr. Williams as editor of the National Gazette. Asks what the passage is from New York to Havre.

II-4-f A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
3


1837? Sep 7

Jamey, Father V(ictor)
Natchitoches, L(ouisian)a

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Jamey fears that Blanc's trip to Grand Coteau in the July heat may have made him ill. In case Jamey's letter did not reach Blanc he has only this to say. Father (N.) Francais's 3 months at Cloutierville did him more good than a quarter in Jamey's parish as he returned cured of his itching to be a pastor. He recovered his health and gained much weight. Right now they have had 8 tragic deaths. They are pretty well settled in the church at the post; all the debts are not paid but by next March they hope to be entirely free. They are working now on the pews at Cloutierville and Jamey hopes to pay all he owes there this year. They had about 40 Communions for the feast of the Assumption. This is very few; there will be many more labors than consolations.
P.S. He sends regards to Father Rousselon.

V-4-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
3


1837 Sep 8

Baraga, (Father) Fred(erick)
Sault de Ste. Marie, (Michigan)

To Father (Francis Vincent) Badin
Detroit, Michigan

Baraga sends Father Badin $5, and he asks him to send them and another banknote to the editors of the Catholic Herald in Philadelphia for a two year subscription. Baraga's trip home is very slow. He had to wait nine days in Mackinac, and in Sault he will have to wait fifteen days before he can depart. Baraga wants all the news he can get about Bishop Rese and about Badin himself. He also asks that Sister Marie Therese be told that he could not find the relics among the things he brought back from Europe. He hopes to find one at his mission and will send it to her as soon as he can.

III-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp.
1


1837 Sep 11

Wood, James Frederick
Cincinnati, Ohio

to Bishop John B. Purcell, of Cincinnati
Cleveland, Ohio

Acknowledges Purcell's letter. Waited for word from Mr. Groesbeck and now expects to sail October 8th. Is anxious to be gone. His mother and sisters will be sad at his parting but he hopes for conversion. Has secured money through Edward Purcell. Edward preached Sunday. Gratified to hear that Purcell finds liberality. Speaks of other arrival at Cincinnati. Mr. McGlean, Father Stokes, Mr. Young preaches next.

II-4-f A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
2


1837 Sep 12

Rafn, Charles C., secretary
Copenhagen, Denmark (New York)

A printed formula invites Purcell to join the Royal Society of Northern Antiquaries on the Ante-Columbian History of America. The form gives the officers, the members, and the purposes of the society.

II-4-f D.S. 8vo.


1837 Sep 18

Ladaviere, (S.J.), Father A. P(ierre)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Ladaviere believes it his duty to inform (Blanc) about a letter he received from France about a priest who they say came to America. Since he was to go to Bishop (Simon Gabriel) Brute it could well be that he went toward Louisiana. Ladaviere will copy the letter on the next page. Ladaviere is doing his little task quietly; he is rarely called.

A.L.S. (French)


1837 Jun 7

Bejiers, Father (?) Isid(ore)
Avignon, (France)

To Father (A. Pierre Ladaviere, S.J.)
(Donaldson, Louisiana)

They have just discovered a true brigand in the person (Ladaviere) asked them to check on. He has stolen on all sides and took money from people either as Mass stipends, alms, etc. Bejiers hastens to tell Ladaviere so that he can take steps to make this known and especially to the Bishop of the place. He said he was going to America with two or three confreres and gave his address at the Foreign Missions to Father Ferreol Peyron.
A. Copy (French)
V-4-f A.L.S., A. Copy (French) 3pp. 8vo.
4


1837 Sep 18

Odin, C.M., Father J(ohn) M(ary)
(Perryville, Missouri)

to Father J(ohn) Timon, (C.M.)
Paris, France

Yesterday Odin received Timon's letter of (August) 23 and regrets that his letter did not reach New York before Timon's departure. He will tell Father (John) Power to forward them to Timon. Bishop (Joseph) Rosati came here last Sunday week. He has gone to visit Father (Francis) Cellini, (C. M.) at St. Michael. Cellini is sick. Their new church (St. Mary's, Barrens) will be consecrated on October 29 and that of St. Genevieve on the following Sunday. Odin has hurried the workmen and Rosati told him to invite the neighboring bishops. Everything goes well at the College. Father (Joseph) Paquin, (C.M.) and Odin have not left the place. Father (Francis X.) Dahmen, (C.M.) has been forced to send Father (Joseph) Mignard, (C.M.) back to the Seminary. Dahmen will inform Timon of the reasons for this. Odin spoke plainly to Mignard and asked him to refrain from his usual free remarks, but he is doing nothing. He will wait until Timon returns before sending someone to replace Mignard. Father (Peter J.) Doutreluingne, (C.M.) is growing very unpopular at the Mines. Since Father John Brands, (C.M.) absence, Doutreluingne has attempted to preach in English and no one understands his long sermons. Odin does not know how things are managed at the Cape, but every marriage is celebrated before the Baptist preachers. Knott J. Wathen (and) Mary Wheeler have given that scandal. Menty(?) has been on the point of death for a long time, but is a little on the mend. Brother (Daniel) Harrington, Father (A.H.) Gandolfo, (C.M.) and the black people have all had a spell of sickness. Mr. Lappin and several others have died. Fathers (Bartholomew) Rollando, (C.M.), (Blaise) Raho, (C.M.), and (Joseph V.) Wiseman have had a little spell of fever. The Sisters of (Loretto) at St. Genevieve are doing extremely well. They have about 60 scholars. Mr. Dahmen seems pleased. Here they have about 20 boarders, a few more are expected. Father (John) Boullier, (C.M.) has sold 10 acres of the land at the Mines to Mr. Reed for $330. He thought it better than to pay the sum allowed him by the arbitrators. They are making a new saw mill at Dechmendy's. Father (Charles) Van Quickenberne, (S.J.), died on August 17 at Portage des Sioux. He had been recalled from his Indian mission. They have not yet heard from Father (Francis) Simonin, (C.M.). Father (Ambrose) Heim is going to Kahokias and Father (John) Kenny to New Madrid. Father O'Donnelly (Father Peter Richard Donnely?) has been here to make his retreat. Father (Ennemond) Dupuy is leaving the diocese and going to New Orleans. The bishop has promised to send some of their Sisters to Arkansas next Spring. Odin does not have time to speak of their mission here; he is occupied with preparing for the exhibition and the work of the church. The parish records from January now list 151 baptisms of Catholic infants, Protestant 77, 42 marriages, 48 burials, 140 First Communions, 128 Confirmations, 400 families and from 2500 to 3000 souls. The Sisters of St. Genevieve want French spelling books; also the college and convent. Timon is to see the editor of "L'ami de la Religion" to arrange for continuing the paper. Mr. Ring gave the Bishop a copy of "Symbolica"; Timon is to buy him a copy of that work. Alex Laforge of New Madrid would like Timon to call and see his sister who lives in Paris. She wants to come to America. Mr. Horine(?) will give two acres of land opposite Chester at the ferry for the chapel that Raho is going to have built in the bottom. A few hundred dollars have already been procured. The inhabitants of Little Canada are building their new frame church. Times are hard and it is difficult to obtain any money. Mr. Davenport could not collect anything for the order given in favor of Mr. Pelagaud. It would be well if Timon could settle it from Paris. They have had to borrow $500. Boullier thinks Timon ought to obtain permission to sell their Bois-Brulé tract of land. (Antonio) Palleli is alone in the kitchen. B(rother?) Capaldo(?) went up to the mines; he wants Timon to try to obtain his readmission into the Congregation. The Bishop has $100 in the hands of Father (Jean Baptiste) Etienne, (C.M.) that were sent from Rome. He wishes Timon to buy candlesticks for the churches of Apple Creek and other places. The Bishop also wants Timon to ask Father Cholleton whether the Firéres Maristes (Brothers of Mary) will soon be ready to come. They need some grammars of Letellier. The bishop thinks they ought to collect those excellent works which appear every day. Mr. (Daly) Daily has all the care of the accounts of college and convent. He says that Timon's father (James Timon), taken sick on his return to St. Louis from Kaskaskias, has recovered. Odin sends his respects to the Superior General, Fathers Lego, Grappia, Fiorillo, Aladel, Etienne, Boulanger, and all the others. The boys are anxious to get a good apparatus. Did Timon give Odin's letter to Dr. Power's sister in New York?

IV-3-k A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
46


1837 Sep 20

Choiselat Gallien, J(?)
Paris, (France)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

This letter will be brought by Dr. Delaruelle who is going to New Orleans to practice medicine. He is highly recommended by a priest of their city and by one of the members of the diocesan council of Paris for the Society of the Propagation of the Faith. For a long time he was attached as a doctor at the Bureau of Charity and rendered numerous services to the poor. Blanc could use his generous and charitable leanings as well as those of his wife. Choiselat Gallien is holding 245 francs at Blanc's disposition.
(P.S.) Choiselat Gallien recommends the Boulanger affair to Blanc's charity.

V-4-f A.L.S. (French) 3p. 4to.
3


1837 Sep 20

Guidé, S.J., Father A.
Paris, (France)

To Bishop (Anthony) Le(!) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Guidée answers Blanc's letter of August 6. The details about the foundation at Grand Coteau and their Fathers (Jesuits) gave him much pleasure. He does not yet know if this fulfills Blanc's wishes, Father (Nicolas) Point, (S.J.) not having yet informed him. Guidée learned that Blanc laid the first stone of the future (St. Charles) College on the feast day of St. Ignatius. As for Blanc's request for new subjects Guidée realizes the advantages of supplementing the small number of workers in so vast a field; the work of Father (Joseph) Soller, (S.J.) among the Germans certainly should continue.

V-4-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
5


1837 Sep 20

Orttl, Dean G. van
Munich, (Germany)

To Bishop (Frederick Rese)
(Detroit, Michigan)

The diocesan court of the archbishopric Munich-Freising had sent two drafts for gulden for the aid of the Catholics in North America on September 12, 1837. In case that these firsts drafts should not have reached their destination, duplicates are included in this letter.

III-2-g A.L.S. (German) 1p. 8vo.
1


1837 Oct 1

Etienne, (C.M.), Father Jean-Baptiste
Paris, (France)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Dr. DelaRuelle, who will give (Blanc) this letter, intends to settle in (Blanc's) locality. He has asked for a recommendation to (Blanc) which Etienne gladly gives because of his esteem and confidence in DelaRuelle. Father (John) Timon, (C.M.) is with them; Timon will not return until next month.

V-4-f A.L.S. (French) 1p. 4to.
3


1837 Oct 2

DeBian(?), Dulle(?)
Mobile, (Alabama)

He understands that Blanc had his reasons for acting as he did toward him but he should have let him know a month sooner for only three weeks ago, at his mother's request, he sold all his father's property for 200 thousand francs. His intention was to be useful in Blanc's diocese and to prove that he had told the truth. He cannot now return to France and live with a step-father who does not think as he does. He showed Blanc's letter to his director who was very much surprised at Blanc's resolve; he encouraged DeBian and told him that a vocation of six years should not be disturbed by a forced decision. He urged DeBian to ask Blanc to write for him in another diocese in the United States. He thinks the Religious of the Sacred Heart have already received the money from his aunt's little property. In any case Blanc will be paid if he will make a note of what DeBian owes him. Although right now he is under Bishop (Michael) Portier he would like to leave as soon as Blanc will have him admitted to another diocese.
P.S. Portier is perfectly satisfied with DeBian's conduct; if Blanc will say a word to Portier, he will remain in the diocese of Mobile and in a short time be made sub-deacon. He is sorry; he would have liked to stay in Blanc's diocese.

V-4-f A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
3


1837 Oct 5

Wood, James Frederick
Wheeling, West Virginia

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Arrived at Wheeling that morning. Left Edward Purcell at Zanesville. Asks for a continuance of prayers. Is visiting with a Mrs. Moon in Wheeling and expects to continue on next morning. Edward Purcell has promised to visit his mother. Hopes for conversion, but advises caution in treating his relatives, especially about the children.

II-4-f A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
3


1837 Oct 15

Wood, James Frederick
New York, NY

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Explains his delay in writing by the many duties at Washington. Visited Georgetown, with Father Williamson, and Father Deloul, and the Archbishop. Went to Philadelphia, where he visited with Father (John) Hughes and Father (Edward) Sourin, and a Mr. (Frenaye). In New York he has called on Father (John) Powers, and Bishop Dubois. In Philadelphia he also saw Bishop (Francis P.) Kenrick. Has many letters. Has been moving about the city constantly. Hopes that the Bishop will not be blamed for his conversion.

II-4-f A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
1


1837 Oct 17

Cauchoix(?), Father D.
Enencourt, (France)

To Father (John Timon, C.M.)
Paris, (France)

In regard to Cauchoix's plan for America, the superior of the seminary believes that the bishop would never give him an exeat; there are at least a hundred parishes vacant in the diocese. However, out of zeal for the faith if (Timon) and he persist, he will consent next July. He thinks this delay is necessary also to test Cauchoix's vocation for this special ministry. If (Timon) will give him his address in America, Cauchoix hopes to join him not later than next August. He regrets very much that he cannot accompany (Timon) as he planned to make a retreat, but in August he will make a retreat at the Lazarists' house.

IV-3-k A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
1


1837 Oct 24

Saenderl, (C.SS.R.), Father Simon
Arbre Croche, Michigan

to (Bishop Frederick Rese)
Detroit, (Michigan)

Saenderl is sending the requested description of the Indian school in Arbre Croche as drawn up by Mr. (Augustine) Hamelin. Saenderl does not understand why such a description is necessary as the government has not given them any allowances for educational purposes since the treaty of 1836. What the government had paid to the Bishop was for missionary purposes and not for the schools. Saenderl regrets that the priest destined for Green Bay is still in Europe. He is expected soon. But meanwhile a dozen of heretical ministers have no opposition in their work as Father (John T.) Vandenbroek does not visit the Bay, because his garden might be robbed in his absence. He may do it when all his fruit is in his barn. The mission of Arbre Croche will soon die a natural death as many Indians intend to settle in Canada in the Summer of 1838. Saenderl thinks he may become an anchorite. He received the "Catholic Library" which (Rese) had sent him.

III-2-g A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
4


1837 Oct 28

Guillon, Annette
Lyons, (France)

To Father (John) Timon, (C.M.)
Paris, (France)

On the 25th she received a letter from Sister Marie Xavier Miséry in which she said that Timon was in Paris for a month and if Guillon had anything to send to Sister, Timon would take it. Guillon has 2 boxes, but they have already been sent on the 21st, addressed to Father (Louis) Moni at the Cathedral in New Orleans. Guillon gives Timon the checks to claim these boxes and stop them at Havre. She will enclose a letter to Henri Meinel to whom the boxes were addressed so that Timon can claim them. Guillon will also send Timon a letter for Miséry. Guillon has heard of a woman who wishes to go to the foreign missions. She believes it would be hard for her to make the voyage with Timon as she does not have all the money for her passage. She ought to apply to the Superior of the foreign missions.

IV-3-k A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
4


1837 Oct 28

Miles, O.P., Father R(ichard) P(ius)
Somerset, Ohio

to (Bishop John Baptist Purcell ?)
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Would be pleased to comply with the Bishop's request that all the clergy make their retreat in Cincinnati but this would involve great difficulty for the (Dominicans). Asks that they be permitted to make their retreat at St. Joseph's, Somerset as in the past. If expedient two will attend the synod.

II-4-f A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
4


1837 Oct 31

Manceau, Dr.
Paris, (France)

To Father (John) Timon, (C.M.)
Paris, (France)

Nothing has been decided about the journey to the beautiful and rich country where Timon lives. In any case, outside his special function as a doctor, he guessed what Timon wants, and has tried, in case he goes, to improve his knowledge of the exact analysis of the minerals. He has some information on a chemist who could be suitable for finding out some ideas about mineral analysis. Mr. Guerin de Vary, Quai de St. Michel, already well-known in the intellectual world, has a profound knowledge on this matter. He has a laboratory, and it should be easy for Timon to make an arrangement with him. If Timon goes he could say he came in behalf of Mr. Duhardin, whom he knows.

IV-3-k A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
3


1837 Nov 1

Durando, C.M., Father Marc (Antonio)
Turin, (Italy)

To Father (John) Timon, C.M.
Paris, (France)

(Translation uncertain) This introduces Brother Guiseppe Sticia who wishes to place himself under Timon's tutelage and obedience. Sticia was born May 5, 1811; received the habit as a coadjutor brother April 25, 1831, and took his vows April 28, 1833. Their procurator gave him 160 florins for his trip to Paris. If the Propagation of the Faith has given money to Timon for the trip and also for this brother he could remit the sum to the procurator in Paris. But if his passage is to be paid by the mission in America it will not be necessary to pay back the sum. Sticia is bringing some chasubles given Durando by a pious person for the missions.

IV-3-k A.L.S. (Italian) 3pp. 4to.
2


1837 Nov 2

(Blanc), Bishop Ant(hony)
Grand Coteau, (Louisiana)

"Limits of the parish of St. Charles of Grand Coteau of Opelousas fixed by the bishop of Louisiana, March 10, 1821." The limits of this new parish are: The course of the Vermillion to the branch of a Bayou of the same name up to the Louis bridge then right to the line dividing the counties of Opelousas and Attacapas up to the Atchafalaya River and along the river to the junction of Bayou Cortableau; from there a line almost parallel to the one dividing the two counties so as to include the Laurent meadow up to Bayou Teche
and from there a straight line bordering on the dwelling of Dr. Raphael Smith leaving it in this parish, from there a line bordering on Bayou Mallet and enclosing the meadow of the same name, and then to the sea. Bishop L(ouis) Wil(liam Dubourg) of St. Louis signed in the presence of Father Hercu(le) Brassac, pastor of St. Charles and Father Marcel Borella, curate of St. Martin of Attacapas. Copy (French. In Point's hand?)
"New parish limits fixed May 15, 1822." Having been in Attacapas and Opelousas to erect the new parish of St. John at Vermillion (Dubourg) changed the limits of St. Charles. The limits between these two parishes are a straight line from the junction of Bayou Pont Brulé and Bayou Vermillion extending to the end of Caranco Island, from there to the head of Bayou Queue de Tortue and following this bayou and the Mermenton River to the sea.
Signed by (Dubourg) before Brassac, former pastor of St. Charles and Father S(egundo) Valizano, present pastor. Copy (French. In Point's hand?)
On November 2, 1837, following Blanc's first pastoral visit, Father P(eter) DeVos, (S.J.), approved as pastor of St. Charles, Grand Coteau, presented the above two extracts which Blanc accepts until such time as he would deem a change to be proper. (In a penciled noted Blanc adds): Father Nicolas Point, S.J., has ordinary jurisdiction and the power to delegate it to his subjects who may seem suitable and the same for convents of nuns or asylums when called there by the Superiors.

A.D.S. (French and Latin) 2pp.

(With this is folded another copy of the first three items in another hand with a note stating that) the southwest limits of St. Charles are not well defined, that is, "the line leading from Bayou Mallet to the sea" does not say what point on the sea nor what is included. If it is a line straight and parallel the parish would have none of the part inhabited by the Kalkaciou (Calcasieu?). The bishop could give some light on this. This note by Father Fl. Sautois, (S. J.), pastor of St. Charles. (On this same paper is a note): Bishop Blanc $12.55 amount of collection for seminary. $5 for dispensation. Copy (French)
With these documents is a map of St. Charles Parish, Grand Coteau copied on that of Louisiana by G.W.R. Bayley in 1855.

V-4-f A.D.S., Copies (French and Latin) 4pp. folio and map
16


1837 Nov 2

Le Gros, J(ohn) B(aptist)
Havre, (France)

To Father J(ohn) Timon, (C.M.)
Paris, (France)

He received Timon's letter today and had not replied sooner because he had not seen the captain of the Georgia until today. The boat will leave the 10th, but the price of passage is very high. The Captain does not want to take anything under 750. There is a French boat for New Orleans, but it will leave later. Le Gros would have put on board the boxes at H(enr)y (Meinel) Mainel's since Timon's passage would be delayed(?). In reply to the letter which he asks Timon to write tomorrow he will let Timon know when he should leave Paris. He sends regards to Father Etienne. (The handwriting is difficult to read and therefore the translation is uncertain).

IV-3-k A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
2


1837 Nov 3

Nozo, C.M., Father J(ean) B(aptiste)
Paris, (France)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Nozo waited for Father (John) Timon, (C.M.)'s return to America to offer Blanc his thanks for the confidence shown in his offer of the direction of the seminary. It will be impossible for them at present. Nozo has conferred with Timon and has given him his instructions about the arrangements which he is authorized to make with (Blanc).

V-4-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
2


1837 Nov 4

Perisse Brothers
Paris, (France)

To Father (John) Timon, (C.M.)
(Paris, France)

They are sending the volumes which complete Timon's order. This morning, when they saw Timon they forgot to tell him about the price of a bible; that they have added several volumes not priced with the intention of letting him know about them and not paying for them; all the foreign books are priced very low, comparatively.
(P.S.) The collection of Latin historians is in press. A single volume has appeared. (Written by) Lecoffre for Perisse Frères.

IV-3-k A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
2


1837 Nov 4

Viszoczky, Father Andrew
Grand Rapids, (Michigan)

To (Father Vincent Badin)
(Detroit, Michigan)

(Badin's) recent letter of October 16, judging from the date of Mr. Watson has satisfied him completely. Viszoczky thanks him for ordering him to remain at his post since the order of his superiors is his chief sustenance. It is true that he applied his fist to Louis Campau, but he had calumniated his worse since the fight than before. He quotes Campau's letter of October 11 in which Campau expressed his resentment over the way Viszoczky has treated him. Mr. Graverate told him, he said, that the letter Viczoczky read him was a different letter and that he is persuaded that Viszoczky is capable of so doing and of other things. He believes him a villain unworthy of the name of a priest, and is convinced that if he exposed to the law what Viszoczky did the day before he would be treated as he deserves, Campau further accuses Viszoczky of insulting him and his whole family. Viszoczky says that if he has failed in anything since he has been attacked by Campau again with Mauran and Gravorate and at his home again it is not keeping a stick at hand since he has a sore arm for nearly three days. He believes he will die here sooner or later but he will die willingly for Christ. Meanwhile he asks (Badin) to prevent a cruel death and inform him in time what measures to take in the springtime regarding the property. He asks him to let him know as soon as possible the arrival of Bishop (Frederick Rese).

III-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
3


1837 Nov 5

Nozo, C.M., Father J(ohn) B(aptist)
Paris, (France)

To The (Vincentians) in America
(Barrens, Missouri)

Father (John) Timon, (C.M.'s) stay in France must seem long to them, but not to Nozo because of the many affairs that he had to treat of after Nozo's return from Italy. Nozo gave him advice about their mission which is particularly dear to him. He consents to their keeping (St. Mary's College) until favorable circumstances present themselves for withdrawing from it. Timon will let them know Nozo's plans about several things. He relies on Timon's and their prudence in the part to take in the transfer of the College to Ste. Genevieve and the day school. He warns them not to undertake too great an expense without being assured of success.

IV-3-k A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 8vo.
3


1837 Nov 9

Chance, Father John J.
St. Mary's College, Baltimore, Maryland

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Acquaints Purcell with Mr. Nicollete, French astronomer who is touring the country. Leaves St. Louis on November 10 and expects to visit Cincinnati. Has instructed him to call on Purcell. Gives Purcell instruction for him on conveyances between Pittsburgh and Baltimore and Wheeling and Baltimore. Asks Purcell to call on his nieces in Seneca County and their father a Mr. Edwards near Tiffin. Asks about a Mr. Wilson, whom he recommended to Purcell.

II-4-f A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
3


1837 Nov 10

Brownson, Orestes A.
Chelsea, (Massachusetts)

To George Bancroft
Springfield, Mass(achusetts)

Brownson apologizes for leaving unanswered Bancroft's favor of July. Since he left the (Boston) Reformer, he has been busy preparing the first number of the Boston Quarterly Review. It is to be open to the free and full discussion of all topics of general and permanent interest. His design is by means of a higher philosophy of man than Reid's or Locke's to Christianize Democracy and democratize the Church. He thanks Bancroft for the second volume of his History. It is the best historical production in their language. The chapter on Quakerism is admirable. He will try to persuade George Ripley to do a review of the volume. It is with no ordinary feelings that he sees Bancroft giving his time and talents to the cause of the masses. He knows what it is to sacrifice ease, property and reputation in their cause. These slanders and obloquy that Bancroft has had to endure have done him no harm. They are in the midst of a revolution of mind and the success of the fight is registered in heaven. The conversion of George Ripley to Democracy is pleasing. When Brownson first became acquainted with him, Ripley was dead set against Democracy, but he is now about right, only in danger like all converts of becoming a little too enthusiastic. He regards Ripley as one of the first men in the United States. Several young men from the Divinity School at Cambridge are coming on well and they will soon have the literature and philosophy and all that belongs to scholarship on the right side.

I-4-h A.L.S. (Xerox copy from the George Bancroft Papers in the Collection of Regional History and University Archives at Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y.) 4pp. 4to.
6


1837 Nov 8

Dujast, Father
Lyon, (France)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Dujast, pastor of St. Foy, is well acquainted with Miss Martin. She is recommended by Father Cholleton for the Society of the Holy Family. Dujast was her director for about 8 years. Cholleton adds (in his own hand) his recommendations to those of Father Dufal in favor of Miss Martin.

V-4-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
5


1837 Nov 9

Miles, O.P., Father Prov. Richard P.
Somerset, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Acknowledges Purcell's of November 3. Miles is in apprehension that his nomination to the see of Nashville will prevent any Dominicans from attending the retreat or Synod, as he must adjust his affairs and go to St. Rose. The loss of anyone in the community will be felt so severely that he feels that he must refuse unless compelled. Archbishop Eccleston has informed him of the nomination, and he has sent for the bulls. If they do not contain a formal precept to accept, he will refuse. He is not disposed to complain but believes a blunder has been made in his nomination, because he lacks the means, the diocese lacks the means and his community, under the circumstances cannot be expected to supply them. Consequently the will of God is manifested clearly otherwise he must refuse.

II-4-f A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
5


1837 Nov 10

Brownson, O(restes) A.
Chelsea, (Massachusetts)

To (R(alph)) W(aldo) Emerson
Concord, Mass(achusetts)

Brownson has learned of Emerson's arrangements for the publication of edition of Carlyle's history of the Revolution. Will Emerson furnish Brownson with a notice of Carlyle's work for the Boston Quarterly Review. Brownson wishes something said of the book and its publication in his January number. Brownson has begun printing a quarterly periodical to be furnished to subscribers at three dollars a year. His design is to have a periodical open to the discussion of all topics of general and permanent interest. Brownson has solicited none of his friends to aid in the first number because of the doubt he had whether, with his public reputation, any of them would have been willing to aid him. He hopes Emerson will enrich its pages now and then with some contributions of his own. The first number is to be out on the first day of January. Brownson thanks Emerson for his Phi Beta Kappa oration. He does not know what the world is coming to if such a voice as that may be heard in old Harvard. Emerson bearded the lion in his den. The Transcendentalists are used(?) Up in the last number of the Christian Examiner. Lache's case is desperate with such a defender who ascribes him no merit but that of writing in a common sense phraseology.

I-4-h A.L.S. (Photostat from Harvard College Library) 4pp. 8vo.
2


1837 Nov 10

(Eccleston), Archbishop Samuel
Baltimore, (Maryland)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

(Eccleston) furnishes Blanc with the substance of the documents which he received a few days since from Propaganda relative to the last Provincial Council (of Baltimore, 1837). (Eccleston) cannot have the acts of the Council printed until he hears from the Bishops of the Province. Three decrees were given by the Propaganda:
1. Confirming the acts of the council;
2. Dispensing with the fast and abstinence on the Wednesdays of Advent;
3. Dispensing with the abstaining from servile work and attending Mass on the Monday of Easter and Pentecost.
(Eccleston) received the Bulls appointing Father John Hughes as coadjutor of New York; Father Thomas Heyden to the see of Natchez; Father Richard Miles to Nashville; and Father Mathias Loras to Dubuque. No action was to be taken on the application of the Bishop of Detroit until he reached Rome. The Sacred Congregation and His Holiness are very desirous to maintain the obligation of fasting on the Fridays of Advent. Following are extracts from the Instructions accompanying the Decree of Confirmation: (quoted in Latin). (Eccleston) has not had an opportunity of consulting (Roger B.) Taney on the important business about which Blanc addressed (Eccleston) some time ago. Taney's health has compelled him to move to the country. (Eccleston) thanks Blanc for his candor in relation to Father (Philip) Borgna, (C.M.). (Eccleston) did not consent to have him placed in his present situation until he had been encouraged by Bishop (Joseph) Rosati. (Eccleston's) voyage to Rome is only in the class of probabilities; its principal business has been settled otherwise.

V-4-f A.L.S. (Part Latin) 4pp. Folio
10


1837 Nov 13

(Eccleston), Samuel, Archbishop of Baltimore
Baltimore, Maryland

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Hastens to give the substance of the documents received from the Second Congregation of the Propaganda in the decrees of the Provincial Council (of 1837). Cannot publish them until he has heard the bishops of the province. The following decrees have been approved:
1. Wednesday's of Advent are no longer fast days.
2. Monday of Easter and Pentecost are no longer days of obligation.
3. The bulls are given for Bishop John Hughes, coadjutor of New York, Rev. Thomas Heyden, Bishop of Natchez; Rev. Richard Miles, O.P., Bishop of Nashville; Rev. Mathias Loras, Bishop of Dubuque. No action was to be taken on the Bishop (Rese) of Detroit until his arrival in Rome. The Sacred Congregation desires to keep the Friday fast in Advent unless the bishops, after mature deliberation, decide otherwise to avoid danger of sin.
The Archbishop includes (in Latin) a few quotations from the decrees:
1. About the title of ordination for the missions.
2. About the abuse of ecclesiastical goods.
3. About clerics before civil tribunals.
Eccleston adds in his own hand an acknowledgment of a letter from Purcell. He says he does not ask about the civil or political merits of the question but about manner of procedure. Feels it better to decide the question without consulting the people of Michigan or the representation of the Bishop of Detroit. Asks Purcell's views. Asks Purcell about his attitude towards Purcell's sister. Cannot disregard her letters because of his regard for her parents.

II-4-f A (in part) L.S. 3pp. 4to.
15


1837 Nov 15

(Emerson, Ralph Waldo)
Concord, Mass(achusetts)

He thanks Brownson for his interest in the work of Carlyle which is being heralded by Emerson. He is also glad to hear more about the philosophic-literary enterprise of Brownson and he shall be glad to get a good word for Carlyle in Brownson's journal. He would like to get the same into a newspaper, also. At Dr. Walker's request he has promised some notice of it for the "Examiner." He is now busy with preparing lecture courses which are to begin shortly, so that he has not had time for writing for the press. Hence he dare not promise Brownson a line for his January journal. Still, he likes the character of Brownson's journal and hopes he will be able to help it soon. He meanwhile sends a card of invitations to his lectures, if Brownson is available.

I-3-e (Signature missing) 2pp. 8vo.
1


(1837) Nov 16

Jamey, Father V(ictor)
Natchitoches, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Nicolari(?) died at the home of Neuville Bambin at Bayou Pierre. All his merchandise was sold and the money is in the hands of the judge of Cadeaux County whom Jamey knows very well. He has not been able to get any information about the other person (Blanc) spoke about but if he is in Texas he will probably not return as the Indians have done(?) horrible things there. Jamey is very glad Father (N.) Francis decided to live at Cloutierville for the fever Jamey has had for three months puts him out of action. Jamey has the where with all to make the first payment and the second half remains to be collected by Francais. Their church at the Post will be finished this month or not later than the last of January. Jamey despairs of curing his fever on the banks of the Rouge river; that is the opinion of Dr. Johanson. (Blanc) is to tell Jamey what he wants him to do and how much (Blanc) can count on the priests who will no doubt arrive soon or have already arrived. The health of his parish is very good. Some say they think they see some turning toward Catholicity but Jamey can only envy their good fortune. If Jamey's fever returns every winter Blanc will lose little in losing Jamey in April.

V-4-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
6


1837 Nov 18

Harrington, Brother D(aniel)
Cape Girardeau, (Missouri)

To Father John Odin, (C.M.)
Barrens, Missouri

The Irishman has not yet arrived. Harrington will send Luke immediately when he arrives, but wishes Odin would spare him a little longer. Father (John) Boullier, (C..M.) has done just as Harrington expected, that is, nothing at all. Boullier took John Hutchins one day to ride around the old Cape. James Hutchins was employed to gather the corn. John moved his family to the old house at the mill and both only helped 3 days to gather corn. Harrington, therefore, had only Luke, Dory(?) and Harry. The corn is about half gathered, no stable fixed for the horse, a large quantity of turnips in the field. Mr. Gibbony not paid for the cart; Mr. Sutten(?) and doctor's bill unpaid. He left no money; any information he wished to get he sought of Hutchins and the Negroes. The surveyor has surveyed the old Cape and forty-acre lot. Mrs. Able can sell no wood. She sold only a few cords and sent a note for $10 which is only payable at 15 per cent. Harrington begs Odin not to leave the business of the Cape depending on the good will of Boullier. Harrington met Mr. Doyle who said he received an order on Odin for $9 which has been transferred by Jones, the painter, to James Hutchins. Another order has been given to Mr. Z(I?)egler(?) on Odin for money. Harrington thought Odin had paid him off when his work was done at the Barrens.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 3pp. Folio
10


1837 Nov 20

Ladaviere, S.J., Father A. P(ierre)
Grand Coteau, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

Ladaviere hoped to give (Blanc) favorable news about Father (Nicholas) Point, (S.J.) but he cannot. Ladaviere's unexpected arrival seemed to cure him but it lasted only two days. Ladaviere thought he would return to Ascension last Sunday, but he must put it off. This kind of relapse is not as serious as before as his presence quiets Point. The doctors talk of sea bathing as soon as he can travel. There being no one else who understands the arrangements for the opening of (St. Charles) College it is difficult to maintain this necessary tranquility. Father (J. Francis) Abbadie, (S.J.) has a touch of fever almost every day. Ladaviere will see what he can do next Saturday or Sunday.

V-4-f A.L.S. (French) pp. 4to.
4


1837 Nov 23

Anduze, Father M(atthew) B(ernard)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Received from Father (August) Jeanjean 469 piastres and 14 cents for the interest due November 1 on a sum due to Anduze by a transaction made before Theodore Seghers of this city.

V-4-f A.D.S. ((French) 1P. 12MO.
2


1837 Nov 23

Hughes, John, Bishop elect of Basileo
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Purcell cannot be surprised at his appointment since he has had a part in it. Explains his failure to write his gratitude to those whom he has visited in the West, by his expectancy of news from Rome and the perplexities that followed its arrival. Invites Purcell to assist with Bishop Fenwick of Boston at the consecration which will take place in New York. Speaks of a convert recommended by Purcell - Bishop Kenrick is to reside at St. John's thus breaking the fetters of Trusteeism with which he himself is to be bound. Asks about Father (Thomas) Heyden, since resigned at Pittsburgh. Father (Edward) Barron is head of the seminary. Sends regards to friends in the West. Has things to tell Purcell but does not care to put them on paper. Rejoices that Bishop (Bruté) is recovering.
P.S. Procrastination his only excuse.

II-4-f A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
10


1837 Nov 23

Point, S.J., Father (Nicholas)
Grand Coteau, L(ouisian)a

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Blanc's interest in the success of their College ) of St. Charles) gives Point confidence to ask for an arrangement that is a trifle trying for Donaldsonville but very desirable for Grand Coteau. There is nothing to be desired in supervisors and professors at the moment. The English professor is living with them. But for good administration there should be a good agent(?), a good bursar, a good prefect of health, etc. To fulfill these offices Point sees only Father (Joseph) Soller, (S.J.) or Father (A. Pierre) Ladaviere, (S.J.). As for Soller, Point feels that the Protector of the Germans and the sick would not want them to call him now but it is impossible for them not to want Ladaviere to come back and to regard his presence as absolutely necessary almost under pain of the death of the College. Brother Chauvet who has been so great a help in the manual labors is failing. Father (J. Francis) Abbadie, (S.J.) can only hobble about. The others are not in very good health and the one who should be the core of it all is almost nothing at all. However Ladaviere's arrival has done him great good and Point wants very much to have him stay. Every time he mentions going back to Donaldsonville it robs Point of sleep.
P.S. Point has just received a letter from the Provincial. He seems very satisfied with what Blanc wrote and promises to do all he can to send the reinforcements. Point sends regards to Fathers Jeanjean, Ma(e)nhaut and Soller. Also to tell Mr. D'Arrhan that he apologizes for not replying sooner.

A.L.S. (French)

Enclosure:

--------
1837 Nov 23

Point, S.J., Father (Nicholas)
Grand Coteau, (Louisiana)

To Father (Joseph) Soller, (S.J.)
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Here is Point's writing to prove he is alive to thank Soller for all his kindnesses. Point hopes Soller will accompany Mr. D'Arron when he brings them his little nephew. Point has gone 4 or 5 days without fever. Ladaviere is now with them. Point received a letter from the Provincial. He knows that the Bishop placed the first stone on St. Ignatius Day and approves of all; their Fathers at Madura talk of nothing but July 4; a new residence at Bourges; Father Pitot dead. Fr. Devos is writing Soller so Point will stop.
P.S. Soller is to ask Jeanjean to send them some numbers of Piquet(?) from time to time. Soller is to send his book case quickly; he is to ask D'harron [D'Arrhon] to do it for him.

A.L.S. (French)

Enclosure:

--------
1837 Nov 23

De Vos, S.J., Father P(eter)
Grand Coteau, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Point will take care of De Vos' letter in reply to Blanc's of the 17th. Point's health is much better. Ladaviere's visit has done him good. They accept with pleasure the offer of a gig and horse (Blanc) is going to get for them. De Vos thanks (Blanc) for granting him the faculty of dispensing from the second degree of affinity in the case of necessity. Abbadie is always bothered with a slight fever. The rest of the Community is well.

A.L.S. (French)

V-4-f A.L.S. (French) 5pp. 4to. And 12 mo.
8


1837 Nov 24

Carriere, (Joseph) S.S., Father
Paris, France

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

He anticipated the ordinary time for sending funds because the Association of the Propagation has made more than the ordinary allocations so as not to leave money idle. The allocation for Cincinnati is 18,000 fr. He sends to Purcell:
1. A draft on MM. Joubert for 2130 fr. in francs and gourds,
2. A draft on M. Fabre of Montreal for 7000 charges for which should be paid by Fabre but if Purcell so wishes he may return the draft.
3. An order on the Bishop of New York for about 6000. Purcell should let him know whether he receives these - He has taken care of the order for 750 fr. Made by Purcell October 15 for the "Dames Vist" whom he hopes have arrived in America already - Says there is an account of Purcell's controversy in the L'Ami de la Religion - Thinks that the Annals should say more - Suggests that Purcell send a long account. Time short - M. Hamon better and again superior of seminary at Bor Deaux. There are 167 seminarians at Paris, 50 at Issy.

II-4-f A.L.S. 1p. 8vo. (French) 3


1837 Nov 25

Esperance, Therese, Baronne de Coppens
Mons, France

to M__________

Has heard that he is on Europe and will soon return to America and desires to send a small sum to Bishop Purcell of Cincinnati. Encloses an obituary of her Sister who left a testament by which 20,000 was to go to the Bishop of Cincinnati. The legacy, however, did not amount to so much as she proposed to send only 10,999 fr. Purcell accepted this in his letter of August 1837. Wants to see to the payment, M_______. Is prompted to this by her desire to aid the missions - Has intended to send something to Father (Augustus) Jeanjean but unsuccessfully.

II-4-f A.L.S. pp. 12mo. (French)
3


1837 Nov 28

Gautier, Father, Parish of the Ascension
Donaldsonville, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

A committee from the cannoniers of Donaldsonville asked if they could assist at the parish Mass in military style in honor of their patroness, St. Barbara, and to have the Te Deum sung for them. Gautier does not know his powers in this last matter and refers to (Blanc) for authorization. Since Father (Pierre) Ladaviere, (S.J.) has not yet returned, Gautier thought that Father (Nicholas) Point, (S.J.) was not well but since he has not sent any news he is afraid that he himself is ill. (Blanc) may have received letters recently from Grand Coteau so that he could relieve his anxiety. Father (Charles H. Boutelou de) St. Aubin, pastor of Assumption passed through on Saturday returning from New Orleans; he could tell Gautier nothing. Thinking that Ladaviere would not tarry longer St. Aubin was to have left yesterday for his missions counting on Gautier to replace him.

V-4-f A.L.S. (French) 1p. 4to.
6


1837 Nov 28

Jamey, Father V(ictor)
Natchitoches, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Jamey came to Natchitoches Saturday at 2. There were few at Mass although he was told it was more than usual. These gentlemen are in the habit of saying their two Masses here on Sundays and Jamey told Father (N.) Francais that his idea was that (Blanc) had told them to say Mass alternately at each of the stations. Father (Edward D'Hauw) Dhawd is as Jamey always thought him to be physically and morally but just now he is truly ill. Jamey has bought all his furniture for $900 payable in six years. (D'Hauw) says he has nothing more to do there but collect which will take until next March. Jamey thinks he is as childish as he can be. Francais considers himself almost like the pastor of Campti saying that D'hawd had charge of the rest of the parish. Jamey said Mass Sunday for (Blanc's) deceased brother and many assisted. (A,) Lecomte and his brother-in-law (Placide) Bossier visited Jamey. When Dawd goes to (New Orleans) Jamey will give (Blanc) full details.
(P.S.) Jamey sends his respects to father Jeanjean.

V-4-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
6


1837 Dec

(Loras), Mathias, Bishop of Dubuque, Iowa
New Orleans, Louisiana

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Announces his acceptance of the Bishopric of Dubuque, Wisconsin Territory. Was consecrated at Mobile on 10th of December. Is on way to Europe. Asks for prayers and advice. Answer to be sent to Archbishop of Lyon, France.

II-4-f A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
5


1837 Dec 4

Mioland, Father ( ) V.G.
Lyons, (France)

To Bishop F(rederick) Rese
Detroit, (Michigan)

Lacking news of Rese since his passage through Lyons and also lacking news of the Diocese of Detroit about which Rese promised to write from Rome, they presume that he has returned to Detroit. The Association of the Propagation has decided to make their decision about the division of the funds at the beginning of the year rather than at the end is so far as that is possible and to transmit to the missions the funds allotted in so far as the funds are available . Thus, they announce that the allocation for the diocese of Detroit for the year 1837 is 9,000 francs. They wish that he would make a draft for that sum on MM. Vue Guerin and Fils of Lyons at 30 days sight and notify the secretary of the Council of that action. Mioland also sends a copy of the new form which they wish Rese to fill out as he promised. They beg him also to add details of the diocese for their information and the edification of the readers of the Annals. Rese understands the importance of this information since it is the life of the Association and almost of the mission since the Austrian government has reduced to almost nothing the publications of the Leopoldine Association. Rese will receive copies of the Annals which will be sent by the treasurer of the Council at Paris, Mr. Choiselat, who will inform him exactly of the matter. Mioland wishes also to inform Rese of a decision made by those who have the administration of the goods of the Association. Rese knows that some missions send persons to Europe to beg for help. These delegates often visit places in which the Association exists. Therefore they make the following observations concerning the results of such actions:
1. There is a diminution of the funds of the Association.
2. There is danger to the work if these men do not conduct themselves correctly,
3. Damage is done among those who do not read the Annals and who will not understand why these men should beg for the same missions for while the Association has collected money.
Consequently it is to be understood for the future that the acceptance of the aid of the Association implies the renunciation of the right to collect funds in the places where the Association is established.

III-2-g L.S. (French) 3pp. 8vo.
3


1837 Dec 9

Boullier, C.M., Father J(ohn)
St. Genevieve, (Missouri)

To Father (John) Timon, (C.M.)
Barrens, M(iss)o(uri)

Boullier is sorry to learn by Timon's of the 8th of the superior's sickness. Father (Francis) Cellini, (C.M.) is expected every day from St. Louis. Father (Francis Xavier) Dahmen, (C.M.) spoke to Mr. Sergeant(?) who promised to go if it is impossible for Boullier to go to the seminary. The worst thing is that Timon will not come over at Christmas; everyone has made the greatest exertions to complete the church.

IV-3-k A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
4


1837 Dec 11

Brasseur, Father (John F.)
St. Martinville, (Louisiana)

to Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Edward Castillo and Marie Dilia Greig, children of sisters, ask for a dispensation to be married. Father (Joseph) Soller, (S.J.) sends word to Blanc that Don Lefevre had written to Mr. Dufilho about the young Don of the faculty of Paris who is probably the same one in whom Blanc is interested. Mr. Dumartrait has sold his brick works for $1500. To avoid expense, why couldn't one give these bricks to those who bought the brickyard on the condition that the same quantity would be given back later? Brasseur sang mass for the first time on the last Sunday of November at New Iberia. The church was too small and if this continues there will be a need for two priests at St. Martin. St. Mary's with encouragement will not be slow to follow the same example. The people at Pont Breaux want to get at building their chapel; the subscription is almost completed. J(oh)n B(aptis)t Beauvais died two days after Blanc left. Brasseur hopes there will be a synod at the beginning of the year.
(P.S.) Another dispensation: Caliste Pellerin and Marie Virginia Provot, also children of sisters.

V-4-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
11


1837 Dec 12

(Rosati), Joseph, Bishop of St. Louis
St. Louis, Missouri

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

During his three months absence from St. Louis he received Purcell's letter which he is not sure that he has answered. Asks Purcell to tell Mr. Moffett to send order for $100 against the old church. With regard to the German priest he consents that he remain in Purcell's diocese. Discusses marriage case suggested by Purcell. His new neighbor cannot reach his diocese now and he has advised him to go to France.

II-4-f A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
3


1837 Dec 13

McAleer, Michael, Father
Canton, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

A member of the congregation who had difficulty with Father Hoffman and was suspended by letter from Purcell wishes to be reinstated - McAleer asks directions about the case. He arrived at Cantob December 8 a few days after Father (Ferdinand) Kuhr - At first people complained much but he has refused to listen - Dr. Hoffman in his farewell talk caused trouble. He attacked the "low Dutch" for their origin and their pride saying that Father Kuhr would follow the same plans as he - leaving the English-speaking people to the assistant - After that Mr. Kuhr announced to the congregation that they must pay his expenses and that they must not come for sick calls without a conveyance, thanking Father Hoffman for his speech - Father Hoffman attacked the Dominicans, Father Henni, Father Collins, and Father Short - Praised only Father Stephen H. Montgomery - Father Kuhr has decided to keep the same housekeeper despite scandals - Mrs. Jacob Short came to him begging to get her pew in the church. Father Kuhr as steward has plans for the pew renting and expenses that he does not approve. Offers to do this work for peace in the congregation - Has been successful himself and expects and expects to speak German in 2 or 3 months - Sunday as Father Kuhr officiates at Canton, he will go to Massilon. Goes now to make arrangements.
N.B. Anxiously expects an answer.

II-4-f A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
11


1837 Dec 15

Point, S.J., Father (Nicholas)
Grand Coteau, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

Point received (Blanc's letter of December 3; he thanks Blanc and the Ursulines for their help. Point has talked to Father (Pierre) Ladaviere, (S.J.) about Mr. Duffel's bill. Duffel is honesty itself but a poor payer because of the enormous burdens weighing on him. Point hopes someone among (Blanc's) (priests) can give the retreat. If Point does not give it, as is very probable because of the opening of (St. Charles) College which will take place January 5, it will be Father (Peter) Devos, (S.J.). The Sisters are to let them know the most convenient time. The college goes on in its small way. It is going up and the small buildings are being readied for the reopening; it seems they will not lack for students. A Dr. Smith of La Fayette parish tells Point there are 14 of the same name who could come to the College. Point also learns with pleasure what (Blanc) tells him of the eagerness in his city for information about the College. Point hopes there will be many like Mr. D'Arron and things will go well. It seems two workmen are enough. Those of Mr. Ardennes seem to be finished. For two weeks the difficulty of finding laborers almost stopped the work but their excellent doctor always rescued them; now that the harvest is over, Negroes are readily found. Point has written to the father General and the Provincial about (Blanc's) plans for La Fayette and the German parish.
P.S. It will be a great service to them if (Blanc) can lend them his stone; they have one but one is not enough.

V-4-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
9


1837 Dec 17

Fransoni, Cardinal J(ames) Ph(ilip), Prefect, Sacra Congregation de Propaganda Fide
Rome, (Italy)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Fransoni received Blanc's letter of September 17. Out of this sale are to come other buildings in the future. As for the Ursulines they cannot sell their property without the consent of the Bishop and for anything of great value they must have the permission of the Apostolic See. His Holiness also consents to the petition about celebrating the Office and Mass of St. Philomena in Blanc's diocese.

V-4-f L.S. (Latin) 1p. 4to.
2


1837 Dec 18

Wood, James Frederick
Rome, Italy

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Asks Purcell to excuse him for writing to his mother first. When he arrived at the College of the Propaganda he found himself unable to be admitted. On his assurance that Purcell would bear the expenses an arrangement was made for him to stay at the Irish College under Dr. Cullen at least temporarily, until there was room at the Propaganda. Has met many priests whom he admires. Traveled part of the way with Bishop (William) Clancy, who is staying at the Irish College and favored his acceptance at the College. Met Bishop (Frederick) Rese and a Dominican named Martin from Somerset. Speaks of the Cincinnati seminarians, all are well except Monfort who injured his health by study. Speaks of giving certain monies to them. Speaks of the sights of Rome. Sends regards to certain friends.
P.S. Asks Purcell to visit his family and pray for them.

II-4-f A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
4


1837 Dec 19

Maurian, Charles
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Maurian, parish judge, grants license to Father L(ouis) Moni, curate of St. Luis Church, New Orleans, to join in matrimony, Hyacinthe Garcia and Madelaine Aricie Dubur, free persons of color.

A.D.S.

On the same paper:

--------
1837 Dec 19

Moni, Father L(ouis)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Moni asks Father (Constantine) Ma(e)nhaut, rector of St. Mary' s, to perform the above marriage.

A.D.S. (French)
V-4-f A.D.S. 1p. Folio (English and French)
4


1837 Dec 23

Auduze [Anduze], Father M(atthew) B(ernard)
Iberville, L(ouisian)a

to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Auduze received Blanc's letter. He is annoyed at Father (Ennemond) Dupuy's delay; only on Dupuy's arrival can Auduze arrange his affairs. Auduze writes the two preceding petitions in Latin because of their nature. The first dispensation is for Derouzin Allain and Constance Landry; the second for Pierre Hebert and Helenne Guedry. (The two applications for dispensations precede this note on the same paper).

V-4-f A,L,S, (Latin and French) 4pp. 4to.
6


1837 Dec 23

Le Gros, J(ohn) B(aptiste)
Havre, (France)

To Father J(ohn) Timon, (C.M.)
Perryville, Missouri

Le Gros hopes this letter will find Timon arrived safely at New Orleans. He has sent the two boxes on the ship Russel, addressed to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc. The boxes came by stage coach without a customs permit for the small one. Except for that, Timon would have received them on the boat Grace Brown. The charges are $22.50. His wife joins him in recommending themselves and their child to Timon's prayers.

IV-3-k A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
2


1837 Dec 27

Smith, L.J., St. Marc D'Arby an F.H. Duperier
New Iberia, Louisiana

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Commissioned by the church at New Iberia, they represent to Blanc that their church is now completed and ready to receive a clergyman. The congregation is probably one of the largest in the state and the distance to St. Martinsville being at least 10 miles, four-fifths of the congregation have not the means of attending services and are excluded in their last illness from the benefit of a clergyman. Consequently, as wardens of the church they ask Blanc to give them a priest; they are willing to support one.

A.L.S. 2pp.

Enclosure:

--------
1837 Dec 27

Smith, L.J.
New Iberia, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Since Blanc's last visit to their parish they have been constantly employed in completing their church and all is now finished except the presbytery which will be completed in a few weeks. Their dependence on the curate of St. Martin is humiliating for so fine a church and large a congregation. Last week his conduct was so unjust that they had a complete rupture with him and Smith said they would close the church until they heard from Blanc. Father (John F.) Brasseur called on the commissioners last Thursday; they stated that with the balance of near $4000 due, with the subscription and pew rent they could entirely pay for the church and graveyard. Brasseur wanted a price fixed for his monthly services as he had been deceived in West Baton Rouge. This allusion to their probity made them disgusted with bargaining with him. His price was $150 to next March; he could not engage for a year as he intended going North but as Blanc had promised him an assistant he should attend once a month in his stead for $400 a year. Smith replied that his charge was too high and that it was never the intention of the founders of this church for the priest to live at least ten miles away. Bishop (Leo Raymond de Neckere) Denacery had promised them a clergyman if they built a church and Blanc had done the same. Brasseur replied that if they did not rent the pews he would still continue to come gratis provided they sent conveyances. Smith replied they would not accept his services at all under those conditions. They are willing and able to support a priest and would be satisfied to have Blanc fix the salary.

A.L.S. 4pp.
V-4-f A.L.S. 6pp. 4to.
7


1837 Dec 30

(Thoreau, Henry David)
Concord, (Massachusetts)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Chelsea, Mass(achusetts)

Thoreau still thinks with delight of the six weeks he passed with Brownson. He was in the city about a month ago, and intended to look up Brownson. But he had to give up when he was unable to find where he had settled. He wants a position. Either as a teacher in a small school, or an assistant in a large one. More desirable still, would be to get a position as private tutor in some gentleman's family. He believes that his theory of education qualifies him to make it pleasant for both himself and his pupil. As references he could mention Emerson, Dr. Ripley and Mr. Hoar. He hopes that Brownson will notify him if he finds or hears of anything like that mentioned by him above. He liked the first number of the "Boston Review." He likes the spirit of independence in it, and believes at last that there exists a magazine representative of American thought.

I-3-e (Signature missing) 3pp. 8vo.
1


1837 Dec 31

Albuzzi, Dr. P.
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

A bill for 26 piastres for visits and care for the year 1837 for Widow Casimire. Albuzzi received 10 piastres on account.

V-4-f A.D.S. (French) 2pp. 16mo.
1


1837 Dec 31

Young, O.P., Father N(icholas) D.
St. Joseph's, Somerset, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
Cincinnati, Ohio

Acknowledges Purcell's of December 14. Speaks of obtaining terms for organ from Mr. Tinal. Price high, seeks a reduction to $600, and asks that Father Henni use his influence to get that price. The church at Lancaster is under roof, but he does not know when they will have funds to finish it. People at Jonathan's Creek want a church. So also at Newark where the Dominicans will undertake the lot if Purcell agrees. Does not agree with Purcell on the appointment of Bishop (R.P.) Miles, pointing to lack of letter from their general as additional proof, that it was not the will of God, that he be Bishop of Nashville. Has not seen the Sisters about Miss Manning. Fathers Wilson and Clarkson want faculties for the scapular of Mt. Carmel. Father (Adrian) Vandeweyer upset by Purcell's words to him. He still goes to Pittsburgh on occasions. Young expects him to go to Europe and remain. House at Somerset nearly completed but too damp to occupy until Spring.

II-4-f A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
11