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Calendar: 1838

1838 to 1848 Jan

Brownson, Orestes A.

Drafts for:

"Christianity Not an Original Revelation With Jesus Nor a System of Theological Doctrines, Properly So Called," Boston Quarterly Review,
I (Jan. 1838), 8-21

Charles Elwood, or the Infidel Converted (1840); reprinted in Works, IV, 173-316

"Conversations with a Radical," Boston Quarterly Review, IV (Jan. and April 1841), 1-41, 137-183. These drafts are actually for an unpublished "Conversation VIII."

"Laroux on Humanity," Boston Quarterly Review, V (July 1842) 257-322; reprinted in Works, IV, 100-137.

Miscellaneous drafts, probably for essays in The Christian World (c. 1843).

"Spiritual Life: Reply to J(ames) F(reeman) C(larke)," The Christian World (c.1843).

"Origin and Ground of Government," United States Magazine and Democratic Review, XIII (Aug.-Oct. 1843), 129-147, 241-262, 353-377, reprinted in Works, XV, 296-404.

"The Church Question," Brownson's Quarterly Review, I (Jan. 1844), 57-84.

"Kant's Critic of Pure Reason," Brownson's Quarterly Review, I (April, July and Oct. 1844), 137-174, 281-309, 417-449; reprinted in Works, I, 100-213.

"Origin and Constitution of Government," Brownson's Quarterly Review, I (April 1844), 208-242; reprinted in Works, XV, 405-433.

"Nature and Office of the Church," Brownson's Quarterly Review, I (April 1844), 243-256; reprinted in Works, IV, 484-495.

Rough Draft, probably for "Mr. Calhoun and the Baltimore Convention," Brownson's Quarterly Review, I (April 1844), 257-269; reprinted in Works, XV, 473-483.

Review of a Lecture on the Mixture of Civil and Ecclesiastical Power in the Middle Ages, December 18, 1843, and a Lecture on the Importance of a Christian Basis for the Science of Political Economy and its Application to the Affairs of Life, 1844, by Bishop (John) Hughes of New York, Brownson's Quarterly Review, I (April 1844), 278-280.

"Bishop Hopkins on Novelties," Brownson's Quarterly Review, I (July 1844), 349-367; reprinted in Works, IV, 527-542.

Rough draft, probably for "Come-Outerism: or the Radical Tendency of the Day," Brownson's Quarterly Review, I (July 1844), 367-385; reprinted in Works, 542-558.

"Sparks on Episcopacy," Brownson's Quarterly Review, I (July 1844), 386-396; reprinted in Works, IV, 558-567.

Rough draft, probably for "The Anglican Church Schismatic," Brownson's Quarterly Review, I (Oct. 1844), 487-514; reprinted in Works, IV, 567-589.

"Literary Notices and Miscellanies: Summer on the Lakes in 1843 by S.M. Fuller," Brownson's Quarterly Review, I (Oct. 1844), 546-547.

Draft, probably for "Literary Policy of the Church of Rome," Brownson's Quarterly Review, II (Jan. 1845), 1-29; reprinted in Works, VI, 520-549.

"Hopkin's British Reformation," Brownson's Quarterly Review, II (Jan. 1845), 29-53; reprinted in Works, VI, 568-592.

Drafts, apparently for "Edward Morton" by S.A.C.P. Clerkenwell, Esq., Brownson's Quarterly Review, II (Jan. 1845), 98-129. (The name "Clerkenwell" was apparently, from these drafts, and alias used by Brownson. Included are a number of pages for a later portion of the story which was never published).

"Methodist Quarterly Review," Brownson's Quarterly Review, III (Jan. 1846), 89-107; reprinted in Works, VI, 550-567.

"Liberalism, and Catholicity," Brownson's Quarterly Review, III (July 1846), 273-327; reprinted in Works, V, 476-527.

"Newman's Development of Christian Doctrine," Brownson's Quarterly Review, III , (July 1856), 342-368; reprinted in Works, XIV, 1-28.

"The Two Brothers; or Why Are You a Protestant?" Brownson's Quarterly Review, IV (Jan., April and July, 1847), I-939, 137-163, 277-305, V (Jan. 1848), 101-116; reprinted in Works, VI, 244-352.

"Admonitions to Protestants," Brownson's Quarterly Review, V (Jan., April and July, 1848), 1-20, 137-163, 305-327; reprinted in an altered form as "A Letter to Protestants" in Works, V, 241-330. In addition to the published Letters there are also drafts for two unpublished letters, one attempting to prove the existence of God, the other attempting to establish the fact of creation.

I-4-k A. Drafts
0


(1836)

Louisiana, Orleans Parish
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Mrs. Casimir
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Receipt for $2 for 1837 taxes on Ilet 49, $1,000 and on one slave. (The name of the collector is indecipherable).

V-4-g Receipt S. (French) 2pp. 32mo.
1


(1838?)

(Purcell, John Baptist, Bishop of Cincinnati
Cincinnati, Ohio

to the President of the Association of the Propagation of the Faith of
Lyons, France

Just as he was hastening in person to thank the Association for its gift of 18,000 francs for the year 1837, M. Carriere has written that the Association has voted the diocese another subsidy of 19,600 francs for the current year. This will be used for the purposes the Association has at heart. Purcell speaks of the growth of the diocese. Instead of 26 priests in 1836 he now has 30, instead of 26 churches of which 12 were brick he now has 35 of which 16 are brick. He now has two fine buildings for the orphan asylums. The female asylum, conducted by the Sisters of Charity, is supported by the St. Peter's Benevolent Society. The male asylum is supported by the St. Stanislaus Society among the Germans. Also there is the Mary's Martha Society for visiting the sick and the poor. The basement of Holy Trinity Church is used for a school. There are two Catholic newspapers, one English and the other German. He praises the peaceful condition of the people and their charity where Protestant groups have been quarreling . Despite the formation of neighboring diocese the number of those attending the churches of the diocese have not decreased. He speaks of the attendance of the churches in Cincinnati, Canton, Massillon, Dover, Paris, Bethlehem, Louisville, Waynesburgh, Randolph, Chippewa, Fulton, Wooster, Sugar Creek, Chillicothe, Portsmouth, Piketown, Columbus where Father Henry Juncker works, Delaware, Somerset, Rehoboth, Zanesville and other places attended by the Dominicans; at Dayton where Father Emanuel Thienpont works; at Cleveland, Norwalk, Tiffin and other towns taken care of by the Redemptorists; and of the churches in Guernsey County. He also mentions the results of his own visit to the Camden and Eaton parishes in Preble County.

II-4-g D. 8pp. 8vo. (Perhaps a copy of Purcell's address to the Association).
32


(1838?)

Lesne, Father J(ames)
(Mobile, Alabama)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Lesne takes advantage of Father M.(D.) O'Reil(l)y's going to Blanc to reply to the offer Blanc made to Lesne in case he left Mobile. Although he cannot go at present he has not given up hope of doing so later. He does not like Mobile but the need of priests in this diocese has made him acquiesce in the proposal of Bishop (Michael) Portier to live with him. His greatest trouble has been his great loneliness.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4vo.
3


(1838)?

Tschenhenss, C.SS.R., Father Francis X.
Tiffin, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Father (Peter) Czakert, C.SS.R., his superior, has asked him about his absence and they agree that these two Redemptorists should stay at one station. According to the notice in the Telegraph he gives an account of what has been accomplished during the year since his return. Gives the number of baptisms, marriages, burials and converts. Speaks of building a Church ten miles from tiffin, where he celebrated Mass January 1. In McCutchensville a church of wood has been erected. In Lower Sandusky some French from Canada have settled and have begun a chapel. Others some miles from Melmar speak of erecting a church. Thinks that there are 1500 Catholics in Tiffin of which two thirds are German.

II-4-g A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
6


(1838?)

(Young, O.P., Father Nicholas D.)

To (Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio)

Under the pastorship of Father Charles P. Montgomery at Zanesville, there are 500 or 600 members, with 200 or 300 communicants. There is a church dedicated to St. John the Baptist erected by the Dominicans in 1825 under Father Augustine Hill, O.P.. When Bishop (Edward) Fenwick first celebrated Mass there, there were was only one or two Catholic families. Later it was attended by Father N.D. Young, holding services at the home of Mr. J.T. Dugan. In Guernsey County, near Brownsville was a congregation, most of whom were converts -400 souls, 200 communicants. They are attended every three weeks. In Morgan County near Meagher's Creek there is another group of about 100 without a church attended also by Father Montgomery. Services are occasionally held at Taylorsville, nine miles down the Muskingum River. Also at a place 12 miles northwest of Zanesville.

II--4-g A.L. 4pp. 12mo.
10


1838 Jan 3

Guidée, S.J., Father A.
Paris, (French)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, Louisiana

(Blanc) will pardon Guidée's replying in a strange hand to (Blanc's) letter of November 11; Guidée is ill. He cannot thank (Blanc) enough for all the kindnesses to the (Jesuits) and he regrets that Father (Nicholas) Point, (S.J.) has not followed more faithfully the wise recommendations (Blanc) gave him in regard to his health. Guidée also thanks (Blanc) for sending Father A. Pierre) Ladavière, (S.J.) to look after Point. The news (Blanc) gave about the future college brought Guidée great pleasure; he rejoices in the hope that their desires will become a reality and that they can really be useful to (Blanc). Guidée wishes it were in his power to furnish the men for whom (Blanc) asks for Lafayette but it is impossible at the moment. It will be only by sacrifice that he will be able to replace Father (Joseph) Soller, (S.J.) at the College and to send as assistant to him at New Orleans as (Blanc) has asked. Later perhaps it will not be so difficult and if the pastor at Lafayette could remain a year perhaps Guidée would have a way to share (Blanc's) viewpoint. He will do everything he can and as soon as he can.

V-4-g L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
6


1838 Jan 3

(Rosati), Joseph, Bishop of St. Louis
St. Louis, Missouri

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Has found Mr. Finny and paid him $100. Requests Purcell to send receipt of Mr. Moffie for $300, for the building committee. Has also sent Mr. Schwab $300 as second payment on organ. Would trouble Purcell to have clock maker, Mr. Flook fixed the clock in the church tower. The city contributed so that they could have a town clock and now, he has to listen to their complaints. Threatens recourse to law, and public withdrawal of recommendation otherwise. With regard to Father (William Pisbach), Rosati says that had he come to St. Louis directly from the Propaganda, he would have received him. But knowing Purcell's need of clergymen he suspects him. A man having opposition to slave states would be unfit for Missouri or Arkansas. In Illinois he could use one who could speak English and knew the country but this would be impossible with this gentleman. Speaks of progress in his diocese. Has established six churches with six clergymen. Has ordained twelve priests, making over sixty in the diocese. Has more than 1200 of both sexes in colleges and convents. Several new churches built and being built. However his debt is $30,000. Others not knowing the number of Catholic emigrants to the diocese, and the subsequent expense for churches, etc. for them have told false reports in Europe, making the impression there that he is no longer in need of help. With the interest on the debt he fears that should the help be withdrawn, he will have to sell his library. The clock and the hospitals are paid for by the citizens of St. Louis, who will not give to pay his debts. His pew rent is all he gets from the people. Would have Purcell write to Vienna to expose his situation.

II-4-g A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
7


1838 Jan 4

Peirce, Isaac B.
Trenton, (New York)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Chelsea, Massachusetts

Peirce tells Brownson that he has delayed writing him because of many things, such as traveling, have kept him from doing so. He went to New England with his wife. He thought of visiting Brownson, but he was engrossed in visiting places and scenes of former days. Finally they turned homeward. On the way back they were notified that their daughter was sick; then at Little Falls, where they stopped, they learned she was dead. He has been nearly crushed by this event. However, God has spared his two other daughters, both of whom were sick and are now well. He feels alone now, but he is ready to go on, to stay for the rest of his days in Trenton Falls, as all his attempts to move have been in vain. He more and more needs to escape from public life. He should like to settle near Brownson, but that dream is too good to possess. He would like to read more good works, but cannot procure them. He has read Brownson's "New Views," but he could neither borrow nor buy "Nature," and has not yet seen it.

I-3-e A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
1


1838 Jan 5

McSherry, (S.J.), Father W(illia)m
(Washington, District of Columbia)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

McSherry introduces Father Isaac Clement Aaronien, an Armenian priest who has been sent to this country to collect for the advancement of religion in the East. He could not expect much success in Washington and Alexandra because of the exertions the Catholics are making to have a large church in Washington. His object is to go to Mexico and perhaps to South America.

V-4-g A.L.S. 2pp. 4vo.
2


1838 Jan 11

Abbadie, S.J., Father J(ohn) Fr(ancis)
Grand Coteau, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Last year they were saying, "A pastor, for the love of his flock, is journeying over the water." Now Abbadie wishes Blanc a happy feast day and announces that the enterprise for the good of his numerous sheep is about to begin. It is a great consolation to him to be among the students. The opening day they had no one because it was a Friday; the three who arrived the next day told them so. There are only nine so far. One wept when his Father left; another's Father asked Abbadie to pray for a Jesuit vocation for his son. Blanc knows that to talk like that one would have to grow up in the shadow of Our Lady of Fourvieè`res and moreover it would have to be Humbert Perrodin. The unexpected absence of Father (Nicholas) Point, (S.J.) leaves Abbadie duties which oblige him to leave further details for another time.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
3


1838 Jan 12

(Louisiana), New Orleans

to (Bishop Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Two receipts for taxes on paving the street and sidewalk on Condé Street; one for $83.23 due October 15, 1837 and the other for $86.77 due October 15, 1836; signed by P. Rigaud.

V-4-g 2 Receipts S. (French) 4pp-. 4to.
2


1838 Jan 13

Fransonius, J., Ch. Cardinal Prefect, Sacre Congregatio de fide Propaganda
Rome, Italy.

To Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

The youth Joseph O'Mealy of Cincinnati, a student of the Collegio Urbano presented letters from Purcell dated October 3, 1837 in which he asks whether in the Apostolic brief of Pope Leo XII on the Dominican province of St.. Joseph, the Dominicans were not bound to pay a certain pension to the Bishop of Cincinnati each year. The Cardinal quotes the decree dated May 2, 1838 to Bishop Edward Fenwick to the effect that the Dominicans are to pay to the Bishop of Cincinnati, if he is not a Dominican an annual pension of $300.
(Signed also by) A. Maius, Secretary.

II-4-g L.S. 1p. 8vo. (Latin)
7


1838 Jan 14

Vivier, (Claude) and (P.) Bouchard
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

They would be unworthy of (Blanc's) confidence did they not acknowledge the favors he has done for them. They are making him a present of a writing table.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp 4to.
2


1838 Jan 17

Blanc, A(nthony), Bishop of New Orleans
New Orleans, Louisiana

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Received Purcell's letter by Dr. (Francis) Hoffman who has gone on to Marseilles, getting passage for $100 through the French Consul. Bishop (Bruté) of Vincennes is there for the Winter. Also Bishop (Portier) of Mobile was there for eleven days. The unfortunate Keily also there. He had a good recommendation from Father (John) Odin at the Barrens, but fell into his old habits as soon as he arrived. McKlosker has also fallen. He demanded the permission to say Mass, and asked the means to go to Europe or to New York. Later he went to Natchez, arriving on the same day as Father (James) Vandevelde. When Father Vandevelde was on the altar he heard that McKlosker had gone to the house of the Colline nuns to say Mass. He sent an Irishman there to say that he had no faculties, who arrived too late for the Mass but stopped the collection. McKosker wrote a letter to Vandevelde insulting him and saying that he had consulted a lawyer and that he, Vandevelde, would have to appear before a civil tribunal for insulting him. Blanc wrote to all his acquaintances at Natchez to prevent it, but Father Vandevelde wrote that he had left that place. Also Mr. (Pierce) Connelly and his pious wife have also arrived and Blanc has written to encourage them. He deplores the sad affair. Father Vandevelde has stimulated the faith of the people at Natchez in a public assembly, from which they sent encouraging letters to the Bishop-elect (Hayden) of Natchez. Connelly full o f faith, Mrs. Connelly an angel. Father Timon has arrived. They had solemn vespers. Has ordained (Joseph) Evrard priest. Father Timon hopes to start the diocesan seminary this year. He is a good man and seems about to place the Vincentians on good footing. He is accompanied by two others, one in minor orders and a brother. He hopes to receive others next year. Bishop Loras is now two weeks at sea. Father (Augustus) Jungian spent two weeks at St. Michel at the college. The little college has opened with 25 or so boarders. Father Nicholas) Point, who has been sick was well enough to conduct the retreat. Blanc says he needs a priest for the congregation at Alexandria, (La.) Red River, where the congregation is mostly American with few French. Asks Purcell to direct him where he can get one.

II-4-g A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo. (Partly French)
20


1838 Jan 24

Brownson, Orestes A.
Chelsea, (Massachusetts)

To (George) Bancroft
( )

Brownson thinks from what he learns that their radical friend at least the working men will prove true, and that Bancroft need apprehend no difficulty. Brownson believes that Bancroft's course will be the true one, and Brownson will exhort all the influence he can. Brownson begs not to be considered as interfering with appointments. He must mention another name, Mr. A.F. Haskell as a candidate for inspectorship. Mr. Haskell is a radical Democrat and an honest, able and deserving man. Brownson does not ask Bancroft to appoint Haskell or anyone, he wants to furnish Bancroft with another name on the list from which he must choose as his judgment directs him.
P.S. Jan(uar)y 25, 1838. Brownson supposed that the enclosed letter had been sent to Bancroft long before. It contains opinion since expressed, but since it was originally intended for Bancroft, Brownson send it now.

I-4-h A.L.S. (Photostat Mass. History Society) 3pp. 8vo.
1


1838 Jan 27

Leopoldine Association of Vienna by Vincent Edward
Archbishop of Vienna, Pres.

To Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

The benevolence and piety of the faithful of Austria have promoted the ends of the Leopoldine Association, and the Archbishop desires that the distribution of the money voted by the Association be just and the best for the purposes of the society. Hence in a session of the Association of January 11, 1834, 4000 florins were given to the firm Arnslein and Erkels for Purcell and the diocese. Asks that Purcell send to the Association a report of the money he received and of the Catholics in the diocese, so that the Association can raise more money. Also asks Purcell to tell what use is made of the money.

II-4-g L.S. 4pp. 12mo. (Latin)
2


1838 Jan 27

(Milde) Vincent Edward, Archbishop of Vienna, President of the Leopoldine Association of
Vienna, Austria

to Bishop John (Baptist) Purcell
Cincinnati, (Ohio)

The benevolence and piety of the faithful of Austria have promoted the ends of the Leopoldine Association, and the Archbishop desires that the distribution of the money voted by the Association be just and the best for the purposes of the society. Hence in a session of the Association of January 11, 1834, 4000 florins were given to the firm Arnslein and Erkels for Purcell and the diocese. Asks that Purcell send to the Association a report of the money he received and of the Catholics in the diocese, so that the Association can raise more money.

II-4-g L.S. 4pp. 12mo. (Latin)
2


1838 Jan 29

(Eccleston), Bishop Samuel
Baltimore, (Maryland)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

A few days ago (Eccleston) received a letter from the Prefect of Propaganda as follows: "On August 24 he received a letter from Bishop Simon G(abriel) Bruté asking for a coadjutor. He recommended three priests: Father Louis Petit, S.J., Father Celestine de la Hailandiere, and Father Ignatius A. Reynolds. Dated Rome November 11."
(P.S.) Blanc has probably heard that Bishop (John Dubois) has had an attack of apoplexy and is dangerously ill at Philadelphia where he had gone on a visit. Should Bruté be at New Orleans Blanc is to show him the circulars; (Eccleston) has written him at Vincennes. (Roger B.) Taney called on (Eccleston) relative to the affairs of Blanc's cathedral but (Eccleston) was not at home. Taney is now in Washington.

V-4-g A.L.S. (Latin and English) 4pp. 4to.
7


1838 Jan 29

Granet, B.
Iberville, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Granet received (Blanc's) letter of the 25th through Father (Ennemond) Dupuy. Its tone was so different from the preceding one that Granet cannot help but think that some one has carried tales to (Blanc), putting him under false colors. For the 5 years and more they have known (Blanc) they have had nothing but praise for him. According to the conversation Granet has just had with Dupuy, (Blanc) seems to doubt that Mrs. Granet's establishment is run in a manner suitable for the teaching or practice of religious duties. This is false. When Granet took over the house at Iberville, Blanc promised it to him for a year but Father (Matthew B.) Anduze always assured them that without doubt they could keep the house as they pleased. So they made all the repairs and Anduze told them that (Blanc) would pay the expenses. Anduze gave them possession of the large (St. Gabriel College) and the small college and in reading over (Blanc's) old letters Granet finds nothing that could make him suspect that (Blanc) did not intend to give them the little college. Anduze, far from keeping them from taking some boys, told them they could expect 40 or 50. They have only 4. Granet thought Anduze acted on (Blanc's) instructions. As for the kitchen, if Dupuy wishes, he is perfectly free to take it. Granet asks to continue as they are for the few months they are to remain. If people knew, they would withdraw the few students they have and today that is their only means of existence. Whatever their positions they will always keep the sentiments they have had for (Blanc) from the beginning.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
6


1838 Feb 5

Brasseur, Father (John F.)
St. Martin, (Louisiana)

to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Brasseur discharged Blanc's commission concerning A. Dumartrait who had just brought back from the County Judge those things sent back through Attorney Simon who frequently goes to New Orleans. Brasseur does not know what to tell Blanc about New Iberia. Brasseur cannot help it if (L.J.?) Smith lost his head several times; if, in building this church he acted from material interest, persuaded that it was a sure way to break with St. Martin and hoping to enhance the value of his own property. Brasseur cannot help that they owe 3 or 4,000 piastres for their church. As for the rectory it exists only in Smith's head. Here is what happened; there were only the three of them, Smith, Mr. Duperier, and Brasseur. Brasseur told them he would exact nothing for coming to say Mass once a month; that they would have to pay only for the choir from St. Martin and at baptisms Brasseur would leave it up to the generosity of the godparents. But he would like to know what they would give a second priest who would have more regular services in their church. They did not say $400 a year was too much but Smith thought in paying a fixed salary to a second priest, they would be tributary to St. Martin and take away the means of having a pastor of their own. They wanted Brasseur to serve their church; they were ready to give him $500. He told them that since they were so rich and bragged they had collected $1800 pew rent, they could count on him and a choir for $190 up to March - four months, after that $400 a year, and if a second priest came they would have Mass at least twice a month on Sunday. Several days later they sent back the things Brasseur had left in their church, things he did not ask for and which he does not need since their church is closed. In New Iberia they drink and play cards a lot; it is the most corrupt place in Attakapas. Blanc is to find out about Smith from Simon, Dumartrait, or any other respectable resident.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
7


1838 Jan 29

Timon, C.M., Father John
Steamer Selma

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

At Purcell's request he went to Amiens and saw Mde. De Porter who thought that Purcell's claim had come too late, but when he called on the notary M. Breuil he found that she had been deceived in this. He left Purcell's letter with M. Breuil (whose letter he encloses) giving to him the power he had received from Purcell. He received the letter enclosed a few days later at Paris. He has the books Purcell named. His trip to France has been successful and he brings with him three Spanish clergymen and one lay brother, all Vincentians, and certain apparatus etc. The return voyage has been long. The Association of the Propagation has augmented its distribution to the bishops of America and advanced the date at which it can be touched.

A.L.S. 1p. 12mo. (Enclosure)

-------
1837 Oct 7

Breuil,
Amiens, France

to Father John Timon
Paris, France

Yesterday at the first opportunity he went to receive the new "procuration to send to the Bishop of Cincinnati since Mme. De la Superior of Sacre Cour wrote August 22, that she had written to him enclosing the Billet of Mme. De Coppens and announcing the sending of the announcement of the "Procuration," which was to be legalized at Washington. The await this "procuration." Since Timon is to see Purcell he asks him to tell the bishop of the condition of affairs. He hopes to get only about half of the sum because of the billet of Mme. De Coppens is null, and may be rejected. Asks Timon to make arrangements for the delivery of the money.

II-4-g A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
5


1838 Jan 29

Kenrick, Bishop Francis Patrick
Phil(adelphia, Pennsylvania)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Father (Thomas) Heyden declined the proffered honor and Kenrick communicated his refusal to the Holy See early in December. He is now residing with Kenrick at St. John's. Kenrick does not recollect who was third on the list. It is likely that no further proceedings will be taken unless at the suggestion of the American bishops and Kenrick thinks the prelate from whose jurisdiction the new diocese is to be withdrawn should be the prime mover. Blanc should propose three names and send them to Propaganda and the bishops unless he thinks it proper to await the action of the Holy See. Kenrick is pleased that Bishop (Simon Gabriel Bruté) of Vincennes improves in health but would it not be just to sustain him in his proposal for a coadjutor? Bishop (John) Dubois got a coadjutor; they both came on a visit last Monday and the bishop was seized with apoplexy. Pittsburg wants a bishop badly but his colleagues do not approve his choice, Father (Patrick?) Carew or Father ( ) Maher of Dublin. The last nomination of diocesan priests will not probably satisfy Rome as one is already a recusant and the others are not highly qualified. Kenrick cannot but think that he might have been indulged in a matter directly regarding a portion of his territory.

V-4-g A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
6


1838 Feb 6

Tschenhenss, C.SS.R., Father Francis X.
Norwalk, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Father (Peter C.) Czakert received Purcell's letter and also one from Father (Joseph) Prost of Rochester, New York, provincial of the Redemptorists, calling him to Rochester. Tschenhenss with Purcell's permission, from Tiffin, also came at that time bur Czakert could not find reason for remaining. Both will remain some time in the hope of establishing a house in the diocese, however, they are happy to return to community life. At Tiffin suggests that a priest speaking both German and English be sent. Trusts that Father (Emanuel) Thienpont will get along better and arrange his and Quin's debt. Speaks of money given Father Thienpont. Will give more to Mrs. Quin. Owes Purcell for books sent from Dayton, but wants to give back catechisms. Expects to see Mr. Thienpont in Tiffin. Wants to see a priest for confession or to meet the pastor of Cleveland. Mr. Morgan, who kept district school will soon go to Cincinnati.

II-4-g A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
8


1838 Feb 8

(White, S.C.), Sister Rose
(Emmitsburg, Maryland)

To Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orlean(s), Louisiana

Blanc's letter of January 22 received and they are grateful for the blessing of the retreat. All will turn to good for Sister Euphrasia; she has a weak head but a good heart. They rejoice at the prospects of the Asylum and in consideration of the orphans agree to take the sum proposed, fifty dollars a year for each sister. This regulation has nothing to do with the hospital. Should Bishop (Simon Gabriel) Bruté be with Blanc they present their affectionate remembrances. They are about to sustain a great loss in the expected death of Bishop (John) Dubois but hope he may be spared. They ask Blanc's prayers for the soul of Sister Mary Thomas. Madame Desmoutien(?) is very happy in her candidate's cap.

V-4-g A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
6


1838 Feb 9

Miles, O.P., R(ichard) P(ius), Father Prov.
Somerset, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

One of the Dominicans went to Newark to secure a lot and found that a very handsome one can be had. It is under the care of the McCarthys there. Regrets the misunderstanding about the lots in Canton and Columbus. Hopes to settle this before he goes to Kentucky after Easter. Asks him to give Father (Adrian F.) Vande Weyer faculties so he can take care of the Germans, who need spiritual aid badly. Was not under censure from Bishop Kenrick and has lived regularly and edifyingly since he came to Somerset. Should Father (John) Alliman write to Purcell about going to Europe, Purcell should discourage him, as he is doing the best in his present location. Includes Miss. Manning's account. Suggests a note to her on obedience.

II-4-g A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
7


1838 Feb 11

Dupuy, Father E(nnemond)
Iberville, (Louisiana)

to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Dupuy's parish gives him consolation; church is well enough attended on Sundays. He has made some repairs, cleaned the sacred vessels and washed the linens. He has repaired the old fences a little while waiting for the cypress to dry out. If Blanc will let him take some of his posts Dupuy will pay for them or return them. Blanc has more than enough cypress there than he needs for (St. Gabriel) College. (B.) Granet has caused a horrible gossip since Blanc notified him to leave; he has posted on the door of the church a notice that Mrs. Granet has no intention of leaving her present establishment at Iberville. People complain that Granet spoils the roads to the church with her horses and animals, the children have other place to play; they go hunting in the cemetery. Dupuy will do as Blanc orders but he does not think Granet is a friend of religion. Granet is going to New Orleans today to talk to Blanc. Today 5 of his girl boarders were at Mass; none from Granet's house came, so he heard. They are asking him for $50 to haul(?) The kitchen and $45 to remake the chimney; the little college could not haul(?) it, they say, for less than $100. As for the firewood, Dupuy forgot to ask Blanc if what Father (Matthew B.) Anduze told him is true and that it is not a question for either Mr. Michaud or Anduze.
P.S. Dupuy's health is a little better.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
7


1838 Feb 15

(Cousin, Victor)
(Paris, France)

To (Orestes A. Brownson
Boston, Massachusetts)

(Brownson) has not answered (Cousin's) response, perhaps because he did not receive the books accompanying it. In a package of books sent by M.A. Brooks to (Cousin) he found two pieces by (Brownson) for which he is very grateful - a new view of the church and an essay on M. Jouffroy which made the method of the new French school look bad. (Brownson) has justly said that (Cousin) has the same approach as Reid and Stewart. (Cousin) is sending two recent writings to (Brownson) republished since the new edition of Fragments, one a reexamination of M. De Biron and the other on the metaphysics of Aristotle. If (Brownson) examines the metaphysics of Aristotle he will find eclectism two thousand years ago. For the rationalist and unitarian he sends a memoir on the first rationalist course, the sic et non which St. Bernard found Arianist and Nestorian. (Cousin) wants the works of Jonathan Edwards. He also sent to Brooks a package of books on pedagogy to be translated and wonders if they have arrived. He sends his regards to Everett, Ripley, and Henry of Hartford. He has not yet received the last of the translation of the Melange of French philosophy. He asks about books used for teaching philosophy in the public schools. He also expects (Brownson) to keep him informed on American philosophy.
P.S. He asks if (Brownson) wishes some lines on Spinoza which were formed during a visit to the poor schools of Amsterdam. (Letter found in Brownson copy of vol. 13 "Oeuvres de Platon.")

I-3-e A.L. (Signature cut out) 3pp. 12mo.
2


1838 Feb 16

(Eccleston), Samuel Archbishop of Baltimore
Baltimore, (Maryland)

To Father J( ) B( ) Debruyn (DeBruyn)
(Detroit, Michigan)

Having failed to receive an answer to his letter of January 13 he sends another copy. He does not have before him the bulls of the erection of the diocese of Dubuque having sent it to Bishop Mathias Loras, but his recollection is that it includes that part of Wisconsin which lies west of the Mississippi. He has no recent news concerning Bishop (Frederick) Rese, nor concerning the appropriations of the Leopoldine Association to his diocese, or that of Baltimore. DeBruyn will oblige by communicating to (Eccleston) the amount. The Holy See has assigned to him the settling of the question of the boundary between the dioceses of Detroit and Cincinnati. If DeBruyn has any objection tp his accepting the boundary decided by the general government he should send them on. DeBruyn is aware that the Pope has dispensed the faithful of the province from the fast and abstinence of the Wednesdays of Advent and the obligation of attending Mass and abstaining from servile work on the Mondays following Easter and Whitsunday.

III-2-g A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
5


1838 Feb 17

Point, S.J., Father (Nicholas)
(Grand Coteau, Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Father (A. Pierre) Ladavière, (S.J.) is going to New Orleans and Point takes the occasion to tell Blanc about their little family. It is growing and shows an excellent spirit. Little Deblanc and de la Haussaye(?) Whom Blanc recommended, have arrived. They, like all the others, seem content with the rules of the house. They praise the cooking which is not an indifferent point. Public opinion seems favorable; their only enemy is the excessive cold. Besides the 26 students here, they have a good number of requests for the opening of the large building. Ladavière will add any details interesting to Blanc.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
2


1838 Feb 17

Propaganda, Sacra Congregation de Fide by L. Abp. Ephsus, Nuncio at
Vienna, Austria

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

In the absence of Mr. Schwarz, the American consul, he sends the sum of 302.24 florins by Baron Eskeles, a Vienna banker, from the foundation of Joannes Baptista Joffroy for the year ending September 7, 1838 for diocese of Detroit and Cincinnati to be divided according to the letter to Purcell by Cardinal Ossini dated December 1, 1835. Congratulates Purcell on the sum of 4000 florins, he has been given by the Leopoldine Association. Wishes that this aid be increased.

II-4-g L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
6


1838 Feb 18

Blanc, Ant(hony), Bishop of New Orleans
New Orleans, Louisiana

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Having been officially informed that Father (Thomas) Heyden has refused the nomination to the see of Natchez, to avoid delay Blanc has written to the Cardinal prefect suggesting the sending again of the brief to Father Heyden or the choice of one of the other two recommended. These two were, Father (James) Vandevelde or Father (Richard) Kenrick. Fears a delay will be injurious to religion in Natchez. Asks that Purcell approve this measure or to offer a new name either to the Cardinal prefect or through the Archbishop. Bishop (Brute) of Vincennes has been three weeks at Mobile, but does not improve in health, because of the bad weather. Father J.J. Mullon will visit Purcell on his way to New York. Asks that Purcell not delay him, because he is needed in his congregation. All well at St. Michel's. Needs two American clergymen for congregations where English is nearly exclusively necessary.

II-4-g A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
10


1838 Feb 23

Granet, B.
Iberville, (Louisiana)

to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

They plan to leave (St. Gabriel College) at Iberville on the 15th or 20th of next month. As soon as they are settled they will offer, in person, their thanks for Blanc's having lent them his house at Iberville. This second move involves expenses they do not know how to meet. If they were a little better off they would now speak of the repairs to Blanc's house which were almost indispensable. Granet has drawn up a statement with the amount he thinks reasonable. He demands nothing; he relies on Blanc's justice. He wishes to have no communication with Father (Ennemond) Dupuy on this subject and asks Blanc to send his reply through Mr. Ker as they no longer have mail at Iberville.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
5


1838 Feb 24

Hughes, John, Bishop of Basileo, Coad. New York
New York, N.Y.

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Speaks of the change that has taken place since he last wrote of his intended visit to the west, when he was worrying about his flock at St. John's in Philadelphia. Purcell prepared for him a great work when he arranged for this change at the Provincial Council (1837). All the plans that had been drawn up have been laid aside without their being proved less wise. Bishop (John) Dubois had a stroke of Apoplexy two weeks after Hughes' consecration and will soon not improbably be dead. He had another a week ago and has recovered more slowly, being weakened in mind, and his memory almost destroyed. Considering the troubles that would not arise in the absence of a coadjutor he sees clearly the Providence of God in his appointment. However he accepted the office as a punishment for his sins. Has confidence in God for strength to bear the burden. Conditions in New York diocese might be worse. There are priests there of doubtful character, who found easy admission. The money for which Purcell gave an order to Mr. Slevin was paid because Bishop Dubois had arranged that before his indisposition. His appointment seems to have caused the minimum of dissatisfaction in the diocese. The idea that most engages him now is the establishment of a diocesan seminary, which he thinks possible of realization.

II-4-g 3pp. 8vo. A.L.S.
5


1838 Feb 24

Miles, R(ichard) P(ius), Father Prov.
Somerset, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Acknowledges Purcell's of the 14th and promises to meet Purcell's views about the two lots. The deed for the lot in Canton has been lost and a copy of the original must be produced. Peace will have to be made with Mr. Perong and money overpaid refunded. Has been informed by Father (Nicholas D.) Young that Purcell has the deed for the lot in Columbus made out to the Literary Society of St. Joseph's. Asks Purcell to send a copy to be signed or to forward it so he can bring it to Cincinnati on his way to Kentucky. The method proposed for handling Miss. Manning's account suits Miles, and Mr. Slavin will attend to it as soon as he receives the order from his brother.

II-4-g A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
4


1838 Feb 26

Wood, James F(rederick)
Rome, Italy

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Has not written for three months. Mr. O'Neal has received Purcell's letter. He is much the same and his physician suggests that he not go to Paris. He will probably go either to Ireland or to America. He will probably sail after Easter. The weather in Rome has been unpleasant and the atmosphere damp and heavy. Bishop (William Clancy) has gone on to his new diocese in British Guiana in good spirits. Dr. Cullen has obtained for Wood a master in Latin and Italian and he will study those the rest of the year and not begin philosophy. Looks forward to Purcell's visit and to his work in the Cincinnati diocese. Understands that McGhann has received orders and that Evrard will receive them this spring. A. Mr. McNicholas sends regards to Evrard. Mai and Mezzofanti cardinals. Mr. Cullen thought of but is too young. Asks for answer from Purcell at least to announce the date of his arrival in Rome. Mentions that note to Burnet is due.
P.S. Has received letter from his sister and wishes Purcell to announce its receipt to her.

II-4-g A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
3


1838 Feb 27

Dumartrait, A.
St. Martinville, (Louisiana)

to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Dumartrait received Blanc's first letter of the 12th and, convinced that Mr. Simon would give Blanc the papers he asked for, he has not hurried his reply. Father (James) Vandevelde brought Blanc's last letter of the 20th. Dumartrait has already seen Judge (Bryant) Briant to obtain the copies of the judgment of the probate court but he could not insert the paragraph Blanc wanted because he had already delivered it to the administrator of the estate. He will supply this when he sends Blanc the copies certifying that Blanc is the residual legatee. Simon had a heavy cold while in New Orleans, which prevented him from seeing Blanc. They hope to have the new bill of incorporation for St. Martin's Church as well as that of New Iberia soon. As to St. Martin's, they will see if it was passed as they presented it or if amendments were made. He has learned nothing more about New Iberia except through Mr. Darby, Father-in-law of Dr. Smith, that they were waiting for a pastor and that as a preliminary they had asked St. Martin Parish to take part in the jurisdiction of the new church. Many years ago the people of the First and Second districts petitioned the Legislature for a separation and the opinion was that a new parish could not be made without great injury to the two existing ones. As to the priest to serve New Iberia that would be at Blanc's discretion. Also there is the question of the transfer of the dead from one parish to another. Years ago Father (Gabriel) Isabey and Marcel Borella had asked their bishops for an assistant who could get around more often to the extremities of the Parishes of St. Martin and St. Mary, the last one never having had a church. The first was Father (Flavius H.) Rossi and Borella; after Isabey died Borella succeeded him and it was no longer possible to have one because of the difficulty of finding priests. Their new charter map(?) For St. Martin's Church extends throughout the whole parish; Dumartrait does not know if it takes in St. Peter's church. They want no rivalry between their churches but want to leave each Catholic the right to his own choice.
(P.S.) Father (John F.) Brasseur read Blanc's letter from the pulpit last Sunday. Dumartrait will send Blanc a general statement in order to close the respective accounts.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
12


(1838) (Mar,)

Juncker, Father H(enry) D.
(Chillicothe, Ohio)

To (Bishop John Baptist Purcell)
of (Cincinnati, Ohio)

Through Mr. Bauman, Juncker sends this letter to (Purcell). Juncker wishes to inform (Purcell) that he managed to gather enough money to cover the debt on the Chillicothe church which is due the following Wednesday. (Purcell), in his last letter, had asked a bill of exchange in order to draw Juncker's money. Juncker does not like to do so, but he sends his account through Bauman. (Purcell) has an account up until the time he sent him the books, which is not entirely complete. He lists additional receipts. Bauman will receive any money remaining in the account and pay (Purcell) what he has overdrawn. Mr. Bauman is worldly and loves the pleasures of this world.

II-4-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 8vo.
2


1838 Mar 3

Lesne, Father J(ames)
Mobile, (Alabama)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Lesne wrote last year about a debt of $40 which Jean Faveray owes his cousin (Francois) Rampon, Lesne's old gardener. Rampon has not been able to get to New Orleans until now and he asked Lesne to refresh Blanc's memory and obtain the money for him. (Springhill) College is going wonderfully this year; there are almost 100 students. Father (Julian) Priour is almost entirely recovered, but Father (Francis) Martinet is not well. As for the convent, things are better than ever; there are about 20 students. The walls of the cathedral are up about 4 feet above the ground. They will be left that way so the foundation settles(?) Well, until Bishop (Michael Portier) can find the money.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
8


1838 Mar 7

Baraga, (Father) Frederick
LaPointe, Wisconsin

to Father (Francis Vincent) Badin
Detroit, Michigan

Baraga received Father Badin's letter of September 28, 1837 on March 5, 1838. He is sorry he cannot send the medals to Badin before the beginning of navigation which is at the end of June. He has brought no other things from Europe for him. The 630 francs which Bishop (Frederick) Rese had paid for the transport of Baraga's luggage will be paid back by Mr. Logros of Havre, to whom Baraga had sent the money from New York through a Mr. Crooks. The expenses of the printing and binding of the Indian books are supposed to be taken care of by the Association of the Propagation of the Faith. If they charge now the sum to the Bishop, they act against Baraga's intentions, for he had told them that he would rather look somewhere else to have the expenses taken care of, than to have them charged to his poor Bishop. But they replied that he should not worry, that they would print two books for the mission. The 6000 florins (about $3345.-) of which Bishop Rese speaks, are in Munich (Germany) and he will receive them at his arrival. Baraga wants to be remembered to Father (Clement) Hammer and to all the other priests who came to America from Europe in such big numbers.

III-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp.
3


1838 Mar 7

Saenderl, (C.SS.R.), Father Simon
Arbre Croche, Michigan

to (Bishop Frederick Rese)
(Detroit, Michigan)

Bishop Rese had told Father Saenderl that he will be able to receive immediately the allowance the government had granted at the treaty for the benefit of the school. Nevertheless there has been hardly any school in Arbre Croche since August 1836, because Rese had declared at that time that the government would pay nothing for educational purposes and Saenderl did not feel obliged to incur the trouble and expense of keeping a school. When Augustine (Hamelin) came to Arbre Croche Saenderl had asked him if he had special instructions from Rese to keep school. He answered that he had only talked to Father (Vincent) Badin. Saenderl showed him Rese's letter and told him that if he wants to keep school he must do it at his own risk and can hardly hope for any recompense. Nevertheless he began his school, but gave up after 4 weeks. Since then Arbre Croche had no (Catholic) school. Hamelin alternated his stay at St. Ignace and Arbre Croche arranging it so as to be absent from Arbre Croche when the Indians were not in the village and if he was there he would follow the occupation of the Indians. Under these circumstances Saenderl could not ask him to keep the school going, much less could he pay him. Therefore he regarded his school only as a gratuitous action. The report which was sent to Rese was a pure lie. It was done on the maxim; he who wants to be deceived etc. and because no one has hardly the right to ask for such a report. If Rese wants a school in Arbre Croche, then it must be done on a solid basis which has not been done until now. It is quite unfair that the bishop let them have the trouble and expense of keeping a school while he draws the income. Saenderl insists that the bishop should come to Arbre Croche and arrange with Hamelin about the school, as Saenderl wants neither trouble nor responsibilities. The school building is uninhabitable, and the Indians decided to demolish the old structure and build a smaller one with just a kitchen and two little apartments for the cook and Saenderle's servant. There are everywhere empty houses, which could be fixed up for Hamelin and his school without great expenses, provided of course that Monseigneur will give him an appropriate compensation.

III-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 8vo.
2


1838 Mar 10

(Fenwick), Bishop Benedict
Boston, (Massachusetts)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

Blanc's letter of February 18 reached (Fenwick) last night. (Fenwick) thinks with Blanc, after the resignation of Father (Thomas) Heyden, it will be too long to wait until the next council before another candidate is recommended for Natchez. (Fenwick) will write to the Archbishop stating his concurrence with Blanc's recommendation. (Fenwick) does not believe Heyden will ever consent to accept a diocese so far south. (Fenwick) is sorry for he is a very worthy man. (Fenwick) does not think either Father (Peter Richard) Kenrick or Bishop (Francis Patrick) Kenrick will accept if appointed. Their hopes will have to rely on Father (James) Vandevelde or another not yet named. The climate will probably deter many northerners. As Blanc knows Natchez he ought to be allowed to be the best judge. (Fenwick) knows Bridget of whom Blanc speaks. She is a good girl but (Fenwick) recommended to her to go to New Orleans to be among her friends rather than alone in Boston. The ringing in her head indicated all was not right. (Fenwick) is glad to hear that Bishop (Simon Gabriel) Bruté is in better health. He is not one to spare himself, even when sick; (Fenwick) hopes he will spend some time with Blanc. (Fenwick) presumes Blanc has heard of the three new miracles -- one in the Maryland Hospital in Baltimore and two in the Visitation Convent in Georgetown.

V-4-g A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
7


1838 Mar 12

Granet, B.
Iberville, (Louisiana)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

In sending the bill for repairs at Iberville, Granet was convinced not only of his legal rights but of Blanc's justice. The sum seems large to Blanc; however it hardly covered Granet's expenditures for materials; the labor was practically for nothing. With Blanc's permission, Granet has drawn on him for $50 and the rest he leaves to Blanc's discretion. During the first two weeks Granet was in Iberville, a workman named Dupuy, hired by Father (Matthew B.) Anduze repaired the roof and floor. Dupuy has just brought his bill which Granet encloses. They leave tomorrow for New Orleans. He has been careful to leave all the things given him by Anduze of which he has made a list. Enclosed is a bill dated August 6, 1837 from F(ran)cois Dupuy hired by Granet for repairs at the College of St. Gabriel to the account of Blanc for 35 piastres, 12 sous.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 5pp. 4to.
4


1838 Mar 12

(Rosati), Joseph, Bishop of St. Louis
St. Louis, Missouri

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Deems it necessary to give information about Father James O'Flinn. O'Flinn came to St. Louis before Christmas with testimonials. Rosati sent him to take care of the mission at Alton, (Illinois). He was received by the people and given boarding and support, and a church was begun, however, he wrote that he wanted a better mission or a letter of recommendation so he could go to Purcell. Rosati refused him a better mission and told him to use the letter he sent as a testimonial. O'Flinn left Alton but since that, Rosati received letters from good and zealous Catholics stating that O'Flinn had done great damage there and requesting another priest. Asks Purcell to take away O'Flinn's letters if he comes to Cincinnati. Asks Purcell to discount any offense he has given in his previous letter, because he did not mean it. Will adopt Purcell's attitude of itinerant clergymen, and asks that Purcell's advertisement in the Telegraph telling the faithful to receive only those expressly empowered, be duplicated with his name.
(Note in pencil on back) $2040 due to Bishop Rese by Mr. Reilly. The writer will try to settle with Bishop Rese in Europe and will write to Father (Vincent) Badin in Detroit.

II-4-g A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
8


1838 Mar 12

(White, S.C.), Sister Rose
St. Joseph's (Emmitsburg, Maryland)

To Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Sister received Blanc's of February 24; all well in the impossibility of their accepting the newly proposed infirmary. They see, with Blanc, how desirable it would be if the orphan boys could be placed under the care of the Sisters; this was proposed to the Council before the final breaking up of the Sisters (of Charity) leaving Poydras Asylum. It should be some old Sisters who would take charge of that asylum if they could be had. Sister Rose regrets the two Sisters of New Orleans should be made unhappy as Sister Fr(ancis) Xavier knew her opinion about sisters leaving their post to travel for health or begging business from one city to another. Her prejudice has been strengthened by that of Sister Regina (Smith) and Sister F. Xavier. But since their superior agrees and the Bishop thinks it well, they ought not to let Sister Rose's opinion trouble them; she regrets it should be in contradiction to her superior. The little word about poor Sister V(incentia?) is noticed. Sister Rose read yesterday a letter from Mr. Wall. The pastor of St. Patrick's leaves tomorrow and will take this; not a word of New Orleans has passed between them of the Sisters' difficulties.

V-4-g A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
6


1838 Mar 14

(Portier), Michael, Bishop of Mobile
Mobile, Alabama

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Recommends the bearer Juliano Pelicio, a good Catholic who intends to settle in Cincinnati to the care and advice of Purcell. Bishop (Bruté) of Vincennes was with Portier for a pleasant visit. Portier fears that Bruté has injured his health by over-zeal. Asks if Purcell hears of hard times in his section. Speaks of a Borzona as professor of theology.

II-4-g A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
4


1838 Mar 15

Armand, Father (D.)
( )

Today Armand married Isidore Granval, son of the late Jean-Baptiste Granval and Marie Magdaleine Benoit and Josep(hine) Hughes, daughter of the late Jean Hu(g)hes and Maria Gaudin. Witnesses: Henriette Delisle and Augustine Hughes who sign with the couple.

V-4-g A.D.S. (French) 1p. folio
8


1838 March 18

(Hughes), John, Bishop of Basileo
New York, N.Y.

to John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Has attended to draft. Taylor's answer was that Fabre was not to be found. Wrote to Mr. Frenaye to take up the matter. Bishop Dubois has funds but Hughes dares not touch them. Is recovering from paralysis. No news in the East. Dr. (Constantine) Pise could easily be induced to join Purcell. Respects to Father Henni.

II-4-g A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
6


1838 Mar 19

(Blanc, Anthony), (Bishop of New Orleans)
New Orleans, Louisiana

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Recommends to Purcell J. Pelicio who visited New Orleans ever winter, and who now goes to Cincinnati to find a permanent home. Blanc gives this recommendation but in gratitude for messages carried by Pelicio to Boston etc. in his travels. Hears that Purcell will go to Europe, but hopes he will visit New Orleans first. Bishop Bruté leaves the next day by way of St. Louis against the wish of Blanc, not improved and during the best season in New Orleans. The Superior of the (Vincentians) Lazarists has finally accepted charge of the Seminary to be located in Assumption parish. Father J. Bouillier, C.M. arrived from the Barrens and took possession of Ascension parish, Donaldsonville. At the end of the week Father (Bonaventure) Armengal, C.M., the Superior of the seminary is expected with Father J. Giustiniani, C.M., as assistant to Father Bouillier. Two others are to be sent later. Speaks of the report of hospitals and religious institutions in the diocese, quoting some of the more remarkable. Speaks of an article in the Catholic Herald on Natchez and Nashville, which was lacking in prudence. Says that he did not complain of an article in the Telegraph on the subject and feels that he has done all he can to take care of that part of his diocese. He has no priests knowing English sufficiently for that purpose. Has even written to the Cardinal Prefect and to the Archbishop of Dublin for aid. In the time of the epidemic his priests as well as himself were very busy taking care of their own sick.

II-4-g L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
11


(1838) (Mar) 29

(Bruté, Father Simon Gabriel)
35 miles from St. Louis, (Missouri)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

P.S. As (Bruté) told Blanc, in his first joy of this retreat he jots down the headings of Blanc's paper - a witness of Blanc's confidence in him but between Blanc, Father (August) Jeanjean and Father (John) Boullier, Blanc could work it out infinitely better. Blanc is to try after Easter to keep Father (Matthew B.) Anduze from leaving. 10 points (for development of the paper?) Are listed.
Point 1) ... soon a rendering of our account like Father (Adam) Kindelon. January, February and up to March 20 so filled with memories full of affection and gratitude, the chapel, the common room, his desk and the writings, the cloistered walk; the bishop and the priests often expressing to each other their desires and sorrows. He imagines Anduze finishing his days at the seminary; building a second parish and sending a good English-speaking priest there; or founding a retreat for priests, Father (L.) VanBockel placed there; and (Blanc's?) Parish at Marigny being built and Father (Constantine) Maenhaut building a fourth, aided by Father (Bernard) Permoli. What a flourishing New Orleans!
P.S. As for (Brutés) health it is always the "responsum Mortis." Bruté sends regards to Jeanjean, that he may remain, with Blanc, the faithful friend of Vincennes, Blanc's first mission.

V-4-g A.L. (French) 2pp. 4to.
5


1838 Apr 1

Kaiser, John for the Central Committee of the Leopoldine Association

to Bishop Frederick Rese
Detroit, Michigan

Memorandum that The Central Committee informs Bishop Rese that 4000 florins C.M. were conceded to the diocese of Detroit in the meeting of January 22. That money has been forwarded to Detroit through the bank Arnstein and Eskeles on March 6. No. 517.

III-2-g D.S. (German) 1p. folio
2


1838 Apr 2

Brownson, O(restes) A.
Boston, (Massachusetts)

To Martin Van Buren
(Washington, D.C.)

Brownson sends the April issue of the Boston Quarterly Review, of which he is the editor, and author of all articles except one. Brownson sends this number for the purpose of calling Van Buren's attention to the article on slavery. If Van Buren will read it he will see that Brownson's view is different from that generally taken by Anti-Slavery men. Brownson contends that abolition societies contravene International law, and cannot be formed without a practical forgetfulness of State Rights. The Review was established with the purpose of enlisting literature, philosophy and religion on the side of democracy. Though Brownson has always been a Democrat, he has not always been in favor of Van Buren; Brownson credited for a long time what Van Buren's political opponents said against him. Van Buren's course in the trying position in which he has been placed since occupying the Presidential chair, has made Brownson repent his former lukewarmness. Brownson sees Van Buren now with the people and the people will sustain Van Buren. The Democratic Party has been somewhat divided but it will come together. Van Buren should be assured that the people in Massachusetts are warm friends. Mr. Bancroft may, now and then, make a mistake but he is held highly and all are confident that he will faithfully serve the Administration.

I-4-h A.L.S. (Photostat, Congressional Library) 2pp. 8vo.
1


1838 Apr 7

Charveys, Sr.
San Antonio, (Texas)

To Father (Stephen) Rousselon
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Anxiety over lack of news from Father (Claude Dubuis makes him write to Rousselon. At Dubuis' departure he promised to write to Charveys after his arrival in France. Charveys has had no letter from this dear professor and friend; the priests who have replaced him have had no news either. Charveys thinks Rousselon will have had news and could tell him about Dubuis' health and also about his return to San Antonio. Charveys, his ex-nurse, his Latin pupil, is greatly upset. If Dubuis is still in France Charveys asks Rousselon to send his address.
P.S. He encloses a stamp.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
2


1838 Apr 10

(Louisiana), New Orleans

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Receipt for 51 piastres, parish taxes for 1837 on Islet 48, $50,000; and 2 slaves, signed by A. Cruzat.

V-4-g Receipt S. (French) 2pp. 32mo.
2


1838 Apr 10

(Louisiana), New Orleans

to Mrs. Casimir
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

A receipt for $1.50 paid for 1837 taxes on F.B. Marigny I(sle)t 49, $1,000; and one slave, signed by A. Cruzat.

V-4-g Receipt S. (French) 2pp. 32mo.
2


1838 Apr 10

Young, O.P., Father N(icholas) D.
Somerset, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Takes the opportunity of the departure of Mr. Swarb to discuss with Purcell his letter to Father (Richard Pius) Miles, O.P.. Young says he was greatly surprised when he learned that Purcell had made a claim against the Dominicans, especially that the claim amounted to $1500. Also he says he is surprised that Purcell claims to have spoken of the matter to him more than once. He has no such recollections. According to the Brief in question Purcell would have lost all the church property except the Cathedral at Cincinnati and the Dominicans besides keeping what they had would have required no permission to acquire other property. Young maintains that as a missioner in the diocese before Purcell's appointment he had rejoiced at his appointment and hoped that he would be a friend of the Order as one high in the American church promised the Dominican General in Rome, in Purcell's name. He is having his own difficulties at Somerset and at Lancaster. Father (Thomas) Martin has written from Rome about the seminarians. Young adds that Bishop (Frederick) Rese told him that the proviso for payment of the money was put in to satisfy an old man and was never intended to be paid. He enclosed money for a subscription to the Telegraph.

II-4-g A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
7


1838 Apr 12

(Altieri) L(ouis), Archbishop of Ephesus
Nuncio Apostolic at Vienna, Austria

to (Bishop Frederick Rese)
Detroit, Michigan

Comformably to the desires of Mademoiselle Marie Marguerite Bossier concerning the foundation of 5,000 florins in favor of the Diocese of Cincinnati according to the stipulations of the decree No. 982, Msgr. (Huguet Pierre) Spinola, in the name of the Sacred Congregation of the Propaganda to the Nuncio at Vienna, on February 10, 1830, the Sacred Congregation, now that part of the diocese has become that of Detroit, has decided that it would be shared by the bishops of bot dioceses equally, all the other conditions of the 1830 decree being carried out. By the decree of the Sacred congregation No. 10, December 31, 1836, the nuncio is authorized to inform Mademoiselle Bossier of these changes and to tell her that these arrangements have the force of a new contract instead of the original one. This is notarized on April 8, 1838 by Father Felix Randanini, Notary and Chancellor of the Nunciature as a true copy of the original one. This is notarized on April 8, 1838 by Father Felix Randanini, Notary and Chancellor of the Nunciature as a true copy of the original document, No. 161. Enclosure.

(Copy) L. Certified (Latin) 3pp. 8vo.

Enclosure:

--------
1830 Feb 10

(Spinola), Huguet Pierre, Archbishop of Thebes, Nuncio Apostolic
Vienna

Archbishop Spinola declares that Miss Marie Marguerite Bossier, an English woman living in Vienna at the Maison de S. Michel, daughter of William Bossier has proposed to the Sacred Congregation of the Propaganda to pay it the sum of 5,000 florins reserving for herself for her lifetime 5% interest and the same for her friend, Miss Charlotte Hill, after her decease. After the death of both, the sum would go to the bishop of Cincinnati or to the one having the care of the diocese in case the see was vacant and in case the diocese no longer exists it is to be used by the Sacred Congregation for the missions of America for the glory of God and the salvation of souls. Authorized by the Sacred Congregation by the dispatch of December 3, 1829, no. 81, in the name of that Congregation declares the proposal of Miss Bossier accepted and agrees to accept the 5,000 florins and pay the 5% interest beginning at six months after January 1, 1830 during the life of Miss Bossier and after her death to Miss Hill on condition that after the death of both the Sacred Congregation will no longer be held to the payment of the interest but shall give the capital to the diocese of Cincinnati on the conditions stated. This note, No. 982, is certified by Felix Randanini, notary of the Nunciature on April 8, 1838 as a true copy of the original preserved in the Nunciature.

III-2-g Copy certified of L(Latin) 3pp. 8vo.
5


(1838?) Apr 17

Finn, Elizabeth
( )

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(This letter is stained and the ink is badly faded. A few words are legible, such as): "1832. . .husband. . .his death. . .Michael. . .if the Lord had spared him. . .only hope and chief dependence rests in your Lordship. . .Mr. Caisley(?) Mentioned in his letter dated 23 August 1837 that he heard the stat had. . ." (Postmarked): New York Ship Apr. 17.

V-4-g A.L.S. 4pp. Folio
1


1838 Apr 17

Reynaud, Father V. G., of Detroit
Chambery, Savoy, (France)

To Bishop Frederick Rese
Paris, (France)

Reynaud does not think that Rese will pass through Chambery since he received Rese's letter of March 16 to which he answered in care of the Archbishop of Vienna and not knowing the time of Rese's arrival at Paris or the time of his stay he is addressing him in care of the cure of St. Roch. If he knew of the time of Rese's visit, despite his rheumatism,, he would try to visit him. In any case he sends the letter of Canon Durand of Aix offering property to Rese. He thinks that he has told Rese his ideas on the establishment, but he adds his opinion. There will be required certain expenses for the acts of the notary, etc. It will require an advance of 2 or 3 thousand francs to repair the house, but this will be repaid in 2 or 3 years. If Durand makes only a private agreement and gives the administration to Rese it will be necessary to carry the administration in his name and 3 or 4 thousand francs must be advanced for this purpose but which should be done so that it can be withdrawn in case he loses it by a contest by the heirs. If Rese agrees he should establish a common life for superior professors who would receive no pay. They would be formed for the missions and after a time would go to the diocese of Detroit if they were priests or if they were not they would be ordained in France and sent out. The cost would be nothing since they would accept only those who had terminated their studies and they would act as professors while studying their theology. If they were not called to the diocese they would return. The revenue from the students would maintain the house, and the surplus would pay the money advanced by Rese. They would not lack subjects because he already knows of 3 who would have been good subjects but who have joined the Marist Society for Ocenia because Rese could not take care of them. A fourth subject would be the cure who is entering the Marists. Father Rese would obtain from the cure of St. Roch intentions for the masses of the priests to obtain their support and clothing. He desires to have Rese agree with him. He has not yet done anything for Rese and burns with a desire to be of service. Since he has been in France he has collected nothing. Marquis D'Altertas has promised to give him money for a bell for the cathedral next year. The collector in France finds it difficult if not impossible to collect since the Association at Lyons has announced that those who receive aid from the Association renounce the right to seek alms otherwise in their dioceses. This was aimed chiefly at Rese and Reynaud because the (Vincentians) Lazarists had claimed that they intended to set up a special association for the diocese of Detroit. Reynaud will do whatever Rese wishes. He has made a collection among the Sisters of the Sacred Heart, the Jesuits and others of rosaries, medals, crosses, etc., which he will send. He also has a beautiful alb of bordered lace which is not finished but which he will save for Rese. He is anxious to see Rese whom he regards as his Father. If it is not necessary for him to go to Paris he asks that Rese write him, giving him instructions, especially on the property at Aix. The cure of St. Luc has written that he has sent the draft for the sum collected. Reynaud has written to the Abbe Sussillon of Turin on the same subject but he has no reply. He thinks the Abbe has written to Rese at the same address at Paris. He is feeling better during the past few days and thinks it is because of the waters there. For the rest he trusts to Providence and asks for Rese's prayers. He is at the seminary at Chambery which has fine solitude. He begs Rese to write him when he arrives in Paris so that they may pass all the time necessary with Rese. He has done nothing regarding Msgr. Rey the Bishop of Annecy where there are grand subjects whom the bishop will grant to Rese. But it is necessary that Rese spend a few days there.
P.S. He has himself chosen the wine to send to Rese but did not give his title but signed himself as priest.

III-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 8vo.
2


1838 Apr 23

(DePins), Archbishop J(ohn) P(aul) Gaston
Lyon, (France)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(DePins) received Blanc's letter dated December 28, 1837 through Bishop (Mathias) Loras who assisted yesterday, together with Bishop (Nicholas Augustine) De Lacroix of Gap at the consecration of Bishop (John Mary) Mioland of Amiens. (DePins) prays that God will increase Blanc's success and the spread of the Church in Blanc's immense country. The Association of the Propagation of the faith are praying for Blanc.

V-4-g L.S. (French) 2pp 8vo
3


1838 Apr 25

Purcell, John Baptist, Bishop of Cincinnati
Cincinnati, Ohio

to

Acknowledges letter of April 5th with breviary and other books. Purcell sends a stove small in size but sufficient for the purpose, costing about $50 to be paid by himself and the receiver of the letter the Lorettines to pray for them. His brother (Edward Purcell) will execute commissions during his absence.

II-4-g A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
3


1838 Apr 26

(Eccleston), Archbishop Samuel
Baltimore, (Maryland)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Since (Eccleston) and Chief Justice (Roger B.) Taney both have their circuits to attend they have missed one another until this afternoon when Taney gave his opinion regarding Blanc's position in the temporal administration of his cathedral and his right to the powers(?) Of a sole corporation. Eccleston gives Taney's words: "The treaty by which France ceded Louisiana does not prescribe the manner in which temporalities of the Church shall be placed. This must depend upon the laws of Louisiana . . ." Eccleston) further asked Taney whether Blanc could receive legacies or bequests which would descent to his successors in office. Taney said Blanc had no right of this kind unless it was granted by the laws of Louisiana. (Eccleston) has mentioned it to no one but Blanc and needs not add that he and Taney ask Blanc not to mention Taney's name in this connection. (Eccleston) has no news about Natchez but confidently trusts it will not long be in desolation. (Eccleston) starts day after tomorrow on a visitation of 6 weeks' duration.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
2


1838 Apr 29

Caulfield, (S.C.), Sister Marie Louise
St. Joseph's, (Emmitsburg, Maryland)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Sister this morning put on the novice habit and she is so happy. They had an elegant instruction from Father McMullen on April 12. Blanc is to tell Sister Regina (Smith, S.C.) that Sister thinks she has forgotten her for she wrote to her and Sister M. Magdalen and they did not answer. Blanc is to give her love to the nuns and in particular to Madame St. Ursule. Mother Rose (White) has been very sick but is better now. Sister heard that Blanc intends having a new infirmary and hopes he will succeed. She and Sister Regina got ready to go down to see Blanc the morning she left but had to turn back because of a fire. She sends her respects to Father (August) Jeanjean and her convent friends.

V-4-g A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
6


1838 May 1

(Louisiana), New Orleans
First Municipality

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Two receipts for 1837 taxes: one for $4.50 on three slaves and one for $125 on Ilet No. 46, $50,000. (The names of the treasurer and controller are indecipherable).

V-4-g 2 Receipts S. (French) 4pp. 32mo.
1


1838 May 3

(England), Bishop John
Charleston, S(outh) C(arolina)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Lou(isiana)

(England) regrets that Blanc had not received his former letter. (England) returned last night from Savannah and finds one fourth of the city destroyed and one of their churches. Also the man who was to have built a small third church for them is beggared by the fire and probably about $1000 lost in the materials that were burned. (England) leaves in a few days for Augusta and the upper part of Georgia. In the case proposed, the Irish marriage was good and if the Scotchman be living, he is the woman's husband. The principles of the case of Holland extend to all cases of such mixed marriages in Ireland.

V-4-g A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
2


1838 May 6

(Blanc), Bishop Ant(hony)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Extract from a letter received from Cardinal J(ames) Ph(ilip) Fransoni dated September 17, 1837: "As to the question of whether the Ursulines can sell anything without the consent of the Bishop, Fransoni replies that episcopal permission is required for small things and permission of the Holy See is required for things of greater value." Blanc certifies that this is a true copy of the original in the episcopal archives.

V-4-g A.D.S. (Latin) 1p. 4to.
2


1838 May 6

Rosati, Joseph, Bishop of St. Louis
St. Louis, Missouri

Letter by Rosati certifying that on May 6th he ordained in the church of St. Mary's at the Seminary, Michael John Joseph Domenech, C.M., subdeacon in that congregation. The witnesses were Father John Timon, Bartholomew Rollando, Joseph Paquin and John Odin of the Vincentians.

II-4-g D.S. 1p. 4to. (Latin)
5


1838 May 8

Tschenhenss, C.SS.R., Father Francis X.
Norwalk, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Informed by the Telegraph to send in an accurate list of baptisms, marriages and interments, and Easter Communicants, he sends the following statistics, in the absence of Father (Peter) Czakert who is on the way from Rochester to Norwalk.
At Stephens Chapel Norwalk, May 1, 1837, to May 1, 1838, 80 baptisms, 31 marriages, interments 3 adults 2 children, 575 communicants, and at Tiffin 450 who made their Easter duty, other communicants nearly 200.
At Tiffin also 95 baptisms, 15 marriages, and interments 5 adults and 6 children.
Understands by the Telegraph that Purcell is hurrying off on his journey to Europe and desires to wish him well.

II-4-g A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
6


1838 May 9

Montgomery, Father Charles P.
St. Joseph's, Somerset, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Acknowledges Purcell's letter. Had intended to meet Purcell at Marietta but had to change his place of residence. Cannot give all the facts about the congregation under the Dominicans because the registers are not at hand. Gives what he has been able to procure:
In Zanesville baptisms 99, deaths 14, marriages 9, Easter communions before he left 130, but there should be nearly 200.
Rehoboth, baptisms 40, deaths 10, marriages 6. Not very correct but guessed at by the attending pastor. St. Patrick's: baptisms 16, deaths 4, marriages 2, guessed at.
St. Joseph's: baptisms 63, deaths 4, marriages 17, correct.
Somerset: baptisms 50, deaths 8, marriages 19. Have not kept list of Easter communicants.
Lancaster entirely unknown.
Thanks Purcell for offer to bring him something from Rome but refuses to specify what he desires. Wishes him success.

II-4-g A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
7


1838 May 12

Henni, Father J(ohn) M(artin)
Cincinnati, Ohio

to (Bishop John Baptist Purcell)
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Gives an extract from the Diptyches ecclesiae Holy Trinity Church, the German parish of Cincinnati from the beginning of May 1837 to the same month 1838.
Baptisms 261, marriages 155, burials 174. First communions 84 boys and girls.

II-4-g A.L.S. 1p. 4to. (Latin)
3


1838 May 14

DeVos, S.J., Father P(eter)
Grand Coteau, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

DeVos takes advantage of Dr. Smith's offer to send the vessels to be filled with the Holy Oils. He hopes to have First Communion in his parish on Trinity Sunday. DeVos would like to have faculties to have Benediction that day. In the request for a dispensation for Alexandre Postilt(?) and Emilie Bobin, DeVos made a mistake and put Julie Stelly. DeVos will leave to Father (Nicholas) Point, (S.J.) the task of telling (Blanc) of the blessings (Blanc's) goodness sheds on their little parish.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
4


1838 May 15

Boullier, (C.M.), Father J(ohn)
Donaldsonville, (Louisiana)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisiana)

Boullier wrote yesterday asking for a dispensation for Albert G. Gilbert to marry his cousin Ophelia Lessard and asks again now in case Blanc did not receive the letter. Everything is broken off with Father (Charles H. Boutelou de) St. Aubin about taking back his slave Isaac, his Negress and the rest. Boullier has just had a visit from Father (Bonaventure) Armengol, (C.M.) who does not want to have anything to do with it any longer. Boullier is just as glad that he does not have the money for the slaves as he could probably buy Isaac again on two years credit. Armengol in the meantime asks Blanc to send him Andrew, who with the aid of the brother, will take over their little kitchen. He would be obliged if Blanc would send him with Ferdinand Serio(?), bearer of this letter, for tomorrow Armengol will be alone with the brother with hardly any provisions and linens in the presbytery. St. Aubin is moving out and all will be taken away. But if the beginnings are difficult the foundations will only be that much more solid and permanent.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
7


1838 May 16

Gooch, James
Washington, (D.C.)

to O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Massachusetts

He names Garret Anderson, one of the principal booksellers there, as Brownson's agent. He has obtained twenty subscribers, and the subscription list is in the hands of Thomas Ely Moore who will get as many more and forward Brownson the list. It is desired that Brownson forward the numbers as soon as possible.

I-3-e A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
1


1838 May 18

(Bruté), Bishop Simon G(abriel)
Vincennes, (Indiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Bruté) thinks so often of the three months in New Orleans with gratitude. His health is better; he has made several visits to Madison, (Indiana): first, Confirmation at Blanc's foundation, St. Peter's of Father (Simon) LaLumière, who then left for labors along the Illinois River, counting on the Irishman to look after Washington, (Indiana). From there to Knobs, where he found a brick church replacing the log one, and had 63 Confirmations in three languages for the French, Irish and Germans. Fortunately Father (Louis) Neyron handled the situation with two new languages he has added since his arrival with (Bruté) in August, 1836. From there to New Albany where things look black; no Confirmations, they were not expecting him. (Bruté) had hoped to see Bishop (John Baptist) Purcell but he had already left for the east where he is set to sail on the 1st or 10th of June. (Bruté) sent him a long letter with all sorts of items, even one for Texas, which, he sees with joy will be one of the first efforts at Rome. (Bruté) had already thought of that worthy Spanish Lazerist when the name was presented. The departures make (Bruté) very sad; the growing seminary will soon console Blanc. Father (John) Hayden, (C.M.) has refused a second time. Propaganda's insistence was unsuccessful. They say the same thing about Father (Richard Pius) Miles. The strange reports about Father (Adolphus?) Williamson are very inexact but it remains true that he had a second cancer on his chest cured overnight. As for Sister Stanislaus Jones and another cure in the community at Georgetown, Dr. Smith at Baltimore and Dr. Bohrer at Georgetown and the Archbishop are convinced but wish for now to keep it a secret. The Visitation at Mobile had one also. Did Father (Auguste) Jeanjean send the wine for Father Julien Benoit? According to Benoit's last letter of May 12 he had not yet received anything. How did it happen that the poor missionary's trunk, sent from here in December, did not arrive until May! During the long winter that (Bruté) passed in Blanc's eternal spring, he had only the most simple provisions for winter.
P.S. Next Sunday First Communion, the Confirmation at St. Francis Xavier, Blanc's former (church?). In the two boxes (Bruté) brought back there should have been:

1. A chalice -- could it have been taken out and not replaced, and be strayed into some corner of the customs?
2. 300 francs which Father (John) Timon, (C.M.) saw. The little sack is there and Father (James) Corbe is forced to content himself with the empty sack. Could there not also be the probability that it could have happened on the boat or in storage before Father (Celestine de) La Hailandière and (Brute) opened them.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. Folio
20


1838 May 19

McAleer, Father Michael
(Canton, Ohio)

To (Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio)

Adds to the report of Father (Ferdinand) Kuhr at Canton. Fifty-seven Easter communicants with others expected shortly to comply. Many just reclaimed from infidelity for want of an English priest. At Massillon about twenty communicants and about nine or ten English families, visited once a month and Mass celebrated in private house. Bethlehem, eight communicants, two or three English families. At Canal Dover, five or six English families and eight or ten communicants. In Paris sixteen communicants, about a tenth or what might be expected. McAleer has visited Danville, Knox County twice, each time upwards of 100 communicants. At present they are erecting a new church. Had to go into the woods to accommodate all the last time. Gave another instruction in the Methodist meeting house.
Added note: by Gather Kuhr that during the year ending May 18, 1838 there were registered at Canton, 33 marriages, 195 baptisms, 37 deaths, and 668 communicants.

II-4-g A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
9


1838 May 21

(Louisiana), New Orleans
Treasury of Municipality No. 3

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

A receipt for $7 for 1837 taxes on F. Franklin, ilet 61, $4500. (Treasurer's and controller's signatures indecipherable).

V-4-g Receipt s. (French) 2pp. 32mo.
1


1838 May 21

(Louisiana), New Orleans
Treasury of Municipality No. 3

to Mrs. Casimir
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Receipt for $2 for 1837 taxes on F. Marigny $500 and on one slave. (Signatures of the treasurer and controller are indecipherable).

V-4-g Receipt S. (French) 2pp. 32mo.
1


1838 May 23

Gallein, G. Choiselat
Paris, (France)

To Bishop (Frederick) Rese of Detroit
Paris, (France)

He thinks he had best arrange for Rese to see Mr. Gossin, vice-president of the Central Council, and Mr. Picot on Friday. These men will begin to examine the allocation of 1838 on Friday evening. Therefore, he is sure that they will be pleased to meet Rese at this time/ Rese is to regard this advice as confidential.

III-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1838 May 24

Menard, Father Ch(arle)s M.
Thibodaux, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

The chapel dedicated to St. Philomena 3 leagues from Thibodaux being about ready for use in two weeks, Menard asks (Blanc) for the faculty to bless it. He intends to have a mission there the week after Pentecost and he will continue to say Mass there twice a month. Since the subscriptions have not been coming in well Menard has been obliged to take the debt upon himself. In this way he has avoided the due bills(?) Which could ruin St. Joseph Church. It only remains now for the interested parties to retrieve their funds as the subscriptions come in. The total is around $700. There is still much work to do on this chapel but he will have to leave that for the future. During the last week while on a mission near St. Mary's cemetery, the trustees met and invited Menard to attend their meeting which had a very different character from that of times past when the famous patriarch was president. As they had an election that day they were to meet next Tuesday to see about having a church. They s aid that anything Menard did would be good, they would sign what he wrote and make up a subscription list. They said if they had listened to Menard they would now have a church; it was Mr. N. Father Jean-Baptiste Nozo, C.M.?) who was the cause of their misfortune. Menard will comply in all that (Blanc) has told him in this regard. St. Joseph Church is coming along; the walls are 22 feet high. At the request of many of the parishioners and especially upon the offer of a subscription made by a lady (Blanc) knows well, Mrs. W., the trustees have enlarged the church by 16 feet. Menard asks if (Blanc) can come for Confirmation at the end of June or beginning of July. Father Hyacinthe Tumoine is well; he sends his respects.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
4


1838 May 25

Armengol, C.M., Father Bonaventure
Assumption, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Anthony (Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Armengol received on Tuesday, (Blanc's) letter of May 18 through (Blanc's) slave Andrew. Andrew's arrival was delayed because the boat stopped there only on its return. Blanc will have learned from a letter Armengol wrote to Father (August) Jeanjean that they have Isaac and Marianne, the flock, the poultry yard and the other things bought from Father (Charles H. Boutelou de) St. Aubin by Father (John) Boullier, (C.M.). Armengol gets along very well with the trustees and hopes they can be induced to do everything reasonable. Armengol is grateful to (Blanc) for sending him his slave whom at present they do not need. They have a good neighbor Apolinaire, Father of one of the children Armengol wants to take who would have taken nearly all of their tillable land; this year it is too late to take it. They will take advantage of it next year. Armengol is returning to Jeanjean by the bearer of this letter, the trifles that he wrote him about.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp.
4


1838 May 30

Fourquoy
Paris, (France)

To (Bishop Anthony Blanc?)
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Bill of 232 francs.60 for an autographic press and other articles.

V-4-g A. Bill S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
1


1838 Jun 3

(Ray, R.U.), Sister Séraphine
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Father A(ugust) Jeanjean
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Conforming to the intentions of Bishop (Anthony Blanc), Sister informs Jeanjean of the results of the chapter held last night about the St. Claude Street property. The Community (Ursulines) donates it, without condition, to build a church. They would like to have it dedicated to their Mother Ste. Angèle, (R.U.). They would like to have a certain portion of the land left at the disposition of the Ladies who run the institution.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
4


1838 Jun 8

Armengol, C.M., Father B(onaventure)
Assumption, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Anthony (Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Armengol received (Blanc's) letter of May 27 last night. It is (Blanc's) privilege to decide the text for the seminary but since (Blanc) has honored him by requesting it, Armengol will give his opinion. There is nothing to lose in the copies of Bouvier ordered because it will be easy to sell them without losing anything. If Bishop ( ) Kenrick's theology book is as full of merit as its author, it would be better to adopt it. Andrew hurt his foot; it has ben well taken care of but is still lame. Brother Blanka teaches Catechism in English to Isaac and Andrew twice a day. Armengol baptized Isaac, heard his wife's confession, and married them. He plans to send Isaac and Andrew to Donaldson to Father (John) Boullier, (C.M.) for a retreat, First Communion and Confirmation. When (Blanc) goes up to Donaldson they can talk about Andrew. Armengol does not know whether Father (Charles H. Boutelou de) St. Aubin can raise the mortgage on Isaac; Isaac was sold as being 25 years old and he is 33; Marianne passed as 55 and she is 61. The one who was going to do an errand for Jeanjean left for the city with St. Aubin at an unusual hour. That is why he did not take the barrel of potatoes and case of eggs but Armengol will send them by Washington. Armengol is very happy about the association in favor of the seminary. Brother has jaundice.
P.S. Armengol is pleased with Andrew's simplicity and docility. He asks (Blanc) to give the enclosed to Jeanjean; it contains some details (Blanc) will enjoy reading.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
4


1838 Jun 8

Roux, Father B(enedict)
Kaskaskia, Ill(inoi)s

to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisia)na

Roux received Blanc's letter of May 12. On his advice he wrote to Bishop (Joseph) Rosati and to Father Cholleton. He has great apprehension about the former as Roux foresees that his leaving this diocese could cool his feelings and that he would alter his affection which he had shown him during 7 years' association. Roux was at St. Louis May 27 and conferred with the bishop about his decision to return to France, trying to convince him that he could no longer endure the fatigue of the missions because of his health and the climate. His replies were those of a tender Father and it was impossible to come to a conclusion with him. Blanc's letter after this interview confirmed Roux's resolution not for his native land but for Louisiana. In consequence of Blanc's offer Roux wrote to Rosati leaving no doubt about his going soon to New Orleans. He did not mention Blanc as he would not want to cause any disagreement. If he can leave St. Louis with the bishop's approval he will be happy. Whatever happens he wants to join Blanc not later than the middle of next August.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
3


1838 Jun 9

St. Aubin, Father H(enry) B(outelou) de
New Iberia, (Louisiana)

to Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Mr. St. Marc is going to New Orleans so St. Aubin takes the opportunity to tell (Blanc) he is at New Iberia but not well enough acquainted to talk about the place. There have been plenty of baptisms and First Communions and a marriage; there is ignorance of religion among these people. There have been big crowds at church. The pew rent surpassed expectations. There is talk of building a rectory; this is indispensable for a public boarding house is no place for a priest. They haven't talked about a meeting of the trustees, St. Aubin thinks they are awaiting De St. Marc's return. St. Aubin has already said Mass at the home of Mr. Laclaire, fusilier; this family edifies him more and more and commands a special interest. St. Aubin will return Tuesday evening to New Iberia to make preparations for the procession of the Blessed Sacrament. Father (John F.) Brasseur who will have a procession at St. Martin on Sunday, has promised his ostensorium, his dais and the music. St. Aubin lacks everything - even a place to lay his head. He intends to return to Assumption the last of the month to finish arrangements with the trustees about fees. He considers going to New Orleans to give (Blanc) information about both parishes.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
4


1838 Jun 10

(David, S.S.), Bishop Jean B(aptiste) M(arie)
Bardstown, (Kentucky)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

(David) received Blanc's letter of May 20. He is grieved that Father (Thomas Heyden). Heyden persists in his refusal especially after the entreaties from Rome. However (David) thinks Blanc does not have far to go to find a suitable subject. (David) thinks Father (Constantine) Maenhaut would fit better than Heyden.

1. He has the required knowledge and virtue;
2. He has been at Natchez and is acclimated and esteemed;
3. He is Belgian and of a distinguished family from whom he could probably procure the help he will need;
4. He knows English well and also French and Spanish.
(David) knows this would be a privation for Blanc's diocese as it was for Bishop (Benedict Joseph) Flaget when he gave up Bishop (Francis Patrick) Kenrick. He resigned himself to it for the good of Philadelphia. Two more names are to be added and why cannot the Jesuits or Lazarists be tapped? Six Sulpicians have been taken: Flaget, (David), Archbishop(Ambrose Marechal), Bishop (Simon Gabriel) Bruté, Bishop (Guy Ignatius) Chabrat, Bishop (John) Dubois. Why can't the Lazarists give Father (John) Timon, C.M. or Father (John Mary) Odin, C.M.? In Blanc's place, (David ) would place the three names in this order: Maenhaut, Timon, and Odin. If he were face to face with Blanc, (David) would speak more freely about one of their priests about whom Blanc asked. But he would not want to put on paper the reasons that would stop him from proposing him for a bishop. Undoubtedly he has talent and eloquence but his conduct toward Flaget, himself, and the coadjutor seems to repulse him.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
12


1838 Jun 10

Roothaan, S.J., Father J(ohn Philip)
Rome, Italy

to Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Roothaan takes advantage of the return of Bishop (Mathias) Loras of Dubuque to reply to (Blanc's) letter of December 20. He is grateful to (Blanc) for the details about the priests of the Society (Jesuits) who are working in (Blanc's) diocese; he is tankful they have fulfilled (Blanc's) expectations. Roothaan has learned that (Blanc) himself laid the first stone of the College (of St. Charles) at Grand Coteau; it has begun to prosper. At this distance Roothaan cannot judge of the opportunity there will be for the priests at the college to take charge of the parish at Lafayette. He relies on (Blanc's) judgment and that of the priests themselves who (Blanc) says are in favor of it. However it should be provisional as such a charge will take a greater number of priests and because parish functions are less appropriate for their Order than other works. Father (A.) Guidée, (S.J.) is engaged in sending a helper to Father (Joseph) Soller, (S.J.). About the marginal note (Blanc) put on Bishop (Simon Gabriel) Bruté wrote among others to try to win him over on the subject of bishoprics being given to members of the Society. Roothaan has conferred with Loras who was forced to agree that Roothaan was right and that in his place he would oppose it too. He also has his hands tied by the very strict provisions of St. Ignatius. Even the Sovereign Pontiff is fully persuaded of the wrong which might result to the society, especially in America.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) pp. 4to.
8


1838 Jun 11

Evrard, Father J(osep)h
Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

Evrard has been very busy since he has been at Baton Rouge. He has now been everywhere except Jackson, (Louisiana). He already knows a great many families, and so far he is very much pleased with the people he has met. He has just formed a ladies' society to take care of the church; there are more than 24. They have already washed and cleaned everything in the sacristy, bought some beautiful candlesticks and made robes for the children's choir. Evrard is well satisfied with the trustees in his two parishes. If he has enough money in the treasury he thinks he can do everything he wants to. Right now the treasury is not large. Father (Peter Francis) Beauprez left only about $60 of which they have paid out $30. In West Baton Rouge Evrard has formed a similar ladies' society. On Pentecost Monday they let the contract at $4000 for the new church which is to be 50 by 55 feet not counting the choir which will be more than 25. The trustees expect some help from Blanc and Father (Auguste) Jeanjean. They intend to invite Blanc to bless the foundation stone. Evrard asks Blanc to send him a cask of white wine for Mass, two registers for their sacristy, 36 French catechisms and some in English, a small English ritual and the journeys of a young Irishman in search of religion.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
6


1838 Jun 12

Chabrat, Bishop Guy Ig(natiu)s
Morganfield, K(entuck)y

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

By a letter just received from Bishop (John Baptist M.) David, Chabrat learned that Blanc had written concerning Natches and whether Father (Ignatius Aloysius) Reynolds would not be a fit subject to be proposed. Chabrat is at a loss for a proper answer. Reynolds has very good qualities but in Chabrat's opinion he also has very bad ones. He believes it is better to have the matter go to Blanc and the other Bishops because Chabrat believes Reynolds to be overbearing, intriguing, and in some instances bordering on insanity. Chabrat may be mistaken and requests them to act as they please provided no responsibility rests on him.
P.S. If Chabrat had known previous to his writing what took place with Father (Nicholas?) Fort he would have informed Blanc for he believes it the duty of every bishop to be candid. He hopes under Blanc's eyes he will avoid such scenes or return to his country. Chabrat supposes the Zampa(?) is still at Nat(ch)it(oche)s or on his way. Mr. Moore delivered the articles Blanc entrusted him with. The weather is excessively hot and Chabrat must ride 25 miles though on Corpus Christi.

V-4-g A.L.S. pp. 4to.
5


1838 Jun 14

Lesne, Father J(ames)
Summerville, (Alabama)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Not knowing the address of the person who wishes to enter their convent, Lesne asks Blanc in the name of the Superior of the Visitation (of the Blessed Virgin Mary) to give her the reply she has wanted for so long and which could not be sent because of Bishop (Michael) Portier's trip. Lesne asks Blanc to aid his gardener, who, as well as his sister, lent money to Jean Faveray, a carpenter, whom Mr. Viel recommended to Blanc last year to work at the Jesuit College. Several letters have been written to him without being answered. His account amounts to $46: $10 lent by Francois Rampon for his passage to Mobile; $3 for linen; $20 for his passage to New Orleans, $5 lent by Mrs. Gratalon; $8 to pay his board at Mr. Priour's who keeps asking for this amount from Rampon, his cousin. Lesne's gardener, Rampon, would be much obliged if Blanc could obtain payment by asking Father (Nicholas) Point, (S.J.) to retain this amount from his carpenter's wages. In case Blanc succeeds he could leave the money with Father (Louis) Moni who has some money belonging to Lesne. Their convent is always very poor, about 12 borders who hardly pay for their board. The Visitandines join in sending their respects.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) pp. 4to.
6


1838 Jun 17

Saenderl, (C.SS.R.), Father Simon
Arbre Croche, (Michigan)

To Father J(ohn) De Bruyn
Detroit, Michigan

Three young Indians, bearer of this letter, intend to come to Detroit to attend an English school, because (Augustine) Hamelin will not teach school (in Arbre Croche). They have no money. Saenderl told them that they would receive nothing unless they pay for their board. But they want to go to Detroit and return to Arbre Croche in case of refusal. They will come to Father De Bruyn for advice. Saenderl has just received De Bruyn's letter of May 22, which cleared up several things. Sometime before Saenderl has received a letter from De Bruyn dated March 21, in which De Bruyn states that he had been officially informed that (Bishop Frederick Rese) will be able to receive immediately the allowance granted to him by the treaty, for the school, then De Bruyn also states in his letter of May 22, that though Rese had succeeded in a formal promise, that the government has not paid a cent. It is Saenderl's opinion that the government always pays if it has promised, but Rese has never received such a promise, because all the money is given to the Protestants and nothing to the Catholics. (Henry Schoolcraft has arranged the distribution so badly among the Indians. With De Bruyn's letter, Saenderl had also received a letter from Mr. John McDonnell, concerning the establishing of a mission among the Catholic Indians in their new territory in the West. In the summer of 1837 Saenderl has spoken to judge McDonnell about the difficulty of placing the Ottawas on the Mississippi (river), because the Indians have a horror of going there as there is no priest, no church in that territory. They prefer to migrate to Canada where they could preserve their Catholic religion. A Catholic mission is indispensable to them. McDonnell asked Saenderl to give him his ideas in form of a letter, which he did. McDonnell had then immediately taken steps in Washington. Consequently a letter which he quotes was sent by C.A. Harris, Commissioner from the Office of Indian Affairs on May 29, 1838 to the Senator John Marrel. A rescript of that letter was sent to McDonnell who again sent it to Saenderl. In it Harris acknowledges the receipt of a letter, with enclosures, written by Mr. Marrel on May 19. Harris states that he is returning the enclosures, but that he cannot act definitely on the appointment of Hamelin as principal chief of the Ottawas until he has a report from the acting superintendent. Concerning the establishing of a Catholic mission at the point designated by Saenderl, Harris states that the annuities of the Ottawas and Chippewas for education have already been distributed among the different religious associations and the department does not intend to interfere at present. Saenderl continues in his letter by saying that this letter of Harris is enough proof that the funds for education have gone to the Protestants and that the Catholics have been excluded. Therefore De Bruyn's statement that he has been informed officially that (Bishop Rese) will receive immediately the money allowed for the schools by the treaty, seems to Saenderl like a fable of Fontaine or like a story from Boccaccio. If the government does not give any money, he does not feel obliged to hold school. He can see that one would like to have a school in Arbre Croche, but for the moment it is a bad speculation. Rese risks nothing but ink and paper which he squanders in making petitions, but Saenderl will risk everything. He thinks it is inconsiderate to expect him to keep a school on his own expenses. If Rese wants a school he should do so at his own risk. If Saenderl employs Hamelin he must also pay him. In the summer of 1837 (Father) (Florimond) Bonduel had sent to him a Miss Tanner, asking him to open a school in Middletown and allow Miss Tanner 200 dollars a year. Saenderl explained to her the situation and she left immediately. Saenderl will employ Hamelin only a little for Arbre Croche.

III-2-g A.L.S. French, English pp.
8


1838 Jun 21

Mucata Osha, Mix E Nine and Na Ogick wa be
Mackinaw, (Michigan)

to Bishop Frederick Rese
(Detroit, Michigan)

Having understood through the priest at Mackinaw that a certain portion of the money allotted for their improvements is deposited in Rese's hands and as the money is for the support of teachers and missionaries amongst them, they feel it their duty to request a portion of the money to be given to their priest residing with them at Grand Rapids, on the Grand River. The Indians make their mark with Charles H. Oakes, John Berry and J.B. Dausman as witnesses.

III-2-g L.S. 1p. 8vo.
3


1838 Jun 23

Brownson, Orestes A.
Boston, (Massachusetts)

To Victor Cousin
Paris, France

He thanks Cousin for his works; he values everything that Cousin writes. He has read with profit the works of M. De Biran. Philosophy is certainly gaining ground in America. Ripley's translations sold well. Last January Brownson commenced the Boston Quarterly Review. He hopes to make it the organ of the New School on this side of the Atlantic. He is preparing for October a defense of the new French school. The number who really understand Eclectic philosophy is not large. The principal ones are Ripley and George Bancroft. Bancroft is writing a remarkable history of the United States; he is one of the best educated men in America, having studied five years in Germany. Bancroft has promised to send Cousin a copy of Jonathan Edwards works. They are about 30 young clergymen and Rev. James F. Clarke, editor of a monthly periodical in Louisville. The whole of Cousin's course of 1829 has been placed in Brownson's hands for translation. Brownson gave a short course of philosophic lectures which were moderately attended. The standard works on philosophy in the colleges are those of Brice and Stewart. In a short time the democratic or dominant party in America will embrace the views of the New School. It will become the dominant philosophy. Cousin reigns in the hearts of young Americans.

I-4-h Photostat and typed copy (Bibl. De M. Cousin, Sorbonne) 4pp. 8vo.
3


1838 Jun 25

Desmarquest, (R.S.C.J.), Sister F., Assistant General
Paris, (France)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

She received (Blanc's) last two letters, the first entrusted to Bishop (Mathias) Loras whom they did not have the pleasure of seeing; he may still be in Paris; and the second through Father (Edward) d'Hauw. In both Sister saw with gratitude the fatherly interest (Blanc) has for their two families (Ladies of the Sacred Heart) at St. Michael and at Grand Coteau. Their Mother-General, Mother (Madeleine-Sophie Barat) is deeply touched by (Blanc's) kindness and sends her regrets that she cannot reply to (Blanc's) letter, but since leaving Rome she has been visiting the houses en route. She will reply upon her return to Paris in about six weeks. Sister apologizes for the inconvenience caused (Blanc) by the box for St. Michael, Mr. Taschy gave them two invoices; they would have done better to send it directly to (Blanc). Madame Gafney did it for them. The good news (Blanc) gives of their two houses gives Sister great pleasure. Their Mother-General is seeking an assistant for America.
(P.S.) Madame (Elizabeth) Galitzin asks (Blanc's) blessing.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) pp. 4to.
6


1838 Jun 26

Smith, L.J.
New Iberia, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

The deaths of his elder son and little daughter within a fortnight have retarded Smith's answer to Blanc's last letter, every syllable of which Smith has strictly adhered to. Yesterday Blanc's new church establishment there met with new difficulties. Father (Charles Henry Boutelou de) St. Aubin, their pastor, has been generally satisfactory until yesterday, when he demanded for a salary, one half the sale of the benches, $1,250 and half of all the casuals which could be equal to $800 more and $300 for his sexton. Smith and Mr. St. Marc had told St. Aubin that they were unable to give more than $400 fixed and the casual the same as the priest at St. Martin's. Smith had made the same reply to Blanc before St. Aubin's coming. They made St. Aubin two propositions, both of which he declined. The church owes upwards of $5,000; they are about building a presbytery and they have the graveyard all of which they could not build for less than $2,000 more. St. Aubin has presented them with a bill of necessary articles for the church amounting to $1,300. St. Marc and Smith are personally bound for the debt and liable to be called on for it next spring. They will abide by what Blanc says is right. Smith gives an exact account from the church treasurer's books.

V-4-g A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
4


1838 Jun 27

Holy Office, Congregation of the
(Rome, Italy)

Some who have repented of being Free Masons have continued to attend meetings and appear publicly as Masons. Is there anywhere in the world where such people can be admitted to the Sacraments? The question is: What is a confessor to do? The Sacred Congregation declared on July 5, 1837 that this cannot be done. On June 27, 1838 the Roman Congregation of the Inquisition confirmed this and Pope Gregory XVI approved it. Signed by Angelus Argenti, notary.

V-4-g Printed L. (Latin) 1p. 4to.
3


1838 Jun 29

Poydras de Lalande, B.
Pointe Coupee, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Although busy with his own affairs, Lalande also had to see about the settlement of the deSermes(?) estate. He sends a precis of the account which showed a balance of 24860 (piastres) in Blanc's favor in March, 1836. At that time his departure for Europe prevented him from rendering an account. He had a year to settle it, but it ran to two. He commissioned his friend Garnier to pay the amount above, receiving a receipt dated March, 1836 (which is quoted). According to a statement of one of the accounts of Quartier and Albert, Poydras found that on October 14, 1833 they had counted 43-12. This is to be adjusted through Garnier. The day of Poydras' departure is near; he regrets leaving here and its people. Enclosed is a statement of what the DeSerme estate owes Blanc.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
2


1838 Jul 6

Delhom, Father
Paris, (France)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
(New Orleans), Louisiana

Delhom was ordained 12 years ago, and has always enjoyed high esteem. After 8 years in France, he was called to the Antilles where he had seven parishes to travel over with 25,000 Catholics. Four years of the work under a burning sun ruined his health and forced him to return to France. He crossed in the ship, the Josephine, of Havre, the Captain Mercadien being the same as at the time when Blanc returned to New Orleans. Being somewhat rested, and being interested in the missions, and being encouraged by what Mercadien and others have told him about New Orleans, Delhom wishes to come there to work under Blanc or some other bishop. His papers are all honorable, 5 letters from his last bishop and his parishioners. If Blanc wants any books, church furnishings, or anything else, Delhom will be glad to carry out his wishes. He will commission the house of Mr. Levavasseur and the master of the Josephine to deliver them to Blanc.
P.S. His address is Care of Dr. Casabon(?) In Paris. Delhom is originally from a family which lived in America where he still has some relatives whom he would be pleased to see again.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
2


1838 Jul 7

Armengol, C.M., Father B(onaventure)
Assumption, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Anthony (Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Armengol received (Blanc's) letter of July 4 through Father (Henry Boutelou de) St. Aubin. Armengol sees the reasons for (Blanc's) advice to advance St. Aubin some of the price for Isaac and Marianne. However, Armengol cannot act on this advice.

1. Father (John Mary) Timon, (C.M.) forbids him to advance any.
2. Father (John) Boullier, (C.M.), Father (Joseph) Giustiniani, (C.M.), and Father (John) Chandy, (C.M.) are against it.
3. Judge Hubbard, Mr. Bela, and others have warned them not to and say that it was not prudent to advance the 300 piastres they have given.
4. St. Aubin concealed the truth about the mortgage for Marianne.
5. Once there is a clear title(?) They will pay in full: (The Congregation) as much as they can, the remainder Bela and their treasurer, Jean Baptiste Guillot; who said he had 500 piastres for Armengol which he said he would pay as soon as St. Aubin lifted the mortgages. These men do not trust St. Aubin; they see his affairs are too tangled. Yesterday there was a long meeting of the trustees to finish the arrangements with St. Aubin. They had dinner in the midst of it; there were 11 at the table. Affairs were settled at last. St. Aubin ceded all his rights to the church and the twelve candlesticks and the 2 gilded crosses which (Blanc) brought from France. The trustees' affection for them is wonderful. Armengol thanks Father (Auguste) Jeanjean for the bathtub(?) And the two chests(?).
P.S. If (Blanc) needs Andrew to fill the loss of George, Armengol will send him at the first hint.
P.S. Since writing this letter they have paid St. Aubin 53 piastres 62 1/2c.

V-4--g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
7


1838 Jul 7

Purcell, Bishop John B(aptist)
L(iver)pool, (England)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

They have just arrived after a prosperous and speedy voyage, having left New York on the 16th. The spoke(?) Last night the Norman, May 25 from (Blanc's) city, Captain Wood. Father (Peter Francis) Beauprez was very sea sick but today his appetite is keen. Purcell got (Blanc's) letter enclosed for Father (Louis)Boué. Purcell sends regards to Father Jeanjean and to Mother Stanislas, and all at Opelousas.

V-4-g A.L.S. 1p. 4to.
3


1838 Jul 13

Armengol, C.M., Father B(onaventure)
Assumption, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Anthony (Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

They will celebrate the feast of their founder at Donaldson. Father (Louis) Boué will give the eulogy; Armengol would be rash to ask (Blanc) to be present but it would give them great joy to have him visit them any time. Father (John) Boullier, C.M. wants to set up the Confraternity of the Rosary on the feast of the Assumption. Armengol wants to do the same in their church, and wants (Blanc's) approval and instructions. Armengol has heard that (Blanc's) approval and instructions. Armengol has heard that (Blanc) has received from Rome instructions about the marriages of slaves and wishes to be informed. The building of chapels in different places in this parish is going well and he thinks they will donate them to (Blanc) to prevent them from falling into the hands of the trustees.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
3


1838 Jul 14

Blanc, Bishop Ant(hony) and others
New Orleans, Louisiana

A summary of the work to be done to finish the Seminary (of St. Vincent de Paul) in Assumption parish. The work to be done on the building, 75 by 51 feet, is (listed in detail). Any work not done with good materials or according to rule will be rejected and replaced at the expense of the contractors. They are to furnish 15 locks -- not to exceed $30 in cost. C. Feutrier, Mr. Ragozzy, Claude Vivier, and P. Bouchard contract to do the above work for Blanc for 8500 piastres to be paid in four payments. Vivier and Bouchard are to get $4400, and Feutrier and Ragozzy 4100.
Signed by all the above.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. Folio
5


1838 Jul 15

(Bruté), Bishop Simon G(abriel) W(illiam)
Terre Haute, (Indiana)

To (Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

This date will show (Blanc) that (Bruté) thinks of him and rejoices in the memory of the three months of close association. The window near him gives on this beautiful church (a drawing of the church in the letter) already 20 feet high which the Bishop of New Orleans is building here as in many other places. It is a pleasure to see, especially for Mr. Drurian(?) who was about to lose his sight and recovered it between two Communions while Bruté was with (Blanc). Since the ordinary span of sight cannot extend from Louisiana to Indiana, (Blanc) should "come and see." If (Blanc) has the faith to build such small things, he should have the grace to build much larger churches which he needs in his large metropolis. This feeble reflection of his charity for his little sister Terre Haute will please (Blanc) momentarily and who knows if Brutés debt of $25 to Mrs. Dolahan of which (Bruté) informed (Blanc) in his last letter and which he asked him to deduct from the $200 of Bishop (Michael) Portier would otherwise not be fulfilled except by this small discount -- very small he should say, pleased as he is by (Blanc's) great generosity -- if meanwhile he could discharge them sooner by the Masses of Father (Auguste) Jeanjean, Father (Constantine?) Maenhaut, or Father (Louis) Moni. (Bruté) will ask them to charge $30 as that is the price of the alter suggested to Father (Stanislaus) Buteux, (C.J.M.), besides his main structure, which would leave all that beautiful shell, nave, lower sides, roof, floor, and in the end some 2 or $300 of debts, but all inspires confidence. (Blanc's) try on the Cat river has received its blessing, the church being finished, (Bruté) blessed it on July 1 and confirmed 34. From there pressing on again over the Ohio he returned to Madison where Father (Michael E.) Shaw(e) is building a church 90 by 50 feet. From there to the home of the Germans of Dearborn C(ount)y. (Bruté) has blessed Father (Joseph)Ferneding's Church of St. Paul, of brick, 83 feet long; then St. Peter's at Blue Creek. At St. Paul he confirmed more than 100. From there he went to Shelbyville about 12 miles from Indianapolis from where he arrived at Terre Haute night before last. Today he has had several Confirmations and tomorrow they expect him at (Joseph) Thralls where Buteux has already blessed the church with Father (Simon) Lalumière before leaving for Louisiana; then Tuesday over the fields near Paris, the third church which has been built. (Bruté) has much joy in the zeal of their young French priests and they are beloved in spite of their imperfect English. (Bruté) is leaving for St. Mary's of the Woods at Thralls with Buteux.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
14


1838 Jul 16

De Verna F. President
Lyon, (France)

To (Bishop Frederick) Rese
Detroit, (Michigan)

Conforming to the instructions in Rese's letter of May 28, concerning the alms collected in Sardinia, they have made a copy of his letter for Father Reynaud and kept a copy for their own use in reference to the necessary steps that may be necessary in Turin to secure the sums of which there is question for the treasury of the Association of the Propagation. The answer that was made to them forced them to have recourse to Rese. This response was in effect what they presumed. Some have refused to fulfill their requests, but only until Rese could testify by a special letter his intention regarding the subscriptions which have been received in his name. They beg him to have the kindness to send them some lines for that special purpose which they can send to Turin and Genoa for the funds of which they speak.
P.S. They include a receipt for 100 francs which has come to Mr. Deverna, the president of the Association of the Faith at Lyons for money he gave to Mr. McCosker, a missionary of the diocese of Detroit who landed at Marseilles with the intention of joining Rese at Paris but who lacked the means of continuing his journey. DeVerna paid this our\t of his personal funds with the thought that Rese would authorize him to reimburse himself at the next allocations of funds.

L.S. (French) 2pp. 8vo.

The enclosure is as follows:

--------
1838 Jul 7

McCosker, (James) Ferdinand
Lyons, (France)

To M. Deverne (a?)
(Lyons, France)

McCosker has received from Deverne the sum of 100 francs which he promised Bishop Haize (Rese)? would return to him.

Note signed.

To this is added:

--------
1838 Jul 7

McCosker, (James) F(erdinand)
Lyons, (France)

To Bishop (Frederick Rese)
(Detroit, Michigan)

McCosker after many difficulties was forced to get (100 francs?) from Mr. Deverne(a)the, President of the Association on his private account. He hopes that Rese will settle the account when he writes. McCosker hoped to see Rese at Paris and was much disappointed.

III-2-g A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
3


1838 Jul 18

(Flaget), Bishop B(enedict) J(oseph)
London, (England)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

Blanc's letter arrived some time ago when (Flaget) was busy carrying out the commission given him by the Pope to travel through all the dioceses which depend on the Central Council of Lyon. Like Blanc, (Flaget) hoped to get together with Blanc when they were both in Europe, but Blanc had left Rome when (Flaget) arrived and the same at Marseilles. (Flaget) can see that if Blanc has no coadjutor he would hasten to join his flock and that being in the prime of life Blanc could do in one day what (Flaget) could not do in four. In spite of his advanced age, (Flaget) would now be in the midst of his flock if the pope had not given him this commission of exhorting all the Bishops to establish or give new life to the Association for the Propagation of the Faith in their dioceses. Accompanying him is a Carthusian from Lyon with a special preaching talent and a perfect knowledge of the Association. The Carthusian preaches first and then (Flaget) presents the extreme poverty of all the Bishops of the Mississippi Valley, especially the newly created ones. In general the results have been wonderful. (Flaget) has heard from America that the Bishops-Elect of Notches and Tennessee do not wish to accept. (Flaget) is sorry because Catholicism is doing very badly in these two states. Vincennes had no more resources, but today it has bright prospects. Bishop (Simon Gabriel William) Bruté has done miracles. The newly elect would have the same claim if they would take up their heavy burden; (Flaget) knows the administrators of the Association are convinced of the necessity of sending great sums to these generous bishops. If Blanc has occasion to give them this important news he is not to fail to do so and if he could persuade them to accept he would be rendering an important service to the Church in America. (Flaget) asks if Father (August) Jeanjean is at New Orleans; some of his friends and relatives do not know where to write him. (Flaget) thanks Blanc for paying the duty on the things assigned to him in order to be sent along to (Flaget's) coadjutor. If Blanc writes to (Flaget) he is to address his letter to Mr. Meynis(?), editor of the Annales of the Propagation at Lyon.
P.S. Regards to Father Moni, Blanc's coworkers, and the Ursulines.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
7


1838 Jul 19

(Loras), Bishop Mathias
Lyon, (France)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

On July 4, on his return from Rome, (Loras) received (Blanc's) letter of May 6. He is very grateful for (Blanc's) friendly and unreserved letter. (Loras) writes with one eye because of an inflammation contracted Sunday at St. Cyr where he celebrated the patronal feast. Invitations like that are frequent here; he accepts only a few. As for St. Just, if he is at Lyon, he will not miss it. Father Roué has been very agreeable; he says (Blanc) owes nothing; in fact he ought to have a little bonus. (Loras) will carry out (Blanc's) commissions in Paris where he is going next Wednesday to arrange for passage on a state steamer. He is almost ready, with 3 priests and 4 subdeacons; he does not know the time or place of embarking. (Blanc's predictions about his success have not been exactly verified but he has 49,000 francs here, 8 at Rome, and perhaps he will have something at Vienna. The administration here retains an extreme reserve toward (Loras); they seem pained that everyone is surprised that he has no one from Lyons. (Loras) himself is cut to the heart. He disconcerted one of the vicars-general by telling him that Bishop (Louis James Maurice de Bonald) of Lepuy had placed his seminary at (Loras' disposal and disconcerted (Bonald) by telling him that Cardinal (Joseph) Fesch had given him 18 pictures. The letter sent to him at Rome from the people of Dubuque, signed by 18 persons, gave (Loras) great pleasure and increased his haste to return to them. (Loras) wrote yesterday to Father Samuel Charles Mazzuchelli, lent him by the Dominicans for 6 years, to tell him that he might not be back by Christmas and to ask him to do all that he could for his people. Blanc is to ask Father (Auguste) Jeanjean to take from the customs the three boxes to be sent from Marseilles to New Orleans for (Loras). One contains books fro the college at Dubuque; the second one the pictures; and the third, things for the church. In the one with the books there is a piece of old broken marble which is the tombstone of St. Cessien, October 24, whose body (Loras) obtained as a precious treasure for Dubuque. (Loras) took deep interest in those fires in the United States; they are a terrible scourge and quite rare in Europe. (Loras) will see the Lazarists at Paris and take all their messages for (Blanc). Those at Rome are very orderly and highly respected. The Father General of the Jesuits gave (Loras) a letter for (Blanc); (Loras) mailed it here. The General talked about the way (Blanc) handled the Fathers; he never say anything like it. The questions about Philadelphia were more for (Loras) than Father Cholleton; (Loras) told him nothing about (Blanc's) reply; he must keep secret what pertains to his confreres. Bishop (Benedict Joseph) Flaget is again visiting the dioceses of France with amazing success. That is what it is to be a saint. (Loras) cannot stop writing without telling (Blanc) how much he shares his point of view and action about the big speculations. The world does not like at all to see them occupied with it.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
9


1838 Jul 20

(England), Bishop John
Charleston, (South Carolina)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Lou(isiana)

Blanc's letter of the 13th was handed to England by Father (C.) Rampon. England is greatly indebted for the manner in which Blanc fulfilled his commissions. They are getting some aid for their churches; they are in very deep distress and not only outstripped by every Catholic diocese but thwarted and crippled by their opponents at home. England now sees New Orleans opening as she ought for the development of her great Catholic resources. The (United States) Miscellany is a losing establishment yet if England gave it up they would be overwhelmed though half his time is consumed by it. As to Notches, England is unable to advise Blanc. At the last Council (England) resolved to confine himself within his own diocese. It has brought him great peace. Father P(eter Richard) Kenrick is going to Europe, his brother informed (England), to recruit his health. Father (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.) has the good will of every prelate in the Union and the great difficulty would be with the Bishop of St. Louis. (England's) opinion of Father (John) Power is unchanged but (England) is alone. There is some mysterious opposition, the ground of which he cannot discover. It has extended to Lyons and Rome and (England) does not think Blanc would get their brethren to join in promoting him except to put him out of New York. It is now near 30 years since Power and (England) are intimate friends and (England) has had dark hints of charges against him among the bishops but could never get any fact or specific charges. (England) has not had a letter from Power since last September. Power felt greatly mortified by the way his name had been treated and was inclined to retire upon an allowance of $1,000 yearly offered him by his brother-in-law. (England) is glad he did not. (England) does not think him as well fitted for a new diocese as a man who had served more in country missions. (England) looks on Odin as the best; Kenrick excellent. He does not think the bishops would sustain Power's name, though (England) would, for any see.

V-4-g A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
7


1838 Jul 30

( )
Paris, (France)

To Father (Constantine) Maenhaut
New Orleans, Louisiana

Maenhaut will perhaps remember that at Lafontaine's hotel in Paris, 20 months ago on Maenhaut's departure, the writer gave him a........ (the ms. is torn here) for Barrier and (the Bishop?) of New Orleans...(This manuscript is badly mutilated and the above is a doubtful translation).
P.S. His son-in-law sends his respects.

V-4-g A.L. (French) 3pp. 2mo.
1


1838 Aug 4

Blackwood, George Rye
Dublin, Ireland

to Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Blackwood writes about the will of William Edmond Gorman, formerly of Rappees (Rapides?). Father John McQuade was bequeathed 100 pounds, and he, Palmer Smith, and Robert Snae(?) were named executors by the will given July 12, 1821 in the presence of Francis Maxwell, William Gallet, and Andrew Crane. The remainder of the property -- 16,000 pounds in the bank, 3 flour mills on the Mississippi, and all his stock and farming tools, with the exception of 100 pounds towards repairs of the chapel of his native parish in Ireland -- he bequeathed equally between his two brothers James and Daniel Gorman. These brothers have engaged Blackwood to seek out this property. He asks Blanc for information on McQuade and the other two executors. Blackwood quotes a memorandum "Copy taken ... July, 1825. Michael Rignay."

V-4-g A.L.S. 4pp. Folio
5


1838 Aug 4

Guidée, S.J., Father A.
Paris, (France)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

For easier communication, their Father General has decided to place all (Jesuits) in Blanc's diocese under the Superior of their mission in Missouri. So from now on the Fathers at Grand Coteau and New Orleans will regard him as their Superior. This same mission is charged with maintaining the college and the residence to be formed at New Orleans. They are glad to begin an establishment which God seems to bless and over which Blanc is willing to watch.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
2


1838 Aug 4

Jogues, Brother
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
St. James, (Louisiana)

Brother asks for the readmission into the diocese of their unfortunate brother and asks Blanc to forget the past.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
1


1838 Aug 6

(Hughes), Bishop John (Joseph)
New York, (New York)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Hughes) is at a loss to reply to Blanc's letter of July 20. In (Hughes') opinion, Father (John) Power would not suit. (Hughes) does not think he would accept it; he is broken in health and the energies of his mind. Of (Hughes') own knowledge he is not aware of anything that should disqualify him but from others he has been made acquainted with transactions which would show a want of integrity. (Hughes) thinks the North could not produce the man required for Natchez. He cannot but approve of Father (Thomas) Heyden's declining. (Hughes) thinks Father (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.) as among the best that could be selected. Bishop (Frederick) Rézé has returned and does not want a coadjutor. Odin is acquainted with the country and character of the people. He has friends in Europe.

V-4-g A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
6


1838 Aug 11

Armand, Father (D.)
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Podalyre Daboral, son of Bruno Daboral and the late Julie Magnier(?), and Marie Dispour, daughter of Jean Dispour and Jany(?) Chadirac were married in the presence of Magdeleine Guillet and Jany Chadirac. (The contracting parties sign).

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 1p. folio
7


1838 Aug 11

Auger, Father
Compiegne, (France)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Two young people of good family foolishly left without being married to establish themselves in America. After a time they asked for a nuptial blessing. They were then at New Orleans and ran a pharmacy. The husband is Pierre Amédée Flécheux, the wife Adelaide Justin. Father (Louis Moni?) Mony married them in June, 1831. Now they are in France and their conscience and concern for their children demand that they have the official document of their marriage. Auger asks (Blanc) to search the register and give 5 or 6 persons an honorable life.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
4


1838 Aug 16

Baraga, (Father) Frederick
LaPointe, (Wisconsin)

To Bishop (Frederick) Rese
(Detroit, Michigan)

Father Baraga is very glad to hear of the happy return of the Bishop from Europe. He hopes that all the Bishop's affairs have been arranged with the best success, and that the Bishop will visit at Lake Superior next year. He sends him the episcopal seal which the Bishop had ordered him to have made with a press which he bought in Vienna. If the Bishop has some interesting news, especially about Rome, he would like to get it before the end of the navigation on Lake Superior. The medals in the package are for (Father Francis Vincent) Badin.

III-2-g A.L.S. (French) 1p.
2


1838 Aug 20

Browne, Bishop Geo(rge) J.
Galway, Ireland

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Brown believes the Misses Fahy who will present this to be possessed of the highest principles of integrity. Their capability of imparting useful knowledge to the pupils entrusted to their care must highly enhance their value wherever they locate.

V-4-g A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
2


1838 Aug 21

Armengol, C.M., Father B(onaventure)
Assumption, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Joseph) Chanet arrived last Sunday with Father (John Boullier, C.M.) Boullier. He has already begun to review his theology; Armengol will inform Blanc about him. Miss Louise Bazire at the request of Father (Charles H. Boutelou de) St. Aubin consented to ask Armengol for the $600 which they had received from her on the articles bought by St. Aubin. Armengol gave her this sum which Mr. Vela lent him gratis. St. Aubin honored them in a manner worthy of his character which Blanc will allow Armengol to pass over in silence.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
5


1838 Aug 23

(Loras), Bishop Mathias
Le Havre, France

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

On Blanc's orders, Loras had a small chain for a pectoral cross made in Paris. He sends it herewith and asks Blanc to accept it as a small token of friendship. In the box there is also a cross and chain for Bishop (Michael) Portier. Loras is abusing Father (Auguste) Jeanjean's goodness with his commissions. Mr. Dô(?) Arrived in Paris. (Loras) saw him as well as Mr. Daion(?). (Loras) hopes before long to go down to Louisiana. Blanc's Lazarists left Havre Sunday; the weather was so bad 6 hours after they left that they would have had to put into port at Cherbourg. (Loras) does not know what awaits his party on the 25th or later.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
3


1838 Aug 26

Bedini, Cajetan C., Auditro N.A.
Vienna, Austria

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Has transmitted through Mr. Schwarz the Consul of the United States the sum of 292.30 florins, a year's fruits from the foundation of Joannes Baptista Joffroy. The sum is to be used for the educating of three clerics to be divided with the Bishop of Detroit according to the decree of the Sacred Congregation of the Propaganda of October 29, 1834.

II-4-g A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
5


1838 Aug 27

(White, S.C.), Sister Rose
St. Joseph's, Emmitsburg, M(arylan)d

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Blanc's letter of July 9 has not been replied to as Rose knew Blanc wished her to delay in hopes he might have a decisive answer to the Sisters (of Charity) taking charge of the Iberville House. They would cheerfully come to Blanc's aid if they had subjects but although their novitiate is very large, the term of their remaining for two years and three months puts it out of their power for present calls for Sisters. Blanc's wish to establish a Motherhouse in his diocese is a most desirable one; the Archbishop is of the same opinion and is about revising their Constitutions. They must look to their poor Emily this winter if she remains so dissatisfied. Sister Rose hopes Sister Bibiana will see the necessity of seeking her happiness in obedience. Their happy child (Sister) Anastasia (Mattingly, S.C.) is at rest; they heard of her death before receiving Blanc's letter. Madame Demoutier, now Sister Lorence(?) and Sister Mary Louise are well and doing their little part faithfully. They are about to commence their chapel. Sister would be pleased to have Blanc's name and that of Father (Auguste) Jeanjean added to the list of subscribers.
(P.S.) She sends Jeanjean their respects and prayers for his paternal care of their Sisters.

V-4-g A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
6


1838 Aug 29

Blanc, Ant(hony), Bishop of New Orleans
New Orleans, Louisiana

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell, Cincinnati
Rome, Italy

Has been cheered with the tidings that Purcell had arrived at Liverpool. Hopes that he will have a speedy and successful journey. The Truth Teller has announced the arrival of the Bishop of Detroit, (Rese) in New York. New Orleans still in good health. Bishop Bruté seems well traveling about his diocese blessing and confirming. Blanc has laid the cornerstone for a new church at New Orleans. The college at Grand Coteau is not completed but the students are flocking in. Mr. and Mrs. (Pierce) Connelly have settled in that quarter, where he teaches music at a convent. Madame Connelly has 23 pupils. Blanc visited them lately and Mr. Connelly acted as his chaplain attending him in soutaine and surplice. When they went to Notches they received a costly gift from their old friends and parishioners. Because of the spiritual deprivations of that section they came to Grand Coteau. Bishop (Francis Patrick) Kenrick has written to Blanc about a new presentation since Father (Thomas) Heyden has refused a second tie. He as yet has not named anyone and thinks only of Father (John ) Odin, C.M. and Father (Richard) Kenrick, but he understands from Bishop England that the latter has gone to Europe for his health. Wishes Purcell to ask the Cardinal Prefect that the opposition of the Vincentians be not yielded to in the case of Father Odin. Blanc would not insist on Father (John) Timon because he thinks that if he is left in charge of the Vincentians for some years more, that congregation will be able to be of great service to the church in this country. Purcell's sister has gone to St. Louis and is well. The Pensionnate at St. Louis as well as that at New Orleans are prospering. Has contracted for the finishing of the seminary at $8500, to be completed the next October 1. Suggests that Purcell come back by way of New Orleans.
P.S. Urges Purcell to write during his travels, saying that he himself will not be able to address Purcell.

II-4-g A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo. (Partly French)
15


1838 Aug 29

Orsoni, Father J(osep)h Marie
Havana, (Cuba)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Orsoni wrote on July 11 asking Blanc to tell him whether he could get into Mexico from New Orleans and also asked if Joseph Chanet could be admitted to Blanc's seminary. Since that time he has had news telling him to wait until affairs between Mexico and France are settled. Orsoni had said that Chanet had been recommended by several pastors of Paris. However they have heard of things which happened on the ship which makes them believe he is a wolf in sheep's clothing. They had been in Havana only four days and he kept tormenting the archbishop to ordain him. Orsoni asked for his papers and was amazed to see that the signature of the Archbishop of Smyrna, Superior of the Picpus Seminary, was forged as well as a certificate from his bishop. This agrees with what Father Cabias, his companion, said, that Chanet had fled when he saw his crimes were going to be discovered. The Archbishop of Havana gave him permission to say Mass. A warship has just arrived from Vera Cruz; it seems the Mexicans have decided to fight. The French have lost many through sickness.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
3


1838 Aug 29

Peirce, Isaac B.
Trenton, (New York)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Mass(achusetts)

He is very much obliged to Brownson for the books he so kindly sent by Rev. George Ripley. He is glad at the prospect of seeing Brownson here this Autumn. He asks him not to fail to come and see him. He forgives Brownson for not writing as he (Brownson) has so much to do himself, but when Brownson is so near, at Utica, he must not fail to come. The past year has been one of great trial, and sorrow, and he would have welcomed a letter from Brownson last Fall. He has received two numbers of the Quarterly, and he sees that the third number is out. He is delighted with his interview with Ripley, who lived up to his expectations of him. He asks Brownson to write him soon, and to look up his letter of last Fall as an admonition to him to write.

I-3-e A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
2


1838 Sep 1

Baross, Father, Vicar General
Lyon, (France)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Young De La Chaumette gave him (Blanc's) letter and he takes the opportunity of De la Chaumette's return to New Orleans to reply. Baross is delighted to learn that Father (Stephen) Rousselon has succeeded so well. He has everything necessary to succeed and they made a great sacrifice in giving him to (Blanc). The diocese of Lyon is getting along well. They have at least 300 priests right now at the seminary on a retreat by Father Bussy, S.J. Bishop (Mathias) Loras spent some time at Lyon; he is now in Paris but they will see him again before he leaves for America. At Lyon Loras said Mass in several churches and gave Confirmation. His presence was a great consolation for his parents and friends. Lyon has furnished so many prelates not only in France but in America, Asia, and Oceania. Baross asks for prayers from (Blanc) whom Lyon Diocese regards as one of its children.
P.S. Baross thanks (Blanc) for his favors to De la Chaumette.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
4


1838 Sep 1

Dupuy, Father Enn(emond)
Iberville, (Louisiana)

to Bishop Anth(ony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Since he has been at Iberville, the thing that has troubled Dupuy the most is the celebration of marriages. He asks Blanc to extend his powers to perform marriages in the third degree of consanguinity and with the impediment of disparity of cult without writing for a dispensation in each case. The Creole families are nearly all related so there is rarely a marriage without impediment. They make great preparations with many invitations before notifying him and then if he does not have time to write they marry before a judge. In Iberville they rarely receive a reply from New Orleans within two weeks. Dupuy would also like to know if he can perform marriages during Advent and Lent. The fever has spared him so far. Smallpox which has caused panic there has abated a little but people still do not come to church. Many ask if Blanc will not soon come there. Dupuy has found it impossible to have the flagstones laid at the College as yet; he will see to it. A workman, named Francis Dupuy claims $35.12 for work at the college, having been hired by Mr. (B.) Granet who told him Blanc would pay him. He said that Father (Matthew B.) Anduze also told him Blanc would pay him. Judge Dutton gave Dupuy a subscription of $3000 for the church at Plaquemine. In two weeks he counts on having $5000 and will send Blanc a copy for his approval as well as the donation of land.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
6


1838 Sep 4

Loras, Widow and Sons
Lyons, (France)

To Father (Auguste) Jeanjean
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Jeanjean is informed that Bishop (Mathias) Loras addressed to him all the articles he could not take with him so that Jeanjean could have them sent to Dubuque. The bishop left from le Havre on August 26 and was to go directly to his diocese from New York. His effects consisting of 12 trunks will leave le Havre for New Orleans by a steamboat due September 10. They have added a box for Miss (Sister Philomele?) Besson at the convent (of the Visitation) in (Mo)bile (the ms. is torn here) and 3 boxes for Father (Peter) Mauvernay, ... (Ms. torn) ... Father Zalade(t), Carthusian Missionary. However, the bishop forgot to leave a copy of all the contents and Jeanjean will find enclosed (no enclosures) as detailed an account as they could make of the articles and their value. They think it will suffice for the customs. The total value is 1234.10 francs; the box for Miss Besson is valued at 85 francs.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
5


1838 Sep 11

Armengol, C.M., Father B(onaventure)
Assumption, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Today Armengol received Blanc's letter of August 27. Blanc had not thought it necessary to make the distinctions which Father (Auguste) Jeanjean insisted on in regard to Father (John) Timon's proposal, that is to fix an allowance for each seminarian. Armengol is convinced they should pay Jeanjean for everything he wanted to buy for them. Father (John Peter) Chandy, (C.M.), Brother, and Armengol are pretty well provided for as to clothing and furniture so that everything Armengol asks for in clothing, bedding, chairs, etc. is for the seminary. As for food, what they do not have there, Mr. Fleutrier will bring from town. Since he asked for the linen for the seminarians which he thought would be sent no later than the beginning of November and that the seminary should furnish everything, at least for some, Armengol thinks it is not his place to set the quantity nor the quality. And if the Seminary is not organized that soon these provisions can be put aside.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
5


1838 Sep 13

Legros, J(ohn) B(aptist)
Havre, (France)

To Father Aug(us)te Jeanjean
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Legros wrote to Jeanjean yesterday by a missionary leaving for Marengo; he gave Jeanjean a copy of the prayers the Baroness should say during the novena that Prince de Hohenlohe will give for her November 21-29. Enclosed is the bill of lading for the 19 boxes sent to Jeanjean's address aboard the Republican. The 12 boxes are for Bishop (Mathias) Loras and one for Sister Philomele (Besson) Basson at the Visitation in Mobile. Box No. 33 is for Bishop (Anthony) Blanc and 3 are for Father (Peter) Mauvernay at Mobile. Three are for Father (Edward) D'ha(u)w. On some of the boxes is written "Books for Dubuque College"; Jeanjean is to supply the (address?).

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
6


1838 Sep 15

(Eccleston), Samuel, Archbishop of Baltimore
Baltimore, (Maryland)

To Bishop (Frederick) Rese
Detroit, Michigan

(Eccleston) has this day received from the Cardinal Prefect of the Propaganda the accompanying documents with directions to forward them to Rese without delay. He quotes the extracts of the letter to himself directing (Eccleston) that he is to send them on immediately and testify to their receipt by Rese; that letters to Rese are not sealed so that (Eccleston) can read them; that he is to understand that Pope Gregory XVI orders Rese to go to Rome immediately. The cardinal Prefect thinks that Rese should come immediately and asks (Eccleston's) opinion on that matter. (Eccleston) asks Rese to acknowledge the receipt of the letters and to send any other information he thinks the case calls for.

III-2-g A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
1


1838 sep 17

Armengol, C.M., Father B(onaventure)
Assumption, (Louisiana)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Armengol received Blanc's letter of August 15 through Mr. Kiernan who arrived last night. He apologizes for not understanding the letter before this one. Armengol thinks it will be proper to call Mr. Menard and Mr. White for if there are five seminarians it will be easier to keep strict discipline; at least it will be easier for the study of English and maybe they could regulate the classes better. They paid back Miss Louise (Bazire?) the $600 at the request of Father (Charles Henry Boutelou de) St. Aubin who has it; and he wished them to pay interest on it. Right now they owe nothing to Louise who will shed many tears before giving her consent. So they are embarrassed for lack of money; they have only 6 escalins. Father (John Peter) Chandy, (C.M.) sends his thanks and greetings to Blanc. Armengol wishes Blanc success in his pastoral visits; they will take care to faithfully carry out the contract in regard to the seminary.
P.S. Armengol will write to Father Jeanjean soon.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
5


1838 Sep 18

Evrard, Father J(osep)h
Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Evrard examined the rectory and is of the same opinion as Blanc that it would be better to build a new one. He would like to raise and enlarge the church first but it is better to go along with the people and build another rectory. It will always be necessary to advise work on the church as it cannot remain the way it is. It is proposed to open a subscription for this before the end of the winter. The trustees are negotiating with an American to sell him part of the land in front of the church. Evrard told them he would consent if he money was used on the church. Several days ago they received news of Father Peter Francis Beauprez; his letter was dated from Dublin. He told that he had visited the northern part of the United States and part of Canada, then left from New York. Beauprez asked the trustees to let him know before he left Rome if he should buy a clock for Baton Rouge; they did not seem satisfied. Evrard would prefer to have the money used to repair the church. Many of them think as Evrard does but it seems the corporation has subscribed $200. Evrard has a marriage to validate. Beauprez talked about it. Nothing new at Baton Rouge; he is very much pleased there. He would have liked to have Father (?) Quely(?) stay there longer.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
2


1838 Sep 18

Terret, Vice President
Lyons, (France)

To Bishop (Frederick) Rese
Detroit, (Michigan)

When the draft of Rese on the bankers V. Guerin & Fils for the 1837 allocation was presented the bankers called attention to the fact that it did not conform to the note which the Association of the Propagation sent him, nor does it conform to the figure for last year's allocation in which they asked him to make a draft for 9,000 francs instead of 9,545 francs. It is true that the no. 58 of the Annalee did say the allocation was different but Rese must understand that the figures cannot be changed arbitrarily without upsetting their accounts, especially since these accounts are entirely closed. Of the 545 francs in question, 500 francs had already been paid by the treasurer of the Council at Paris and sent to the German Redemptorists for the account of the diocese of Detroit, a payment authorized by the council, as an exception. The other 45 francs had been sent directly as a special gift to a missionary of the diocese. To regularize this mistake there remains only to consider the 545 francs as a payment in advance of sums which will be allotted in the future to the diocese of Detroit. Rese will understand why they have to take such care to avoid the criticisms of those who are jealous of the work of the Association. They profit by this occasion to recall their demand for a letter which they can show regarding the box containing the subscriptions received at Turin by M. Reynaud. They await an answer on this point.

III-2-g L.S. (French) 3pp. 8vo.
3


1838 Sep 20

(Louisiana), New Orleans

to The Ursulines
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Receipt for $1069.66 for paving at their property on the Bayou Road at St. Claude Street; signed by P. Rigaud.

V-4-g Receipt S. (French) 2pp. 16mo.
2


1838 Sep 22

(Eccleston), Bishop Samuel
Georgetown, D(istrict of) C(olumbia)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Eccleston) recommends Misses Eliza and Jane Jennifer who have spent several years in the Academy of the visitation at Georgetown. As there is no priest in the neighborhood of their uncle's residence near Franklin, Louisiana, they may find it necessary to consult Blanc about their religious duties. They will reside with their uncle Judge Baken.

V-4-g A.L.S. 1p. 4to.
5


1838 Sep 25

DeVos, S.J., Father P(eter)
Grand Coteau, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

DeVos asks for a dispensation for Benjamin Aloise Smith, son of Benjamin A. Smith and Elisabeth Anna Hardey; and for Elisabeth Sara Hardey, daughter of William Frederic Hardey and Sara spooling. DeVos signs as pastor of St. Charles.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
5


1838 Sep 25

Lefrancque, E.
Havre, (France)

To Father (Auguste) Jeanjean
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Their mutual friend, J(ohn) B(aptist) Legros told him that he had sent Jeanjean several packages for Bishop (Mathias) Loras, and 3 for Father Peter (Mauvernay) Mauvernet at Mobile. Lefrancque has been given instructions about the invoices of the latter and hastens to get a letter to Jeanjean for Father Zalladet of Lyons who informed him that the invoices for these three ... (the ms. is torn here). Lefrancque is sending this letter through New York in the hope of eliminating any customs duty when the American ship "Republican" arrives. Mr. Daron left for England several weeks ago. Lefrancque sends his respects to Bishop Blanc.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4tp.
6


1838 Sep 26

Basque, Father
Neschers, (France)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

If on Mr. Geoffroy's departure for New Orleans, Basque had not written asking Blanc to take an interest in his work he would not have been able to conquer his great timidity for Blanc's kindness had encouraged him. Geoffroy reported that Blanc had received his printed works with pleasure and promised him a good collection. If he gets numerous subscribers he will be proud to count among the benefactors of his church many Catholics of the United States and 3 bishops. Without government aid and solely by his publishings he has rebuilt his church. Debts for the interior decoration oblige him to ask for help from pious souls. If the young man did not give a true report, Blanc's reply can let him know. He sends a copy of his works for Blanc to distribute.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
2


(1838) (Oct. - Dec,)

Brownson, Orestes A.
(Boston, Massachusetts)

To Victor Cousin
Paris, France

Brownson is printing an article on eclectic philosophy. Rev. James Walker, one of the editors of the Christian Examiner, will be professor of philosophy in the University of Cambridge. Brownson sent Cousin a package of school books and a letter from a lady in Boston. The letter hardly does justice to the state of education in America. But every year they are improving. He also sent three pamphlets from a friend who is producing a sensation among them. Brownson asks for information about Lamennais who interests him very much.

I-4-h Photostat and Typed copy (Bibl. De M. Cousin, Sorbonne) 2pp. 8vo.
1


1838 Oct

Kennedy, M.
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Cora, slave of Mrs. Kennedy born October 1838 "sprinkled" by Father (Louis) Moni.

V-4-g A.D.S. 2pp. 32mo.
1


1838 Oct 2

Fargere, Father
Champoli, (France)

An extract from the register of Champoly parish: On January 19, 1803, Antoine Lunel,land-owner living in Sagnelonge, son of the late Antoine Lunel and Antoinette Farjon; and Antoinette Planche living in the village of La Planche, daughter of the late Jean Marie Planche and Antoinette Fourni, having fulfilled the requirements as it appears from the register signed by Mayor Louis Gaubey, received the nuptial blessing from the pastor of Champoly Chapel in the presence of Jean Marie Planche, Jean Phauer, Jean Bourganet and Gilbert Coavour. Father Guillot signs as pastor. Fargere states this is an exact copy from the register.

V-4-g A.D.S. (French) 1p. 4to.
2


(1838 Oct 3

Franque, E(mi)le
(Havre France)

To Father (Auguste) Jeanjean
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(This letter is badly damaged) ... September 24, relative to the shipment made by (John Baptist) Legros of three packages for Father (Peter Mauvernay) Mauvernet; the bill is in the one marked Number 268. Today Franque informs Jeanjean of two shipments, one for Bishop (Joseph Rosat)I(?) at St. Louis, the other for Bishop (Mathias) Loras at Dubuque. They contain religious articles and books.
P.S. Legros has paid the costs for Mauvernet; about 60-70 and taken it from Blanc's account.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
5


1838 Oct 3

Haseltine, Father J(oseph)
Bardstown, (Kentucky)

To Father Aug(ust) Jeanjean
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Jeanjean's favor of August 28 was received on September 22. Haseltine thanks Jeanjean for his attention to the affair. Haseltine knew nothing of Madame Armitage except seeing her name in the baptism record as sponsor to Amelia Kelly. Father Geo(rge) A.M. Elder, president of St. Joseph's College, was taken ill on September 16 and died on the 28th of a chronic disease of the heart. His body was brought to the Nazareth graveyard on October 1. All loved him. The trustees of the College met the following day and elected Father Martin J(ohn) Spalding president. The College nearly completed or renewed after being burnt nearly 2 years ago. There are 80 interns and 40 externs. At Nazareth they have 135 borders. Amelia Kelly had been troubled with a bad cough and was confined to bed August 19; she expired October 2 and today Haseltine consigned her remains by the side of her mother. She was 22 days less 22 years old. Her life since she was in this country was most edifying; this world was one of sorrow and affliction first by the death of her mother and soon after by the sentence of her only brother to the penitentiary. Haseltine wrote to Ja(me)s W. Byrne of Sloo and Byrne, enclosing $20 for purposes mentioned in the letter. Since he has learned that Byrne is in Texas. If Sloo has not opened the letter Jeanjean is to ask him to do so and do what is requested. If the letter has been sent to Byrne, Jeanjean is to call on the state and city treasurers and pay the tax of Widow Elizabeth Kelly and Haseltine will send the amount. Haseltine sends respects to the Bishop and to Father Maenhaut.
(P.S.) Their two Bishops are well.

V-4-g A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
8


1838 Oct 3

Wood, James Frederick
Frascati, Italy

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell, Cincinnati
Paris, France

Acknowledges letter of Purcell and speaks of his desire to speak to Purcell in Rome. However realizes the need Purcell has of making friends for his diocese and the time required for such visits. Hopes he will stay in Rome for the Christmas celebrations. While at the Irish College he began the study of Latin but due to difficulties of language he has discontinued the aid of an instructor since going to the Propaganda. Thanks God on this anniversary of his going to study. Has received letter from Edward Purcell, in which he asks Wood to tell the bishop to avoid any statement that Protestants could pervert.

II-4-g A.L.S. 4pp.
1


1838 Oct 6

Saulnier, Father Edm(und)
Carondelet, (Missouri)

To Father (Auguste Jeanjean
New Orleans, Louisiana)

If Saulnier offended by sending that false $20 note or if Jeanjean has not received his letter, Saulnier begs his pardon. For a long time he has had no Mass intentions and he is without provisions. If Jeanjean can get some for him Saulnier asks for a barrel of sugar, a little rice and white wine and coffee. What a service that would be to the pastor of Videpoche! Bishop (Joseph Rosati) made a visitation at Salt River near Jefferson City and at Father (Peter Paul) Lefevre's missions up the Mississippi. He is always on the go; he does not seem pleased at St. Louis. The drought has taken the potatoes and beans; the corn is good but the if the drought continues they will have no wheat. He sends his regards to Bishop Blanc and all the priests.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 1p. 4to.
4


1838 Oct 8

Bourget, Father
Besanay, (?France)

Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Bourget is happy to have so good an occasion to bring himself to (Blanc's) mind. Mrs. Goutenoire whom Bourget married today is the bearer of his respects. Bourget hopes this new addition to (Blanc's) flock will give him nothing but consolation. Her ancestors are a guarantee of this and Bourget hopes (Blanc) will favor her with his good advice. (Blanc's) and Bourget's old friends are the same as (Blanc) left them at his last appearance on the continent. The eyes of the pastor of St. Just is well. How quickly they would commission him to send their regards if they knew he was sending these few words.
(P.S.) Bourget asks (Blanc) to let Mrs. Goutenoire call on him when she is writing to her parents so she can give Bourget news of him.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
2


1838 Oct 8

D'hauw, Father E(dward)
Thielt, (Belgium)

To Father Aug(us)te Jeanjean
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Jeanjean asked for news of VanBockel. On arriving at le Havre, they stayed at the hospital but as VanBockel was anxious to see Paris they went down to the Hotel Bon Lafontaine which Jeanjean knows. The price did not suit VanBockel so to avoid disagreements, D'hauw left for Belgium after 4 days and VanBockel went to another hotel on St. Sulpice. At Louvain D'hauw went to VanBockel's son's house to see if he was there and told he was living in lodgings at Brussels. D'hauw's health is better and were it not for the cough he believes that instead of this letter Jeanjean would see its writer. In a week D'hauw is going to leave for Rome. His weakness has disappeared and his heart has stopped fluttering. Jeanjean has no doubt seen that Archbishop (Engelbert) Sterckx of Malines is now a Cardinal-priest and that Father (Louis Joseph) Delebecque, president of the seminary at Bruges is Bishop of Ghent. D'hauw met Father ) Peter Francis) Beauprez at the home of Father (Charles) Delacroix at Ghent who is going to Rome also. D'hauw sends greetings to Fathers Maenhaut, Rousselon, Soller, Leon, etc.

V-4-g A.L.S. (FRENCH) 2PP. 4TO.
6


1838 Oct 8

Mauvernay, Father P(eter)
Spring Hill College, Ala(bama)

To Father (August) Jeanjean
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Perhaps Bishop (Mathias) Loras' boxes and trunks have not yet arrived. That is the result of the suspending of regular trips of steamboats which are under repairs to conform to the law of Congress. Mr. Beranjou(?) promised to let Mauvernay know when they are sent and Mauvernay recommends them to Jeanjean's care. Maybe Loras has already written Mauvernay from New York. Bishop (Michael) Portier asked Mauvernay to ask Jeanjean if he could find in the bookstores about 60 French books suitable for young people for prizes at the commencement in November. Did Mauvernay tell that it was on the three master "Lyons" that Loras and his eight missionaries were to leave le Havre on August 22. Have they seen its arrival at New York in the papers? All are well there. The foundations of their Cathedral are being laid since September 29.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
3


1838 Oct 9

Martin, Father (John)
Pointe Coupée, (Louisiana)

Martin has taken no steps for the upkeep of the seminary for two reasons. He has not been well this summer and he has barely the means to keep up at Pointe Coupée and the other parishes. He thinks it would be better to circulate a subscription. Martin heard that Bishop (Anthony Blanc) had gone to Opelousas, Jeanjean is to let him know when (Blanc) will return to New Orleans and if he intends to come to Pointe Coupée this fall. There has been no arrangement in his affair with the trustees. Mr. Janin, their lawyer said he was surprised it had not been withdrawn from court and settled with Martin and that it was shameful for a parish to refuse to pay its pastor Martin's claims for furniture for the two churches amounts to $3000 and several hundred piastres. If the case goes to court Martin will need $200 ro $250 to pay his lawyer. Jeanjean is to let Martin know if he can count on him for this amount. Yesterday Martin had a baptism at Bayou Sarah and a burial at St. Francisville. Last month there were several deaths at Pointe Coupée. Martin would like to know several things about the Seminary and College at Grand Coteau.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
6


1838 Oct 10

Sichard, Father
Baignes, (France?)
To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Sichard takes the opportunity to address another request to (Blanc) through Miss Bouis of Pointe Coupée. This young lady, to whom (Blanc) gave First Communion, married to Dr. Dumoine. Sichard's parishioner and friend, is spending several months with her mother-in-law and will return in August with her husband to Pointe Coupée. Sichard would be happy if he could accompany them and work under (Blanc). They have talked so much of (Blanc's) administration and the good he has done in his diocese. The Bouis family could give (Blanc) information about him or (Blanc) could write direct to his Bishop at Angouleme. Sichard has been a priest for 18 years; for 15 years pastor of Carton.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
3


1838 Oct 11

Jamey, Father V(ictor)
Natchi(toches, Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
Grand Coteau, (Louisiana)

It will soon be two months that Jamey has been ill and he does not know when the fever will leave. So he cannot prepare for Blanc's visit so soon. Their church is getting along well, they have promised it for January; he will count on February. The sooner Blanc can send Father (F.) Gaut(h)ier, (S.J.) the better. General Bossier(?) will see that he gets there if G(authier) is at Grand Coteau. Blanc is to send Father (N.) Francais his appointment at the same time. Jamey asks Blanc for his exeat for next April on the return of Fathers (Peter Francis) Beaupre(z) and (Richard) D'hauw. The fever has weakened his body but his intellectual and moral facilities are worse.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
5


1838 Oct 12

( )
Georgetown, D(istrict of) C(olumbia)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

( ) has learned that (Blanc) has in one of his seminaries a Bernard Kiernan who intends to study for the priesthood. ( ) deems it his duty to hinder this as by application to the president of Georgetown College and the pastor of St. Patrick's Church in Washington (Blanc) will discover that Kiernan has sought to deceive him and thus sacrilegiously enter the clergy. Kiernan speaks of Father F(rancis) Kiernan of Boston who died miserably in August in Washington and from whom he asked, ignorant of his death, false testimonials of character. Father Kiernan died pennyless and houseless and had it not been for a priest in Washington he would have been carried to the poor house. (Blanc) cannot tell who the writer of this is; he is a friend to the clergy and learned by accident of (Blanc's) protégé. He also refers him to the pastor of St. Michael's where Kiernan strove in vain to deceive a poor girl.

V-4-g L. 2pp. 4to.
3


1838 Oct 12

Armengol, C.M., Father B(onaventure)
Assumption, (Louisiana)

to Father (August) Jeanjean
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

The articles bought for Armengol at New Orleans have not yet arrived; they would be grateful if Jeanjean would have them sent. Father (Jean-Baptiste) Etienne, (C.M.) wrote Armengol that 8 Lazarists were being sent from Paris; there will always be several for their seminary. It seems they were to leave in August or the beginning of September. They will have commencement there in November. The work of the seminary is going forward.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
3


1838 Oct 12

McSherry, Father W(illia)m
Georgetown, (District of Columbia)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

A few days ago a letter was received for Father Francis Kiernan directed to McSherry's care. Kiernan died suddenly in Washington on July 30. The letter is from Bernard Kiernan and McSherry thinks it better to enclose (no enclosure) it than to make any extracts. Some time ago a letter was received from the same man written in Philadelphia to the purport that B. Kiernan was in Philadelphia with a wealthy family with a prospect of marrying one of the family if Father Kiernan would write and say Bernard did not wish to be a priest, that it would be better for him to be a doctor or lawyer and that if anyone would set him up in business he would be remunerated abundantly. This letter came a few days after Father Kiernan's death; McSherry made a gentleman acquainted with its contents who would prudently prevent any deception of the family in Philadelphia.

V-4-g A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
3


1838 Oct 13

(Loras), Bishop Mathias
New York, (New York)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

They arrived after 43 days crossing and 9 months 9 days of absence. In the middle of the ocean they saw boxes and trunks floating on the waves. On arriving they learned from the passengers of the Elie that they had found a submerged ship still floating and it seemed that all had perished. They had only a violent wind and had to remain at the cape one day. It was painful not to be able to go South but in certain respects the north suits him better. He will leave soon for St. Louis with his little clergyman who, like Loras, is working on his English. Loras wrote to Father (August) Jeanjean to ask him to take care of his boxes and trunks which were to leave le Havre September 8 and also about the 2 boxes from Marseilles and his effects from Mobile. He hopes Jeanjean will deliver to Blanc the letter and little box for him. Father ) Peter) Mauvernay will try to pay the expenses. Loras is studying the clergy and people here. There are two bishops and the diocese is not administered. Poor Charleston has had its toll of illnesses. Fortunately they do not have any of that in the land of the Sioux, the Hurons and Algonquins.
P.S. Loras asks for ordos for 4 subdeacons, 2 priests, and himself and a few extras.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
3


1838 Oct 17

Dupuy, Father Enn(emond)
Iberville, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Peter and Helen, related in the first degree, wish to have a dispensation to marry.

V-4-g A.L.S. (Latin) 3pp. 4to.
1


1838 Oct 19

Pouget, Father
Montauban, (France)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, Louisiana

An old friend of Bishop (Louis) DuBourg who was his archdeacon for five years, has almost the right to write to (Blanc) especially to fulfill a debt of charity. A woman who lived in Louisiana is returning there to find a son who has become her only support and to find in (Blanc) a Father who will give her support in the way of salvation. She leaves today. Madame Marcenac's unfortunate is the cause of her troubles.
P.S.Pouget came to her aid in the expenses of her separation and her trip. Besides the money from the sale of her silver, he loaned her a thousand francs on her ticket. (Blanc) may have to defend her against the allegations Father (Matthew B.) Anduze, (C.M.), her brother, might see fit to make about her fortune, etc.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
4


1838 Oct 19

Verhaegen, S.J., Father P(eter) J.
St. Louis, (Missouri)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Verhaegen has just received a letter from their Father General who stated that, having asked the Provincial's opinion, he has decided to join the French colony of (Jesuits) in Blanc's diocese to their mission in Missouri. This greatly surprises Verhaegen but he thinks it has great advantages. The General wants him to go to New Orleans to find out about the group and provide for their needs; he would like to take with him two of their members who know English. This will give him a chance to inform Blanc on things of mutual interest. Verhaegen plans to leave November 10. He sends regards to Father Jeanjean.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) p. 4to.
2


1838 Oct 20

Bruté, Bishop Simon G(abriel)
Vincennes, (Indiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Once again two from Vincennes but neither one is a collector.
1. A traveler to France, Father (Celestin) de la Hailandiêre, Bruté's vicar-general and quasi-coadjutor, is going to try to bring back some more missionaries as what they have are not sufficient.
2. Father (John A.) Vabret, Superior of their three Eudists, president of the College (of Vincennes), and chaplain of the Sister, etc., is threatened with consumption. Hew is a saintly priest; could he be in a room in the hospital in the care of the Sisters or at the Ursulines? Probably "out of question" although Bruté is sure he would be Father (Stephen) Rousselon's man. Father (Auguste) Jeanjean will put him on better terms. Vincennes and its poor bishop, cured by Blanc, believe he could again restore a missionary to long years of service. Bruté's "few days" are lengthened and he is better and better. Since asking Jeanjean about the priest announced for Texas, Bruté has learned, not his name but that it was a priest who had obtained jurisdiction from the Bishop of Monterey and who could not believe that Rome would take the initiative for the Lazarists. Bruté gives the lines which surprised him as well as the high esteem for Father (Anthony) Ganilh, the mistakes of Bishop (John Baptist) Purcell, etc. Their astonishment -- Father McCosker seen at London by a priest from this country who wrote that he officiated as deacon with the Catholic bishop of London, before that in Ireland and -- to return to America. To return to the two travelers, time did not permit Hailandiére to go to New York, as Bruté had written to Jeanjean and he changed to New Orleans in order to accompany his confrere.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
11


1838 Oct 23

Provensal, Father and Father Allec
Poligny, (France)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

These two French priests wish to give their services to the New World. In France and in all of Europe circumstances have forced their fellow countrymen to forget their eternal destiny while in America it is the lack of priests which is perhaps the cause of neglect of religion. They ask Blanc what papers, books, languages, etc. they would need to serve under him.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
2


1838 Oct 24

Beauprez, Father P(eter) F(rancis)
Bruges, (Belgium)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Since his arrival in Europe Beauprez has been waiting to write until his affairs were settled but as that will not be soon he will give Blanc some news. He is awaiting a letter from Father (Auguste) Jeanjean to whom he sent some money. From Baton Rouge Beauprez went to St. Louis, Louisville, Cincinnati, Columbus, Ohio, and Cleveland and across Lakes Erie and Ontario to Buffalo and Niagara, then up the St. Lawrence to Osneburg and Montreal. Then to New York where he met Bishop (John Baptist) Purcell and three priests about to embark for Liverpool. Beauprez joined them. From Liverpool they went to Ireland, London and Ostend as well as Bruges and Woumen, his native country. Purcell came out of Belgium with his pockets full for his diocese. Beauprez waited at Bruges to accompany Purcell to Rome but on the advice of Father (Edward) D'Hauw he abandoned the plan for fear he might not be able to get over the Alps. Blanc has learned from a letter from D'Hauw that Beauprez wishes to remain in Belgium; the reason, Blanc already knows. Beauprez believes Blanc will have no objection to granting his exeat. Nothing has ever afflicted him more than the unfortunate event for which he was denounced. It would have been a thousand times better if he had never set foot in America.
P.S. In case Blanc sends his exeat he asks him to send a letter of exchange on Paris for all Beauprez has lent to him and to Father (Joseph) Evrard which amounts to almost $200. Mr. Lorgnier is authorized to handle the money. Blanc is to let Beauprez know if Evrard found his horse. Beauprez sends regards to the Hicky, Lorgnier, Bonnecaze and Shepperd families, to the Bishop and Emanuel Landry and greetings from D'Hauw.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
6


1838 Oct 25

Guidée, S.J., Father A.
Brugelette, Belgium

to Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, Louisiana

Guidée wrote (Blanc) on August 4. He informed him that their Father General has placed St. Charles (College), as far as regards the religious, under the jurisdiction of the Superior of the Missouri mission who is to supply the college at Grand Coteau. Guidée must remain aloof from the discord between (Blanc) and Father (Nicholas) Point, (S.J.) regarding Father (Joseph) Soller, (S.J.) and the care of the Germans. He only hopes and prays all will be arranged satisfactorily and that the Missouri superior will find a way to help New Orleans without neglecting Grand Coteau.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
4


1838 Oct 31

Bruté, Bishop Simon G(abriel)
Vincennes, (Indiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Blanc will soon find Father (Celestin) de la Hailandière and Father (John A.) Vabret at his house with their letter of recommendation and request for hospitality. Hailandière is going to France to bring back men and funds, for 8 or 10 months or a year, like Bishop (Mathias) Loras. With this loss of his right arm there is the further sacrifice of Vabret who has contracted consumption and whose doctor orders him South to that same city which did Bruté so much good last winter. Possibly Vabret could have one of the rooms upstairs reserved for priests of the diocese. Bruté will pay; he is sure Vabret will edify Blanc and be edified by Blanc and also Father (Stephen) Rousselon and Father (Auguste) Jeanjean, who might help Hailandière with his departure although Bruté understands that Jeanjean himself is going to France if he has not already gone. Bruté has asked Hailandière to ask Blanc and to write back what is right about the jurisdiction of Texas -- the Lazarists -- or that anonymous priest who announced in the Catholic Advocate of Bardstown as having his jurisdiction from the Bishop of Monterey and in the same sheet said that Father (Anthony) Ganilh preached the funeral sermon for Father George Elder. Nothing new up north and much sickness. Bruté's health is astonishingly improved and allows him to replace the absent ones with the help of his two young friends Father (Anthony) Parret, ordained August 15, and Father (Maurice) Ber(r)el, vice-president of the College of St. Gabriel of Vincennes). Bruté teaches a little at the seminary.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
12


1838 Nov 6

O'Neill, Father P(atrick)
Charleston, South Carolina

to Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Alfred Augustus E. Charrin left Charleston twelve or eighteen years ago for New Orleans to go into a counting house. He answered two of his mother's letters but none of her late letters. She thinks the young man has met with his Father, Louis Charrin, who keeps a hotel in St. Charles Street. If either son or Father is in New Orleans Blanc could confer no greater favour than to prevail on the son to write his mother and if possible send her assistance.

V-4-g A.L.S. 1p. Folio
3


1838 Nov 7

Dupuy, Father Enn(emond)
Iberville, (Louisiana)

to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Peter Cyril Hebert and Helene Guedry are the ones to whom Blanc gave the dispensation for first degree relationship. Dupuy apologizes for the trouble he gave Blanc but it was good to learn of Blanc's safe arrival. Dupuy took care of the claim against the College (of St. Gabriel) for the carpenter, F(ran)cois Dupuy, for $35.12 . Last Sunday 8 persons met at the rectory and tried to elect trustees. Since no one came to the place designated in their anonymous poster, they canvassed at the door of the church but only one wished to come. They went ahead with the election hiding themselves from Dupuy. Now he hears that the congregation in general is protesting against such audacity in wanting to elect trustees without knowing how. Enclosed is a list of dispensations granted in Iberville for the year 1838. (Names, dates, and fees are given).

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 6pp. 4to.
6


1838 Nov 9

Chazelle, S.J., Father P(eter), St. Mary's College
(Bardstown, Kentucky)

To Father (Auguste) Jeanjean
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Chazelle again sends his papers for Mr. Caballero and asks Jeanjean to receive the money. As there is a premium on Eastern papers, if he receives a check on Philadelphia the premium will be placed to the credit of the persons of whom Caballero is the agent. Their Mass wine is nearly gone. It is impossible to get good wine in Kentucky. If Jeanjean can find several barrels of white wine, he is to inform Chazelle but in the meantime he is to send a barrel or two or some cases directed to Mr. Forsyth and Company, Louisville. The amount to be paid by Caballero is $518.75 and Jeanjean is to deduct the cost of the wine. Their establishment is improving; they have 110 boarders. Last July two young men died after receiving Baptism. Chazelle's health is not very good, all the fathers and brothers are well. They seldom have news from Grand Coteau. They have learned from the papers that (Pierce) Connelly is professor of English literature.

V-4-g A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
4


1838 Nov 12

Résé, Bishop Fred(erick)
Detroit, (Michigan)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Résé recommends Mr. Palms who will bring this letter. He is modest, pious, and instructed in music, the son of a respectable family in Detroit. He is going to visit his brother in New Orleans or Texas; if Blanc can help him find his brother, Résé will be much obliged.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
2


1838 Nov 14

Chalon, Father G(abriel)
Mobile,(Alabama)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisia)na

Chalon wishes to send 100 piastres to his mother who has been widowed for the second time and needs his savings. She has located at Jury and his Father's friends have made her take back her first name. Chalon asks Blanc, if he still has money in France, to send him an order for the 100 piastres in favor of Claudine Chalon and Chalon will repay him as soon as he receives Blanc's instructions. Chalon visited Pascagoula last September; there he found several persons from New Orleans who kept him longer than he planned. So he did not visit West Pascagoula nor Biloxi where they greatly desire to see a priest. As soon as he can he will return there.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
3


1838 Nov 14

DeGaulne, G(erar)d(?)
Bordeaux, (France)

to Father Auguste Jeanjean
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

At the order of Father J(ohn Mary) Timon, (C.M.), Superior of St. Mary's College in Perry County, Missouri , DeGaulne has addressed to Jeanjean various goods of which he will find the bill of lading enclosed (no enclosure). Jeanjean is to receive them and send them on to Timon. The invoice and consul's statement necessary for customs duty is in the letter DeGaulne wrote to Timon. (A duplicate letter is folded with this one).

V-4-g A.L.S. And duplicate (French) 4pp. 4to.
2


1838 Nov 15

Bruté, Bishop Simon G(abriel)
Vincennes, (Indiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

How could Bruté aspire after one letter to send Blanc two people and one to stay all winter! They left St. Louis November 1. Bruté has stopped writing to Bishop (Celestine) de la Hailandière hoping he would find prompt passage. There is nothing new; his health is better and with Father (Anthony) Parret, his last young priest, 23 years old, they are getting along. Bruté plans to permit a visit to New Orleans by a priest who saw Blanc at Lyon who hopes by this trip to further a district like Whiter River, (Indiana) was when Blanc began with 10 families and where there are now St. Peter's, St. Mary's and St. Simon at Washington as Father (Simon Petit) Lalumière insists on naming the church he has just built there. Apparently to bind Bruté.

1. The permission;
2. To follow at Terre Haute with the same success, for Father (Stanislaus) Buteux's church is also under cover and the $200 of Bishop (Michael) Portier is going to almost finish the most needed part of the interior;
3. Permission for Father (Julian) Benoit of Lyon who will come to see Blanc after Christmas. It will veritable be Louisiana versus Indiana.
In a short time, at Jeanjean's return, Blanc will be abundantly blessed and 20 or 25 years after Bruté's death Blanc will say he wishes that poor Bishop of Vincennes could see all the changes and growth. Benoit is that good priest of St. Mary's near Rome, (Indiana) on the Ohio and of Troy, also, whose letters Bruté read to Blanc last winter. God has accorded Benoit the conversion of Protestants and little by little of fallen-away Catholics; he can hope to see this district develop as Blanc's White River did. Bruté could not refuse him several weeks at New Orleans and Mobile.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
12


1838 Nov 15

Chalon, Father G(abriel)
Mobile, (Alabama)

To (Father Auguste Jeanjean?
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Chalon recommends a young seminarian named Forges from le Havre. (Jeanjean?) Is to take care that this innocent does not declare to the customs what he has in his possession. If he has with him three boxes of books for the Visitation Academy, (Summerville, Alabama) (Jeanjean?) is to notify Chalon at once and Father (Albino) Desgaultière who has just arrived will go to New Orleans to claim them and protest against the duty.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
4


1838 Nov 15

Mauvernay, Father P(eter)
(Mobile, Alabama)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Mauvernay received (Blanc's letter with the two enclosures, one for Father (Francis) Martinet and the other from E. Fran(c)que. He has received no instructions about Bishop (Mathias) Loras' boxes. Mauvernay will do what he can to get them out of customs unless one more able than he can do it before November 26, the day he probably will arrive at New Orleans with the students. He will have three of his own to claim for which the invoices are in box M.M. No. 268.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 1p. 8vo.
4


1838 Nov 15

Neale, Sister Marie Scholastique
Summerville, (Alabama)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Sister received Blanc's letter announcing the death of her Father to Miss Délestra. She asked Father (James) Lesne to give Délestra the letter. Délestra has left. She could not govern her tongue and they found in her very few of the dispositions for the religious life. Therefore Bishop (Michael) Portier sent her back. She is now at the home of Mr. Montégre, a fellow countryman. They are sorry to not be able to receive Blanc's protégé; they hope to be more fortunate another time.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
4


1838 Nov 16

Armengol, C.M., Father B(onaventure)
Assumption, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Armengol has received Blanc's letters of the 1st and 7th. Douglas is among the plasterers hired by Mr. Feutrier. The carpenter they want to hire is excellent. They will have a solemn remembrance of the deceased members of the Association of the Propagation of the Faith about November 27. Armengol thinks it will be better not to send any other seminarian until they are reunited. Armengol has difficulty meeting expenses. If Blanc can give them mass stipends it will help them. (Joseph Chanet continues to give good expectations. Both are in care of Father (Thaddeus) Amat, (C.M.), one of their three priests who remain with them with Brother (Raymond) Sala, (C.M.). Armengol has two classes of Latin a day with Mr. Herisson(?).
P.S. When Armengol received Blanc's letters Father (John) Boullier, (C.M.) had already stopped the steamboat for five of their men whom it was thought better to send to the Barrens for facility in English.
P.S. Feutrier is not coming along as he should, there are only two plasterers; they have to mix their own mortar. If it continues as at present the work will not be finished at Easter. The carpenters complain because it is the cause of a delay in their pay. Armengol asks to give the enclosed to Mr. Fort.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
7


1838 Nov 17

Evrard, Father J(osep)h
Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)

to Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Evrard thought (Blanc) would visit them this month but Father (Ennemond Dupuy?) Dupuis has just told them that (Blanc) will not come before January. In the meantime Evrard would like to know what is the custom in regard to fees for dispensations for marriages. The vicar-general gave him the faculty of applying a dispensation from second and third degree consanguinity. The names of the contracting parties are Jules Malaison and Elise Dupuis. Evrard is now preparing his third sermon in English but it is an effort. They had a storm which bent the cross on their steeple and tore off 3 or 4 sheets of zinc. Negotiations about the church land came to nothing; it seems they cannot transfer it. The sugar cane froze; it is a loss for planters. The future subscription for the church will feel the effect of it.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
5


1838 Nov 19

Chabrat, Bishop Guy Ig(natiu)s
Bardstown, (Kentucky)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

Father (Francis) Chambige, the bearer of this letter, is of the Diocese of Kentucky and was ordained by Chabrat about 4 years ago. The precarious state of his health and the cold weather of last winter have induced Chabrat to allow him to spend this winter in Louisiana. The trustees of St. Joseph's College, (Bardstown) have authorized Chambige to collect what is due to the institution. Chabrat recommends Chambige who may prove an ornament to Kentucky and do much good, as he has already done.

V-4-g A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
3


1838 Nov 21

Martin, Father (John E.)
Pointe Coupee, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Yesterday Laurent Chitz, president of the trustees, came with his brother Georgette(?), etc. to ask Martin to settle with him. Martin told him the settlement would have to be that day or he would give him until the middle of December if he gave him something on account. Chitz gave Martin $100 and promised another $200 tomorrow. Tomorrow Martin plans to see Madame Brigitte; next Monday to go to Avoyelles for 10 days. On his return, he will go down to New Orleans; he received Blanc's letter last Saturday. Mr. and Mrs. Beauvais send their respects.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
4


1838 Nov 24

Finn, Elizabeth
Maryborough, Ireland

to Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(This letter is damaged so that it is not possible to read it in its entirety). She received (Blanc's) letter of May 6 informing her of his enquiries regarding the estate of her deceased husband, James Finn. ... She laid all necessary documents before Thomas Wilson, Consul of the United States for Dublin and received a certificate authenticating them on August 4, of which she hopes to be the nearer. She will proudly accept the assistance of Mr. Daron. ... The delay in returning her thanks was occasioned by affairs to arrange here before she would set out on so long a journey. She will take the earliest opportunity in the new year of embarking with her eldest son and perhaps another friend for New Orleans. ...

V-4-g A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
4


1838 Nov 25

(Bruté), Bishop Simon (Gabriel)
Vincennes, Indiana

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

(Bruté) heartily recommends Father John McCloskey, distinguishing him well from Father ( ) McCloskey of Mobile. He received all his education at the Mountain, 6, 7, or 8 years, always a model of conduct and piety. Bishop John Dubois destined him to set up his seminary and while waiting for Nyack to be finished he sent him to Rome. (Bruté) saw him there in 1836, lodged in St. Andre de la Valle and taking courses at the Roman College, and saying Mass at the Jesuits. (Bruté) thinks McCloskey might conciliate everyone as Bishop (John) Hughes did. (Bruté) does not recall his oratorical ability but his handsome face and bearing would speak well. (Bruté) especially recommends McCloskey's prudence, tact, and good judgment. Blanc can inquire at Baltimore and at New York. (Bruté) cannot express the impression of Father (Auguste) Jeanjean on him. As for the two boxes for (Bruté) he hopes that after talking to Father (Celestine) de la Hailandière he will be able to get them. As for the coadjutor, no news for (Bruté), although several days ago they had news from Father (Ignatius A.) Reynolds of Louisville who said that the French newspapers and "L'ami de la Religion" named Hailandière, whom (Bruté) asked for. The Archbishop has not written for 9 or 10 months despite repeated letters, 3 since September, and one asking Father (Louis R.) Deluol to get a letter. No letter either from Propaganda except one in reply to the one written at Blanc's giving his views on Texas and Canada which have been justified anew. (Bruté) believes their friend will have gone but if he is still with Blanc (Bruté) sees nothing new ahead but the arrival of his library in good shape. Blanc and Bishop (Michael) Portier will not lack for the $200. Father (Stanislaus) Buteux reminds him about it once a week from up the Wabash. He suggests Father ( ) Kennion for occasional help but Blanc will know best. (Bruté) thanks Blanc for replying to his questions about the Iroquois. Blanc can tell Father (John) Vabret and limit the examination to the years 1667, 1668, 1669, and 1670, and the three or four years before that if Jeanjean's collection has them. (Bruté) does not have the Relations between 1663 and 1670. It is a question of Iroquois excursions toward Lake Michigan, Mackinac, and even Lake Superior and Green Bay, routing the Hurons and Illinois and pushing them toward the Mississippi. General (William Henry) Harrison in his speech referred to their reputation as conquerors (??). Another reply Blanc can give Vabret: Does Blanc recall that Bishop (Benedict Joseph) Flaget owned land between the church and the river, at Assumption, and even where the fort was re-established from 1811 to 1814?

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
16


1838 Nov 27

( )
( )

A bill for books: 179.80 for Bishop (Anthony Blanc); 118.50 for Father (Stephen) Rousselon.

V-4-g Bill (French) 2pp. 12mo.
2


1838 Nov 27

D'hauw, Father E(dward)
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Father E(tienne) Rousselon
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

A bill for books amounting to 387 francs, 45 centimes. (Marked) paid by D'hauw, December 30, 1839.

V-4-g A.D.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
1


1838 Nov 27

Roux, Father B(enedict)
Kaskaskia, Ill(inoi)s

to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisia)na

Roux had intended to go down to New Orleans the first of this month to labor under Blanc's orders but circumstances make it necessary to put off his departure for 2 or 3 months in order not to hurt Bishop (Joseph) Rosati's feelings in his regard or turn him against Blanc. About three weeks ago Roux wrote to Rosati about his decision to leave the diocese to go to Blanc and probably to return to Lyon. Rosati begged him not to leave. If Blanc says that roux's reasons given in his first letter leave his conscience free, that his leaving the Diocese of St. Louis is not contrary to the will of God, Roux will join Blanc. Rosati knows nothing of what has passed between Blanc and Roux. Roux would like Blanc to tell him whether he has received an answer from Lyon about obtaining permission to enter Blanc's diocese. If Blanc can send him mass intentions it will help roux greatly.
P.S. Their Visitation Community has many who can teach English but none for French. If Blanc can exchange with the Communities in Louisiana both sides could benefit.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
3


1838 Nov 30

St. Mary's Seminary
(The Barrens, Missouri)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

A statement of expenditures for 1837 and 1838 for J(oseph) Evrard, (Charles M.) Menard, and Mr. Iego. Balance due $57.68.

V-4-g A. Bill 2pp. Folio
4


1838 Nov 30

Jenifer, Eliza
Near Franklin, Attakapas, (Louisiana)

To (Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Not passing through New Orleans as expected prevented her from presenting in person a letter entrusted to her by Archbishop (Samuel Eccleston) of Baltimore.

V-4-g A.L.S. 1p. 4to.
2


1838 Dec 1

Landry, Lenfroy T.
St. Francisville, (Louisiana)

To (Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Landry wishes a dispensation to marry in Advent.
P.S. The lady he is to marry is from the diocese of New Orleans and the marriage will take place there,

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 1p. 4to.
1


1838 Dec 3

Donnell, (Mrs. Anthony)
Newport, (Ireland)

To Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Mrs. Donnell has a brother and an uncle who are priests. Her brother is in Rome; her uncle, parish priest in Newport for 22 years, is 70 and retired. She had communicated with Bishop McHale of Tuam who offered to write Blanc about her unhappy situation and probably will, but she considered she could do it best. In 1821 she married Anthony Donnell and they had seven children. Anthony went to America and did very well but the second time he converted all he had into money except the furniture and failed. Then a master of a ship from St. John's, N.B. gave him free passage and he went to New York and then to Utica and begged her to prepare to follow him. He left Utica in 1835 and came to New York instead of coming for his family. After 18 months she received a letter saying he had returned from Texas and said he would be worth a good sum of money and asked her to come to live there. She has had only one letter since. There are many from her neighborhood who write but latterly they omit mentioning him. One mentioned him being in Texas and doing well. Some say he is living with a Natchez woman in Texas, others say he was killed in a street riot in New Orleans. She asks Blanc to make inquiries in New Orleans, Natchez, and Texas. Some brothers went to Texas last summer who knew him, and also John Nowlan, a Protestant; also persons of the names of Conway, Coleman, Macguire, Very Reverend Dean Burke, Westport, or Father J(ames) Hughes, Newport.

V-4-g A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
2


1838 Dec 3

Ring, P.J.
Donaldsonville, (Louisiana)

To Father (August) Jeanjean
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Ring asks Jeanjean to pay the steamer, Little Red $117; Father (John) Timon, (C.M.) will be responsible for the same.
(On back of the letter): P.W. Kennady, master of the Little Red; Washington and Hartich.

V-4-g A.D.S. 2pp. 16mo.
2


1838 Dec 4

Armengol, C.M., Father B(onaventure)
Assumption, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

The carpenters will finish next week. Those they have hired will go into town to enjoy(?) The fruits of their labors and bring all the tools they need. If Blanc wishes they could buy the screws for the beds. Mr. Feutrier is not getting along as he should. He quarrels with the workers; often he does not have materials for the workmen; he pays 2 to 3 piastres a day. Armengol has learned that Feutrier asked Blanc for 300 piastres for a cistern. Armengol asks Blanc not to give any other work to Feutrier and to get rid of him as soon as possible. Armengol hopes to have a cistern built for a fraction of what Feutrier asks. Armengol would like Blanc to ask Feutrier to leave the convent as soon as the carpenters go. Mr. Duvernais has not yet come because of trouble with his teeth. Armengol expects him tomorrow. It has been a long time since Judge Hubbard donated the land; he is waiting only for Mrs. Dutour's signature. Armengol thinks Hubbard will go with him to St. Michael on the 10th to complete this business.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
4


1838 Dec 4

Mollun
Havana, Cuba

to Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Mollun returns the letter (Blanc) sent him. About the delicate questions Blanc asked about the one who wrote it, Mollun asks Blanc to regard his silence as significant. La Gazette des Tribunaux for last December will no doubt acquaint Blanc with the position of Father Cabias. The priest took advantage of the kindness of the Archbishop of Havana to attach himself to a parish here which he does not seem disposed to leave fort New Orleans. As for (Joseph?) Chanet, it is exactly that simplicity and good nature that Blanc noticed which made Mollun decide to recommend him to Blanc. Mollun believes Chanet will always be worthy of Blanc's support' the writer of the letter has neither the right nor the power to take it away from him.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. Folio
3


1838 Dec 6

Verhaegen, S.J., Father P(eter) J., St. Charles College
Grand Coteau, L(ouisia)na

to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisia)na

Verhaegen arrived on the 4th and was cordially received by the priests. As to temporal affairs, the situation is critical. They are threatened with several lawsuits. Mr. Arden does not seem disposed to settle with Father (Nicholas) Point, (S.J.) Without recourse to a civil judge and Mr. Macon the same. Arden's partner came to see Verhaegen today and Verhaegen gave him a letter for Arden asking him to come to talk over affairs; Verhaegen's position is painful: Point explains things one way, the Father Consultors another way. Nothing is in writing. Verhaegen asks Blanc to come there if at all possible. If he cannot come Verhaegen will do what he thinks best with the advice of the consultors. The students are in the new building. They are badly housed but have a good spirit and are happy. There are 65. There are few workmen at the college and the work goes very slowly. Verhaegen admires the location of the college; it is second to none in Missouri. Communication with New Orleans is difficult at this season but the parents would rather send their children here than place them in institutions not having the same advantages as Grand Coteau. The Americans in this quarter are overwhelming him with visits. Blanc will find him fat and in better health.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
5


1838 Dec 8

Soller, S.J., Father J(oseph)
Grand Coteau, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Father (Nicholas) Point, (A.J.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Father (Nicholas) Point, (S.J.) wishes to keep Soller. Father Peter J. Verhaegen, (S.J.) wishes to go along with Blanc's wishes; moreover he knows the Father-General's intentions. Before sending Soller to New Orleans Verhaegen wants to know:
1. If all is concluded with Mr. Fouché about the land for the church;
2. If the church will be entirely under the direction of the Jesuits without fear of disputing with the trustees.
When the church and the house are built there will be two priests and one brother. They will use three languages in their ministry. Soller hopes he will soon present his respects to Blanc and go to work again for the salvation of souls. He thinks the same little cell will again be at his disposal.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) pp. to.
5


1838 Dec 11

Dupuy, Father Enn(emond)
Iberville, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Dupuy asks Blanc to send him one or two ordos; he will not forget to pay for them at the first chance. Everything as usual here.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) pp. to.
1


1838 Dec 12

O'Kennelly, Father J.F.
Santa Cruz, (Virgin Islands)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

O'Kennelly writes in favor of a man to whom he is greatly attached and who is worthy of Blanc's protection. Mr. Rosenorn, whose late Father was governor of St. Thomas and whose uncle, Father de Macarthy, died in France, is going to New Orleans in hopes of bettering his lot and obtaining an independence hardly possible in the Danish Colonies. Rosenorn has a very good European education, and although Lutheran, has led an exemplary life at Ste. Croix. His mother, a fervent Catholic, would be very much consoled if her son could receive advice from Blanc in a strange city.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. Folio
3


1838 Dec 13

Kiernan, Bernard
Louisville, (Kentucky)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Kiernan solicits (Blanc's) intercession and mercy for himself, an outcast from all religious society, the cause of which is unknown to him. Kiernan has suffered a great deal to become a priest and asks (Blanc) to get the Bishop of Louisville to receive him. Kiernan was expelled from (Blanc's) seminary when (Blanc) did not write.

V-4-g A.L.S. pp. to.
1


1838 Dec 14

(Bruté), Bishop Simon (Gabriel)
Vincennes, (Indiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Their good friend is to leave the 25th according to his letter finally received after being 40 days without news. The departure of Father (Auguste) Jeanjean afflicts (Bruté) almost as much as it does Blanc. What a sorrow for a missionary to leave at the time of his greatest experience! That is the way (Bruté) reasoned at the departure of Father (Matthew B.) Anduze but this departure leaves him desolate. There is another point: the decree of their councils which obliges all priests after 6 months to attach themselves to a diocese and thus not be able to leave without an exeat. 15 or 20 years of service lost to their churches! The Sisters were also grieved. Blanc or Father (John) Vabret is to remember (Bruté) to them. Their (Sisters) are well but have a very limited number of students. (Bruté) wrote Vabret as soon as Hailandière's letter arrived as he is writing to Blanc. (Bruté) has no pressing business - the $200 so greatly desired by Bishop (Michael) Portier has been called to Blanc's attention enough, but he always gets consolation from correspondence with such a good colleague that the pretext is very agreeable. However he is out of favor with the metropolitan without knowing the pretext; the metropolitan wrote in January about his coadjutor and about the Advent fast. (Bruté) had asked him to reconsider the fast and also asked about what had become of their subscription of $200 for classical books. After 8 months, while at Bardstown for the consecration of Bishop (Richard Pius) Miles, (Bruté) was complaining to Bishop (Joseph) Rosati who said, "Our metropolitan does not like to write." After that (Bruté) wrote on September 16 and 3 or 4 more in these three months. He even wrote to Father (Louis) Deloul an to Father (John Joseph) Chanche asking these mutual friends to explain the mystery in regard to an old servant of Maryland, 25 years, and of Baltimore and the Mountain, and treated quite otherwise by the predecessors of this worth Lord, his "old child" at St. Mary's. (Bruté) has three times as many letters from Archbishop (John) Carroll and ten times as many from Archbishop (Ambrose) Miracle. (Bruté) loves, esteems, and respects Archbishop (Samuel) Eccleston but cannot explain this mystery. If it is neglect of correspondence, that confirms (Brute's) opinion of the necessity for another metropolitan see in the West and to provide more actively for the immense future before them. Father (James) Emery, S.S. (?) gave them the rule that all letters deserve an answer even if it is a servant's. What a future! And what advances by Rosati! (Bruté) hopes that Blanc who has so many religious houses will now obtain clergy. Blanc will have plenty of time to see his seminary provide them. (Bruté) is awaiting a letter from Vabret about the commissions Father (Celestine) de la Hailandière gave him - the boxes at the customs and the supplies. (Bruté) would ask him to remember him to Father (Constantine) Maenhaut who was so kind to him last winter, to Father ( ) Daurion(?) and Father ( ) Kennion if he sees them.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
17


1838 Dec 14

Jeanjean, Father Aug(uste)
Paris, (France)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Since leaving New Orleans he has been thinking of the place he left. The surprise and pain caused (Blanc) is still in his mind but he hopes it will be softened by the zeal around him. In the two hours Jeanjean spent at (Blanc's) house he witnessed such a display of zeal and devotion that he was surprised. It made it clear to him that he had been a great obstacle to much good. He spent 24 hours in New York; the weather was so bad he did not see Bishop (John) Dubois but left a letter for him with the Sisters. Jeanjean arrived at le Havre on the first Sunday of Advent; he found Mr. and Mrs. (J.B.) Le Gros in a sad state, unable to walk well after apoplexy and paralysis. They wanted him to stay with them. Jeanjean is still at the Foreign Missions where Bishop (Denis de) Frayssinous is in a sad state morally and physically. (Blanc) will have seen in the newspapers that Cardinal (Carlo) Odescalchi has entered a Jesuit novitiate at Verona; from the Pope's vicar to novice. He is 52. Father Jean-Baptiste Lacordaire is in Paris at the Lafontaine; he is recruiting for the Dominicans at Rome to which he belongs and where he will return shortly. Father (Hercule) Brassac is accompanying Bishop (John Baptist) Purcell as grand-vicar. They left Paris in October for Vienna and Italy. Jeanjean has not found out where Father (Edward) D'hauw is. Father (Peter Richard) Kenrick recently went through Paris to Rome as did Father (John) McGill of Kentucky. Father (?) Niel is now in good health; he is inclined to return to America. Madame (Madeleine Sophie) Barat is in better health than she has been for a long time. She has asked Jeanjean to accompany her in the Spring to Rodez where she is going to establish a house. Madame Eugenie (Audé) is much wasted. Purcell has obtained his Sacred Heart establishment that he wanted so much; he will take a group with him including a Visitation nun.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
13


1838 Dec 15

(Cousin, Victor
Paris, France)

To (Orestes A. Brownson
Boston, Massachusetts)

A few days ago he received the Boston Quarterly Review containing orations of Emerson and a letter of Madame Elija Robbins. He is sending Abelard to George Bancroft in exchange for Jonathan Edwards, also two works to Brownson. Brownson's Review is essentially democratic. He tells Brownson not to forget philosophy in the midst of his political pursuits.

I-3-e A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo. (French) (Signature cut out)
1


1838 Dec 17

Portier, Bishop Michael
Mobile, (Alabama)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Portier had already told Blanc his idea of the offer made and he authorizes Blanc to count him in for half of the 200,000 piastres and to borrow this sum for three years at 3 percent. Portier will furnish security by a mortgage of 100,000 piastres to pay the interest at Paris.
(P.S.) Blanc is to let him know if it will be necessary for him to come to New Orleans.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
1


1838 Dec 18

Le Clerc, A.
Anvers, France

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
Cincinnati

Explains his silence by saying that he thought the Bishop would not remain at Paris but was much astonished to find by his letter that he was still there on November 21. Father Brassac did not give him his itinerary and consequently he tries to reach him in Rome. The memory of the Bishop's visit is still fresh in the minds of the Mother and her daughters. Speaks of gifts which he has received from the Gilles family. Has received in all 711 francs, 75 cent. Mentioned the donors and asked how it is to be remitted. Speaks of the joy of the Community of nuns there. They have 10 novices and 6 postulants. Would like to have the bishop receive their promises in the Cenacle. However if he does not visit them at least he should pray for them. The Mother Superior and her daughters ask his blessing. Adds his own regards.

II-4-g A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo. (French)
3


1838 Dec 19

(Smith, S.C.), Sister Regina
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Sisters Magdalen and Regina could certify the state of the German child's head but they do not like to appear in public on such an occasion. The child had had the sore head so long, the mother said it would die is it were cured. The child and mother were in Dr. Stone's ward where the Sisters never go. (On the address side of the letter of written) Anne Conwells.

V-4-g A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
4


1838 Dec 19

Verhaegen, S.J., Father P(eter) J., College of St. Charles
Grand Coteau, (Louisiana)

to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

Verhaegen has just received Blanc's letter of December 8. The news about his arrival here will have reached Blanc now if his letter is not lost. As to the young man, Verhaegen can give no information as he does not know how he has behaved at the university. Verhaegen talked to Mr. Boudreaux and since it is only a few months since he left the novitiate he did not know him at St. Louis. Verhaegen thinks Father (John) Elet gave him a certificate of good conduct if he merited it. Verhaegen will be pleased to give the retreat to the Ladies (of the Sacred Heart) because he can make his at the same time; it is impossible to get to New Orleans at the time fixed. Father (Nicholas) Point, (S.J.) cannot either because he is needed here so urgently. Verhaegen fears that Blanc does not know about the temporal affairs of this house. Messrs. Fisher, Arden, and Offett have caused much trouble. Verhaegen impatiently awaits Blanc's coming here. Point has gone to St. Michael. After the retreat he will go to New Orleans. Verhaegen asks Blanc to urge Point to return to his post as soon as possible. If Verhaegen had not been afraid of displeasing Blanc he would have forbidden Point to be absent during these stormy times. The debts for the building fill him with fear.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
6


1838 Dec 20

D'hauw, Father E(dward)
Rome, (Italy)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

D'hauw has been in Rome almost three weeks and planned to stay until Easter but Blanc's letter made him anxious to get to work and Rome is not the place to learn German. So next month he thinks he will go to Austria or Germany. He is getting much better except for his cough. Blanc has already heard that Cardinal (Carlo) Odescalchi has entered the Jesuit novitiate at Verona. On December 2 the Pope held a secret consistory to accept his resignation. Tears were shed. Bishop (John Baptist) Purcell has gone to Vienna and he is expected here soon. Someone assured D'hauw that Father (John Mary) Timon would be coadjutor of St. Louis as he is asked for on all sides and they have written to Bishop (Joseph) Rosati to renew his request. Yesterday D'hauw had an audience with the Pope; he was introduced by Father (John) McGill of Bardstown. As for Father (Cyril?) Dela Croix, D'hauw referred several times to the foundation but he seems to have made up his mind because, he says, with a much less sum he could do the same thing in Belgium. Further, his way of talking about Louisiana makes D'hauw think it would be almost useless to make a collection although with a letter from Blanc he perhaps could knock on a few good doors. D'hauw has been told that Bishop (Charles) Forbin Janson has arrived in Rome and is staying with the Lazarists. D'hauw will go to see him; perhaps he can recommend a place to learn German.
P.S. His mail is to go to Ch(arle)s Masson, Thielt, Belgium. Mr. Bouisse sends his respects. (The name Father) Isaac Clemente Aaron is written on the address side of the letter).

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
9


1838 Dec 20

(Lepappe du Trevern), J(ean) F(rancois), Bishop of Strasbourg
Martenkeim, near Strasbourg

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell, Bishop of Cincinnati
Rome, Italy

When he heard that Purcell arrived he supposed that he came to Strasbourg because of the needs of Cincinnati. Had he succeeded to at least half of fortune of his predecessors Purcell's ideas would be just. Then 1000 louis would be as easy to give as 100 francs now. However, he will send to Msgr. Garibaldi for Purcell 200 francs. He is ashamed of the small amount. Hopes that Purcell will arrive safely in Rome, where he has not been for a long time. Expresses his good wishes for Purcell.

II-4-g A.L.S. (French) 1p. 8vo.
3


1838 Dec 21

Anselin, Father
Pas-de-Calais, (France)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

Charity forces Anselin to recommend the enclosed letter (no enclosures). The unfortunate person for whom he is writing begs a reply in case her husband is dead.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
1


1838 Dec 22

Chandy, C.M., Father (John)
Assumption, (Louisiana)

Mr. Bouchard today finished the work on the seminary and plans to leave tomorrow. Bouchard put the cornices on the columns of the balcony but he could not put on the 15 locks or hand the 12 doors on the ground floor because they do not have the hinges in the stores in Assumption. Bouchard promised to send the locks, hinges, and hooks by Hubert Caire, the carpenter. Mr. Feutrier is entirely finished with the second story; the firs is ready for the last coat. The bricks will probably not get laid until the end of January. Chandy has had a good part of the wood cut that they will need. Caire is a good workman. (Blanc) is to make certain purchases for them. Father (John B.) Audizio is confined to his bed; Father (Joseph) Giustiniani, (C.M.) Left this morning to replace him. Chandy leaves tomorrow for Bayou Boeuf for Christmas. On his return he plans to visit Belle Rivière and thereabouts for the first time. All their group are well.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. Folio
5


1838 Dec 22

Fontbonne, Sister St. John
Lyon, (France)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Sister wrote a previous letter asking (Blanc) to receive a box for Father (James) Fontbonne of the Archdiocese of St. Louis but not having (Blanc's) address, she is sending a second letter to inform (Blanc) that there is a B on the box and instead of one box there are three. Neither Bishop Leroulage of Lyon or his correspondent at le Havre thought a box could be sent to New Orleans and believed it would remain in New York. If (Blanc) will see that it arrives her nephew will pay all the expenses.

V-4-g L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
2


1838 Dec 23

Chabrat, Bishop Guy Ig(natiu)s
Bardstown, (Kentucky)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Bishop (John B.) David has just communicated Blanc's letter to him. Chabrat believes that Father (Anthony) Ganihl is the author of the two articles in the Catholic Advocate on Texas; Ganihl is a Spanish teacher in St. Joseph's College. He showed Chabrat faculties his bishop had given him not only for Matamoras but Texas also. Chabrat allowed him to remain at St. Thomas Seminary until nominated by the trustees (of St. Joseph's). Fathers (H.) Deluynes and (Ignatius A.) Reynolds interceded for him. As of late Chabrat has little confidence in Ganihl; he has behaved pretty well but Chabrat has requested Father (Francis) Chambige to pay Blanc what Chabrat owes him. Chabrat would like Blanc to send him the regulations of the orphan asylum of the Sisters of Charity and the powers of the lay managers if there be any. He has had some trouble with the Ladies' managers of Louisville, Reynolds being at their head. The Sisters of Charity there would have had about 16 lay superiors had Chabrat not interfered. David is becoming old and infirm.

V-4-g A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
7


1838 Dec 24

Thorpe, Elizabeth
Carrollton, (Maryland)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

For some time prior to her visiting New Orleans all her views were confined to passing the remainder of her life as a religious. On trial she finds she has not a true vocation. She now finds herself without the necessary means for support and asks Blanc to lend her $100 for her present emergencies and to enable her to continue the study of music for two or three months to be fitted to teach it. She would also like to obtain a situation of governess.

V-4-g A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
1


1838 Dec 25

Chavin, Emile
Dole, France

to Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Bishop (Benedict) Flaget of Bardstown, at Dole during his trip, advised Chavin to write to (Blanc) on a matter concerning a family of orphans. Father (Gabriel) Isabey, (O.P.), Prefect Apostolic at St. Martinville, Attakapas, lived in Louisiana for 40 years. Coming to Dole, his native land, Isbey brought with him his nephew Francois Marc, brother of Chavin's mother. Isabey died in 1824; Marc died September 20, 1826, at St. Martinville. His heirs are Julien Marc, a land owner of Dole, and Chavin's deceased mother. An inventory of Marc's estate was made November 22 and December 4, 1826, at the request of executor Simon Gonor. It is estimated it will not amount to more than 57,860 francs. Chavin lists the remittances made by Mr. Haydel, whom the Jesuits recommended. In making his last remittance Haydel wrote from New Orleans, May 4, 1836: "Enclosed is a draft for 2,120. He has suffered so many losses that it is all he can send at this time. He will send 600 piastres, the balance, as soon as possible. Attorney Roman says if they win the suit there will be more." Since they have had neither money nor a letter they are worried and have given power of attorney to the French consul. Chavin asks (Blanc) to get information from Haydel in St. John the Baptist Parish.
P.S. If Haydel has any money, he is to send it to Mr. Cottez, notary at Dole, who is in charge of Chavin's family affairs.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
6


1838 Dec 27

(Loras), Bishop Mathias
St. Louis, (Missouri)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

(Loras) replies to Blanc's letter of November 11 and to the one addressed to Bishop (Joseph) Rosati of the 17th. Two things plead in (Loras's) favor concerning his belongings which have caused Blanc so much trouble.

1. The absence of Father (Auguste) Jeanjean, whom he had asked to take charge of them;
2. The precautions (Loras) had taken in France concerning the customs in America. He had asked his vendors to send all the invoices by mail to Jeanjean. The ship "United States" is stopped at the mouth of the Ohio, from which it probably will not leave until February. No. 236 contains candlesticks and chandeliers; (Loras) presumes it is on the way with the two trunks and two cases of Moiselle. He is sorry to have been obliged to go the northern way; his stay which will not last beyond the end of January has been extremely useful to him. Rosati is really angry with Blanc for having lured Father (John Mary) Timon, (C.M.) to Texas without him having a hand in it, knowing that Rosati was taking steps to have him as coadjutor. Rosati said he was much more considerate about Jeanjean whom he could easily have drawn to St. Louis. Blanc is to tell the French consul how much he appreciated his greeting. (Loras) could have seen the queen but he learned from the Lazarists that it was impossible to obtain passage on state ships so he did not want to trouble Her Excellency. Besides, he is a bit of a Republican. He is sorry for Blanc if he loses Jeanjean.
P.S. Blanc has said nothing of (Loras's) request for him to take from a large new trunk:

1. A bundle of old clothes for the convent at Mobile;
2. A pectoral cross and chain for Bishop (Michael) Portier; and finally,
3. A little chain for Blanc himself as a token of his gratitude.
(Loras) presumes Blanc will authorize him to say Masses for the 8 ordos which have not yet arrived and even to pass some along from time to time for there is much poverty in the "far West." (Joseph) Nichollet is here, always agreeable and wise; he still loves the south of France.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
7


1838 Dec 28

(Fenwick), Bishop Benedict
Boston, (Massachusetts)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Being absent from Boston when Mrs. Gavan left for New Orleans, he could not give her a letter to Blanc. She is the daughter of a good mother and excellent Father and (Fenwick) recommends her to Blanc's pastoral attention.

V-4-g A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
2


1838 Dec. 28

Timon, (C.M.), Father J(ohn Mary)
Galveston, (Texas)

They arrived safely on the night of the 26th. He mad inquiry about Mrs. Donaldson; she is at Anahuac, 40 miles away. Steamboats do not go there so Timon must await a small schooner next Monday. Divine Providence directed him to two of the most influential men here who were old acquaintances. He has obtained a new house belonging to one of them where he celebrated Mass. He finds a considerable number of Catholics; they are anxious to put up a church and have a clergyman. It appears to him this must become a very important point and a clergyman ought to visit it at least occasionally. Timon intends to pass to Victoria through Houston and thence to San Antonio de Bexar. Though this town only began last March, there are now nearly 1500 persons here, upwards of 100 houses all new and not one chimney; as yet they have no bricks. Two houses have chimneys brought from Baltimore. About 30 vessels are in the harbor. He will write again from Anahuac.

V-4-g A.L.S. 1p. 4to.
3


1838 Dec 30

Abbadie, S.J., Father F(rancis), St. Charles College
Grand Coteau, (Louisiana)

to Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

The college has 67 students. They are expecting a larger number soon; there are at least 105 to come back. One of the oldest left yesterday, preferring to leave rather than obey. Mr. (X.) Baudraud, imprisoned at Lafayette, has just been freed.

V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
3


1838 Dec 30

Martinez, Fran(cisco) Pizarro
Washington, (District of Columbia)

To Bishop Antonio Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

Father Isaac Clemente Aaron, Armenian monk and missionary of the Propaganda in Asia, was introduced by Martinez's compatriot, Father José Lopez, S.J.. The object of Aaron's visit is to collect alms to build a church. Since he will pass through New Orleans on the way to Mexico, Martinez is sure he will find a good reception.

V-4-g A.L.S. (Spanish) 2pp. 4to.
3


1838 Dec 30

Pierz, (Father) Francois
Grand Portage, (Wisconsin)

To Bishop Frederick Rese
of (Detroit, Michigan)

Father Pierz tells the Bishop of his many and great tribulations. When he was sent to the mission of Sault Ste. Marie on November 4, 1836 with the order to enlarge the church, the Bishop had assured him that he would pay the old church debts, owed to Mr. Rancher. Pierz therefore undertook the building of the church on voluntary subscriptions, which, however, were not all redeemed. He had a stone foundation made, in the inside a solid floor was laid and the building fitted with lathes. In the priest house 5 rooms were finished. He had proceeded with the greatest economy and he and his help worked with the other workers. He also spent $60 of his own money. He always endeavored to build in such a way as not to have any debts on the church. But Mr. Francher who took it upon himself to manage the church money, collected all the money and used part of it to pay off the old church debt and added new debts to Pierz's account. In order to pay off that new debt and the traveling expenses to Grande Portage, the Company took all his potatoes in Sault Ste. Marie. He had spent over $100 for the cultivation and enclosure of the fields and gardens and he hoped to receive a fine compensation for his potatoes, but those robbers took 154 Minots (about 171 bushels) paid him 4 shillings (97 1/3 cents) instead of $1, and in that way he was cheated out of his fortune. Because he bought some (fishing) nets for his livelihood and intended to start a farm and raise some cattle on his new mission in Grande Portage, these scoundrels thought he was doing it for speculation, which would be detrimental to them. They want the Indians to remain uncivilized and poor and to keep them in slavery so they can cheat them longer. Therefore these people tried to frustrate his mission and they began to persecute him in every possible way. They poisoned his cow, which he bought with borrowed money, right on the first night and the little calf is also sick. He paid his board to Mr. Cote, so that he would not owe anything to the Company. He even gave his watch away. He started his own household with a hired man. Two pounds of butter, two pounds of bacon and a little four are his whole winter supply, more he could not afford to buy. The poor Indians, who themselves are in danger of starvation, gave him a few fishes so he would be able to barely exist through the winter and work for his beloved Indians. The Bishop had given him the written assurance of giving the mission in Sault Ste. Marie $200 a year through Father Baraga and had promised him orally $200 for the mission in Grande Portage. However, he cannot live on empty promises. Neither for Sault Ste. Marie nor for Grand Portage did he receive any support. He did not even receive an answer to his many letters and his reports about the missions. When he lost all his belongings he entreated the Bishop to send him the most necessary mission requisites but he received no answer. He wrote to his friends in Europe to send him the things indispensable for his mission but those gangsters of the Company would not send the letters away. He had to tell his Indians that he could not start a mission and could not give them a new livelihood on the new farm and many of them had to go away to earn a living somewhere else. As he is persecuted by the (American) Fur Company, left destitute by the Bishop, ans weighed down by poverty, he cannot do his work as a missionary. Therefore he intends to leave the service of the Bishop in the Spring. However, he still hopes that the Bishop will keep his word and send him the rest of the promised money, also the necessary money for the church in Sault Ste. Marie and some money for his other mission expenses which he is not obliged to pay from his own money. He should send that amount with the first ship to Mr. John Ord, government agent of Sault Ste. Marie in the Spring either by walking over the ice or by using an Indian canoe after the ice has melted, to hear the Easter confessions, if another priest does not arrive there before him.

III-2-g A.L.S. (German) 4pp. 8vo.
3


1838 Dec 31

Armengol, C.M.,, Father B(onaventure)
Assumption, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Armengol has Blanc's letter of the 26th. They are grateful for the books Blanc sent; he will do his best to exactly observe the ceremonies. As to the young Frenchman and his mother, Armengol leaves it to Blanc's prudence. However, Armengol doubts if the lady could be useful as he fears that she would soon have the same ideas as the Creoles of La Fourche who hate the work they consider proper for slaves. They have enough help for washing, ironing, and work inside the house. Armengol fears for the young men who have been a long time out in the world and come to the seminary without sufficient proof of their vocation. A sad example is Mr. Herisson who finally left of his own volition; he would have had to be sent away if he had not left. Felix Boué is a different case. If there were 4 or 6 they could keep them separate and these little Creoles would yield good fruit. Father (John) Chandy, (C.M.), bearer of this letter, will inform Blanc about the work of the seminar, etc.
V-4-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.