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Calendar: 1841

(1841)

( )
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

In reading the book of philosophy published in 1841 by Blanc St. Bonnet, the writer found it impossible to resist the desire to extract from it the portrait of the chaste man. The extract entitled "Enthusiasm" follows.

V-4-l Copy (French) pp. 4to.
1


1841

( )
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Parish statistics for Vermilionville, (Louisiana) served by Father (Pierre Francois) Beaupre(z).

V-4-l D. (French) up. Folio
2


(1841?)

Bellier, Father (John Peter)
(Vincennes, Indiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

This letter will be brought by one of their men (Eudists), Father (Maurice) Berel, whom the doctor has advised to spend the winter in New Orleans. He is very studious and Bellier believes Berel could be very useful while regaining his health and could find means to pay his expenses which they would find it impossible to do. They will never forget Blanc's kindnesses to Father (John A.) Vabret. Perhaps Berel could begin the day school of which Blanc spoke to Vabret. Bellier believes that in a few years they can have a very good college here and can help Bishop (Celestin de la Hailandière) do the good he wishes to do. Bellier signs as the president of the College (of St. Gabriel) of Vincennes.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
6


(1841?)

Miles, Richard Pius, Bishop of Nashville
Nashville, Tennessee

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Mr. James Lawler, the bearer, is a good Catholic looking for employment. He came to this country by the invitation of an apostate brother, not knowing this fact until he arrived. Rather than risk the loss of his religion he has left his brother and now seeks employment in Cincinnati. Miles recommended him to Purcell and adds that he hopes the young man who lately came to Nashville has returned safely.

II-4-h A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
3


(1841-1842) ( )

P(eabody), E(lizabeth) P.
( )

To Orestes A. Brownson
( )

When Peabody said that she hoped England would fight on its stand as regards the Creole Case, she was really expressing confidence in her own country. She wanted England to fight, if necessary, to keep the slaves on its territory. She supposes America will yield the point, since it means yielding nothing valuable. Peabody believes that America would have all the advantages over England in a war, and therefore she would hate to see such a war occur over the Creole Case. It would fix attention on the essential evils of slavery. She would not give up the constitution to end slavery immediately, the gain is not great enough for the loss. A war would not risk the loss of the constitutional government only purify it. Her ideas and Brownson's ideas are widely different but they are both patriotic. (There is a copy of this letter with the original).

I-3-f A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
1


1841

(Rousselon, Father Stephen
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Three leaves from a notebook of receipts and expenditures. Among the items are the following: Receipts. January 5, received from Genevieve Audry to the account of St. Claude Convent to pay Angelique Aliquot, repayable in a year at 10% interest, $600; January 7, received from Mother Thérèse for the same purpose, without interest, $500; January 8, received from his deposit from Father (Auguste) Jeanjean, $100; received from Joseph Jamey for the balance of the account with his cousin, $89; March 23, received from Mr. Seghers a deposit of $800. Expenditures. January 7, given to Mr. Seghers for the Aliquot business, $800; January 11, loaned to the Bishop for a year, $330; March 24, put in the Citizen's Bank by the Bishop at 5% for six months the $800 received from Seghers; cash on hand $84.87 1/2. Receipts. April 20, received from Consul (Victor?) David for the Account of Bishop (Mathias) Loras, $230. Expenditures. April 24, given to Mother Thérèse on the account of Miss Courson, $45; April 26, given to Mr. Benoit for the account of Bishop Loras, Miss Courson, $183; etc.

V-4-l A.D. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
9


1841 Jan-Dec

Maurian, Charles, Parish Judge
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Marriage licenses issued by Maurian, and a few by J. Bermudez, Parish Judge pro tem., to Father (Constantine) Maenhaut and to Father Stephen Rousselon, to marry the following persons:

June 29 Nicholas Schmidt and Catherine Ueber
Sep 6 Louis Armand Garidel and Josephine Adonai Andry
Sep 16 Alphonse Gaux and Marie Henriette Fervier
Sep 24 John Gallagher and Ellen Smith
Oct 2 Edmund Tuey and Catherine Flint
Oct 4 Peter Grady and Ellen Largy, widow of Darby Moran
Oct 15 Edward Higgins and Hannah Mockler
Oct 18 Richard McDonald and Mary Mealy
Oct 21 Owen McKane and Letitia Gallagher
Oct 22 William Moran and Mary Gibney, widow of John McIntyre
Oct 22 Patrick Hanahan and Bridget Fury
Nov 2 Thomas Callinan and Bridget Mooney, widow of Peter Prendergast
Nov 3 Frantz Axmann and Helena Braunbran
Nov 8 Paul Arpin and Euphémie Pauline Boyer
Nov 8 Dan Casey and Margaret Tehan (on the back of this license is written), daughter of Pierre Courotte and Elina Laporte born February 23, 1844; godfather, Germain Plessy and godmother, Josephine Hoa. Elizabeth, daughter of Owen McNulty and Bridget McGavin, born July 6; Patrick Horan(?) and Mary Gilroy
Nov 12 Pierre Bernard Michel and Josephine Esteves, free persons of colour
Nov 16 John Coghlan and Margaret Carroll
Nov 19 James King and Ann Kelly
Nov 25 John Keefe and Catherine Dade, widow of James French
Nov 26 Owen Murphy and Ann McMahon
Nov 30 Patrick Bradley and Catherine Ballan
Dec 3 James Farrell and Jane Fulton, widow of James Boswell
Dec 4 Luke Getely and Margaret McCawley
Dec 9 Joseph Wederstrandt and Marie Grenaud, free persons of colour
Dec 10 Martin Sweeney and Ann Malone
Dec 16 Elijah Tilburg and Margaret Degan, widow of Nic(k?) Brian
Dec 16 Nicholas Perard and Marie Magdelaine Topenot
Dec 18 John Twomy and Margarite Reed
Dec 18 Thomas Sheehan and Ann Byrnes
Dec 20 John Smith and Bridget Carr, widow of W(illia)m Carr
Dec 22 Joseph Schoff and Henrietta Schmidt
Dec 24 J.H. Webb and Mary McManus, widow of Michael Moran
Dec 24 Joseph Fischer and Suzannah Holterith
Dec 27 William B. Smelzer and Caroline Vaughan
Dec 29 Frederick Rabénau and Sarah Levy
Dec 31 Michael Ennis and Elizabeth Hopkins
Dec 31 John Hore and Bridget O'Connor, widow of Christopher O'Bryan.

V-4-l 38 licenses 12 mo.
97


1841 Jan 1

Albuzzi, Philippe
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To The Estate of Felicité (d')Abat, Widow Jean Casimire
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Receipted bill for $35 for medical care from the years 1838, 1839, and 1840 up to the time of her death December 2, 1840. Signed by L. Trigant(?) collector.
(On the back of the receipt Albuzzi has written) that the bill was presented twice by L.M. Dokminy, his collector, to Bishop Anthony Blanc who refused to pay it.
(A newspaper notice is pasted on the back of the receipt stating that) notice is hereby given to the creditors of the d'Abat estate to show cause why the bill presented by Blanc as executor for the deceased Felicité d'Abat should not be paid. This notice dated January 8 is by W(illiam) F.C. Duplessis, Register of Wills.

V-4-l D.S. (French) 2pp. 16mo.
6


1841 Jan 1

(Louisiana), New Orleans Post Office
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Receipt for $6 for box rent. Signed for G. Montamat by V.(?) F.(?) Wiltz.

V-4-l D.S. 1p. 16mo.
3


1841 Jan 1

Lynch, Anne C.
Providence, (Rhode Island)

to O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Mass(achusetts)

She sends him greetings for the New Year, and tells him that she had a fine ride home in the snow from his house. Whenever she returns from a visit to his house she has a feeling that her mental stature has increased many degrees. Then, back in her own surroundings the influence of her friends seems to stifle her. Whenever she does expand, it is despite them, rather than because of them. Perhaps he is too combative to understand her feeling, but he must have at some time felt the same. His calm and determined self-reliance must help him in his sustained action. She is expecting him on Saturday positively, unless he writes to the contrary, which he promised to do if he had to change the day. She has given out that he intended to lecture to them, so she doesn't want to be disappointed. The "Journal" must have suspected his coming as they copied the remarks of the "Evening Post" with suitable commentaries. She has looked at the "New Age" and thinks it is on the right track, though it does not seem precisely to know where it is going. She hears that in Rhode Island people are allowed to vote or not to vote by virtue of a charter given their ancestors 200 years ago by one Charles Stuart living in England. She wishes that others would take Brownson as an example and go out to battle for the highest truths and the furtherance of Democracy as he has done.

I-3-f A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
2


1841 Jan 3

Deluol, Father L(ouis) R(egis)
Baltimore, (Maryland)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Duluol received Blanc's letter of December 20. On learning of Father (Peter Victor) Plunkett's arrival at New Orleans, Deluol asked Archbishop (Samuel Eccleston) to send his exeat; it should be on the way now. (Eccleston) will also have written that it will be impossible for him to say anything about Natchez and its future bishop. Deluol has no doubts about Bishop (Joseph) Rosati but he doubts if anyone but a saint would have taken 3 months to get from Paris to Rome to present the acts of the Fourth Provincial Council of Baltimore. An ordinary man would have made all haste to put the Holy See in possession of these documents. The proposing of Father (John Joseph) Chanche for the new see of Natchez was known everywhere before it was known at Baltimore. Deluol thinks Chanche will accept but at his age, 46, in a climate like Natchez, it is condemning him to a premature death. Both Chanche and (Eccleston) believe that he would have full disposition of funds. Deluol has seen a copy of the resolution of the trustees giving the church to the bishop; there is one clause he does not like. And Edward Elder wrote his uncle that he was not able to get it canceled. Blanc brought Deluol the letter from Marie Fortunée Lasaillie; she asked for a copy of her baptismal certificate. Deluol sends it; she gave no address.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
9


1841 Jan 3

Friedel, Louis
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Friedel asks (Blanc) to give his approval to the books he submits for his examination. At the time he undertook to translate Abbé Schmid's works he was all well off. Since then adversity has struck. He and his wife are strangers from a far away country, looking for asylum and means of support.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
1


1841 Jan 4

(Portier), Bishop Michael
Mobile, (Alabama)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Portier) has been trying to borrow the 3500 Blanc spoke about but has nothing sure before May 1. Does Blanc know any source? Father (Ferdinand Dominic) Bach is urging him to close.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
2


1841 Jan 7

Verhaegen, S.J., Father P(eter) J.
St. Louis, (Missouri)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Verhaegen answers Blanc's letters of December 4, 10, and 24. Verhaegen received (James?) Kelly with all the affection due his virtues and service to religion but as he had no place for him there Kelly found a place in the city. Verhaegen predicts Kelly will return to New Orleans by the end of the year. Blanc need not worry about the 70 intentions for the Ordos. The speculation in Blanc's letter of December 20 is magnificent! If that property could only be bought right now! But their poor Province could not do it. St. Charles College is situated disadvantageously. Another college on the coast would not be amiss but where would the professors come from even if they had a place and suitable buildings? If it were up to Verhaegen this would be his plan. Grand Coteau would become a residence staffed by two Fathers and two Brothers and the personnel would be taken to Versaille or elsewhere provided the new college was at a convenient distance from New Orleans. Blanc could submit this plan as his own if it seems good. When Father (Joseph Richard) Bole, Father (Auguste) Paris' companion, came to see them last November he brought a letter in which Paris told of his painful position. Verhaegen thinks he will have trouble adjusting to the climate and way of life in Arkansas. He is not the first to express the desire to withdraw from the post assigned by Bishop (Joseph) Rosati. But in the bishop's absence Verhaegen has decided to let no one leave the diocese for good. He counts on the bishop's return in 10 months. Father (Timothy) Conway is doing much good in his missions. Verhaegen spoke to Bishop (Mathias) Loras about the Holy Oils and he promised to be here for Holy Week. If he is not to be, will Blanc give them some. Father (Peter John) De Smet, (S.J.) has returned from his trip to the rocky Mountains. He converted nearly all the First Heads; he baptized 200 in one day. He is now editing an account. Verhaegen sends regards to Father Jeanjean. May their prayers cure him!

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
9


1841 Jan 8

Lesne, Father J(ames)
Mobile, (Alabama)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Lesne has had an interview with Bishop (Michael) Portier who, although he consented to let him go, asked him to stay until Easter. Portier fears that Father (Symphorian) Guinand, who left two months ago to take up a collection in Havana, will not want to return to Pensacola. Also, Portier is afraid that those who came from France may find some difficulty so that Father (John) Basin and Portier might have to go to the College. Lesne cannot leave the bishop in such embarrassment. So if Lesne does not leave next Tuesday with Bishop (Mathias) Loras it is because he believes he should not leave the Bishop.

V-4-1 A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
5


1841 Jan 8

(Loras), Bishop Mathias
Dubuque, (Iowa)

To Father (Stephen) Rousselon
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

The 18 ordos arrived at St. Louis and some are already at Dubuque. The 14 Masses will be said.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 1p. 4to.
1


1841 Jan 8

New Orleans, Commercial Bulletin
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To The Estate of (Felicité) D'Abat
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

A receipted bill for $6 for the succession notice. (A clipping of the notice from the newspaper is pasted on the receipt. It states that) notice is given to the creditors of the estate to show cause within ten days why the account presented by Bishop Antoine Blanc, testamentary executor of the deceased widow of Jean Casimir should not be homologated and approved by order of the Court, W.F.C. Duplessis, Register of Wills.

V-4-l D.S. 1p. 32mo.
4


1841 Jan 9

Hart, Charles; Fenner C. Geo(rge)
)Providence, Rhode Island)

to Orestes A. Brownson, Brown University
Providence, (Rhode Island)

Brownson was requested by a vote of the United Bro(thers) Society to attend their regular meeting, but thought proper to decline this invitation. They are transmitting to Brownson the following resolution:

That the act of the Faculty of Brown University or any number thereof in attempting to frustrate the wish of the Society, in regard to the attendance of an honorary member, was wholly unwarrantable.

I-3-f A.L.S. 1p. 8vo. 2


1841 Jan 9

Schneider, C.
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To (Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Receipted bill for $88.78 for 6 boxes of sperm candles.

V-4-l A.D.S. 1p. 16mo.
1


1841 Jan 11

Boullier, (C.M.), Father J(ohn)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Receipt for $210 from Father (Auguste) Jeanjean for the Seminary (of St. Vincent de Paul) at Assumption.

V-4-l A.D.S. (French) 1p. 16mo.
2


1841 Jan 11

(England), Bishop John
Charleston, S(outh) C(arolina)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

(England) regrets he cannot be in New Orleans the last week of this month. He is obliged to remain for an important case at the Court of Sessions involving one who has been the best benefactress of his institutions. He had determined to meet Blanc's wishes and those of Father (James Ignatius) Mullon but he will not be able to leave previous to February 1. The trial at the soonest comes on or before January 25.

V-4-l A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
2


1841 Jan 11

Tabor, Martha A.
Thibodeaux, (Louisiana)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

She has an opportunity to write Blanc by Father (Julian) Priour. She made her First Communion on December 11 with Father (Victor) Jouann(e)ault. During Priour's short sojourn at Lafourche, Tabor was at the convent. She received Blanc's letter some months ago. She received letters from the Convent; her godmother appears to desire their return to the Sacred Heart but she has despaired o f ever returning unless for a short visit. Tabor signs as Blanc's godchild.

V-4-l A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
3


1841 Jan 12

Whitredge, W.C.
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Bill for $1.05 for freight on the Brig Porpoise. Receipted on the back on January 19, 1842.

V-4-l A.D.S. 2pp. 16mo.
1


1841 Jan 13

Duncan, L.C., and M(anue?)l Musson
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

The public prints will have informed Blanc of the heavy calamity to the Asylum for the Relief of the Destitute Orphan Boys. The school house and library have been lost by fire and the dormitory of 40 boys was entirely consumed on the morning of the 12th. The Directors are compelled to submit their wants to the sympathies of the public. They have been appointed as a committee that is to present this subject to all the churches in the city and request that Blanc submit the same to the congregation in his charge. Though bequests of considerable prospective value have been made by two citizens yet the interest of this institution consists in real estate chiefly unimproved. Thus the Asylum where there are now one hundred children is dependent on the favor of the Legislature and upon the bounty of individuals. Demands against the treasury usually exceed its resources.

V-4-l A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
3


1841 Jan 14

Doogan, Father Robert
Alexandria, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Blanc has forgotten to send an ordo. He asks Blanc to forward one and a Catholic Almanac. He received the clothes and books. He hopes Father Jeanjean is now well.
(P.S.) Blanc is to inform Doogan if the Council of Trent has been received in his diocese. How should Doogan act with regard to some Catholic ladies who have been married to Protestants by the judge. They are French Creoles and live about 16 miles from town.

V-4-l A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
1


1841 Jan 15

Beauclerc, (Victor)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Beauclerc sends Miss de L's reply. Her fears of a trip to England are deeper than he can combat. It is difficult to have her join her grandmother without her parents knowing it and besides the M(arqu)ise de L. could not leave London without her sons knowing it. She would have to give her granddaughter over to those who have a right to claim her and this is to be avoided above all. If (Blanc) knew the persons and the circumstances he would share Beauclerc's opinion. Miss de L. hopes to receive word from London agreeing to her return to France. In the meantime she offers to retire to some honorable refuge; she acts in his interest and he is grateful. But he doubts they could find a refuge. His resources are dwindling; he can do nothing as he planned for the expiation of his faults and the well being of his family. He will seek from Blanc the strength and consolation he needs.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 8vo.
1


1841 Jan 15

Timon, (C.M.), Father J(ohn)
Galveston, (Texas)

To Bishop A(n)t(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Timon arrived a few days ago in company with Father (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.). Today Timon baptized a lady whom God called to the church and as he passed on to Austin her husband, renouncing Free Masonry, has begun to practice his duties. The scarcity of money is such that he fears the building of a church will be delayed sometime. On Monday Timon starts for Nacogdoches, Louisiana and San Augustine, thence to Natchitoches, Louisiana where he expects to be about February 3. A lady professing to be a religious of the Visitation and accompanied by a novice arrived a few days ago to see about establishing a convent. She brings no papers and seems to be under some obligation to Bishop (Mathias Loras) Lorace. Timon would like to know what Lorace wishes. She returns to New Orleans. Timon has written to Cardinal (James Philip) Fransonius; he sends it open that Blanc may read it and tell him what he thinks of his remarks on Mr. De Seligny; Timon wishes what he advocates and Odin is anxious that the honor alluded to might be granted. He suspects that in the last six months letters to the same purport have been sent to Rome. If Blanc does not think the letter improper he is to forward it.

V-4-l A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
10


1841 Jan 16

Hany, Benj(amin) F.
Gettysburg, (Pennsylvania)

To (Orestes) A. Brownson
(Boston, Massachusetts)

By authority of the Philomathean Society of Penn(sylvania) College he informs Brownson that he has been elected an honorary member of this association. The object of the Society is to cultivate a taste for learning and to create and cherish mutual regard and friendship among the members.

I-3-f A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
2


1841 Jan 18

Bancroft, Geo(rge)
Custom House-Boston, (Massachusetts)

To O(restes) A. Brownson, Marine Hospital
Chelsia, (Massachusetts)

He wants Brownson to furnish him an account of Brownson's "Contingent Fund", (old clothes) with the balance on hand December 31, 1840.

I-3-f A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
2


1841 Jan 18

(Hailandière), Bishop Celestin de la
Vincennes, (Indiana)

To Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

Blanc is the first one to whom (Hailandière) has used the term "confrère." He sends Blanc most of Mr. Latapie's bill. He retains part of it for correcting some errors, such as 10 boxes of tea for Mrs. Parsons instead of 10 pounds. He likes what Blanc told him about Father (Julian) Benoit. He thinks they ought to try every means to keep the best priests in America. He will talk to Benoit and if he persists in wanting to return to France, (Hailandière) will tell him what Blanc offers. But he does not think that they can count on him. He is now at Fort Wayne with an assistant, and seems quite satisfied. (Hailandière) has another priest here he would like to recommend to Blanc. Blanc may have seen by the newspapers from Chicago where Mr. O'Meara is. He writes the most gross slanders about (Hailandière); only God can cure the wounds of that church. The money (Hailandière) sends consists of a letter of exchange on (Mark A. Frenaye) of Philadelphia; Blanc is to see that it is sold. (Hailandière) is sorry there is so little hope for Father (Louis) Neyron's health; it will be a loss for Blanc and for America. (Hailandière) is sorry that there has been nothing done about the project of a collection in the islands.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
9


1841 Jan 18

Pouget, Abbé
Montanban, (France)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Pouget wrote two years ago about Mrs. Marcénac of Rodez, née Anduze whose lot is deplorable. Pouget has helped her for a long time and loaned her 1000 francs to go to Toulouse where she hoped to find a means of livelihood. The promises given her failed to materialize. Pouget had asked (Blanc) to deal with her brother Father (Matthew Bernard) Anduze to whom he enclosed a letter asking him to honor the contract for the 1000 francs. (Blanc) replied that he had spoken to Anduze and given him Pouget's letter and that in spite of their small grievances Anduze would take pity on her and honor her contract. Anduze did not reply to Pouget directly or indirectly. The silence made Mrs. Marcénac's sufferings greater. Pouget again asks (Blanc's) intervention; if Anduze knew his sister's sad position he would put aside the supposed wrongs.
P.S. Anduze should not forget that Pouget was an intimate friend of Bishop (Louis William) Dubourg at whose house Pouget met Anduze.

V-4-1 A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
4


1841 Jan 19

Lynch, C. A(nne)
Providence, (Rhode Island)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Mass(achusetts)

She thanks Brownson for his letter of Saturday. She is in agreement with his defense of the Fall and finds it original. She agrees with Brownson entirely in what he says of the affections being the springs that set our intellects going. She likes Brownson's views of women particularly well. She supposes that Brownson has decided to publish the Pole article in the Review. She has just been reading the chapter on the manufacturing population in England, in "England and the English," and acclaims that it is heart rending. She believes slavery is preferable. She is glad that Brownson was pleased with his visit in Providence.

I-3-f A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
1


1841 Jan 19

(Purcell), Bishop J(ohn) B(aptist)
Cin(cinna)ti, (Ohio)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

A worthy Italian on his way down gives (Purcell) this pleasure. He tends Blanc a work fraught with instruction and interest, the "Ages of Faith." Blanc is to tell Father (Auguste) Jeanjean not to be in too great a hurry out of this world (Purcell) owes him 25 francs; maybe it will do to place as much to Blanc's credit for the "Ages of Faith." It is no easy matter to get to seeSister Angela's niece. Her stepfather is a Presbyterian and surrounds himself by the blackest influences hostile to Catholicism; the child never comes to church that (Purcell) knows of. (Purcell) sends a book and a letter to Pierce Connelly in Blanc's care. Bishop (Joseph) Rosati has written about a coadjutor. Would it not be ab awful thing for (Purcell) if, after all the pains he has taken with a certain somebody, he should slip off or be carried off, as Jesuits will not allow "one of theirs" and as another said he would never consent to be naturalized in the U(nited) States! What is Father (Thomas R.) Butler doing down below? He promised to be home by Christmas; his congregation is suffering. Blanc is to tell him so. Their Sisters of Notre Dame are installed; they will do well.
(On the address side: Care of) M. Luchesi.

V-4-l A.L.S. 2pp. Folio
8


1841 Jan 20

Conrad, F.D.
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Conrad received Blanc's letter of the 14th. Blanc judged correctly that he was entirely engrossed by his legislative duties which with the bad weather prevented him from paying his respects. Blanc will find in him the sincerest disposition to aid in every manner consistent with his obligation as a Representative. As chairman of the Committee, he will leave this tomorrow on a visit to the Penitentiary. On his return he will wait upon Blanc and be happy to render any service in his power in relation to the subject of Blanc's letter.

V-4-l A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
1


1841 Jan 21

Bruyère, Father (John), St. Thomas (Seminary)
Bardstown, (Kentucky)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

Bruyère is the priest from Lyons who received hospitality from Blanc several days ago when he was on his way to Kentucky. To relieve the monotony of this retreat where he is studying English Bruyère offers his services to Blanc during Lent. It was a preaching career that he prepared to follow in France when he was urged to do something not spontaneous enough for him and which may oblige him to return to France. He would be happy to be of use to Blanc.

A.L.S. (French)

On the same paper:

( )

Chabrat, Bishop Guy Ig(na)t(uys)
Bardstown, Kentucky)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Bruyère asks Chabrat to add a few words to his letter. Chabrat recommends him in a special way. He is an excellent priest but troubled by some scruples. Chabrat hopes these will be dispelled by time and (Blanc's) company. Rather than see him return to France, Chabrat would consent to his remaining with (Blanc).
P.S.Father (S.H.) Montgomery has expressed a desire to remain under Blanc's jurisdiction for two years. Considering Montgomery's pecuniary embarrassments, Chabrat grants him leave to do so though his Covington congregation must suffer greatly from so long an absence.

A.L.S. (French and English)

V-4-l A.L.S. (French and English) 4pp. 4to.
3


1841 Jan 22

Jouanneault, Father V(ictor)
Thibodaux, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

For at least four months Jouanneault has had the desire to be sent on a mission without being able to attain it. Day before yesterday he obtained permission to go to Ho(u)ma to examine the disposition of the people and to find a place for a priest. He succeeded immediately so they are coming next week in a pirogue as it is impossible to take the church things in a carriage. There is an immense good to be done there; the population exceeds that of La Fourche Interne. He will go regularly either every two weeks or every month according to arrangements to be made with the parishioners. He is sure of receiving enough for his services. The expenditures made by Father (John B.) Audizio having pinched him, he might refuse Jouanneault what would be just on such an occasion. In order to avoid the slightest argument, Jouanneault asks Blanc to let him know what would be his right from marriages and burials. As he has half of the baptisms he is satisfied on that score. The people are ready to make a subscription to build a church; they have already told him of someone willing to give the land. He thinks that while waiting for a church they could subscribe a salary of 2 or 300 piastres for the priest who would come to say Mass from time to time. What arrangements would be necessary with Audizio? The difficulty of carrying everything for Mass each time makes Jouanneault think that they should have a trunk which could be left at the depot to hold all the articles. Could Blanc find an altar stone, missal and chalice at his house? Some persons at Thibodaux can make the albs, chasubles, etc. It is at least a month since he wrote to Baltimore for English books; he does not know what to do to get some as they are a necessity. To live in peace here Jouanneault has to endure many humiliations so that he would like to go out not for a time but forever. However he is glad to have a place and he asks for patience to suffer as long as Blanc thinks fitting as Audizio's assistant.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
3


1843 Jan 23

Armstrong, J.A.
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

The contents of Blanc's favor of the 21st have been made known to the President and directors of the Fireman's Charitable Association; they tender their thanks for the noble manner in which Blanc met their call. He reiterates his best wishes for a favorable issue to their exertions in the cause of the widow and orphan.

V-4-n A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
2


1841 Jan 24

Bazin, S.J., Father J(ohn)
Spring-Hill, (Alabama)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

Basin received Blanc's letter announcing the sending of the 30 ordos. Basin received them and holds himself responsible for the Mass intentions which have been acquitted. Bishop (Michael) Portier told Basin that last year Blanc, in sending the ordos for 1840, had said nothing about Mass intentions and so Portier feels himself indebted to Blanc. Will Blanc clear this up?

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
2


1841 Jan 25

Jamey, Father V(ictor), St. Landry,
(Opelousas, Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

A Mr. Chassin of Vertilliac(?) In Perigord has just consulted Jamey about the means to take to have his son Justin (Chassin) come to Louisiana. Justin is 13, a student at the little seminary of Bergerac. He wishes to send $250 to France of which 800 francs would be for Justin's passage to the Seminary at Lafourche and 450 to place his son Felix, age 11, in the seminary at Bergerac. Jamey told Chassin he could do nothing before writing to Blanc:
1. To see if he would receive the son.
2. To see if Blanc would write to the Bishop of Perigueux or the ordinary to obtain the young man's admission and to get from Blanc's broker in Paris the above mentioned sum. The last time Jamey saw Blanc he forgot to ask for the faculty of establishing a Confraternity of the Scapular. (Pierce J.) Con(n)el(l)y recently suggested that Jamey join him in founding a newspaper at Grand Coteau. Since Jamey knows Blanc's position and since funds are needed for such an enterprise he did not want to promise anything before consulting Blanc. They did not arrive at Indian Village until after the boat had left. They found another and since there were 5 gentlemen they shipped by weight and gave the captain $130 which took them to Negreville(?). The president of Franklin College was on board; he was very attentive to Jamey even to the point of abstaining from meat on Friday. It proves the truth of the old proverb that to be good friends you must fight at least once. The first question they asked at the College and Convent was: When is the Bishop coming? A little tour here would be useful and please everyone greatly.
P.S. He sends regards to Fathers Jeanjean and Rousselon.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
6


1841 Jan 25

McLaughlin, Father P(eter)
Cleveland, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Speaks of the difficulties which he encountered at Cleveland. The Dutch and Irish were opposed to him at first. Speaks of the more notable cases that have been settled by name. Thinks that the flock may be worthy of Purcell when he visits them. The Lyceum has invited him to lecture in his room, which was well received. He has benefitted by the work of Father (John) Dillon and Purcell. Asks Purcell's opinion about the lectures. Asks that under conditions existing there whether he may not say Mass in his room during the winter. As Purcell has urged him to abridge his duties he has arranged the following: First Monday of every month preaches at Laport, and celebrates the following; 57 Catholics there. Cuyahoga and Akron are visited every second Tuesday of the month, and four Sundays of the year. The rest of the time he stays at Cleveland. Mr. Golden has invented a new candlestick and has given six to him and has added some other ornaments. D.L. Fischer has fallen away and joined a heretical sect. McLaughlin asks that he be no longer agent for the Telegraph and that Purcell write reprimanding him for his utterances about the manner of holding the church property. Asks that Purcell settle who is to be master of the church property, he or the congregation. Mr. Fischer has been proved a swindler. When he visits Cincinnati he will be satisfied to see the female seminary. Sends his respects to the seminarians and friends.

II-4-g A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
7


1841 Jan 27

Delery, Ch(arles) N.
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To the Estate of Félicité D'Abat, Widow of J(ean) Caismir
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

A receipted bill for $50 for Delery's fee as attorney named by the court to represent the absent heirs. Paid by the executor of the will, Bishop A(nthony) Blanc. Signed by A.L. Michel, collector.

V-4-l D.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
4


1841 Jan 28

Ganilh, Father Ant(hony)
Natchez, (Mississippi)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

Ganilh has just received Blanc's letter of January 21; it was balm to which he has long been a stranger. He came to Natchez only as a last resort. Previously he had tried to start a school in several places and had not succeeded. He had hopes of obtaining some pupils for French and English here but what can he do in this cruel situation? He did not leave Kentucky gladly. The college became unbearable because of the rebuffs and the unruliness of the young people in his classes. Bishop (Benedict Joseph) Flaget offered him another place but then did not wish to give it to him. Ganilh solemnly declared that nothing happened on his part, from the moment Flaget made the offer and Ganilh's departure for Kentucky that would make him deserve the letter in which Flaget told him that he had changed his decision. Also there should be some indulgence for a weakness which amounted to hypochondria before age dimmed his imagination. After his return to Kentucky he believes he acted with great caution; he bore many humiliations and affronts and suddenly comes this new storm. In a cold climate he suffers from rheumatism. The North would be fatal for him. Blanc spoke of retirement. He can catch only a glimpse of Blanc's plan; if he would explain further Ganilh could make a decision. He could not retire to a house where they would treat him scornfully. This is what he suffered at the College at Bardstown for two years. It is not his fault that he is in his present state; he asks only to do what is right.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
2


1841 Jan 28

Pichot, A.W.
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

The joint committee of both houses of the Legislature intends visiting tomorrow the (New Orleans Female Orphan) Asylum over which Blanc presides and known as the Soulet Asylum over which Blanc presides and known as the Soulet Asylum. Should Blanc think it proper to be present or to have some person represent him, the committee will receive any information given to them.

V-4-l A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
3


1841 Jan 28

Sherrod, C.O.
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

Sherrod begs Blanc to take an interest in two unfortunates who are without a position or money. Her husband is a painter; she wishes to find a place as a governess or in a shop. She was born and raised in business until the age of 18 after which she was a teacher in a boarding school for French and German until she came to the United States where she has been for 2 years. At Cincinnati she was married by Bishop Purcell on August 30, 1840. Blanc can see the notice in the Telegraph. If she fails to get a position, she could take some pupils in her home or take enough sewing to pay expenses until her husband goes to work.
P.S. If Blanc wishes to know her capabilities he is to tell her husband who brings this letter but he does not speak French. Then she will write in detail to inform Blanc.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
1


1841 Jan 30

Poursine, F.A.
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

To (Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

A receipted bill for $12.59 for letters taken out of the post office.

V-4-l A.D.S. (French) 1p. 16mo.
1


1841 Jan 30

Serruys, Ch(arles), Belgian Legation
Washington, (District of Columbia)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Serruys presents a fellow-countryman Louis Dutremer who is going to New Orleans on business.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
2


1841 Feb

( )
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To (Bishop Anthony Blanc?
New Orleans, Louisiana)

(The writer) recalls that when (Blanc) wrote him at Paris, he said, in a figurative style, that he hoped (the writer's) "oldest" would be followed by several "juniors." So here is a junior about to see the light of day. If (Blanc) were to ask why he is in New Orleans he would not reply because he has already told his cousin and does not wish to repeat himself. If he wished to talk to (Blanc) about New Orleans he would say that one finds here all of Europe's finest. When he saw cherry brandy from Angers advertised in the papers, (Blanc) can imagine how it delighted the (writer's) filial affection. But since he has talked of New Orleans in his letter to Abbé Denechau, he would rather report on the time following his arrival in America. As he thinks that (Blanc's) good friend Mesnet(?) Will have read (Blanc) the letter (the writer) wrote him toward the beginning of 1838 (Blanc) will recall that he spent his first months at Bardstown at the Bishop's house studying English; he lead a peaceful life which recalled his days at St. Sulpice in Paris and his solitude at Bellefontaine before leaving Anjou. In April he was sent to St. Thomas Seminary, four miles from Bardstown. He regretted the peaceful life he had to leave.

V-4-l A.L. Incomplete (French) 2pp. 12mo.
3


1841 Feb 2

Beauclerc, (Victor)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Beauclerc called at (Blanc's) house several days ago and regrets he did not find him. He gave one of the servants the book (Blanc) loaned to Miss de L. His means obliged him to leave the hotel; he is now in a furnished house in Rue de la Douane. He has been confined to his room by an all over aching but when he recovers he will come to pay his respects. He can live for six weeks but then he will be destitute. He begs (Blanc) to find employment for him and spare his family new sorrow. The separation which (Blanc) considers necessary will take place when he has the means to carry it out. He has not received any news of the Marquise or his children. This long silence disturbs him more than the deplorable state of his health and the new misfortunes which threaten him.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1841 Feb 2

(
England), John, Bishop of
Charleston, S(outh) C(arolina)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Lou(isiana)

Confidential. Notwithstanding every effort to leave for New Orleans tomorrow he perceives that the attempt would be an insurance of almost ruin to a portion of his charges. He labored to place his affairs in such a state as would allow him to visit Blanc's city and meet him and Father (James Ignatius) Mullon and other friends but God willed otherwise. Pecuniary claims form the least part of his obligation. There are consequences of another description which Blanc and Mullon would be the first to warn him not to risk. His absence probably would afford the occasion for an evil which would not be remedied in many years. Nothing short of an extreme emergency could make him determine upon giving such a disappointment. (England) wishes Mullon to see this; he will write Mullon a letter which he will be at liberty to use but which will not be so explicit as this. After Bishop (Joseph) Rosati's long delay the proceedings of the Council have had their happy result. (England) trusts that Blanc's expectations of Chance (Bishop John Joseph Chanche?) may be all realized.

V-4-l A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
4


1841 Feb 3

Cummiskey, Eugene
Philadelphia, (Pennsylvania)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Blanc's) favor of December 1 came to hand but owing to closed navigation on the river and having to order some books from Boston the books were not forwarded sooner. Cummiskey sends "Rules of a Christian Life" in the second volume of which is a catalog of his publications. Their Bishop is well. Cummiskey will always supply the nuns with books on reasonable terms.

V-4-l A.L.S. 1p. 4to.
1


1841 Feb 4

(England), John, Bishop of
Charleston, S(outh) C(arolina)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(England) has received from Father (Joseph) Van Horsigh of Washington an introductory note recommending his countryman Louis Dutremerz who leaves in the morning for New Orleans. He will probably arrive as soon as a letter (England) will send to Father (James Ignatius) Mullon to notify him that (England) leaves about the first of March to meet Mullon's wishes for St. Patrick's Day. His Viaticum has also been duly honored(?). (England) hopes to spend a week with Blanc though greatly pressed for time. Dutremerz has letters for Blanc from the Belgian Minister.

V-4-l A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
4


1841 Feb 6

(England), John, Bishop of
Charleston, (South Carolina)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Lou(isiana)

(England) apologizes for delaying his answer to Blanc's last favor. A press of very perplexing business was the cause. Father (James Ignatius) Mullon wrote (England) by the same post; he expressed a preference for the festival of St. Patrick. (England) has determined to leave the 1st or 2nd of March and thus hopes to see Blanc on the 9th or 10th. He is greatly crippled for time and cramped in finances so he must not stay longer than the 18th.

V-4-l A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
2


1841 Feb 6

Mt. St. Mary's College
Emmitsburg, Maryland

to William McCallion

A bill for board, tuition, stationery, etc. for August 6, 1840 and February 6, 1841.

II-4-g A.L. 1p. 12mo.
1


1841 Feb 6

Verhaegen, S.J., Father P(eter) J.
St. Louis, (Missouri)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisia)na

Verhaegen has decided to leave tomorrow for Cincinnati and does not have much time to write. Father (Peter John) De Smet, (S.J.) who will bring the enclosed is preparing to establish a great mission among the Indians in the Mountains and has asked Verhaegen to allow him to visit Louisiana to obtain help. Verhaegen has approved his plan and has no doubt that Blanc's zeal for such a good cause will engage his interest in its success.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
2


1841 Feb 7

Chabrat, Guy Ig(natiu)s, Bishop of
Bardstown, (Kentucky)

To Father N(apoleon Joseph) Perché
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Perché's remaining so long at New Orleans and not having written makes them uneasy. Chabrat has no one else to take charge at Portland; they have Mass on Sunday but what is that compared to what Perché did. Then Claircreek and the other stations are all deprived of spiritual assistance. Perché is to return to Kentucky as soon as possible for Chabrat could not conscientiously consent to his staying to preach during Lent. Father (John) Bruyère lately come from France has applied to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc to give a course of instructions during Lent in New Orleans. He is an excellent clergyman and man of talents. He will take Perché's place. Perché is to remember Chabrat to the Bishop, Father Jeanjean and others.
P.S. Father (Stephen H.) Montgomery has obtained leave to remain in Louisiana for two years.

V-4-l A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
6


1841 Feb (?)8

Derice, F.
( )

To (Bishop Anthony Blanc?
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Derice is so angry with the Americans that he will take care not to write them anything but a note. They were sent five large books and good, long letters and they make fun of the donors. They are to take what they want of these 80 small books since the large ones have not reached them or seem not to have satisfied them.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 1p. 16mo.
1


1841 Feb 8

Elliot, W(illia)m St. John
Natchez, (Mississippi)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

With regret, Elliot encloses the resolutions of the Board of Trustees of the Catholic Church of Natchez, Father (Joseph N.) Brogard undertook secretly to have the constitution of the board changed by the legislature and in such manner as has proved very offensive to the board as Blanc will discover by the resolutions which were unanimous, Elliot being absent. It is a pity this difficulty should have occurred as Elliot hears they may soon expect a Bishop; it is a great disadvantage to the success of this poor struggling church which will require much in the Bishop-elect.

A.L.S. 3pp.

Enclosure:

On the motion of R(ichard) Edward it was resolved that Brogard, for the insidious and clandestine manner in which he has attempted to change the incorporated act of this association, having for its main purpose the putting of the temporal concerns in the hands of the clergy, meets their disapprobation and is thought to be unworthy of the dignity and piety suitable to a clergyman. This Board will therefore suspend, as far as lies in their power, his further administration and withdraw further support. They recommend their president to correspond with the Bishop to remove Brogard and furnish another more suitable.

d. 1P.
V-4-l A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
4


1841 Feb 8

Jouanneault, Father V(ictor)
Thib(odaux, Louisiana)

To Father (Auguste) Jeanjean
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

In a few days Jouanneault is to receive a package of books from Baltimore among which there is a small missal. He had asked the Bishop to get him one and now asks Jeanjean to cancel that request and asks for some Mass cards and cruets. Father (John B.) Audizio became ill the day Jouanneault was to leave for Houma; he is better now. As the same thing happened last year with Father (Julian) Priour the people are a little discouraged since Audizio has been promising them for 12 years. Houma is five leagues from Thibodaux in Terrebonne Parish. The sheriff told him that the population of Terrebonne exceeds that of La Fourche Interieure. Houma is the most central place for a church. Between Thibodaux and Houma there are only rich sugar growers, mostly Protestants but above Houma are all the little people, driven back by the rich, and they are all Catholics. Petit Caillou and Grand Caillou are about 12 leagues from Thibodaux. At Houma there is a beautiful brick courthouse, a prison, 3 or 4 shops as well as a billiard hall and some other houses. They would like to build their church next to the courthouse; the land there is donated. For a long time Jouanneault has had nothing to do although there is work for 3 priests if one visits the parish. But Audizio fears that his horses would suffer and that he would be called to go on foot during Jouanneault's absence. He hopes Jeanjean's health is improved.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
6


1841 Feb 8

Webb, Ben(jamin) G.
N(ew) Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Father A(uguste) Jeanjean
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

A bill for $5.50 for a subscription to the Catholic Advocate. At the bottom of the bill Father I(gnatius) A. Reynolds wrote: Received payment for the past and present year.

V-4-l D.S. 2pp. 32mo.
3


1841 Feb 9

Van De Velde, S.J., Father J(ames)
University of St. Louis, (Missouri)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
N(ew) O(rleans), L(ouisian)a

Van De Velde takes the occasion of Father P(eter) J. DeSmet's departure for New Orleans to recommend him in a special way; DeSmet will explain the object of his trip. Several days ago Van De Velde received a letter from the older brother of Father Chibeaux asking for a death certificate and inventory of his things. Van De Velde has obtained letters of administration of which he will send a copy to this brother who is a pharmacist at Charleville, Department of Ardennes. It is very probable that Chibeaux left some things at the convent or that they were sent to Charleston as Van De Velde found three trunk keys among his things and the autumn section of a breviary. Blanc is to tell Van De Velde whether to send the things to New Orleans or to Charleston so he can inform the brother.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
3


1841 Feb 10

Lesne, Father J(ames)
Mobile, (Alabama)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Lesne received a letter Saturday from Bishop (Mathias) Loras saying that Blanc intends the post at the mortuary chapel for Lesne if he comes to Blanc after Easter. Lesne thanks Blanc for again thinking about him. He has promised to stay only until Easter and as the College (of Spring Hill) is going very well; Bishop (Michael) Portier will not be inconvenienced as he was when Lesne wrote Blanc. So Blanc can count on him; he could not live any longer at Mobile for many reasons which Loras has probably given in detail. Lesne will do his best to fulfill Blanc's assignment.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
4


1841 Feb 10

O'Reily, Father M.D.
Vicksburg, Missi(ssippi)

to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

O'Reily spent 3 or 4 days of last week in Jackson, the capital of this state; he found about 20 or 30 Catholics. They would willingly rent a house to use as a chapel if O'Reily would promise to spend a Sunday in the month with them. He promised to visit there after Easter if no alteration interfered. O'Reily presumes that Father (Stephen) Rousselon told Blanc of his intention to go to see Blanc this week. He hoped he would then have secured an uninterrupted title to this house and lot but he finds that the man who promised to give a bond of $5000 to that effect, has failed to do so. He has more difficulty than anticipated. O'Reily made him a promise, on the strength of one of Blanc's letters to endeavor to pay the $1250 due. Several of the congregation and others recommended a subscription not only for the means but for the purpose of uniting Protestant feeling in their behalf. Yesterday O'Reily presented the subscription paper to the Marshal of the Southern District of this state; he subscribed $50. O'Reily will give the paper to a committee of the laity and let them make the best they can of it. O'Reily will have to write on business of his own in the course of 2 or 3 weeks.

V-4-l A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
4


1841 Feb 11

(Flaget), Bishop B(enedict) J(oseph)
Bardstown, (Kentucky)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

Strictest secrecy should be kept about what (Flaget) is going to say about Mr. XX. Blanc is perfectly free to act with circumspection in regard to Mr. XX and especially to judge more kindly of the apparent brusqueness of Bishop G(uy Ignatius) Chabrat. All that Blanc said in his last two letters about Mr. XX and the enthusiasm he excited wherever he spoke does not surprise (Flaget); (Flaget) heard it in France before his Bishop consented to give him to (Flaget) for his missions. But there is also a dark side to his picture. After only 7 or 8 months at Bardstown Mr. XX knew enough English to be put at the head of the Seminary by Chabrat and he was also made chaplain and confessor of a community of religious with a boarding school where he went, (Flaget) cannot say how often, as he was still in Europe. After 3 or 4 months almost all the pupils and the religious were upset, some for and others against. The Superior was fearful of the result when she told Chabrat about it and Chabrat was of the same opinion. Mr. XX was commissioned to form a French parish at Portland where 3 or 4 hundred Frenchmen live. XX accepted with pleasure and must have told Blanc what he had done there and what he hoped to do. XX probably had not thought of coming to America because shortly before (Flaget) arrived in his diocese, his bishop had retired him to a religious community for precisely the same trouble as above, with the added circumstance that when he left the convent to take a parish, one of the novices left the convent. XX himself told this story and blamed it on weak and foolish heads, saying that he would like to go to the foreign missions where this happening would not be known. Now that Blanc knows the strength and the weakness of Mr. XX would it be prudent to give him the direction of the two Communities of which Blanc spoke? (Flaget) is sure Blanc will approve of Chabrat who wrote yesterday to XX to come back to his spiritual children because Chabrat is convinced that the posts which Blanc offers will be fatal for him. Chabrat's conduct is all the more surprising since he is entirely unaware of XX's conduct in France, (Flaget) has kept silence in respect to his coadjutor and for the same reason he has told Blanc all he knows of XX to justify his conduct and that of his coadjutor. Until (Flaget) hears of Father Jeanjean's death, he will pray for his cure.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
3


1841 Feb 13

Thorpe, Elizabeth
Grand Gulf, Miss(iss)ippi

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
N(ew) Orleans, Louisiana

Thorpe wrote to Blanc some months ago and now addresses him for the last time because she thinks that the surveillance belonging to him and Bishop (John Baptist) Purcell is hurrying her prematurely to the grave without allowing her the necessary peace of mind to prepare her for a world to come. She has no tranquility day or night. She came here to establish the school after being unsuccessful in her application for entrance at the Ursuline Convent and could now live contentedly were it not for Blanc's surveillance. She did not find the system less oppressive in the Convent of Loretto than in the world. As regards this thing in a political point of view; it serves for the French and Americans to exhibit their hatred toward her nation. The cruelty shown her injures the Catholic name. It rested with Blanc and Purcell to have prevented this evil. At least they might have protected the widow. She has written to New York to have her complaint laid before the British consul. She wrote to Blanc about 3 months ago when in New Orleans asking his patronage but did not hear from him. If she did not take laudanum she does not know what she would do.

V-4-l A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
2


1841 Feb 15

Pichot, A.W.
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
(New Orleans), Louisiana

In behalf of the joint committee of the Legislature appointed to visit the several orphan asylums of New Orleans, Pichot informs Blanc that they intend visiting the asylum in the second Municipality over which Blanc presides, at half past four.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
2


1841 Feb 15

Wood, James Frederick
Rome, Italy

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Thanks Purcell for his letter of the 20th of December. Hopes that God will bring about the conversion of his mother and sister. Tells Purcell that William (Montfort) after mature deliberation and consultations with the Rector and the Cardinal has decided not to go on in his studies and has been given permission to leave Rome. Wood suggests that a stronger and older man be sent in his place. Has seen Father (William) Pisbach's pamphlet and regards its style as worthy of it scurrility. Has received a letter from Father (Henry D.) Juncker from France asking about the route and the expense to Rome. Bishop (Richard) Miles has left Rome, but Bishop (Joseph) Rosati is still there. Monsgr. Piatti ill. Father Grassi the Rector sends his respects. Will visit the Superior General of the Jesuits to thank him for their work in St. Francis Xavier's College. As to the German priest suggests that Father Huber can point out a good subject whom the Propaganda can have the Franciscans send. No hope of getting Father Agostino. There are several Germans in theology including a Mr. Rolfs whom he thinks Purcell might obtain.

II-4-g A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
7


1841 Feb 17

Brogard, Father J(oseph) N.
Natchez, (Mississippi)

to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Brogard has just received Blanc's letter of the 12th. Brogard received a copy of the resolution in the hand of the secretary who also received the order to take away the essentials for the celebration of Mass. Brogard offered them to him but he did not wish to take them. The resolution was framed in such terms that Brogard could not believe that the president had consented to have it sent. Brogard did not think appropriate to tell Blanc the facts because of his relationship with the Bishop named for this diocese. Since Brogard has been head of this congregation he also spared no effort but in vain. So he himself circulated a subscription list and in a few days obtained promises of more than $3000. His efforts seemed to move (William St. John) Elliott who decided to write to Blanc to invite him to lay the first stone. The time for the ceremony arrived and nothing was said. So Brogard proposed turning over the two lots to Blanc. Brogard would be ashamed to repeat the absurdities expressed about his proposition. Some said Blanc would build stores on the best spot and build a mean chapel on the other. Others added that they could have as bishop an old man like that of New York (Bishop John Dubois) who would tyrannize the Congregation. Finally they agreed to write Blanc that they would put the property in his hands for the first bishop on two conditions:
1. That he build them a church sufficiently large;
2. That the Bishop of the diocese be required to give them someone who could fulfill his duties.
The letter which Brogard brought did not express their true feelings and they did not even read Blanc's letter in their council meeting. Having no hopes of this plan's success Brogard sought another. The suggestion was made that a petition signed by the congregation be sent to the state legislature to obtain a council of three members only, presided over by the Bishop of the diocese. He believes the petition miscarried because two trustees, J.B. Nevitt and C.H. McGraw wrote against it. They adopted a resolution against Brogard and immediately a general sentiment of indignation broke out against them. Their pretext for opposing Brogard's view is that he asked 4 or 5 persons, the first who signed the petition, not to say anything about it. If he were Blanc he would not reply.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
6


1841 Feb 17

Conahan, Charles
Cincinnati, (Ohio)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Conahan has endeavored to find some trace of the box of books forwarded to Blanc last fall but as yet without success. The agents of the boat have promised to exert themselves for its recovery. Conahan has forwarded a box per the Amazon containing catechisms, etc. to the amount of $37.23. He hopes Blanc will receive them and that their Society will receive further orders from him. Folded with this letter is the bill of lading on the Amazon, Daniel Conahan, Master for the trip.

V-4-l A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
2


1841 Feb 18

B(ellune), M(arqu)ise de
Versailles, (France)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

After seven months of anxiety it is from (Blanc) that she has received the first consolation. She received a letter from her husband two months ago; it contained some repentant words but his position remains the same. But she has hopes for the Father of eight children! (Blanc) is to continue to be his patron. She deplores the obstacle which delayed Miss (Izabel's) departure. She believes the arrival of a letter addressed to (Blanc) by way of England, containing one from an aunt of this young lady will probably remove the difficulty. B(ellune) is worried about her husband's means for living there. In a letter she wrote him six weeks ago, she let him know that she could hardly help him. However if he needs it she would like to know so that she could do something.
P.S. She has just written to her husband, (Victor) Beauclerc at the Hotel d'Orleans. If he has left there she asks (Blanc) to see that he gets it.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
3


1841 Feb 18

Lefranc, Father (John)
(Barrens, Missouri)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Lefranc has many things to say to (Blanc) but he has just been informed of the sudden departure of Father (James) Burlando, (C.M.). Lefranc despairs of learning English here; he has only 4 lessons of reading a week. These gentlemen are very busy. He would teach French to the seminarians; they are Irish and too negligent. A little difficulty frightens them and he sees them no more. If he had known any means of making himself worthy of (Blanc's) goodness he would employ it.

V-4-l A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
2


1841 Feb 18

L(ynch), Anne
Providence, (Rhode Island)

To O(restes A.) Brownson
Boston, Massachusetts

She sends Brownson the translations which leaves her with many misgivings. She does not want Brownson to mention who did it as she has not the slightest pretentions to the understanding of French. The preface has been translated by her and Brownson can either take it or not. She likes Miss (Harriet) Martineau's "Hour, and the Man," but does not think Brownson has done her justice. Brownson says that faith, that is the highest form of love, puts us in harmony with God and his universe and that in this state we can do all things, elements and spirits obey us and that miracles are wrought. This appears, to her, to be rather indefinite.

I-3-f A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
2


1841 Feb 22

Brassac, Father H(ercul)e
Paris, (France)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

Although he is not specifically charged with Blanc's affairs his interest will excuse the steps Brassac has taken. A few days ago a Father Imbert came to ask some information about the diocese of New Orleans saying that he intended to go there and offer his services to the Bishop. For six years he was an unbeneficed priest living St. Thomas d'Aquin at Paris and his conduct was always irreproachable. Only they had never prevailed on him to hear confessions. He is very negligent in his dress. This together with his age, 46 years, makes Brassac think it would not be proper to admit him into Louisiana. Brassac tried to dissuade him but does not think he succeeded. As he has means he thinks he will carry out his plan. Blanc could give him a celebret and then use him as he saw for himself. He asks Blanc to keep the contents of this letter from Imbert.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
2


1841 Feb 22

Timon, C.M., Father J(ohn)
(Assumption, Louisiana)

To Charles Boglioli, C.M., James Rolando, C.M., and Louis Roata, C.M., Seminary of St. Vincent de Paul
(Assumption, Louisiana)

They are to present themselves to Bishop Anthony Blanc to receive Holy Orders.

V-4-l L.S. (Latin) 1p. 4to.
4


1841 Feb 23

Chabrat, Bishop Guy Ig(natiu)s
Bardstown, (Kentucky)

To Father N(apoleon Joseph) Perché
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Chabrat wrote a few days ago to exhort Perché to return to Kentucky and gave his reasons why his presence was required amongst his flock. Now from Perché's letter it appears that the success of Perché's visit depends on his remaining during Lent. If Perché after reflection believes he ought to stay, Chabrat gives his consent, however, with reluctance. Perché is to present Chabrat's respects to Bishop Blanc, Father Jeanjean and others. Bishops Flaget and David send remembrances.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
1


1841 Feb 23

Chanche, Father John J(oseph), St. Mary's College
Balt(imore, Maryland)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

A few days ago Chanche received the Bulls appointing him Bishop of Natchez. His spiritual advisers think he cannot refuse. At his age and with his sedentary habits to leave a northern climate to go to a southern one cannot but prove detrimental. However he must go and he will. His friends have appointed March 14 as the day of his consecration. His future steps will depend a great deal on Blanc's advice. Should he go to Natchez this spring; would it not be exposing himself too much in the climate? He asks Blanc to give him all the information he can.

V-4-l A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
2


1841 Feb 23

Massias, J.F.
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Massias gives permission to her Negress, Josephine Virginia to marry Janvier Ducoudreau.
Signed by Durand for Miss Massias.

V-4-l D.S. (French) 1p. 16mo.
2


(1841) Feb 24

Berel, Father Maurice
St. Martinsville, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Since Berel was not fortunate enough to attend the retreat he offers his respects and asks (Blanc) to answer the following: (four questions in Latin on the administering of the Sacraments). Berel asks (Blanc) to decide whether he should stay here for Easter and also to send him a letter of faculties. Not having been a priest long, he would be glad to receive these faculties. There are three very interesting American families here. The Dr. Mudd family is especially edifying. They have often expressed their desire to again see (Blanc) at St. Martinsville. The time would not be lost if (Blanc's) presence could awaken some spark of faith among these poor people. Since leaving New Orleans, Berel has received no letter, either from France or the College of Vincennes.
(P.S.) He has just received two letters forwarded by (Blanc). There is another question on which he would like (Blanc's) advice (2 more questions in Latin follow).

V-4-l A.L.S. (French & Latin) 4pp. 12mo.
2


1841 Feb 24

Découdreaux, Charles
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Découdreaux gives permission for his servant Bértelemie to marry if the Negress' mistress consents.

V-4-l A.D.S. (French) 1p. 16mo.
0


1841 Feb 25

Connelly, Pierce I.(?)
Gracemere, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

It is more than a year since (Blanc) last spent a few days among them. What satisfaction it would have been for (Blanc) to have been there while Madame (Elizabeth) Galitzin, (R.S.C.J.) made her visit, an admirable holy woman. The Ladies (of the Sacred Heart) in (Blanc's) diocese no doubt have reason to bless God for her coming. Have the bulls naming the Bishop of Natchez been sent from Rome? The kind assistance sent them from their pious brethren abroad will indeed be welcome. Connelly is rejoiced that (William St. John) Elliot takes an interest in the affairs of the Church and would be happy if Major (Henry) Chotard could be induced to do so. If natural virtues could make a man a saint he is one who would stand very high in heaven. May God reward him for all his kindnesses for Connelly and his family. Has (Blanc) looked into the book which they owe to the zeal of the Bishop of Cincinnati? Not the least blessed sign in the country is the building of a public church in Philadelphia where the rich are not to be fenced off by pews but come in contact with God's poor. (Cornelia Connelly) would join in asking (Blanc's) blessing; she is at her classes. In a month she expects to be again confined. How can Connelly repay God for what He has given him in her and his little children. He hopes one day to see his sister-in-law a novice in the Sacred Heart.

V-4-l A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
7


1841 Feb 25

(Eccleston), Archbishop Samuel
Baltimore, (Maryland)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

A few days since, (Eccleston) went to Georgetown to perform an interesting ceremony and found among a number of papers left on a previous visit four or five letters which he had forgotten to request the out-sister to send to the post-office. One was addressed to Blanc covering the enclosed instrument (no enclosure). It is needless now to send the letter as Blanc will see from the sequel that his inquiries about Natchez can be answered from a more authoritative source. (Eccleston) has received the official confirmation of the Acts of the last (Fourth) Provincial Council with the assurance that all proceedings were agreeable to the Holy Father and the Cardinals of Propaganda. As soon as the documents can be prepared the four Provincial Councils will be printed together. Father (John Joseph) Chanche has received his Bulls of episcopal appointment to Natchez and expects to be consecrated on the third Sunday of Lent. Father (Richard Vincent) Whelan for Richmond will be consecrated the following Sunday. Father (John Mary) Odin's Bulls have been sent via New Orleans. The Cardinal Prefect requests (Eccleston) to induce Odin to accept; the Secretary adds that a refusal will not be well received. (Eccleston) does not know Odin's address and asks Blanc to acquaint Odin with the particulars just mentioned and urge him to comply. From the tenor of a letter from Bishop (Joseph) Rosati, (Eccleston) presumes that he has informed all the Bishops of the Province that he has prepared another list for the Coadjutorship of St. Louis: Father Peter (Richard) Kenrick, Father (Peter J.) Verhaegen, S.J., Father Ed(ward) Purcell. Had not Kenrick shown so strange a vacillation of mind relative to his entering the Society of Jesus, (Eccleston) would have felt little hesitation of the nomination. (Eccleston) knows nothing of the origin of the enclosed printed document (no enclosure).

V-4-l A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
11


1841 Feb 25

(Eccleston), Samuel, Archbishop of Baltimore
Baltimore, Maryland

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Informs Purcell that he has received the official confirmation of the acts of the Provincial Council of 1840. As soon as the documents can be prepared he will have the four councils printed. Father (John Joseph) Chanche, appointed Bishop of Natchez, will be consecrated March 14th. Father (Richard Vincent) Wheland will be consecrated (Bishop of Richmond) March 21. Father (John) Odin is appointed administrator of Detroit and Bishop in partibus. Does not know the origin of the enclosed printed document. Has received letter from Bishop (Joseph) Rosati announcing that since Father (John) Timon has refused the coadjutorship of St. Louis, he suggests: Fathers Richard Kenrick, Peter Verhaegen, S.J. and Father Edward Purcell.

II-4-g A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
16


1841 Feb 25

Elliot, W(illia)m St. John
(Natchez, Mississippi)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanck(!)
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Elliot found Blanc's letter of the 11th at his residence on the 23rdafter a week's absence. He has shown Blanc's letter to all the trustees but one; they all disclaim any intention of trespassing on Blanc's prerogatives or feelings. Elliot has no copy there of the resolutions he enclosed in his last respects. They meant only an action by the Board of Trustees as far as the money or temporal tie should be sundered and the spiritual attachments to be removed by Blanc and requested Elliot to enclose their resolutions to show Blanc how much they felt outraged by their priest. Elliot was sick and was prevented attending the meeting. Several trustees assure him they went there with the kindest feelings toward Father (Joseph N.) Brogard and were in hopes his offensive conduct was the effect of ignorance of temporal matters. Instead of showing regret he treated them with contempt. Today two of them said he refused to salute them on Sunday at the church door. Elliot has gone into detail not from any bad feelings to Brogard but in justification to the members acting in the matter. John B. Nevitt drafted the resolutions and trusts Blanc will not believe that one of his oldest and best friends would do anything wrong towards him or the Catholic Church. Elliot would not have held on so long but in hopes of keeping the property together until he could place it in the hands of the Bishop. Several of the trustees despairing of any Bishop accepting this See desire Elliot to say they would be very happy if Blanc could procure the services of Father (S.H.) Montgomery for this place in default of a Bishop. This is a very poor congregation.

V-4-l A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
5


1841 Feb 26

L(ynch), A(nne) C.
Providence, (Rhode Island)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Mass(achusetts)

She apologizes for her last letter which she says was a sin. She thinks she must have been suffering with a fit of dyspepsia. She thinks his remarks on the dawning era of petticoat government are ingenious. She shall leave all disputed points to be discussed when she sees him again. She agrees that Bulwers "Night and Morning" was not what she expected of Bulwer. She thought he would improve more as he grew older. She has read Leigh Hunt's notice of Byron, and she thinks he was very small in many ways, and very inferior to the high-minded Shelley. She hopes he will come next week and have dinner with them. She would like to know what day he can come. If he doesn't come Monday, she would like him to write saying so. She is glad her translation suited him. She says he must have plastered more than he slashed. She spent last evening with Mrs. Whitman and she likes this woman better than any she has ever known.

I-3-f A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
1


1841 Feb 27

Dansac, L.
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Dansac gives permission for his Negro, Sezard to marry Manda, Negress of Francois Boi(s)doré.

V-4-l A.D.S. (French) 1p. 16mo.
1


1841 Feb 27

Lesne, Father J(ames)
Mobile, (Alabama)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Lesne wrote some time ago in reply to a letter from Bishop (Mathias) Loras. He told of his resolution to leave after Easter. He will pack the rest of his things the week after Easter. Then he will leave to join Blanc if Blanc considers it fitting. His low spirits are caused either by his present false situation or by the pain of leaving Bishop (Michael) Portier with whom he has lived for nine years. If he has a little tranquility andn the necessities of life it will be all he will need. His debts will keep him from using his income for some years. Lesne would be abliged if Blanc will let him know whether he can give him a suitable post and what kind of lodging he could have. Having kept house he has furniture as well as his library, etc. He asks Blanc not to forget him in his prayers.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
3


1841 Feb 28

Beauclerc, (Victor)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

In giving his recommendation to the Governor, (Blanc) has not asked any guarantee except Beauclerc's word. Beauclerc wishes to justify such confidence by telling (Blanc) of the difference between the instruction he proposes and that being used in the schools today. If his system seems useful (Blanc) can speak with more assurance; if it seems useless Beauclerc will confine himself to employment more suited to his talents. (He then outlines his course of instruction). He believes Jefferson College (Convent, Louisiana) would profit by adopting his system. If at the end of three months, favorable results are not seen, he will resign. He would remain at the College as long as necessary to complete his work so that it would not fail after he left.
(P.ZS.) His landlady, Mrs. Douce, has moved and he has gone along; he is now at the corner of Conti and Bourbon Streets.

V-4-l A/L/S/ (French) 7pp. 4to.
3


1841 Feb 28

(Rosati), Joseph, (Bishop of St. Louis, Missouri)
Rome, (Italy)

To (Father) (Peter Paul) Lefevere
Roulers, Belgium

He received Lefevere's letter yesterday and was delighted to learn that the stay Lefevere made in his homeland has perfectly restored his health. He asks that God may be blessed for this and says He will also be glorified by the use Lefevere makes of his energies in traveling for the glory and salvation of his neighbors. God accorded him the same grace. For after being in Europe and especially in Italy he felt twenty years younger and suffered not the least indisposition. It seemed to him his spirit took on a new vigor. He hopes God will also give him the grace to use his energies in working whole heartedly for the service of God and neighbor. He received on every hand a reception he did not deserve, but for such help people do not find anything. God is to be blessed. The Pope is very satisfied with the American Church and bears it a particular tacit affection. He has approved the decrees of the American Council and consents to the demands the American bishops have made. Father (John J.) Chanche is created bishop of Natchez, Father (Richard V.) Whelan of Richmond and Father (John Mary) Odin Coadjutor and administrator of Detroit. Bishop (Richard Pius) Miles left after a few days. He will pass through France and return to Belgium. He wishes to ask Lefevere if he can return to America with him, for he wants to return before Rosati. Rosati foresees he will not be able to embark for America before the end of spring or beginning of autumn. He has to preach often here and will be steadily occupied during Lent. He has already given a mission in the Sabine to his settlement of Monte-Atorio and will leave tomorrow to give a retreat at Sarae. On his return he must preach eight days in the church of Monte-Aevallo, then give an eight day retreat to the political prisoners at Chateau-St. Ange. Today he will have the good fortune to pontificate in the Sistine chapel where the Pope (and) his cardinals will be present. It is a great honor for him to be able to enjoy all the ceremonies of the Pope's chapel. In the rank of a bishop assisting at the throne, he is very near His Holiness. On Lefevere's testimony he will receive into his diocese the young ecclesiastic, who then will be able to leave. Father (Benedict) Roux ought to return shortly with Mr. McDonnald and the other brothers. He received news from St. Louis. All goes well except the finances. Father Gaspar H. Ostlangenberg is at Salt River. If you can put another preacher in his place, you will be able to take care of him and put him where you think fitting. He must close this letter. He asks Lefevere to write before leaving. Adieu. He asks for prayers.

III-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 8vo.
7


1841 Feb 28

R(ousselon), Father E(tienne)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Jean and Francoise, whose permission is attached, received the nuptial blessing. Witnesses: Angelina Barthelmy, Roxelane Mora, and Madeleine Jorget.

A.D.S

Attached to the above:

--------
1841 Feb 28

Boisdoré, Fr(ancois)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Boisdoré gives permission to his servant Marie Francoise to marry.

D.S.
V-4-l A.D.S., D.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo. & 32mo.
4


(1841) (Mar )

Rappe, Father Amadius Louis
Toledo, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
Cincinnati, Ohio

Asks a marriage dispensation etc. for first cousins married by squire, also for a Protestant to marry a Catholic girl. St. Patrick's day was a triumph for temperance along the Maumee River, and has attracted the attention of all to the influence of the Church. He expects a letter from Purcell announcing his visit.

II-4-g A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
2


1841 Mar

L(ynch), A(nne) C.
Providence, (Rhode Island)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Mass(achusetts)

She has deferred writing to him until now for she is sure the world is in no great haste to see the translation of so eminent a French scholar as herself. However, she says the translation is at his disposal entirely. She does not want her name mentioned. She thinks it a good plan to publish it in the "Review" alongside the translation he once mentioned to her in pamphlet form. She was not offended by anything he said to her. She is glad that Mr. and Mrs. Brownson think of visiting them. They are still in the same place. Her mother's health is failing again, and she is anxious to have her go to Vermont when the traveling will permit. She wants to know what are his possibilities of leaving the hospital, and what is his project if he leaves. She hopes he will consider seriously being a farmer. She may be in Boston in the spring. She needs some painting materials which she cannot get where she is.

I-3-f A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
1


1841 Mar 2

Jouanneault, Father V(ictor)
Thibodauxville, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Immediately on his return from Houma he hastens to report on his first mission. The success exceeded all his expectations. He baptized 75 persons. Many also talked of having their marriages blessed. Several Americans came to ask him to preach in English last Sunday. He promised to do so on his next trip. Could Jouanneault not demand half of these fees from Father (John B.) Audizio? The leading inhabitants want to meet on the 19th to discuss means of building a church and rectory. The one who is to give two arpents of land - another is to give as much - has made him believe it will be very easy to take up very easy to take up a subscription of 2,000 piastres. (The names of) Mr. Roussel and Mr. Greenage (appear in the margin of the letter to the left of this statement). Several have assured Jouanneault that they would subscribe two piastres a month for the services of a resident priest. He went two leagues beyond Houma and he believes that it is the center of the more than 300 people who would be in this parish. Now Blanc can judge whether an assistant is a useless fixture at Thibodaux and whether Audizio with his rheumatism is able to do all the good there is to be done in his parish. Jouanneault would like to leave Thibodaux for his own consolation rather than his interest. He asks Blanc to send him the things he asked for to say Mass and the books from Baltimore which should have arrived. He counts on bringing the money at Easter. In regard to marriages at Terre Bonne, he would like to know what to do about banns. He baptized two adults who had difficulty in finding godparents; is it always necessary that one godparent be a Catholic? A boy of 10 wishes to enter the seminary; would there be a way to have him get it? Jouanneault feels that the work he is undertaking is beyond his power; he asks Blanc to assist him by his advice. He will be more docile than he is to Audizio.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
5


1841 Mar 2

Pavageau, A.
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

To (Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Receipted bill for $11 for services from December 29, 1840 to date. A notation of $1 for fixing the keys of the organ is added at the end.

V-4-l A.D.S. 1P. 12MO.
1


1841 Mar 3

Dansac, L.
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

To (Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Receipt for $5 for coal; signed by Frutin(?) Bonsignes.

V-4-l A.D.S. (French) 2pp. 16mo.
2


1841 Mar 4

Baraga, (Father) Frederick
Lapointe, (Wisconsin)

To Bishop Fr(ederick) Résé
Detroit, (Michigan)

Baraga is quite distressed about his money. He is building a new church and he implores the Bishop to let him have the money which is his, according to all rights. He includes a letter from his agent in Triest, (Italy), Mr. J.P. Suppautschitsch, who informs Baraga of all the money that was sent to him from Europe since his return to America. But Baraga has received only about $255 - which Father Vincent Badin has sent him through Mr. William Brewster. Baraga demands now from the Bishop the rest of the money which should be sent through Mr. W. Brewster, Agent of the American Fur Company in Detroit (Michigan). Baraga thinks it must be at least $400. The mission is in good order. Baraga is building a larger church on a very beautiful spot. He wants the two enclosed letters back again.

III-2-g A.L.S. (German) 3pp.
3


(1841) Mar 8

Brogard, Father Joseph N.
Natchez, Mississippi

to Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

His work keeps him from writing often. Their prospects for the future are good and he believes the Bishop-Elect (John Joseph Chanche) will be grateful to Brogard for the measures he has taken in the interest of the diocese. Brogard tried to justify his conduct by showing that the trustees did not wish to build a church nor to give the Bishop the land on which it should be built. New circumstances have proved that he had not judged badly. Mr. Elder received a letter from his uncle informing him that the Archbishop had just brought Chanche's bulls. In the trustees' meeting (William St. John) Elliot, whose only fault is weakness, proposed writing to the Bishop-Elect to offer him the lot in question. The trustees said they wished only to send Chanche a letter full of flattering expression which would obligate them for nothing. Brogard wrote a congratulatory letter to Chanche telling him he would be astonished to find the congregation so different from what it had been represented. They had made three objections to Brogard's petition:

--------
1. That he had not told them of his plan;
2. That he told some persons not to spread it around;
3. That he wished to deprive the congregation of its property.

So they wrote to Blanc and received an answer of which they had no reason to boast. It was not read in the meeting. Doubtless if Blanc had known when he wrote it that they had applied to Father (Stephen H.?) Montgomery for his services without consulting Blanc, his letter would have been a bit more severe. Last Sunday Brogard received $10; the chapel is always filled. He hopes that in May they will have other trustees and all will go well. Mrs. (Felicité) Gireaudeau believes, with many others, that if the Bishop does not succeed in getting the title it would be better to build the church elsewhere. She has a lot beside her house which she would give for it. Brogard does not think the Bishop will be reduced to making use of it.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
7


1841 Mar 8

McCaffrey, Father John, Mt. St. Mary's College
Emmitsburg, Maryland

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
Cincinnati, Ohio

Sends Mr. William McCallion's bulletin and the account against him. His conduct is favorable and McCaffrey believes that he shows signs of a vocation. Asks that the payments be made in advance. Has received a copy of Purcell's edition of the Ages of Faith and subscribes for five more. Purcell may pay the publisher and deduct the amount from McCallion's bill. The appointment of the new bishops is a subject of congratulations. The Mountain deserves the name Parens Episcoporum. Hopes to see Bishop Whelan consecrated. Sends regards to Father Collins. The bulletin of Mr. McCallion is included and is dated the same day and is filled out in McCaffrey's hand.

II-4-g A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
3


1841 Mar 9

De Goesbriand, Father Louis
Louisville, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
Cincinnati, Ohio

Received Purcell's of February 6, while he was visiting Mount Eaton and Chippeway. Father (John) Lamy had asked him to visit his congregation and Father (Basil) Shorb had come to work among the Germans at Louisville. At Chippeway the French had not seen a French priest for 12 or 13 years, yet because of a misunderstanding he saw only a few. He intends to revisit them during the paschal season. Congregation at Mount Eaton had not come to a decision. Because of their nearness to Father Lamy he decided to wait until they had decided. The Catholics of Harrisburg had decided to build a church and started a subscription. The man who has charge wishes to place the church in a place easy of approach to the 50 families there, but De Goesbriand believes a site on the road to Paris would be more central. Fears that the other would leave occasion for derision of religion. Further the church at Louisville needs enlargement and perhaps it would be better to do that and then take of Harrisburg. He leaves the decision to Purcell. He visited the faithful at Georgetown, (Columbiana County), numbering 15 families mostly from Savoy. He found them in a sad condition because of neglect. Prompted by the actions at Harrisburg he suggested the building of a church. The people were surprised. He finds that he can have $110, wood, land to be given by three citizens. The people would be content to be visited during the week. He leaves the decision to Purcell. Thanks Purcell for the approbation of his association but asks him to return the copy of the statutes. He has now 48 members. Has hopes of obtaining the conversion of two adulterers. He awaits the advice of Purcell in the latter. Thanks for the ciborium received. Gives in detail the number of baptisms, marriages and burials in Louisville, from 1838-41. There are few conversions because of the conduct of Catholics, especially as regards drink, also because of scandal of a priest at Canton. Speaks of some new emigrants in the vicinity of these towns. Speaks of those who do not understand the language of their pastors. Gives examples and deplores the want of priests. In postscript asks for the Telegraph and some books which he lists.

II-4-g A.L.S. 5pp. 8vo. (French)
10


1841 Mar 10

Beauprez, Father P(ierre) F(rancois)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Receipt for $300 received from Father (Auguste) Jeanjean for the account of the bishopric.

V-4-l A.D.S. (French) 1p. 16mo.
1


(1841) Mar 11

Armengol, (C.M.), Father B(onaventure)
Assumption, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Armengol did his best on the mission Blanc gave him in regard to the Religious (of the Sacred Heart) of St. Michael. He heard confessions from Wednesday morning to Saturday after Mass. On Friday three postulants received the habit. The Visitatrix and Madame Aloysia (Hardey?) asked Armengol to send one of their priests to give a retreat for their pupils. They cannot do so without being sent by Blanc. The Ladies also want this retreat during Holy Week which seems almost impossible. Father (J.M.) Masnou, (C.M.) is at Donaldson to replace Father (Thaddeus) Amat, (C.M.) who left with Father (John) Timon, (C.M.). Armengol is satisfied with their seminarians, in particular (Charles M.) Mènard. Timon inferred that he would propose to Blanc to confer the diaconate on him and on Mr. Tiernan also, at the end of Lent. There are also new postulants for the seminary who will apply to Blanc.

V-4-l A.L.S. 3pp. 12Mo.
8


1841 Mar 11

Wood, James Frederick
Rome, Italy

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Sends these few lines to correct the impression that William Montfort's letter might give. His letter might give the impression that he had his superiors' unqualified approval in his decision to discontinue his studies. Wood makes it clear that the superiors rather did not oppose what they saw to be a determination not to pursue ecclesiastical studies any further. Purcell will understand this from the previous correspondence on the subject. The Cardinal has written to Leghorn about a vessel for Montfort but has as yet received no reply.

II-4-g A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
3


1841 Mar 14

Lesne, Father James
Mobile, (Alabama)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Lesne sends this with Father (Julien) Priour in reply to Blanc's last letter. He thanks him for giving him the details of the post to which he has been assigned. Bishop (Mathias) Loras wrote so vaguely that Lesne did not know how he stood. That was why he wrote a second letter by Father (Ferdinand Dominic) Bach. Blanc says Lesne is to preach in the new church to which he is sent. This is no obstacle; if he did not preach oftener at Mobile it was because Bishop (Michael) Portier wished to preach or to appoint someone to do it. He would like a pulpit if possible. As for Mr. Loperena's note, Lesne will try to pay soon if he succeeds in selling some of his belongings which is difficult in these times. Just now he is trying to settle his affairs before Easter; he wants to sell everything he cannot take with him. He hopes to be in New Orleans in Easter week.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
6


1841 Mar 15

(Beauclerc, Maria), Marquise de Bellune
Versailles, (France)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

The death of her Father-in-law, the duc de Bellune, makes her ask (Blanc) to send on the enclosed letter to (Victor Beauclerc's) address. It contains a copy of her Father-in-law's will. She dares not recount here all the grief she has had especially because of her Father-in-law's severity toward his son; her husband is to tell (Blanc). The clause in question, which the law has already declared null, is also null before God by the pardon she has asked for and received for her husband before a minister of the Church. Has her husband repented? It is through (Blanc) that her children will some day find their Father again. She impatiently waits for the news that the greatest obstacle has been lifted.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
3


1841 Mar 15

O'Reily, Father M.D.
Vicksburg, Missi(ssippi)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Yesterday O'Reily receive Blanc's communication written on board the steamer V(icks)burg. He complied with Blanc's instructions. He had written to Father (Stephen) Rousselon on February 27 requesting him to inform Blanc of the accident that happened to O'Reily and of the impossibility of being in New Orleans on the 3rd. The young man, to whom O'Reily officiated yesterday for the first time in three weeks. The capular ligament of the hip must have been injured. A young man named Gibson called on O'Reily on his way home from Georgetown College where he spent 2 years, being a convert. Gibson got a letter of introduction from Father (James) Ryder to Bishop (John Joseph) Chanche who gave Gibson a few lines to O'Reily. Gibson stated that the report in Baltimore was that Chanche would visit his diocese as early as possible and return after a few months. Father (John) Timon, (C.M.) called on O'Reily on the 7th; O'Reily paid him $40 which Timon asked him for and which O'Reily thought were paid him by Blanc according to a letter from Father Rousselon. A proposition was made yesterday through Mr. Green of O'Reily's congregation from the person of whom the house and lot were purchased to give and make such conditions as would give insurance that they would never be interrupted in their possession but that he was so embarrassed in his affairs that he could not get any person to sign a bond for $5000, the amount O'Reily required before paying any more. O'Reily told Green that if the parties would file an affidavit that no collusion had taken place, O'Reily had hopes that they could pay the $1250 due before a month. If this affidavit be made O'Reily has no apprehension that they should ever be interfered with.

V-4-l A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
7


1841 Mar 16

Bryant, Jo(h)n D.
Quincy, Florida

to Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Bryant is residing in a part of Florida remote from the privileges of Holy Church, to his deep regret. He is acting as a private tutor to three young men and would gladly remove to any place in Blanc's diocese where he might enjoy the ordinance of religion. Being a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania he is competent to instruct in classical, mathematical, and English learning. At present he receives $500 a year, with board. If there is no opening, he would not refuse to commence a classical and English school.

V-4-l A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
1


1841 Mar 17

Borgna, Father Ph(ilip), Mt. St. Mary's College
Emmittsburg, (Maryland)

To Francis McFarland
( )

This is a certificate of his acceptance into the sodality of the B.V.M. signed by Borgna as rector, and John McCloskey and Michael F. Martin.

I-1-a D.S. (Latin) 1p. 4to.
1


1841 Mar 19

L(ynch), A(nne) C.
Providence, (Rhode Island)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Mass(achusetts)

She is a bit vexed that Brownson did not call at her home when visiting in her neighborhood. She wanted to see him for a selfish motive; she has no friends here who are much interested in her, whereas his encouragement, coaxing and flattering makes her thrive.
With regard to the profession of the law, she has no doubt that he could be successful in it. But, she thinks it would be dry and cramping to such a mind as his, which has been for so long questioning God, nature and the lower powers. She asks why he doesn't take a farm? He could make a suitable living by cultivating vegetables and poultry; and he would then be able to go on with the "Review."
With regard to the Modern Slavery, she tells Brownson to let the publisher see it if he wants to. Let him give what he thinks it worth.
She says she is anxious to see the next "Quarterly," and asks him not to forget the "Poles" article.

I-3-f A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
1


1841 Mar 19

Marsh, Catherine A.
Havana, (Cuba)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

The steam ship Natchez arrived there last Saturday. She trusts that before this Blanc will have an answer from Father (John) Barry. She asks Blanc to write her if he said anything about her brothers and to inform her concerning her daughter who went to the Convent. She is anxious to hear if the Sisters are satisfied with her. (Blanc) is to let her daughter know about her; she hopes she will learn all in her power so that she may make Marsh's last days more comfortable. She asks for Blanc's blessing to enable her to work for her living.
P.S. He is to direct his letter to Mr. Fulton's Boarding House.

V-4-l A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
2


1841 Mar 23

Doutreluingne, C.M., Father P.J.
Monroe, (Louisiana)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

They arrived last night without accident except that the captain took a longer way than necessary. Everywhere they found Methodists full of prejudice against the Catholics. Here they find great indifference. They went first to Judge Bruys who said he was not a Catholic but that he was from Geneva. His daughter is a Catholic. Bruys sent them to Henry O. McEnry, an Irish Catholic, but his wife is not. They hope to say Mass at their house today. They do not know yet if they can find a place to say Mass and have catechism. His confrere, Father (James) Burlando (C.M.) joins in sending respects.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
5


1841 Mar 25

Fransonius, Cardinal J. Ph.
Rome, Italy

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

William Montfort, from Purcell's diocese will give him this letter. He leaves his studies at the Urban College because of ill health. While at the college he has given account in piety, morals, and studies. The Cardinal hopes that he will recover and be of use to religion.

II-4-g L.S. 1p. 8vo. (Latin)
3


1841 Mar 25

Wood, James Frederick
Rome, Italy

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Sends this message by William Montfort with a few small articles. Sends pictures for Father Collins, and Father Edward Purcell. The others and the beads and other things he sends to the bishop. He also sends a book of ceremonial to the superior of the seminary. Had intended another book for Father O'Mealy but failed to receive it. Has been promised another on Princess Borghese but has not received it. Will send no news since this letter will not be received for some time.

II-4-g A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
1


1841 Mar 26

(Hailandière), Bishop Cel(estin de la)
Vincenn(es), Indiana

to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

He would have answered Blanc's letter of February 19 sooner but he was embarrassed to speak about what Blanc asked for in his letter received yesterday. Father (Francis M.) M(asquelet?) was not sincere. Blanc can ask him for the letter in which (Hailandière) thanked him, after 3 months, to his great regret. He had been recommended highly by the Bishop of Coutances and at first he thought him very capable; he soon saw he had made a mistake. M(asquelet?) Talked nothing over with (Hailandière), blamed everyone without distinction. (Hailandière) does not say he is a bad man but he is imprudent and presumptuous. He would not want to employ him near him; he will try to find a place for him. (Hailandière) sends $50 for Mr. Latapie; he cannot find his note at the moment. (Hailandière) thanks Blanc for his trouble and also thanks Father (Auguste) Jeanjean. If the Lord takes him, will Blanc get (Hailandière) any books or manuscripts Jeanjean may have on the Far West. (Hailandière) rejoices in the consecration of Bishops Chanc(h)e and Whelan. Blanc is to use all his efforts so that Father (John Mary) Odin does not refuse. A refusal would be an infinite evil for the diocese of Detroit. Blanc is to give (Hailandière's) regards to Father (Louis) Dufour; if he finds the New Orleans climate does not agree with him could he not come and try St. Louis. They are trying to finish their little cathedral; he believes it will be consecrated during the summer. He thinks Blanc would not refuse to come; nor would he refuse permission for one of two of their missionaries to collect a little in his diocese if only to repay the expenses of their trip.
P.S. He sends respects to Father Rousselon.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
8


1841 Mar 26

Soller, S.J., Father J(oseph)
Grand Coteau, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

They have learned with pleasure that Blanc will come to visit them. Father V(ictor) Jamey told them that Blanc would be at Grand Coteau the third Sunday after Easter. They will prepare their children for First Communion and Confirmation. For the most part they are well; Mr. P. Arnoudt, (S.J.) is very poorly. They regret they do not have about 20 more students. They have only 63 just now. Hos is Father (Auguste) Jeanjean? Jamey brought them the sad news. Would it not be indiscreet to ask for St. Charles College or at least for the house in Paris, those letter of their Fathers on the missions of New France found in Jeanjean's library? Soller believes they are in the right place; they are so rare. It seems the original intention of Jeanjean was to bequeath them to one of their houses.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
4


1841 Mar 29

Dumartrait, A.
St. Martinville, (Louisiana)

to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

On the 25th Dumartrait received Blanc's letter of the 16th telling him of the letter supposedly signed by Messrs. Rousseau, Sexton, Bienfesane, and Nicolas. He did not answer immediately because the trustees were to meet day before yesterday and Dumartrait wished to show them Blanc's letter. Rousseau and Sexton, two of the most respectable persons in town and friends for many years of Dumartrait, were surprised to see by Blanc's letter that someone had used their names to call attention to the character of Father (Charles Henry Boutelou de) St. Aubin and unfortunate Father (Maurice) Berel who inspires all the sympathy possible by his physical state which cannot long endure such an illness. To convince Blanc of the falsity of the letter Dumartrait had Nicolas Dessege come at the time of the meeting and in the presence of two witnesses. Ch(arl)es Fayot and Ch(arl)es Olivier Duclozel, trustees, he said he had never written or signed any letter to Blanc. The trustees want Blanc to send them the letter so that they can see if it is the same writing as those received last Christmas Eve addressed to St. Aubin and to Nicolas Detiege and unsigned. Bienfesane, the fourth person, is a baker; he is very peaceable and they did not judge it necessary to have him come. This malicious letter should not worry Blanc any more than it does them. St. Aubin, while not yet recognized by the fabrique as the definite pastor is esteemed no less. He fulfills his duties with zeal and Berel could only evoke feelings of compassion. Charged with overseeing the church and also as a resident of St. Martinville Dumartrait will set the police to search for the author of this letter. They have said nothing to St. Aubin or anyone. St. Aubin blessed the chapel at Pont Br(e)aux, 4 leagues from Martinville; yesterday he said Sunday Mass there. Berel could only say a low Mass at St. Martin Church; he is too weak to sing. The new church will be finished in a few months; Dumartrait would like to have the dedication before next winter. Election of trustees will take place a week from today; several do not wish to continue. His only wish is to see the new church finished so that the wishes of Father (Marcel) Borella may be carried out.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
11


1841 Mar 30

Poursine, F.A.
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

A receipt for $21.74 for letters taken from the post office from February 1 to March 30.

V-4-l A.D.S. (French) 2pp. 16mo.
1


1841 Mar 31

Van De Velde, S.J., Father J(ames Oliver)
St. Louis, (Missouri)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Van De Velde received Blanc's letter of the 13th; he wrote to Bishop (John) England about Father (J.F.) Chibeaux's effects. At the request of his family, Van De Velde took charge of the administration of the effects Chibeaux had on him in St. Louis; his authority goes no further. He sent the inventory, death certificate, etc. to Chibeaux's brother, a pharmacist at Charleville, and is awaiting his orders. Van De Velde has pursued (John) Mullanphy many times but without success. He has been named Judge of the Circuit Courts to which the appeal was made, which is to appear this month. The case must again be sent to the Court of Common Pleas. Mullanphy has promised to see that the legacy is paid. It would be good for Blanc to write a "plaintive" letter to Mrs. Delaney or her husband; they have much influence over Mullanphy but, as Colonel O'Fallon says, if he once gets something in his head, no one can change it. The other day Van De Velde received a box with 6 gold candlesticks and a crucifix with the bill. Mr. Kernion tells him that this box was addressed to Blanc. Father (John A.) Elet, (S.J.) tells him that he had asked Blanc to have them sent from Lyons and that they were for their new church. They are much too small and they cannot use them. He will try to get rid of them as he can but the bill must be paid; he could arrange with Father (Peter J.) Verhaegen, (S.J.) to have the amount paid to Choiselat Gallien in Paris. They are expecting Father (Peter) De Smet, (S.J.) with Gustave ( ) by one of the first boats.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
12


(1841 Apr)

Lefranc, Father (John)
(Assumption, Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Blanc) has lost a friend who made his troubles easier; Lefranc hopes he is in heaven and can take a more particular care of (Blanc's) concerns. Would to God that (Blanc) may find a new Father (Auguste) Jeanjean. The enclosed letter Lefranc has lately received (no enclosure) will cause (Blanc) some joy. Lefranc has engaged this gentleman to go to see (Blanc); his proposal is sincere but not free from interested views. He styles himself a Catholic; he is sober, honest, and just and ready to sacrifice all for the education of his children. He believes and acts not as a Catholic. Father (Auguste) De Angelis is apt to negotiate this affair. The company of Carrollton will contribute as all the inhabitants. If (Blanc) can gain Edward Guillot who lives two miles from Blanc's side, (Blanc) will certainly succeed. Guillot is Catholic, not rich but very much esteemed. Lefranc does not know if (Blanc) approves this project.

V-4-l A.C.S. 3pp. 4to.
5


1841 Apr 2

(Purcell), J(ohn) B(aptist), Bishop of
Cin(cinna)ti, (Ohio)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Before receiving Blanc's letter, (Purcell) had written to Archbishop (Samuel Eccleston) to state his opinion of the document dispatched to them from Rome about making their wills. Its provisions will be harder for (Eccleston) to fulfill than for the suffragans. It would puzzle a Philadelphia lawyer to say whether the will of every bishop was made in strict conformity with the laws of his own state and of the United States! (Roger B.) Taney and (William George Read) Reid had to give it up when summoned before the Council. How could Bishop (Benedict Joseph) Flaget, at his age, attend to such matters in Cincinnati, Vincennes, or Michigan; or Baltimore, for that would be his duty as Dean. Blanc's advice to Bishop (John Joseph Chanche) of Natchez was surely according to God. The people of that city who have so long looked for a bishop would not easily be reconciled to his being consecrated months before they had a sight of him. Long years hence it will endear him to his flock to relate with those who witnessed it, the destitution of his first year in their midst and how wonderfully God has blessed them since! The value of such reminiscences is worth knowing. Should Chanche come to Cincinnati it will not be in (Purcell's) power to accompany him; the building of the Cathedral and German Church will keep (Purcell) engaged. Bishop (Joseph) Rosati's names have filled (Purcell) with astonishment. The General of the Jesuits has refused, with the Pope's approbation, to allow any of his to be bishop. Father (Peter Richard) Kenrick has declared, by his brother, never to become a naturalized citizen of the United States and (Purcell's) brother, Father (Edward Purcell) is but a neophyte and at that indispensable. Father (John) Odin's transfer to Detroit from Texas is a most inauspicious movement for the latter place. (Purcell) sends his very best love to Father (Auguste) Jeanjean; would that if had pleased God to leave him longer to them but for Jeanjean it will be a great gain. Poor Miss Johnson is for the present a lost case. Blanc's assurance -- "best friend"-- in his last two letters has waked (Purcell) out of a trance. He never had what he dares consider a friend.

V-4-l A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
13


1841 Apr 3

(Cadolini, Cardinal), J. Archbishop Edessa
Rome, Italy

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

The rescript sought by Purcell is sent with this letter. Purcell's letter was a source of joy to him, and also Pope Gregory XVI in granting the request embraces Purcell with greatest affection. The Cardinal himself congratulates him and prays for Purcell and holds himself in readiness to do whatever Purcell will demand.
(To this is added a note in French in his own hand expressing his affection for Purcell).

II-4-g L.S. 2pp. 8vo. (Latin)
2


1841 Apr 4

Badin, Father S(tephen) T(heodore)
Portland, (Kentucky)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Badin congratulates Blanc on the diminution of his pastoral cares by the first Bishop of Natchez and because during Lent Blanc has had two preachers from their diocese, whose return they are awaiting. If Father (Napoleon Joseph) Perché has not gone Blanc is to tell him that Badin found in Bishop Flaget's library, the book he had asked Perché to get in New Orleans. Perché will hear with sorrow that Mrs. Gigon has died as she lived. Badin will remain at Portland until Perché returns not wanting his parishioners to be forsaken as they have been, so he will not have to hurry too much if he can still do some good for this church. Bishop (Mathias) Loras visited them; he was delighted at their establishment. Loras will spend Easter at St. Louis. Badin also congratulates Blanc on the new St. Patrick Church. Badin sends regards to Fathers Moni, Maenhaut and their two Kentuckians.
(P.S.) If Perché and Father (John) Bruyère can find at New Orleans, the history of old Orleans, they are to get it for Badin.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
5


1841 Apr 4

(Chanche), John Joseph, Bishop of Natchez
Philadelphia, (Pennsylvania)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Chanche) received Blanc's two letter of the 8th and 15th ult. on his way from New York whither he had gone for a few days after his consecration. He thanks Blanc for his good advice. He will leave Baltimore as soon after Easter ad he can proceed to Natchez. He will see Bishop (John Baptist) Purcell in Cincinnati and try if he cannot make good Blanc's suggestions in relation to Father (S.H.?) Montgomery and Father (Ignatius A.) Reynolds. (Chanche) has received letters from Father (Joseph N.) Brogard and (William St. John) Elliot. Both express the wish that (Chanche) would accept the appointment but give no details concerning the affairs of the Church. (Chanche) hopes Brogard will not think of leaving Natchez. (Chanche) entreats Blanc to continue to govern the Diocese until he can be fixed in the South. It would give him much pleasure to meet Blanc before he goes to Natchez; it would be very agreeable if Blanc would accompany him there.

V-4-l A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
7


1841 Apr 6

Doutreluingne, C.M., Father P.J.
Monroe, (Louisiana)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

He thinks he will be at Monroe until Easter after which he will go down 40 miles to Prairie de l'E. (Prairie du Lait?) in Columbia Parish. Blanc can address him in care of Colonel Henry McEnery, where Doutreluingne rooms as he will go on horseback and return to Monroe. Blanc will greatly oblige him by sending 2 or 3 dozen catechisms and a dozen prayer books, all in English. There is much good to be done here; religion is almost entirely abandoned and ridiculed. Almost all are unbelievers; they especially do not want to go to Confession. He visited one person who believed all the Catholic Church teaches but she refused to go to Confession and died thus. However they respect Catholic priests. In the two weeks he has been here he has baptized only two Negro children. Today he baptized 8 persons among whom were Mrs. Willson on of the leading women of the town with 2 of her children.
P.S. Since he has received little and fearing to lack money, he borrowed $19.50 from Father (James) Burlando, (C.M.) promising him that Blanc would pay him when he went t New Orleans. Doutreluingne is anxious to hear some news about Father Jeanjean.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
5


1841 Apr 10

Armengol, (C.M.), Father B(onaventure)
Assumption, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

The bearer of this letter is a young English man who has been at Natchitoches with their priests and also at the seminary for some months. He is leaving for England to settle an inheritance and wishes to return at once to enter the (Vincentian) Congregation as a Coadjutor. He is certainly very worthy of recommendation. It is impossible for Armengol to send any of their priests to St. Michael. They are worn out and this will be worse at the departure of (Anthony?) Andrieux whom Father (John) Timon has called to finish his novitiate. Mr. Morrisson, Brother Locateli and Brother Canepa are leaving also. Armengol must ask Blanc to send them Father (P.J.) Doutreluingne, (C.M.) as soon as possible. They are worried about Father Jeanjean.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
8


1841 Apr 10

(Louisiana), New Orleans Parish
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Mrs. (Jean) Cazimir
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Receipt for $1.50 for the 1840 tax on 3 sq. 49, $1000, and on one slave. Signed by A. Cruzat as treasurer.

V-4-l D.S. 2pp. 16mo.
2


1841 Apr 10

Walter, W.J.
Washington City, (District of Columbia)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Blanc's favor of February 7 was received. Walter felt grateful for the expressions of good will towards him, his family, and his literary undertaking. He trusts his exertions in the cause of Catholic literature will find the success Blanc augurs for it. His readings during the last 2 or 3 years have offered him abundant materials for other numbers of the "Catholic Family Library" not inferior to the Sir Thomas More and Mary of Scots. Walter has to thank Blanc for his kindness in his behalf in reference to the family of Madame Martinez; she has been induced to recognize the justice of his demand in behalf of his little ones and has promised to pay the note out of the first available funds. Walter's visit to Washington has not been without effect. Senator (Alexander) Mouton has exerted himself in favor of Mrs. Walter's land claim in Baton Rouge and carried it through the Senate which is equivalent to a recognition of the justice of the title. Last Sunday Walter dines at Georgetown College with Archbishop (Samuel) Eccleston) and Bishop (Benedict Fenwick) of Boston; both were in the best of health and Walter named his having had a letter from Blanc in February. He solicits Blanc that if anything can be realized from Mary of Scots, to let Mrs. Walter and his little ones profit by it.

V-4-l A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
5


1841 Apr 11

Lamy, Father John
Danville, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

When he was at Cincinnati last February he spoke to Purcell about Julius Brent and Purcell agreed to take him into St. Francis Xavier College. His mother has bought him clothes and will send him this month. He baptized him today and has been to Communion. He has baptized another and is instructing three or four. On Easter the church at Danville was crowded with nearly a thousand people. He wishes that he could have spoken English well. He asks Purcell's prayers that he may be a good priest. He hopes that Julius's mother will become a Catholic.
P.S. He asks that Father Edward Purcell send the Telegraph to Francis Haas, of Nashville.

II-4-g A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
2


1841 Apr 11

Wood, James Frederick
Rome, Italy

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Speaks of the ceremonies of Holy Week and Easter in their little church and of their organ which he wishes they had in the Cincinnati Cathedral. Has written a memorial to Cardinal Fransoni about the number of Germans in Cincinnati, the loss of Father (Ferdinand) Kuhr and (William) Pisbach, and the absence of Father Juncker for his health petitioning for German priests for the diocese. The circumstances concerning Father Kuhr and Pisbach have indicated Propaganda to the need of caution. The previous letters have informed Purcell about William Montfort's decision. Wood will hold this letter until he has learned of Montfort's ship, and destination. Wood believes he has given up the idea of a vocation. Hopes that he can retain his health and vocation. Speaks of some he has seen in Rome.

April 16:

Has note of Montfort of March 30, saying that he sails on the "Nile" for Boston. Bishop (Joseph) Rosati is still in Rome, but will soon visit a few days in Naples. Rosati gave them a retreat before Easter.

II-4-g A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
5


1841 Apr 12

Brogard, Father Joseph N.
Natchez, (Mississippi)

to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisiana)

Several weeks ago Brogard informed Blanc that a meeting of their congregation had been announced in the papers with the object of turning over their property to their Bishop and that shortly after a new choice of trustees was to be made. Brogard now send on the results of these two meetings. The meeting was held and fortunately adjourned without accomplishing anything. (William St. John) Elliott, who was ill that day, had naively planned to replace the member of the Council who was most opposed to the plan, Captain J(ohn) B. Nevitt. It seemed wise to postpone the affair until the Saturday following the Bishop's arrival. The election was very satisfactory to Brogard. The congregation wished to prove to him that they had not shared the feelings of the trustees about him last winter. They asked him to preside at their meetings. Of the 7 who served last year only Elliott was reelected. The Bishop's presence is required immediately. As soon as the Bishop is in possession of the property, Brogard intends to resign as president and member of the council and go down to St. Michael for a retreat. Brogard is very sensitive to the kind words Blanc wrote him in reply to his request to be transferred. In the event that the See of Natchez is not filled he would rather die at his post ran abandon it. His doctor recommends physical exercise and forbids strained speech.
P.S. Brogard received a letter from Bishop (John Joseph) Chanche who informs him that he has come down. Brogard begs Blanc to have Chanche come back up as soon as possible; they await im impatiently.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
5


1841 Apr 14

B(ellune), M(arquise) de
Versailles, (France)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Two weeks ago B(ellune) received (Blanc's) letter announcing the departure of M(iss) I(zabel). She was waiting for her arrival before writing her thanks. She went to I(zabel's) aunt's home to inform her. This aunt wanted no o ne from B(ellune's) side to meet her niece. She said the simplest way would be to follow the instructions I(zabel) would give. She would write from Havre or on board the Talma. But 12 days have passed since the boat arrived. B(ellune) has asked (Ferdinand) Ducros to go to Nantes to see what is happening. He left 4 days ago. B(ellune) is praying for her husband and children, also prays for (Blanc). She has sent to (Blanc's) address a copy of her Father-in-law's will which she wants to reach her husband and to give him the details of his Father's death and its results on her husband's position. Ducros has given Father (Hercule) Brassac 1500 francs for a draft on (Blanc); she hopes it will save her husband from embarrassment.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
4


1841 Apr 14

Bryant, Jo(h)n D.
Quincy, Florida

to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Blanc's letter of March 27 has just come to hand. There is nothing that can compensate for the deprivation of Holy Church and he awaits an opportunity to change his location to one where he may enjoy these privileges. His present engagement will occupy him until November 21. Any information on the subject will find a ready response. His education renders him competent to perform the duties of tutor in a college or principal of a public school.

V-4-l A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
1


1841 Apr 14

Timon, (C.M.), Father J(ohn), St. Mary's Seminary
(The Barrens, Missouri)

To Bishop Ant(hon)y Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Timon has just received Blanc's letter of March 15 and thanks him for giving him early notice of what interests him deeply. He is grateful to find that Blanc does not enter "con amore" in the spirit of the Archbishop's request. Timon feels that Father (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.) will not suit the post to which he is called and that if he seeks to do his duty, in 2 or 3 years he will be in the grave. His acceptance will much indispose their brethren in Europe particularly, as no obedience has been sent. Timon has letters from Rome intimating that if he refuses an obedience will be sent. His loss will be a terrible one for Texas. They have fixed upon Cape Girardeau for their (Vincentian) novitiate until Timon's return from Europe. (Anthony) Andrieu, (C.M.) Will have an opportunity there not only of learning English but preaching frequently in it. As soon as Andrieu finishes his novitiate he will return to Louisiana. Father (Mariano) Maller, (C.M.), who is strong in English, will go down. Timon will also try to send another priest to the Seminary so that his absence and that of Father (John) Boullier, (C.M.) will produce no serious inconvenience to Blanc's diocese. Blanc promised him some letters for Europe to plead for Texas. Should he send any to be handed [sic] by Timon himself, they might find him at their house in Paris. Father (John) LeFranc is learning English as fast as could be expected from one of his age; he will succeed well. Poor Father Jeanjean is apparently not long for this world. Timon has recommended him to the prayers of the Sisters and of this Community.

V-4-l A.L.S. 3pp. 4to
9


1841 Apr 15

A(rmand), Father P.
( )

Claude Pierre Samory and Francoise Eleanore Doubrère married April 15, 1841.

V-4-l A.D.S. (French) 1p. 16mo.
2


1841 Apr 15

Audizio, Father J(ohn) B.
Thibodeauxville, (Louisiana)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Last year it was understood between Audizio and Father V(ictor) Jouanneault that Jouanneault would be paid at the rate of $200 a year in stipends as assistant, up to Easter, April 11, 1841. Audizio gave him $116 for 7 months. The $200 will not be paid to him. Now, Jouanneault pretends to have a letter from Blanc which would make Audizio pay. Audizio recalls very well that when he talked to Blanc after the retreat he told Blanc that he thought the trustees would give half and Terrebonne the other. But the trustees refuse; up to now Terrebonne has promised nothing and Audizio's means do not permit him to give it. So the assistant here will have to be satisfied with his maintenance and fees which would bring him at least $500. If Audizio had promised he would refuse now because:
1. Jouanneault acts very badly towards him and slanders him;
2. He does just as he pleases and goes walking with the ladies and in his absence Audizio has to do his work;
3. If the trustees refused to give him something in stipends, it is because they do not want him; most of the parishioners are turned against him. One young man threatened him with blows because of certain sermons and because of the abominable way he acts. However, they need an assistant in this parish, one who would be suitable.

V-4-1 A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
4


1841 Apr 15

Brassac, Father H(ercul)e
Paris, (France)

To Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

Brassac sends a draft, the first, for 300 piastres to the order of Mr. Ducros. If it is not accepted Blanc is to advance the sum and draw on Brassac. If Blanc can get at least part of the money in question before maturity, he will greatly oblige the one who asks Brassac to send it. Brassac has heard nothing more of Father Imbert. It would be easy to procure some good priests who, too old to learn English, about 40, could not go to the western (dioceses), but might be very useful in Louisiana. But they do not have the means of paying their expenses. If Blanc would authorize him, Brassac could send a few. He has received many applications. Bishop (Richard Pius) Miles is in Holland and expects to sail from England in the latter end of June. (Brassac writes on the stationery of the Ecclesiastical Agency of Catholic Clergy of the United States.)

V-4-l A.L.S. (French and English) 2pp. 4to.
5


1841 Apr 15

Brogard, Father Joseph N.
Natchez, (Mississippi)

to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

(William St. John) Elliott has finally decided to take steps to place the diocesan Bishop in possession of their church property. Elliott has notified the congregation to meet on the 29th to vote on it. Captain (John B.) Nevitt among others condemns this concession. Among those of the same opinion is the editor of one of their papers, M.J. (Levins) Lavins, a brother of the priest of the same name in New York, a consummate muddler. He has great influence with the working class. He told Brogard that he intended to use his pen to put off the plan and to use his influence in the election of trustees on May 3. Blanc can see how much they wish that Bishop (John Joseph) Chanche were here. There has been nothing further done to the house and Brogard does not dare to divide the chapel room in two as he at first intended to do for fear that the church cannot be built before he leaves. He has taken (Bishop Charles Forbin) de Janson's $50 for different repairs. If Brogard's physical and moral strength permitted he would experience great pleasure in fighting at Chanche's side but it is impossible for him to remain. What is worse is that he must talk so much; confessions during Holy Week wore him out. If Blanc has a place in the country he would accept it gratefully. If not, since the northern climate is harmful for him, he would have no other recourse than to ask his family for means to return to France. This would be very painful to him. The sacrifices he has made for the good of religion in this town for almost two years and also Blanc's kindness will not let him be reduced to this.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
7


1841 Apr 15

Née, P.L.
Paris, (France)

To Father H(ercule) Brassac
( )

A draft on V(ictor?) David for $300. (Brassac endorses the draft) to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc.

V-4-l D.S. (French) 2pp. 16mo.
3


(1841) (Apr 16)

--------
1839 Oct 24

Armand, Father P.
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Armand blessed the marriage of Theodore Rodolf and Marie Thomas of Zurich (who sign) in the presence of the undersigned: Etienne Thomas, Mary Thomas Marie (signature illegible). (Added below) son of Frederic Rodolf and Emerance Keller of Zurich; daughter of Etienne Thomas and Justine Joubert.

A.D.S. (French) 1p.

On the same paper:

--------
1839 Apr 22

Ar(mand), Father P.
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Armand gave the nuptial blessing to Pierre Louis and Desiré belonging to the Widow S. Ducayet in the presence of the witnesses who make this mark: Therese, Francois, Jean Louis, Louise.

A.D.S. (French) 1p.

--------
1839 Dec 27

Armand, Father P.
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Armand gave the nuptial blessing to Isaac Segassie, born in France, son of Jean Segassie and Jeanne Fourtie(?), and Rita Ossepha Lougar, widow of Charles Vivant, daughter of Jean Lougar and Marie Jeanne Prudhomme in the presence of the witnesses Jean Segassie and Alfred Duhart (who sign as well as the bride and groom).

A.D.S. (French)

Added on the same page:

--------
1841 Apr 16

A(rmand), Father P.
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

And to Claude Pierre Samory and Francois Eleanore Doubrère.

A..D.S. (French) 1p.
V-4-l A.D.S. (French) 3pp. Folio
15


1841 Apr 16

Francais, Father (D.)
Avoyelles, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Francais begs Blanc to send a replacement as soon as possible because he is going to leave this parish to do penance some place or to take Father (Nicholas) Fort's place at the bishopric. Here, he is on the brink of danger. He will leave all he possesses to whomever Blanc sends to take his place. He has provisions for a year, a house all furnished, a horse, a cow and a calf. He will take only his personal linens; he will even leave his books. For his salvation, Blanc is to send a replacement; he cannot save himself alone.

V-4-l A.L.S. (Latin and French) 3pp. 4to.
2


1841 Apr 20

Berel, Father M(aurice)
St. Martinville, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Father (Charles Henry Boutelou) de St. Aubin, having by his zeal put this parish on a footing which requires an assistant capable of helping him, tells Berel that he is going to (Blanc) to arrange this. If St. Aubin's charity does not refuse to give Berel hospitality after he gets an assistant, his house, too small for three priests, will not permit him to. Berel begs (Blanc) to find him some other refuge. His health is improving; however, it is not very robust. Berel places himself entirely at (Blanc's) disposal until he receives orders from his Superior. If that order is to go back to France, Berel does not believe he could carry it out before a year as he does not have enough money for the passage. So (Blanc) could count on h im for a year at least and as much longer as his health and superiors permit. Father (J. Peter)Bellier, superior of the College of Vincennes, wrote to the Superior General to ask him to leave Berel in (Blanc's) diocese or to offer (Blanc) another priest of their Congregation as he said on leaving a parish, one would be of great help to the College by sending them provisions and students.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 8vo.
4


1841 Apr 20

Lesne, Father J(ames)
Mobile, (Alabama)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Lesne had promised to arrive the week after Easter. He would have left if Bishop (Michael) Portier had not had to go to give Confirmation at Mount Vernon. The Bishop will return the first of next week. Lesne was just as well satisfied for this delay since his rheumatism came back on Easter and he could only say Mass and that with extreme difficulty. He is better and hopes the hot weather will cure him. They have learned with sorrow of Blanc's loss of Father Jeanjean; they share it. All their priests are well.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
3


1841 Apr 21

R(ousselon), Father E(tienne)
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Laurent Lucien and Rose Isabelle, slave of E. Joublanc received the nuptial blessing; witnesses: E. Joublanc, mistress; and Julliete, Negress.

V-4-l A.D.S. (French) 1p. 16mo.
2


1841 Apr 21

Whelan, Richard Vincent, Bishop, Richmond
Richmond, Virginia

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Purcell's own experiences in the matter of his consecration will supply the needed apology of Bishop Whelan's failure to write, and thank Purcell for the many favors received from boyhood. Whelan will be in Wheeling on May 16, and would like to go on to Cincinnati on that day but fears that he cannot. In his desire to promote the interests of religion he gives Purcell permission to give faculties to any priest along the Ohio River for the Richmond diocese provided Purcell considers such priests of unblemished reputation and not likely to cause scandal. He makes this distinction to safeguard the interests of religion. He is starting for Petersburg. He will inform Father Hoerner of this arrangement with Purcell.

II-4-g A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
4


1841 Apr 23

Jouanneault, Father V.
Thibodauxville, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Being authorized by Blanc to leave his post, Jouanneault has decided to leave the place vacant on the 5th or 10th of next month. Today Father (John B.) Audizio seems resigned to continue to pay an assistant but since as soon as he hears that Jouanneault is the cause of his ruin he will again treat him like one of his slaves and since in spite of all his trouble he sees so little fruit of his instructions, Jouanneault is anxious to begin a new career. He needs to be with a priest who inspires his confidence. Up to now he has sought peace and consolation in vain.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
2


1841 Apr 24

Haillandière, Celestine, Bishop of Vincennes
Vincennes, Indiana

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

According to the advice of the Sacred Congregation of the Propaganda he has made his last will. One copy he has sent to the Archbishop of Baltimore and one he has kept there. By his last will he has made Bishop Purcell his legatee, and in case of his death Bishop (Guy I.) Chabrat of Bardstown. According to the instructions of the Sacred Congregation he informs the legatee that he is to regard the succession to be not for his own good but that the legatee is merely to hold what he receives for the regular successor in the see of Vincennes. According to his instructions he also mentions those priests most worthy of seconding his views so that Purcell may be able to know his views. Those he mentions are Fathers M. John Corbe of Vincennes, Augustus Martin of Logansport, (Simon) LaLumiere of Washington, (Indiana) and Michael Shawe. Nearly all the property of the diocese is in the hands of De Haillandière as a private person. However some belongs to the Bishop or his successors in office. These he desires to change but his lawyers cannot tell him how to do it. He can add nothing to this in thanks to Purcell or in excuse for placing this burden on him.

II-4-g A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo. (French)
7


1841 Apr 24

Haillandière, Celestine, Bishop of Vincennes
Vincennes, Indiana

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Explains his silence as an unwillingness to bind Purcell to a correspondence when he could use this time so well in his diocese. He needs the advice of Purcell in a thousand cases, especially in that of Father (James) O'Meara, who by knavery and falsehood has persuaded the Irish of Chicago the De Haillandière's conduct is merely the action of a Frenchman against the Irish. Would ask, if he dares that Purcell write in his own hand a defense of the episcopal dignity insulted in his person some words to these people whom would listen to him. Would like to ask Purcell to prevent priests of this diocese from being taken away for that of Cincinnati, and to express his regrets to see one or two candidates acquired for Vincennes being harbored at Cincinnati. He says these things because of the poverty of the diocese and his own incapacity. Further, Purcell has promised to preach at the consecration of the cathedral at Vincennes. De Haillandière thinks that all will be ready by the last of July and expects to have the bishops of the west there. If Purcell does not wish to perform the consecration, De Haillandière will ask someone else. Would like to ask Purcell to give the retreat for the clergy immediately after or before the consecration. After the retreat he intends to hold a diocesan synod in which the decrees of the Council of Trent will be explained with the modifications in force in the dioceses of New Orleans and St. Louis. After the synod will be a retreat for the people of Vincennes for which he asks for a priest of Purcell's diocese. He knows that he asks much but this is his vengeance on Purcell who had so much to do with his appointment to the see of Vincennes. Is grateful for the friendship of Purcell.
P.S. He is in debt to Purcell for money which he had loaned to Madison (Indiana) and for other things.

II-4-g A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo. (French)
5


1841 Apr 25

Audizio, Father J(ohn B.)
Thibodeauxville, (Louisiana)

To Bishop A(nthony) Le(!)Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Audizio was astonished that Father (V.) Jouanneault had dared to tell Blanc that Audizio did not want an assistant. It is a lie. It is true that Audizio tried to take away the 200 piastres of fixed fees because he saw that Jouanneault made at least$550 a year without the $200 since he has nothing to spend either for food, horses, laundry, etc. because Audizio furnishes all that. Jouanneault has $360 for Masses, at least 100 for baptisms, 100 and some for fees for burials. Audizio is convinced of the necessity of having an assistant in this parish. But he wants one with whom he can live in peace; he will pay him whatever Blanc says. If the assistant behaves badly Audizio will take his complaints to Blanc. Jouanneault proposes to leave for New Orleans on the 5th or 10th of next month. His life is in danger here; he has already been threatened on Easter in an affair something like what just happened to Father (Julien) Priour. This would be scandalous, especially if it happened during divine services as they propose.
P.S. Audizio yesterday gave Father (Charles Henry Boutelou de) St. Aubin a letter similar to this to take to Blanc; he lost it on the way.

V-4-1 A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
4


1841 Apr 25

(Chanche), John Joseph, Bishop of Natchez
Baltimore, (Maryland)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Chanche) will leave Balt(imore) on the 27th and go directly to Blanc by Wheeling and the Ohio. He intended going by way of Charleston and Mobile but he has been told it is not the shortest route. As he is very anxious to see Blanc before he goes to Natchez; he will take the boat for New Orleans, and if Blanc is visiting his diocese he will go where he is. He has no crozier so Blanc will have to supply one. They heard unofficially of the great loss Blanc has sustained in the death of his friend Father (Auguste) Jeanjean; his long illness gives them reason to believe the information is correct. (Chanche) fears that the important undertaking in which he is about to be engaged is much above his strength; he feels as if he had done wrong in not resisting the appointment. If it were possible for Blanc to go with him to Natchez, it would be a great consolation to him.

V-4-l A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
3


1841 Apr 25

Lynch, Anne C.
Providence, (Rhode Island)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Mass(achusetts)

Mrs. Whitman asked her how Brownson was progressing with the faith of Necessity. She told Mrs. Whitman that he did not allude to the subject. She is improving very much in reading French. She has almost finished "Spiridion." She likes it exceedingly. There are many passages that sound the depths of her experience, and doubtless his, too. Especially the passage which condemns idleness in a man. She has met somewhere some excellent remarks on the merits of money versus genius. The genius complains of poverty when he sees the rich idiot rolling in wealth, forgetting that it was acquired at a price he himself refused to pay, a drudgery he has refused to submit to. Brownson certainly did not spend his hours of youth in study just to be rich. A comprehensive soul, a rich mind pregnant with inexhaustible stores of entertainment and reflection - these are their own reward. She feels that she has advanced much in the last year, due to the influence of Brownson's writings. They found her cold, and analytical. Through them she has learned to synthesize. She supposes Brownson moves this week.

I-3-f A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
1


(1841) Apr 25

Vignes, H(enriet)te Nugent
Pointe Coupée, (Louisiana)

to Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, Louisiana

After fulfilling her religious duties she does not know any better way to spend the rest of the day than by talking to (Blanc). She did not hear Mass today nor has she for three months because of the great difficulty in getting to the church and also because from what she has learned, Father (John) Martin no longer wishes to say Mass at Pointe Coupée. He said Mass only twice during Lent. Why is it that all the advantages are for the people of Fausse Rivière? She has heard murmurings about him. (Blanc) doubtless knows that Vignes is a mother for the second time. Her children Joseph and Marie Estelle are well. She wishes (Blanc) would pay them a visit. Raymond (Vignes) sends his respects.

A.L.S. (French)

Added April 27, 1841:

Today a petition was presented to obtain a priest for St. Francis Church. Vignes did not wish to put her name to it because she was afraid to sign against her pastor. However it seems that Martin is resolved no longer to say Mass at Pointe Coupée. Vignes would be happy if (Blanc) could do something for them either to have Mass at St. Francis at least twice a month or to give them a priest.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
5


1841 Apr 27

Armengol, C.M., Father B(onaventure)
Assumption, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Armengol has received Blanc's letter of the 17th. Blanc's sorrows touch him. In regard to the Seminary (of St. Vincent de Paul), Mr. (J.) Tiernan has not left and Armengol hopes that Father (John) Timon, (C.M.) will leave him to them. Father (John) Chandy, (C.M.) has set himself to teaching the seminarians, and Armengol keeps on working always. He is satisfied with their progress. He is satisfied with (Charles M.) Menard; he works courageously at teaching. Timon wrote that he would send Armengol two priests of whom one is Father (Mariano) Maller, (C.M.) whom he could not send immediately because of a class in theology of which he is in charge. He will come as soon as vacation begins. Armengol thinks that Father (P.J.) Doutreluingne could work on the mission for which Blanc intended him, with Timon's consent. However Armengol would like him to come to the Seminary until the arrival of the priests Timon is sending. Menard wishes to go to see his mother and sisters; shall Armengol let him do it? Armengol asks Blanc to send off the enclosed letter to Timon by the first steamboat; it would be very good if he could receive it before he leaves for Europe. All are well and send their respects.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
8


1841 Apr 28

Timon, (C.M.), Father J(ohn)
Cape Girardeau, M(iss)o(uri)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Blanc's letter of March 21 has just reached Timon. Has some friend but recalled the memory at Rome that but a few months before Father (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.)'s nomination, special powers had been expedited to him to confer Confirmation, precisely because Timon had expressly remarked that it would be almost impossible for Timon to go to Texas, whence Odin was in fact Prefect Apostolic of Texas, a mission at least as important as Detroit, he would not so soon have been named. Timon would ask if Bishop (Joseph) Rosati makes it a case of conscience for Odin; did he not make it equally a case of conscience for Bishop (Leo Raymond) De Neck(e)re, (C.M.). Timon cannot help but think that De Neck(e)re as Superior and visitator of their Congregation would have lived longer. Timon fears should Odin accept, his life may be much abridged. Should he accept they have all to begin again and it will be easier to find another Bishop for Detroit than another Odin for Texas. Timon has just received a letter from (Alphonse) De Saligny, the French ambassador at Austin; Saligny repeats the offer he made of his table and for a priest at Austin; speaks of the final passage of their bill. Timon asks Blanc to forward his answer to Saligny; he may now be in New Orleans. The President of Texas, (David) Burnet has also written enclosing copies of the acts declaring "the churches of San Antonio, Goliad, Victoria, the lot at Nacogdoches, the churches at the missions of Conception, San Jose, San Juan, Espado, and the mission of Refugio, and the church of the Alamo . . . be, and are hereby . . . declared the property of the present Chief Pastor of the Roman Catholic Church, in the Republic of Texas, and his successors . . ." Timon also asks Blanc to forward his letter of thanks to Burnet. Father (Joseph) Giustiniani, (C.M.) requests Timon to send him a Negro boy, "Dory"; Timon hardly knows how to direct him safe to Natchitoches except through Blanc and asks him to have this boy sent safely by the first Red River boat. He is an excellent Negro, brother of Andrew and John. They have just perfected their arrangements for the (Vincentian) novitiate at this place. Everything wears a most pleasing aspect. Should Blanc visit them he is to stop here first; it is but a step from the landing to their house. From here one of their priests can accompany Blanc by Jackson to The Barrens, thence to Ste. Genevieve, thence to St. Louis. On this route Blanc will find many improvements to please him.

V-4-l A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
12


1841 Apr 29

B(ellune), M(arqu)ise de
Versailles, (France)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

B(ellune) sends the second notification about the payment of the sum she sent to her husband. If she did not know her husband's need she would have waited until she could speak more calmly about the person who arrived on the Talma. The distrust of this person's family paralyzes all the steps B(ellune) would like to take for her welfare. M(iss) I(zabel's) silence worried her so that she sent (Ferdinand) Ducros to Nantes to try to find out what happened to her. He left with a letter from her aunt saying that she added to her trouble by delaying her return to Paris. At Nantes Ducros went to the home of the captain of the Talma and learned that the lady had arrived and gone to a hotel but left a few days later for Paris. Ducros not wishing to do anything against the family wishes left Nantes. (This letter is in bad condition; it is difficult to read a complete sentence. There is mention of) going to England. B(ellune) begs (Blanc) to help her husband by his advice about his position because of his Father's death.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 5pp. 12mo.
3


1841 Apr 30

Lesne, Father J(ames)
Mobile, (Alabama)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Lesne did not answer Blanc's last letter because he was in bed and could not leave the house. After his request to which Blanc replied so kindly, Lesne wrote that Bishop (Michael) Portier had given him permission to leave his diocese but that seeing how much his request afflicted Portier, he would have to arrange matters to know when Lesne could leave. In Lesne's second letter he told Blanc of his conversation with Portier who showed him the difficulty of replacing him and asked him to stay until Easter. Lesne thanks Blanc for all his kindnesses. He certainly will leave this diocese; he has very strong reasons for this step which is costing him much as he intended to spend the rest of his life here. He also thanks Blanc for the information about Miss Ross. He believes she wanted to deceive him and tried to deceive another of their priests.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
3


1841 Apr 30

McGill, J.
Milneburgh, (Louisiana)

To Milne Asylum for (Destitute) O(rphan) B(oys)
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

A bill for $148 for board for 10 orphan boys, house rent, and lamp oil.

V-4-l A.D. 2pp. Folio
1


1841 May

McGill, Father (John)

To Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

McGill encloses an order of W.S. Murphy for $36 instead of the money he had paid for Purcell; but if Purcell desires he will get the money. Thanks Purcell for the money he lent him, itemizing his return payments. (This note is written on the back of a note as follows).

A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.

--------
1841 May 22

Murphy, W.S.
St. Mary's

to Rev. J. McGill

The note is addressed to Dr. S. Bonner for $36, and beneath this is a letter to McGill explaining how a Mr. Dwyer had inquired about a refund and that he was in the dark about the matter until he heard from Purcell, stating that the debt was $45 instead of the other sum.

A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.

II-4-g 2pp. 8vo.
1


1841 May 1

Doogan, Father Robert
Alexandria, (Louisiana)

To Father (Stephen) Rousselon
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

The bearer, Patrick McCloskey, will give Rousselon $50 to forward to Ireland. Rousselon is to have the check drawn in the name of Father John McKenna of Maghera, Ireland.
P.S. Doogan sends his homage to the Bishop.
(A note on the letter): ". . . remitted to Tyler Parsons of the Ship John G. Coster to be forwarded January 7, 1842."

V-4-l A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
7


1841 May 1

Dufresne, A.(?)
(Ste. Genevieve, Missouri)

To Bishop (Anthony) le(!) Blan(c)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

She sends this by Mr. Miguire to recall herself to Blanc. Being en route to Ste. Genevieve, after remaining at New Orleans two months without her husband, she came to join him, at Blanc's advice, in this almost wild country at the end of 1839. They bought a little place below the Academy. Everyone said they would not get water there but they got it at 37 feet. If Blanc has any work either for himself or others in marble or stone for monuments or statues she asks him to send them the order. He will be satisfied with the work; there is very fine marble and stone there.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
1


1841 May 1

(Louisiana), New Orleans
Treasury of Municipality No. 3

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Receipt for $6.75 for 1840 taxes on F.F.I. 61-D2-1500. Signed by DuGany, treasurer.

V-4-l D.S. 2pp. Folio
2


1841 May 1

(Louisiana), New Orleans
Treasury of Municipality No. 3

to Mrs. (Jean) Casimir
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

A receipt for $5.50 for the 1840 taxes on F.M.I. 49-D2-1000 and on one slave. Signed by DuGany as treasurer.

V-4-l D.S. 2pp. 32mo.
2


1841 May 4

Martin, Father J(ean)
Pointe Coupée, (Louisiana)

to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Blanc will receive from Mr. Bineaud, his singer and bearer of this letter, the $21 from the Easter collection. Martin lost $6 of it; if the collectors had passed among the colored people they would have collected something more. They were stung by this, thinking they were scorned. There are other difficulties about the church in Pointe Coupée which he knows has been abandoned since last April 25. Martin has already announced that Mass will be said every Sunday at Fausse Rivière until a new order is given. Several ladies at Pointe Coupée have passed around a petition which 5 or 6 ladies have signed and sent it by Coustaix, who is the cause of all the trouble, with a letter to Mrs. C. Stall at St. Francisville asking her to sign and to write to Blanc. She refused and showed Martin the letter when he was at her house. Martin thinks that with a little patience they can put an end to all this; it has gone on a long time. Martin was not surprised to hear of Father Jeanjean's death and is the more sad because he thinks he could and should still be living.
(In pencil on the third page of the paper): Nicolas (Verret), son of Marcelin Verret; Josephine Verret, daughter of Jean Baptiste Verret.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
10


1841 May 4

Timon, C.M., Father J(ohn), St. Mary's Seminary
(The Barrens, Missouri)

To Bishop Ant(hon)y Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

On Timon's return from the Cape where he saw the (Vincentian) novitiate begin under consoling auspices, he received Blanc's letter of April 21. He frankly explained his views of the nomination of Father (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.). He has since perused the documents and his conviction became stronger. There is no obedience upon him, therefore Timon thinks he does his duty in advising Odin to send back his Bulls. Timon has sent Father (J.M.) Mignard, (C.M.) to the Seminary; he writes Father (P.J.) Doutreluingne, (C.M.) to remain there. Timon could send a most talented priest, Father (Michael Domenach, C.M.?) Domenec, a Spaniard who speaks English and French, who is now their parish priest and whose amiable manners have caused many conversions; but he would prefer to send him next year; he leaves orders to that effect. At Parish Timon hopes to make arrangements still more profitable to Blanc's diocese. In a few days Timon starts for New York; he does not hope to embark before the middle of June. He has requested their priests to say Mass for their dear and lamented Father Jeanjean.

V-4-l A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
6


1841 May 6

Bourget, Ig(natius), Bishop of Montreal
New York, (New York)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

Being on his way to Europe, Bourget writes for information about Jean Baptiste Brosseau, who they say lived in Blanc's diocese. This man left his wife, Catherine Trudelle, at Montreal about 31 years ago and went to Louisiana. For several years no one has had news of him and believe he may be dead. His wife would like to establish this fact in order to remarry but up to now her search has been fruitless. If Blanc will send any information to Father Manseau, vicar-general of Montreal, it would be a great service to the poor woman. Bourget takes this occasion to renew the acquaintance he made with Blanc on his visit to Montreal and to offer his services in Europe should Blanc have need of them.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
4


1841 May 9

Odin, C.M., Father J(ohn) M(ary), St. Mary's
(The Barrens, Missouri)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

It has been impossible for him to resign himself to accept the office which His Holiness has conferred on him. He has sent back the bulls; Father (John) Timon, (C.M.) approves of this step. He regrets that his sending back the bulls will prolong the widowhood of Detroit but hopes that this will be compensated for by the choice of a subject more capable of governing the diocese. If Blanc has occasion to write to Rome he is to beg the Holy Father not to think of him any longer. Odin will leave the Seminary toward the end of the week to go again to Texas.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
4


1841 May 10

Purcell, Doctor
Norristown, P(ennsylvani)a

to Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Purcell has made a discovery that the medical world has been in search of for hundreds of years. Lavoisier of France and Sir H. Davy of England were the two greatest chemists the world has produced. Neither they nor all before them did not obtain the desired object that Providence was pleased to bestow on Purcell. He has prepared a medicine that can destroy every poison from the smallest to the most deadly kind. The writer of this letter is a Catholic. New Orleans is visited every year by a plague; Purcell intends to give Blanc and the two gentlemen with him at the Cathedral as much as will preserve their lives. If they take a teaspoonful and go into a hospital where they are dying with the plague they will not take it. Purcell is a British subject; he is a man in years and no family but his wife. He will not instruct any doctors in this country; if he instructs anyone it will be some of the Catholic colleges. He intends to send some medicine to Bishop England of Charleston. Purcell has worn the Mt. Carmel scapular for 30 years. If Blanc wants any of the medicine he is to inform Purcell to whom he should give it. He would not trust the sale of it to any but one of the clergy. Norristown is but an hour's journey from Philadelphia.

V-4-l A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
1


1841 May 10

Van De Velde, S.J., Father J(ames)
St. Louis University, (Missouri)

To Father P(eter) J. Verhaegen, (S.J.) or Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

On the supposition that his letter may still reach Verhaegen, Van De Velde communicates the sudden death of Father (J.) Van Sweevelt who was found lifeless in his bed this morning. He had performed his usual Sunday duties and appeared gay and healthy last night. No one can fully replace him. Tomorrow Van De Velde will accompany the body to St. Stanislas and bring Jos(eph) Verdin to take his English class. Father G(eorge A.) Carrell, (S.J.) will fill his place with respect to the direction of the new church and Van De Velde will help him. Father (P.) Verhaegen, (S.J.) and Father (J.B.) Emig, (S.J.) will try to replace him for the congregation, confessions, etc.
(P.S.) Van Sweevelt is laid out in the chapel; people come in crowds and cries and sobs resound through the place. (On the address side of the letter): Care of P.H. Kernion, Louisiana Sugar Refining Company.

V-4-l A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
8


1841 May 11

Chanche, John J., Bishop of Natchez
New Orleans, Louisiana

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Captain Green landed him safe at New Orleans after four days. Chanche thanks Purcell for arranging for him to travel on Captain Green's boat. Thanks Purcell for his hospitality. Suggests that when Purcell cannot come to visit him that he send letters by Captain Green. Bishop (Anthony) Blanc is absent in places where Chance cannot go to him. Chanche will have to go to Natchez. Bishop (Michael) Portier expected in New Orleans every day. Chanche has written to Father (Lewis) Deloul on the subject mentioned by Purcell about the sisters.

II-4-g A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
6


1841 May 12

Chabrat, Bishop Guy Ig(natiu)s
Bardstown, (Kentucky)

To Father (Napoleon Joseph) Perché
Portland, K(entuck)y

After reflecting on what Perché told him yesterday, Chabrat mentioned the whole to the Bishop. They have concluded to insist on the coming of Father (John) McElroy to give the retreat himself. Chabrat returns his most sincere thanks for Perché's good will.
(P.S.) He hopes to see Perché shortly.

V-4-l A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
2


1841 May 16

L(ynch), A(nne) C.
Providence, (Rhode Island)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Mass(achusetts)

She believes that Brownson once accused her of never expressing any pleasure at receiving his letters. She atones for this by saying that they have been not only a source of great pleasure, but also of great improvement. She is glad that he is satisfied with his new quarters, and thanks him for his invitation to visit him, which she promises to avail herself of at sometime. Her mother is going to Vermont, so she hopes that she will get some work done. She has been unaccountably indolent since her return from Boston. She wrote to Harpers about her poetesses. She was told that they did not wish to engage any more works at the present time. If she did not otherwise dispose of it, however, they would like to look at it. She intends to go on with the work.

I-3-f A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
1


1841 May 16

McNamee, Father Joseph
Fort Ball, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Would write of the disorder created in Norwalk by Father Joseph E. Freygang had not Father (Joseph) Machebeuf informed Purcell of the whole story. At Purcell's request he visited Norwalk and obtained the keys. When he decided to say Mass, there were threats which he ignored. Father Freygang threatened to keep the sacred vessels until his salary is paid. The other congregation there are doing well, but that of Toledo is not doing so well, since McNamee has not been able to care for them because of illness and because of Mr. Warlop. The church at Maumee has been inclosed and the people are anxious to see Purcell. Rode to see Father Machebeuf who is doing much good at Sandusky City, and his other missions. Finds the stubborness of the Germans harder to encounter than bigotry.
P.S. Asks if Father (Julian) Benoit of Fort Wayne has faculties from Purcell since he visits and makes contributions on the canal.

II-4-g A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
10


1841 May 17

Masnou, C.M., Father J. (M.)
Donaldsonville. (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Someone came last Sunday to ask permission to exhume a body from the cemetery to be placed in a Catholic cemetery at New Orleans. But as Masnou has no authority to give the permission he asked the person to return next week to receive (Blanc's) decision. Before leaving, Father (Thaddeus) Amat, (C.M.) warned him that he must go to Rivière Smit to validate several marriages; if (Blanc) thinks it proper for him to go Masnou asks for the faculty to dispense them. He would also like the faculty to give the scapular.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 3pp. Folio
2


1841 May 21

Brogard, Father Joseph N.
Natchez, (Mississippi)

to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

At last Brogard has the honor of announcing the arrival of Bishop (John Joseph) Chanche who came on May 19. He went directly to the City Hotel where he wrote Brogard. In minutes Brogard went to him and took him to Mrs. Felicité Gireaudeau's house who put two sets of rooms at his disposal and gave him his board for the time being. Yesterday, Ascension Day, Chanche said Mass and gave a short discourse. His presence has filled the congregation with enthusiasm and makes Brogard believe that all will go well. Today Brogard appointed two trustees to go to ask Chanche whether he is satisfied to remain at Mrs. Gireaudeau's and if not, to promise to provide something more suitable. Tomorrow the congregation will meet again to decide on two lots. Brogard has a desire to express to Blanc which will have a great influence on his future; he desires to be recalled to the diocese of New Orleans. The reasons are well known to Blanc. Brogard wishes to go down to the Seminary as soon as possible.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
4


1841 May 21

Jordan, Father Paul
Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)

to Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Father (Joseph) Evrard has told Jordan several times that his kindness would ruin him but Jordan does not know what has already ruined Evrard. Ever since Evrard knew that Jordan had written to (Blanc) he has changed in Evrard's eyes, and he asks why Jordan wrote such requests which had upset everything. Jordan told him that he could not until he had had a reply from (Blanc). Evrard always speaks badly of the other parish (East Baton Rouge?). that it brings him nothing, that a priest could not live there. Evrard told Jordan to go if he wished and make his own arrangements, that he would not go if they gave him a thousand piastres and the fees. People tell Jordan to be on guard because it seems that Evrard is after him. The third Sunday after Easter, Evrard instructed Jordan to preach at Baton Rouge. Seeking information from a certain lady setting herself up as a doctor, she told him that it was very good. If Jordan is a poor Spaniard he is capable of defending his rights and performing his duties without causing trouble. Jordan went over to the other side to prepare the children for First Communion several days after Ascension. Evrard said he would come to help. He came but it was to perform a marriage ceremony that brought him a fee. He came back the eve of the Ascension and told the children that if Jordan had consecrated the hosts Evrard would have given them Holy Communion before returning to Baton Rouge for Mass. There is no unity between them, hardly even charity. Jordan is very tired and discouraged; there is no peace or justice.
(P.S.) He is ill with fatigue.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
4


1841 May 21

Machebeuf, Father Joseph P., Alphonsus
Norwalk, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Having received Purcell's of April 28, he went to Norwalk as soon as his sick calls would permit on May 8th. Father (Joseph E.) Freygang was at Thompson's church and from there he intended to go to Tiffin. Machebeuf wrote to him for the keys and to prevent him from going to Tiffin where there were some signs of disorder. Machebeuf went again to Norwalk and found that Freygang was there unwilling to see him. Finally Machebeuf went to his room and in an effort to talk to him the door of Freygang's room came off. Freygang fled to some of his friends, and when he threatened Machebeuf with the sheriff, Machebeuf fled to Sandusky City. Father (Joseph) McNamee came the same evening and Father Freygang thinking him a friend gave him the keys. The next day Father McNamee said Mass and told the congregation that Machebeuf had been sent by Purcell to take over the parish. McNamee then went to Sandusky City to Machebeuf and gave him the keys. Machebeuf went to Norwalk and said Mass. Freygang said Mass in Norwalk also for his own "congregation." He tool the vestments and says he will keep them until he received his full payment. Machebeuf has heard that Freygang intends to join the Lutherans and has promised to tell all the "secrets." Asks Purcell to come to visit these people.
P.S. Warns Purcell of the lies of the Kilbly family.

II-4-g A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
6


1841 May 22

McCaffrey, Father James
Marietta, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Is sorry that he could not attend the laying of the cornerstone of the new cathedral, but being celled to a remote part of his district by sick calls he could not go. Regrets to inform the bishop that the log church at Sunday Creek, Perry County has been burned. Has heard that some threatening letters were found about the ruins. McCaffrey feels bound to tell Purcell about the excitement that prevails in that neighborhood due to imprudent zeal in attacking the sects and threatening all who did not join the church. Speaks of Father (George) Wilson having preached in the church. Hopes for a new church. The church at Meig's Creek is being roofed, and he hopes will be ready for dedication in August or September. Has not received his Holy Oils for this year yet. Will send the deed for St. Mary's Church at the first opportunity.

II-4-g A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
6


1841 May 23

Scallen, Mary
Hope Estate, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Mary called on Blanc with her mother fully determined to inform him of her engagement to James Mather but her diffidence deterred her. The kind interest which Blanc has given to her welfare and the friendship he has manifested for her mother throughout a life of trials and affliction induce her to hope that Blanc will be present at her marriage. June 17 has been fixed for the occasion; being her grandfather's birthday he is desirous that it be on that day. He unites in requesting Blanc's presence.

V-4-l A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
2


(1841 May 23)

S(eton), Cath(arine)
(New York, New York)

To Reverend James (Roosevelt) Bailey
Haerlem, (New York)

She saw today Miss Jones and spoke to her of Bailey's wish to see her. She promised to be here on Tuesday if Bailey can find it convenient to make a visit. Cath(arine) proposed so early a day as she thinks it likely she may go in the country the latter part of the week to pay W(illia)m a visit. She prays God to bring Bailey to a happy decision in his extensive speculations.

II-2-n A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
2


1841 May 24

Garrand, Paul
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Garrand addresses Blanc as President of the (New Orleans Catholic Male) Orphan Asylum. The bad state of his health will not permit Garrand to continue the duties with which Blanc has entrusted him. His stomach is very weak. The climate, the continual noise with which he is surrounded, the daily difficulties with rebellious pupils, have combined to bring about this change in health. So he can no longer be useful at the orphanage. He asks Blanc to release him so that he may return to France at the first opportunity.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
2


1841 May 26

Geoffroy, F.
Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

At a meeting of the trustees held on the 21st Geoffroy was requested to ask Blanc if Father (Joseph)Evrard is pastor of East Baton Rouge in particular or of West Baton rouge together. On the 17th the parents and children of J. Daigre, who died the evening before, came to ask the pastor to have the funeral for their Father, offering him 25 piastres. He refused, saying that he had to go to the other side of the river to prepare the children for First Communion and he left. This has caused much scandal as this was not a rich man but one whom everyone esteemed. They assume that Evrard should have done both things since Father (Paul Jordan) Jourdan who assists him, was also on the other side instructing these same children. Instead of instructing that day Evrard performed two marriages and only the next day returned for the instruction. They wish to know whether Evrard can absent himself from his parish under such circumstance. The fabrique also loses money which they need to pay their debts.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
6


1841 May 26

McGill, J.
Milneburgh, (Louisiana)

To Milne Asylum for (Destitute) O(rphan) B(oys)
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

A bill for $160.12 for board of 10 orphan boys, house rent, lamp oil, hats, ribbon, and shoes at Mr. Alexis'.

V-4-l A.D. 2pp. Folio
2


(1841) (May 26)

Purcell, J(ohn) B(aptist), Bishop of
Cin(cinna)ti, (Ohio)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Restitution is to be made of $1000 to William A. Neilson, formerly a merchant in Louisville, Kentucky, later going to Vincennes after a short time, 7 or 8 years, to Richmond, Virginia. Purcell asks Blanc to write to Father Timothy O'Brien, without giving the circumstances, or to the Bishop of Richmond to make inquiries whether Neilson or his brothers are there. If Neilson or his heirs are found, Blanc is to give authority to be drawn on for $1000 and Blanc can draw on Purcell for the same amount.
(P.S.) Blanc is to ask for a receipt from Neilson and send it to Purcell. (Purcell sends the letter by) Bishop (John Joseph) Chanche of Natchez.

V-4-l A.L.S. (Latin) 2pp. 4to.
4


1841 May 27

(Chanche), John Joseph, Bishop of
Natchez, (Mississippi)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Chanche) regrets exceedingly that Blanc was not at home when he was in New Orleans and that the uncertainty of where he was prevented (Chanche) from meeting him as he had intended when he left Baltimore. (Chanche) thought it well to come on here immediately and leave the information he so much needed to some future time. Father (Joseph N.) Brogard tells (Chanche) that Blanc will be in Natchez after Pentecost. (Chanche) is anxious to see Blanc before he returns to the north. (Chanche) finds the people here as he could expect but their means seem very limited. A priest would have been sufficient for a long time to come. No provision of any kind had been made for (Chanche) and there does not appear to be anyone to suggest what ought to be done. If he had only a pied a terre he should find himself comparatively easy. But he must not complain; the sacrifice is made. The congregation held a meeting a few days ago and empowered the trustees to give (Chanche) a deed of the old graveyard on which the church is to be built. When the deed is made, (Chanche) will appoint some persons to make collections. He fears that much cannot be done at this time. (William St. John) Elliott is sick and goes north next Monday. Matters must remain in status quo until ext fall. (Chanche) regrets that he did not defer his coming until that time. From a letter which Father (Stephen) Rousselon showed (Chanche) it would appear that Brogard wishes to leave Natchez and retire to some more quiet congregation. He has not yet announced his intention to (Chanche). . . . . (ms. torn here). He is not the person that would suit this . . . (Ms. torn) not therefore make any objection. (Chanche) would be sorry that Brogard should retire before (Chanche's) return in the Fall. Although he has no prospect of bringing anybody with him in the Fall, it would be better to be alone than with one who is not well with the congregation. (Chanche) sends his respects to Rousselon and to Father Maenhaut for his kindness.

V-4-l A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
5


1841 May 27

Doogan, Father Robert
Alexandria, (Louisiana)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Blanc is to inform Doogan when he proposes visiting this post or if he will do so this season. Blanc will be pleased to hear that the trustees have made arrangements to finish the church and build his house, etc. $3000 is offered for the building of it; it is to be finished by October 1. Doogan has a few missions to make after which he will forward an account of his parish. Blanc is to inform Doogan if he will allow him to do anything with his unfortunate Mexican affair this summer. Should Blanc consider that leaving now would damp their present prospects, he is to prohibit his going until the Fall. Blanc is to forward the vestments on board the first boat as Doogan requires them very much.

V-4-l A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
2


1841 May 27

Evrard, Father J(osep)h
Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisia)na

While Evrard was on retreat, the members of their fabrique were changed. By intrigue they put young people in the places of Mr. Layet and Mr. Nugent. But the election was not legal. They let persons vote who were not yet 21 and also Protestants. Should there be another election; what steps should Evrard take? At West Baton Rouge things are going from bad to worse. The present committee does all it can to harm their parish. They are the ones who prevented him from going to say Mass as usual at West Baton Rouge by refusing to look him up at Mr. (D.?) Hickey's. They wish to do nothing for their church and now that they could have Mass on Saturdays, Sundays, and feast days they do not want to make any arrangements. Evrard told them to leave for the priest the incidental fees which amount to $300 to $380 and to give $200 to him besides. They replied negatively; they want their own pastor; they will treat him like a servant, give him only $600 a year and refuse him all kinds of fees. But Evrard hopes things will change and in the meantime they will celebrate Easter and Evrard will instruct the children as he has done up to now. Father (Paul) Jordan is there, thanks to some good souls. He does what he can but he cannot be well enough understood to replace Evrard. Evrard would prefer an English speaking priest; Evrard does not know that language well enough to stay at Baton Rouge where one must preach in English. (The letter is sent by the courtesy of) Hickey.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
7


1841 May 29

Patterson, Henry S.
Philadelphia, (Pennsylvania)

To (Orestes A. Brownson
Boston, Massachusetts)

He is sending him the article on Shelly which he promised to offer to Brownson's inspection when in Boston during the last summer. He wonders is it too late for the July number. He would like Brownson to let him know sincerely what he thinks about it, and whether it is really of any worth to him. In the last Review, there were many errors which crept in by various means. Brownson has in this city many admirers, but they are not of the type that will add to his popularity. Brownson's essays along with The Dial have contributed their readings. The "community" question is causing more attention and discussion than ever before. He will send to Brownson a pamphlet issued by Mr. Ginal, the pastor of the German Rationalist Church, who is getting up a colony for Texas, somewhat on the Fourier plan.

I-3-f A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
3


1841 May 29

Propaganda Fide, Sacra Congregation de by (Altieri) L., Archbishop of Ephesus, Apostolic Nuncio
Vienna, Austria

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Has transmitted to Purcell by Mr. Schwarz, U.S. Consul at Vienna the sum of 151.12 florens, as fruits for six months ending May 7, of the Joffroy foundation of 5040 for the Indians. This is to be divided equally with the Bishop of Detroit according to the decree of the Sacred Congregation of December 5, 1835. The Archbishop thanks Purcell also for a copy of the controversy between Purcell and Campbell. (A note on the back says that the mother of the pious Countess Lesniowski died July 7, 1841).

II-4-g L.S. 2pp. 8vo. (Latin)
6


1841 May 30

Armengol, C.M., Father (Bonaventure)
St. Michael, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Armengol is here to help Father (Pierre) Ladavière, (S.J.), who is ill, to prepare the children for their First Communion. The event took place very satisfactorily. Armengol is leaving right after Vespers for the Seminary (of St. Vincent de Paul) to be there at 8 tomorrow. When will Blanc come for Confirmation and orientation? He hopes Blanc will be pleased with their little seminarians and also with (Charles M.) Menard. Father (P.J.) Doutreluingne, (C.M.) has arrived but Armengol has not sent him to report his mission to Blanc because he did not know where Blanc was. In the meantime he sent Doutreluingne on missions in the parish; he has done wonders.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
5


(1841) May 31

( )
(New Orleans, Louisiana?)

Martin Keefer, aged about 38 years, a native of Ireland(?).

V-4-l Fragment 1p. 32mo.
1


1841 June

(Altieri, Prince) Archbishop Ephesus, Apostolic Nuncio
Vienna, Austria

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

At the point of starting for Rome to spend a few days he has received from Purcell as a souvenir a copy of the "American Antiquities" which besides its own merits is dear to him as a sign of Purcell's remembrance of his visit with him in Vienna. As he read the book he seemed to find himself near Purcell studying in the traditions of the country, signs of the Catholic religion. The Abbe Brassac sent the book, but for some unknown reason the letter accompanying it was not received until June 4th. He prays God to bless Purcell's labors with conversions. His secretary also sends his respects.
P.S. Mentions the thanks sent in the previous note for the copy of the Purcell-Campbell controversy.

II-4-g A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo. (French)
2


1841 Jun 1

Armengol, C.M., Father B(onaventure)
Assumption, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Armengol has just received Father (Stephen) Rousselon's letter of May 26 and thinks it prudent to have Father (P.J.) Doutreluingne, (C,M.) go immediately to report to Blanc on his missions. If Blanc does not wish to come up to the Seminary now, Armengol would like to know if he goes to St. Michael to talk to him about some interesting matters. Everyone at the seminary is very well.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
3


1841 Jun 2

Lynch, C. Anne
Providence, (Massachusetts)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Mass(achusetts)

She says that Brownson is not more than ten years her senior and recollecting how much sooner the female mind comes to maturity than in the male Brownson should be no more than 51. She discusses a book on Mesmerism. She says the religious elements of her character have developed almost entirely the past year. She had before that a kind of vague unfathomed sense of God but he was too mighty and too distant to excite any feeling but that of awe. She feels differently now. Brownson's writings and conversations have influenced her opinions more than anything else ever did.

I-3-f A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
1


1841 Jun 3

(Chanche), Bishop John Joseph
Natchez, (Mississippi)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Chanche) has received Blanc's letter of May 21. In the letter (Chanche) wrote on the 28th he gave Blanc hope that if Blanc could come to Natchez, (Chanche) would endeavor to meet him somewhere on the River. He must now abandon this. The people here seem anxious to commence the church at once; he hopes to see the corner stone laid before it becomes necessary to go north. The deed which puts the graveyard in (Chanche's) hands will be signed today. Where the money is to come from (Chanche) does not know. (William St. John) Elliot is away and in his absence not much can be done. Perhaps the people may succeed in raising the walls some feet above the ground and when (Chanche) returns in the Fall, they will see how it may be continued. (Chanche) wrote Blanc his views of Father (Joseph N.) Brogard; if Blanc consents he thinks Brogard will for he seems desirous to make a commencement of the church. (Chanche) would be glad if Blanc would send him $1000 of the money Blanc has for him. He has to be here until the 11th. It is probable that when (Chanche) gets to Vicksburg he may request Blanc to pay $500 to Father (M.D.) O'Reily for his church. The remainder of the money Blanc is to keep until further notice; it must be something like $7000. (Chanche) regrets that Father (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.) sent his Bulls back to Rome. He supposes Odin's reasons are such that his refusal may be accepted. (Chanche) wrote the Archbishop that he would think that Father St. Germain, the curate of St. Laurent in Canada, would be a very proper person for Detroit. He is certainly the flower of the Canadian clergy. His situation is not agreeable in Canada and he spoke of coming to spend the remainder of his days with (Chanche). But (Chanche) is afraid he could not for a long time offer a man like him even a home. (Chanche) will try to see Father (Ignatius A.) Reynolds on his way north. As for Father (S.H.?) Montgomery, it is out of the question.

V-4-l A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
11


1841 Jun 4

Timon, (C.M.), Father J(ohn)
Baltimore, (Maryland)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Timon spoke yesterday with Archbishop (Samuel Eccleston) and explained why he did not hear sooner of Father (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.). (Eccleston) seems to concur with Timon on the subject and wishes if possible to obtain the nomination of another person, Timon preached the Sunday after Ascension at Chicago. The prudent conduct of the clergy there has had its due effect; the scandal is nearly extinguished. At Detroit, Timon spoke with Father (Francis Vincent) Badin who would much like Father (Stephen) Dubuisson as Bishop of that See. Timon is certain that the delay caused by Odin's non- acceptance will produce no addition to the existing evil. Father (John?) O'Reilly, late pastor of Pittsburgh, is going to Europe; it seems that his late Bishop is much dissatisfied with him; it would not do for him to obtain any office at Rome; he will do very well in the novitiate of the Holy Society to which he wishes to unite himself; he will not sail with them. They start June 8 on board the "Duchess of Orleans."

V-4-l A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
8


1841 Jun 6

Brogard, Father J(oseph) N.
Natchez, (Mississippi)

to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Brogard received Blanc's letter of May 29. It asked him to have patience about his change and to help as best he could the "excellent prelate" (Bishop John Joseph Chanche) which Providence has placed in Natchez. It will doubtless not be for long; it is not important whether the parish Blanc gives him is better or less good than Natchez. The deed by which they have turned over to Chanche the ground upon which the church is to be built, has been signed and registered.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
3


1841 Jun 6

(Calhoun), J(ohn) C.
Washington, (D.C.)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Mass(achusetts)

He read with pleasure the article on Distribution. His opinion remains unchanged on the subject of hereditary property. Many of Mr. (John) Tyler's friends assert he will veto the bank bill. Tyler would be thoroughly states' rights if left to his own inclination, but he has accepted office at the hands of those who differ from him. Much is in Tyler's power. The relation between the states and general government is a question of deepest interest. He is gratified with the kind felling towards him by the members of the party in Boston.

I-3-f (Signature cut out) 3pp. 8vo.
3


1841 Jun 6

Whelan, David
Baltimore, Maryland

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Since his previous letter Whelan has been very near death from pleurisy. Hopes to be well enough to continue his studies in a few weeks. He is compelled to ask Purcell to do all in his power to change the decision of his brother Bishop (Richard) Whelan of Richmond, Virginia. Although David wishes to go on for the diocese of Cincinnati Bishop Whelan insists that he practice self restrain and prepare for the diocese of Richmond. David sees only dissatisfaction ahead in such a turn of affairs and expects to write to Bishop Whelan who is at Norfolk giving confirmation, to ask him again to let him return to Cincinnati. He regrets bothering Purcell in this way.

II-4-g A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
4


1841 Jun 7

Bruyère, Father (J.M.)
(New Orleans, Louisiana?)

On June 7 Bruyère married Jean Louis Cesar, slave of Mr. Duconger and Louise Populus, slave of Jean Baptiste Cajus; witnesses, Aglee Bourbon, Corine Blanc, Josephine Pégné.

V-4-l A.D.S. (French) 1p. 16mo.
5


1841 Jun 7

Verhaegen, S.J., Father Peter J.
St. Louis, (Missouri)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisia)na

On his return from a trip to the country, Verhaegen has just learned that the "Meteor" leaves at 6 tomorrow and his letters for their priests at Grand Coteau must be written tonight. Bishop (Joseph) Rosati has just informed him that the Holy Father has appointed Father (Peter Richard) Kenrick to be his coadjutor. Verhaegen hopes he will soon come to deliver him from his purgatory. Rosati will not return so soon. The Pope has confided to him some very important business which will take time. He is to leave for Santo Domingo to try to make arrangements for the welfare of religion there. Madame (Elizabeth) Gallitzin has written from New York. She told him of Blanc's letter from grand Coteau which seems to have piqued her a little. She fears that Verhaegen shares Blanc's sentiments. She will soon know what Verhaegen thinks of the impression she made on the Sisters (Religious of the Sacred Heart) by making them believe that all her plans had been approved and directed by Verhaegen. She wishes to add her foundation for the Indians up to next year. Verhaegen replied that experience had taught him that one should not look for constancy in women.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
5


1841 Jun 8

Purcell, J(ohn) B(aptist), Bishop of Cincinnati
Cincinnati, (Ohio)

To Bishop (John) Murphy
Cork, (Ireland)

Bishop Murphy will call to mind a stranger who visited his See in 1838 and who now writes to introduce Charles Cist, an author of a book not yet in the Bishop's library. Cist is a distinguished fellow citizen of Purcell and will distinguish Cincinnati by his manners even more than by his pen. Purcell is pleased to hear that Murphy is well, and that Dr. Kerry is privileged to spend some time in Rome. Father Beauprez does not forget the episcopal benefactor he met in Dublin. (Copy from the Chicago Historical Society).

II-5-g A.L.S. (Photostat) 1p. 8vo.
2


1841 Jun 8

Rhett, R. B(arnwell) (Congressman from South Carolina)
(Washington, D.C.)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Massachusetts

He says Brownson's extravagant praise of his last speech comes only from the strong similarity of opinion which they share on the subject that was discussed, and his enthusiasm of temperament, which though sometimes a blessing, is often a curse, though without it nothing great or glorious can be done for the race. If Rhett needs encouragement to pursue truth, he would like it to be in the voice of Brownson, who, the first mind of England has declared, is the greatest genius in America. Brownson's mind, is a mind not made in schools, and which no school can control. When it errs, as all minds sometimes do, it errs mostly from the glory of its innate light and not from the false beacon other minds have erected. So, while he believes Brownson erred in his too partial estimate of his (Rhett's) speech, he would rather have his recommendation than those of all Boston and Harvard combined.

I-3-f A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
1


1841 Jun 10

Mina, Father Ve. M(odest)e
(Bonnet Carré, Louisiana)

to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Mina received Blanc's letter of June 1 only today. He hastens to remind Blanc of the promise he made at the retreat to assist at the patronal feast of Mina's [parish and give Confirmation. He announced this good news at his first time in the pulpit March 14. He has prepared several to be confirmed on the 24th. If Blanc could come a few days before and stay a few days after it would be a double honor, especially for Mina.
]
V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
2


1841 Jun 10

Wood, James Frederick
Rome, Italy

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Has received Purcell's and has delayed writing in order to tell Purcell of his success with the Superior General of the Franciscans. He called on the General May 20, then left a note, and finally wrote a letter but has received no answer. Wood believes that the general is held back for fear of trouble in Bavaria where displeasure was felt by the Franciscans for the sending of Father Huber to Cincinnati. Bishop (Joseph) Rosati is back in Rome. Wood understands that he will go on a legation to Santo Domingo. Rosati has acquired a coadjutor in the person of Father Peter Richard Kenrick. Speaks by names of the doings of persons going to and from Rome who are familiar to Purcell. Sends a clipping for the Telegraph. The Pope has ordered prayers for China. At the conclusion of a triduum at the College of the Propaganda the Pope visited them to attend the Mass, and they had an audience with him in the college library.

II-4-g A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
6


1841 Jun 13

Jamey, Father V(ictor)
Op(elousas, Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

A week ago Saturday Father (Joseph) Billon arrived. He seems very active and industrious but animated by a quite French zeal which in this country approaches indiscretion. If Opelousas likes him as much as he likes Opelousas Blanc can make them happy in 4 or 5 months. Jamey has just seen Mr. Bignon for the 50th time; he objected that he had notes in court. Jamey told him that he would take them at his risk. He has only one for $100 which he has presented . He said he had to keep the funds of the inheritance in case of new claims on it. Jamey has just had good news of Adele; if the attacks continue Jamey fears more for her health than for her vocation. He believes she needs someone who knows her and could direct her; it would be an act of charity if Blanc could make a little trip there. Jamey does not doubt that St. James College sent some emissaries to the Red River to strengthen St. Charles College as it did three years ago. Father (Joseph) Sol(l)e(r, S.J.) proves more and more that he is not the man to be at the head of this establishment. The students know only his name and the parents do not like him as president. Jamey will leave Sunday the 20th for the river and Natchitoches. He will return as soon as possible for his mission at Calcasiou.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
7


1841 Jun 14

Bellune, M(arquise) du
Versailles, (France)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

She has received (Blanc's) letters of April 5 and 20. She has just received news from her husband (Victor Beauclerc) and supposes that by now he has left New Orleans. She thanks (Blanc) for his protection in this cruel epoch and hopes that her children will soon again enjoy the tenderness of a Father. The letter of exchange for 2050 francs was presented to her on May 22 and tomorrow she goes to Paris to give this sum to (Ferdinand) Ducros so that it can be paid on June 22. In his last letter her husband said that it was his intention to go immediately to Europe but she is glad he is not coming straight to France because she fears the resentment of Miss I(zabel's) family. She arrived at Nantes 2 months ago and in spite of all of her efforts Bellune has not been able to find where she is. She gave up her efforts because her aunt told her that they could be compromising, that she was in touch with her niece, and that her Father had ordered her to go to London. It was learned that Madame Beaumond had left Nantes to go to Paris. Bellune has found so many contradictions in the conduct of the family that it seems she has been a dupe. She only wished to be helpful to I(zabel). She is awaiting news from her husband as to what she should do. As the mother of a family she sees the need of reunion but perhaps for the moment it would be more prudent in a foreign country; there is much to be considered in the future of eight children.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
5


1841 Jun 14

Bruyère, Father (J.M.)
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

On June 14 Bruyère married Jean Gabriel and Marie Delile: witnesses: Marie Dedoux and Aimé Woilson(?). On June 14 Bruyère married Joseph Solan(?) and Thérèse Gabrielle; witnesses, Marie Dedoux and Aimé Woilson.

V-4-l A. Note S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
6


1841 Jun 14

Doogan, Father Robert
Alexandria, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Doogan puts Blanc in mind of the vestments Blanc was about to send him from New Orleans the last time Doogan was there. They are at the Asylum, one of the three left there by Father (Adam) Kind(e)lon. Doogan requires them for the mission very much. The sacristan of St. Patrick's is to send Doogan a box of bread.
(P.S.) Blanc is also to send a set of small altar cards; the ones he has are too large to carry out on the mission.

V-4-l A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
2


1841 Jun 14

(Rosati), Joseph, Bishop of St. Louis
Rome, Italy

to Bishop (John) B(aptist) Purcell
Cincinnati, Ohio

A number of copies of the printed rescript have been given him and he does not doubt that Purcell will see it with pleasure. (Rosati) intends to leave Rome after the feast of St. Peter. Not being gifted with the courage to beg he has not received any additional from the Association of the Propaganda which has placed him among the less favored. God knows the debts with which he has been loaded. (Rosati) has decided to spend what he has to send a colony to his diocese: 5 priests, 3 young clergymen and 4 or 5 brothers. Besides he has obtained from the General of the Jesuits, 2 priests and 2 brothers to replace those who have gone from St. Louis to Cincinnati. But they all labor for the same cause.
(Copy from Chicago Historical Society).

II-4-g A.L.S. (Photostat) 1p. 8vo.
3


1841 Jun 17

(Hailandière), Celestin (de la), Bishop of
Vinc(ennes, Indiana)

to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

The consecration of their church will take place August 8. (Hailandière) hopes that Blanc will come; he has many reasons to want Blanc and Blanc knows how much their poor people would be pleased. Bishop (John Joseph) Chanc(h)e will be coming. Perhaps other bishops will come and they could talk over their affairs. Blanc could aid him by his advice.
(P.S.) So Father (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.) has refused; how unfortunate. Could Blanc not write to Rome to order him to accept? Bishop (Joseph) Rosati did that in regard to Father P(eter Richard) Kenrick. What will become of Detroit?

V-4-l A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
7


1841 Jun 18

Evrard, Father J(osep)h
Vicksburg, (Mississippi)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisia)na

Evrard has been at Vicksburg for a week. As the "New Orleans" stopped at Natchez quite a while, he delivered Blanc's letter to Father (Joseph N.) Brogard, as Bishop (John Joseph) Chanche was absent. Evrard does not know when Chanche will come to Vicksburg but they look for him any day. Evrard felt well on board the "New Orleans" but here he suffers from stomach trouble. However for two days he has been better. He is applying himself to English, reading, listening, and speaking. He is pleased with Father (M.D.) O'Reily; he is a good child. Just now he does not feel very well. They board with good people. The regime is half French, half American. They write from Baton Rouge that the hatred of the new Pharisees of the fabrique is not yet satisfied. May God pardon them and help him to pardon.
P.S. Chanche arrived this morning; he plans to leave for the north Monday or Tuesday of next week. June 19, 1841.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
6


1841 Jun 18

Wood, James Frederick
Rome, Italy

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Has at last received an answer from the superior General of the Franciscans dated from Naples. Through the Congregation of the Propaganda an order has been issued for two members of the Bavarian province to go to Cincinnati to assist Purcell. Wood supposes that William Montfort is now among his friends at home. Believes that the Congregation will pay for his trip home. Has had Father Grassi mention to Archbishop Cadolini about the transfer of the property to the Jesuits. Wood speaks of happenings of Cincinnati, of the conversion of Mr. Duke, and of Reuben Springer. Speaks of his mother's and sisters hope in Providence to care for their worldly needs, of the sickness of James Kerney. Bishop Purcell has mentioned losing Edward Purcell. Through Father Brassac he has been told to ask $300 from Bishop (Joseph) Rosati. Did not need the money but thought Purcell might desire to make some purchases. Rosati expects to leave 29th for Santo Domingo by way of New York. He expects to embark shortly a company of 14 for St. Louis diocese. Does not know whether Fathers Grace and Young will return, though the latter has not finished his curse yet. Father Grassi says that a Father Pazzi was to go to Kentucky. Has heard nothing of Bishop Miles. Bishop Clancy was in London. Speaks of imprisonment of the Bishop of Gibraltar and the attitude of the British government. Adds his remembrance to his friends.

II-4-g A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
7


1841 Jun 21

Armengol, C.M., Father B(onaventure)
Assumption, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
St. Michael, (Louisiana)

Armengol arrived at the Seminary last night at 11. He is sending Father (P.J.) Doutreluingne, (C.M.) to accompany Blanc to St. John Baptist. Armengol received a letter from Father (John) Timon, (C.M.) dated June 7 at New York in which he spoke of the seminary at Philadelphia of which the (Vincentians) have taken charge for which he wishes Father (Anthony) Penco, (C.M.) who is at Natchitoches, to leave at once. Timon will try to fill his vacancy as soon as possible. Timon is to leave the 8th on the "Duchess of Orleans."

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
6


1841 Jun 21

(Chanche), John Joseph, Bishop of Natchez
Vicksburg, (Mississippi)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

When (Chanche) last wrote from Natchez he mentioned he would probably request Blanc to transmit $500 to Father (M.D.) O'Reily. Since his arrival here he is induced to request $1000. (Chanche) arrived here Saturday in the "Baton rouge"; gave Confirmation to some persons O'Reily had prepared. (Chanche) will leave today in the "Meteor" for St. Louis. He expects to be in Balt(imore) by July 15.

V-4-l A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
3


1841 Jun 22

Coskery, Father Henry B.
Baltimore, (Maryland)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Blanc has probably already seen in the "New Orleans Bee" the accompanying prospectus of the Academy of the Misses McNally of Baltimore. Coskery asks Blanc to permit his name to appear among the references. For particulars he refers Blanc to Father (James Ignatius) Mullon. Archbishop (Samuel) Eccleston) is on a tour through his diocese; when he left about a week ago his health, which has been somewhat delicate, was better. (This letter is written on the inside page of the prospectus. The references listed are): David Hoffman, Jeremiah Hoffman; J. Bradford, W. Carter, John McTavish, British Consul, Baltimore; and J. Crawford, British Consul, New Orleans.
(On the back is written) Jos(ep)h Klark.

V-4-l A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
6


1841 Jun 22

(Loras), Mathias, Bishop of Dubuque
Potosi, (Iowa)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

After the ordinances from Rome concerning the bishops' wills by which the Church property goes to the successor of the title, (Loras) has chosen Blanc to be his residuary heir, if he has no objection. Blanc is to let him know before he sends the document. Father (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.) has refused. (Loras) always was convinced that he would and that it was an unsuitable choice in view of the immense good he would do in Texas without leaving his congregation. (Loras) suffers more than anyone from these delays. He had to give $1000 last week to Prairie du Chien, (Wisconsin) to help build the church. But he was well repaid by 119 Communions and 70 Confirmations. He is greatly troubled because of Father (P.?) Kelly at Milwaukee; he received petitions against him again yesterday. The seminary at the Barrens has just refused to take him. If (Loras) interdicts him again he will perhaps corrupt(?) His confrere and compatriot at Chicago. Perhaps (Loras) should undertake that long trip this summer. He is also troubled about Miss Calkin(?), feeling that perhaps she is not useful for the Ursulines. She wrote that she did not wish to hear any more about Madame Exley so she could not come to Burlington. After Father (Stephen) Rousselon's severe letter (Loras) sent her money to come to Prairie du Chien where he thought she could do something in french for she has not made great progress in English. If she decides not to come, Divine Providence will find a suitable place for her in New Orleans which would perhaps be the best. If Blanc and the Ursulines have been tried on her account they will all partake of the merit of having wished to save a soul by making her useful to religion. (Loras) thinks it was either Bishop Portier or Blanc who wrote the article in the paper about Father (Auguste) Jeanjean's death. Blanc can never repair the loss. It seems that Father R(ousselon?) Will have trouble gaining the confidence of the clergy; his situation has become more critical by the death of his colleague. Will Blanc ask (Rousselon) if he has thought of getting some good works for him if Jeanjean's library is sold.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
9


1841 Jun 26

Martin, Father J(ea)n
Pointe Coupée, (Louisiana)

to Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Martin received Blanc's letter of May 24 on June 9. Blanc is not to fear that Martin will die in debt. His biggest debt is to Blanc and all the others, counting the court costs, would come to about $200. If they pay him he will have enough to clear them up without touching what the corporation of Pointe Coupée owes him. His case was pleaded for the first time at the last court; at the moment when they were going to render a judgment, Martin withdrew the case; the judge and some lawyers said he did well. The principal reasons are:
1. This affair should be judged according to church law;
2. His lawyer told him he should collect all the fees at the church and that the trustees were not authorized to take advantage of the church property such as land and houses. Toward the end of May the trustees tried to make Martin leave but all their steps turned to shame for them; he has never been more peaceful and busy. He lives at Fausse Rivière where he has Mass every Sunday and on weekdays. Twice a week he is going to Pointe Coupèe; he has been asked to baptize at the home of the Widow Pierre Goudran. Tomorrow after Mass he intends to set out for Avoyelles to be gone about 12 days. On his return he would like to see Blanc. He has learned with regret that Father (Joseph) Evrard had left his parish; he does not know if it is true.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
6


1841 Jun 27

Armengol, C.M., Father B(onaventure)
Assumption, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

The trustees of Paincourt(ville) have posed this dilemma: either give them a priest to live among them or stop serving their church and they will have recourse to the court to see that Armengol is punished. Their conduct has been very rude and especially toward Father (John) Llebaria, (C.M.). So today they did not have Mass and none of their priests will set foot in their church unless Blanc orders otherwise. These gentlemen have shown everyone their devious intentions. The people no longer trust them much; some wish to see the church. The (Vincentians) have taken all the vestments and sacred vessels which were there. Blanchard is already at the Seminary; content as an angel. He received Communion with the seminarians today and is wearing the cassock for the first day. John's health is much better and so Armengol thinks Blanc would prefer that Armengol not send him to the town. All goes well at the Seminary.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
4


1841 Jun 27

L(ynch), C. A(nne)
Providence, (Massachusetts)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Mass(achusetts)

She thanks Brownson for his kind letters. The Quarterly was received and the first article she liked very much. She reads his political attacks and is pleased with them. There are thousands of minds that Brownson has wakened to spiritual consciousness and put in the way of truth that Brownson must not abandon them. She would like to know what Brownson intends to convey by "the true God incarcerated in the man Jesus, Our Saviour, the Son of God, one with the Father, through whom alone we can be cleansed from all sin." This seems to her very different from some things Brownson has said elsewhere. Anyone it appears to her would understand from this that Brownson believed that Jesus was a man like other men. The book Brownson asks about is" Facts in Mesmerism by Chauncey Hare Townshend. She asks if Brownson has witnessed any experiments in magnetism: she has heard of some interesting cases. She has just read (Theodore) Parker's sermon and liked it though it contained nothing Brownson had not previously said.

I-3-f A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
4


1841 Jun 27

Mina, Father Ve, M(odest)e
(Bonnet Carré, Louisiana)

to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Yesterday Mina received Blanc's letter containing the dispensation for Charles Cicet and Célina Jacob. Blanc's hurried departure prevented Mina from repeating his request for a dispensation for Jean Valcour Songy and Zoe Bassié. He asks Blanc to send it by Mr. Labarre. He is going to make up for something he forgot - Blanc's memorandum of last March.
1. The approximate figure of the Catholic population of St. John Baptist where there is not a single Protestant family, just a dozen or so individuals: the sheriff's table for last year brings it to 5776 whites, slaves and free persons of color. This table is certainly not exact as in 10 years it shows an addition of 22 people in the parish while the number of baptisms is 237, burials 115. Marriages this year 25, Easter Communions 200. Stations are in houses at the 4 ends of the parish and 2 or 3 annual and solemn ones at the home of Laurent Vickner opposite the church on the opposite side of the river.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
8


1841 Jul 1

DeGoesbriand, Father Louis
Louisville, Starke County, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Received Purcell's letter of June 16 very late and has sent the answer in care of Father (Peter) McLaughlin at Cleveland. He believes that he has in the environs of Louisville 150 persons to be confirmed. If Purcell will inform him of the time of his arrival, all will be ready. Sunday July 11, he will go to Chippeway to work among the French there. At Canton there will be another group to be confirmed but he does not know the exact number. Has news of his family and they are well. He is pleased at Louisville despite the calumny that forced him to appear before the Justice of the Peace. But the imposture has been confounded. Hopes for good and a long visit with Purcell.

II-4-g A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo. (French)
5


1841 Jul 3

Thomson, J.P.
Le Havre, (France)

Bill of lading on the Rubicon for two boxes to be delivered at New Orleans to Father (Stephen) Rousselon.

V-4-l D.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
1


1841 Jul 4

Doogan, Father Robert
Alexandria, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

Mrs. Nestor, a very respectable Catholic from Maryland requests Doogan to entreat Blanc to send her a little girl from the asylum, one from 9 to 12 years old. Doogan does not know a place in which an orphan would be better treated. Her passage will be paid on her arrival here by Dr. Nestor.

V-4-l A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
3


1841 Jul 7

Van De Velde, S.J., Father J(ames)
St. Louis University, (Missouri)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Van De Velde has caused the imposter Father Santinus Bottez, to bolt after having taken his long list of recommendations from pretended superiors and several bishops of France and Belgium, and the United States. As well as his list of subscriptions begun at the recommendation of Bishop (Peter Richard) Kenrick and the Archbishop. He had collected $718 not counting the private sums he must have received on his tour. The day he came to the college Van De Velde arranged a meeting at the bishop's house where he questioned Bottez before Bishop (John Joseph) Chanc(h)e and Father (Peter J.) Verhaegen, (S.J.) and Mr. Ride. After many contradictions on Bottez's part, Verhaegen announced that he would take his recommendations until he could receive a reply from Blanc. Bottez was to return yesterday at 8 but he has not appeared. Two or three months ago Van De Velde ousted another, an Italian, pretending to be Spanish of the Mercedarian Order. Van De Velde asks Blanc to get information about Bottez who told them that 7 of his companions, who were waiting for him to leave for one of their houses in the Philippines, were living in New Orleans at the home of Mr. Batises. Their names are Father José Lopez, Father Joaquin Sanchez, Father Felix Rodriguez, Father Thomas Garcia, Father Ildefonso Ximenez, Father Santos Lopez, Father Thomas Salvatierra all religions of the Order of St. John de Matha. It could well be that there is a group of these imposters at this house. The Bishop of Natchez left yesterday for Louisville after 10 days with them. He officiated on Independence Day and gave Confirmation last Thursday. He visited Kaskaskia and the novitiate.
P.S. Verhaegen left last week for the Potowatomi (Village) with 4 Religious of the Sacred Heart who wish to open a school there for Indian girls. Madame (Philippine) Duchesne and Madame Lucille (Mathevon) are of that number, and Father (John B.) Smedts, S.J. and Mr. (Joseph) Renaud, (S.J.).

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
20


1841 Jul 8

Odin, C.M., Father J(ohn) M(ary)
Galveston, (Texas)

to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Their crossing from New Orleans to Galveston was prompt and favorable. They arrived last Tuesday evening. Affairs in Texas seem to have taken a sorry turn. Judge (James) Webb left for Mexico to negotiate with the government but had to return without being admitted. This insult is deeply resented by the Texans. They talk of war and invasions but Odin hopes they would not have the courage or means to step outside their own territory. At last they have a small beginning of a church, 50 by 20 feet. They were going to suspend work for lack of funds. Odin gave $100 and they began again. This church will cost 8 or 9 hundred piastres and Odin is convinced that the town cannot furnish half that. It will not even be plastered but they will be happy to have a place to fix their altar permanently. Father (Nicholas) Stehlé, (C.M.), tired of begging his daily bread, is returning to Missouri; his going leaves Odin greatly embarrassed. Odin's intention was to settle at Galveston and H(o)uston for several months but the house where they say Mass is to be rented soon; he has therefore decided to go to visit the scattered Catholics and he will return when they can get into the new church. Sickness is ravaging the banks of the Trinity, the Brazos, and the Colorado and the Indians lately have committed several murders around Austin and San Antonio. Odin is sending several letters for France; it is impossible to stamp them here.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
5


1841 Jul 9

Bach, Father (Ferdinand Dominic)
Springhill, (Alabama)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Father Cessent who will bring this letter to Blanc, whom Blanc saw last year newly arrived from France, and who had the courage to plunge down to Alabama to learn English and where he was very ill for six months, is a priest from whom Bach hoped to get great help. But circumstances which could seriously compromise him and them, force him to leave the College. Cessent really has talent and knows enough English for ordinary things. He does not belong to their congregation (Fathers of Mercy?) and never can. Blanc is to judge whether he can use him in his diocese.
P.S. Bach is sorry not to be able to write more.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
4


1841 Jul 9

Everett, A(lexander) H., Jefferson College,
St. James Parish, L(ouisian)a

to O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Massachusetts

He received the North American, the Christian Examiner, the Northern Light, the Lady's Review, the Democratic Review all on the same day. He liked especially Brownson's article on "Social Evils and Their Remedies." He has regretted that circumstances did not permit Brownson to accept Mr. (Victor) Cousin's invitation to go and visit with him in Paris. If he remains here long (Jefferson College) he thinks that he shall prepare to deliver for the edification of the students, a course of lectures on Moral Philosophy, or its branches of Metaphysics, Ethics, Politics and Political Economy.

I-3-f A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
3


1841 Jul 11

Bonnecaze, L.
Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, Louisiana

Bonnecaze has just received (Blanc's) letter of the 8th asking information about Bernard Dellepiane. When Dellepiane came to Baton Rouge armed with a letter of recommendation from Mr. Delpit of New Orleans, it was Bonnecaze who about four years ago, placed him with Villeneuve Le Blanc and after staying there one or two years, Dellepiane left Le Blanc's to marry his neighbor Miss Julien Godeau. (Blanc) can tell Dellepiane's Father that he is well and has settled in West Baton Rouge. He has a pharmacy and raises a little cotton. Bonnecaze can let (Blanc) know if he has a family if (Blanc) if he has a family if (Blanc) needs to know. Bonnecaze's wife and Léontine wish to be remembered.
(P.S.) Bonnecaze would be pleased if (Blanc) could do something for their church because the pastor they now have cannot make himself understood either in French or English. He asks (Blanc) to send them someone while waiting for Evrard's return.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
6


1841 Jul 12

Holmes, John
New York, (New York)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Chelsea, Mass(achusetts)

When he was at Brownson's home he was somewhat undecided with regards to his future pursuits. Since that time he has resolved to devote the entire energies of his soul to the cause so ably advocated by Brownson. He deems it necessary and prudent to go into such a course of preparation as will remove the risk of becoming a dead weight upon the cause. It is his purpose to go into complete retirement for a year or longer if necessary, devoting himself entirely and exclusively to such a course of study and reading, as will tend to remove deficiencies of early education. He has enough resources to carry him on for a year - longer if he can recover anything from the wreck of his business. He is inclined to the opinion that "Smith's Wealth of Nations" was the fount from which Thomas Paine drew most of his political ideas. In (Holmes) opinion, it is the monopolizing and malign influences of corporations, or the misapplication of capital and money to like purposes that is doing a work in the under currents of our social systems that causes all the injustice that is suffered by the laboring classes. He believes that his most prominent deficiency is the want of a correct and positive knowledge of the art of punctuation. He wants to know from Brownson if he can board with him for the term which he will devote to the cure of his deficiencies.

I-3-f A.L.S. 8pp. 8vo.
2


1841 Jul 12

Jouanneault., Father V(ictor)
Thib(odaux, Louisiana)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Many a time Jouanneault has found it necessary to ask for a change. Blanc's last reply was that if Jouanneault left Thibodaux he would have to look for employment outside the diocese. Jouanneault replied that he preferred to suffer rather than knock in vain on the doors of several bishoprics much as he wished Blanc would find him another place. As he has received no reply to his last letter addressed to Father (Stephen) Rousselon, because of Blanc's absence, Jouanneault has just written to the Bishop of Mobile to ask if he could be received there if he leaves Thibodaux at the end of his year which expires September 8. He would rather take any other place than be separated from Blanc who has rendered him a great service by receiving him into his diocese. Father (John B.) Audizio has been ill for several weeks and is still in bed. Jouanneault has just performed a marriage with great repugnance as the parties are related in the second degree and the dispensation has not yet arrived. The pastor made him do it and to ask for 15 piastres.
(P.S.) Jouanneault is so disgusted sometimes he is tempted to seek some other employment than the ministry if Blanc does not take him away from this place. His difficulties often give him a troubled conscience.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
4


1841 Jul 12

(Whelan), Bishop Richard Vincent
Richmond, (Virginia)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
N(ew) Orleans, (Louisiana)

When Blanc's letter reached Richmond, (Whelan) was visiting his vast diocese. He found the request something more difficult than perhaps either of them anticipated. The letter was not sufficiently explicit as to the occupation of Blanc's friend and among 25,000 such a one might pass unknown. (Whelan's) own brief residence renders his personal efforts powerless. A legal friend used every exertion to discover Mr. Neilson. He is informed that a W(illia)m H. Nelson kept tavern last year at Hanover Court House about 30 miles from Richmond. (Whelan) will continue to make inquiries. (Whelan) asks for Blanc's prayers, as not his personal interest only but those of his flock are now in great measure represented in his person.
P.S. He sends remembrance to Father Mullon.

V-4-l A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
4


1841 Jul 13

Soller, S.J., Father J(oseph)
Grand Coteau, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

The feast of St. Ignatius is not far off and it has particular significance for the College of St. Charles. They will celebrate the anniversary of the laying of the first stone, placed by Blanc's hands. If Blanc's duties will not permit him to leave, they hope he will come for the distribution of prizes which will take place in mid-September. Father (Theodore) de Theux, (S.J.) is quite ill but not in danger. Two scholastics are ill also and several students but none from New Orleans except Montreuil who became ill this morning.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
4


1841 Jul 14

Bessy
Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc for Father (Joseph) Evrard
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

52 years ago was a great day; Evrard had not yet seen the light of day. Bessy received Evrard's letter of June 27 from Vicksburg. Evrard is now at Pensacola, it would be better if he were here, the air is better. Having been elected treasurer by the trustees, the books were turned over to Bessy and he immediately learned on examining them, all that Evrard had explained in his letter; all his observations in this regard persuaded the trustees instantly. One small item remains - about a loan of $1500 from the bank. Only Evrard can explain this; why does he not return? The helper he left does not suit anyone; Evrard is to come to relieve them quickly; his presence would shed light on all the fog a few muddlers have spread before the eyes of the people.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
3


1841 Jul 14

Robery, Dr.
Ile de la Fausse Rivière, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Leblanc(!)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Robery sends Blanc a letter (no enclosure) from Father (John) Power of New York. In leaving New York Robery planned to go to St. Louis; that is why Power wrote a letter for Father Delmeth. Circumstances induced Robery to stay in Louisiana. He hopes Blanc will recommend him to (Marcelin) Sicard, who brings his letters and to others at Ile de la Fausse Rivière where he has been living for two months and where he wishes to practice medicine. Since Blanc has lived there and his leaving was regretted by all, it will be easy to do another kindness and help him to establish a clientele. Robery has written to Power and Blanc should receive a letter soon.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
4


1841 Jul 15

Connelly, Pierce
Gracemere, (Grand Coteau, Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Connelly sends a line to the steamer by Frank. He has just received a letter from the Casserlys, Catholic booksellers in New York, begging him to use his influence in obtaining for them a proper agent in New Orleans to obtain subscribers to the Dublin Review and to receive the work for them. From the character of the work Connelly thinks no periodical would be so useful with the American portion of the population. It has fairly established its claim to stand on a par with the London and Edinburgh. The price is reduced to $6 a year. Mary has taken up her abode at the Convent and is only waiting to hear from Madame (Elizabeth) de Galitzin what day she shall take the veil. Mademoiselle has asked permission to follow her and will go at the end of the month. Connelly's wife (Cornelia Connelly) thinks she can make arrangements by which she will be able to do without anybody from New Orleans. The baby was exceedingly ill last week and they thought he would have followed the other two blessed ones but he has perfectly recovered. (The name of) Mr. Vezian (is on the address side of the letter).

V-4-l A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
6


(1841) Jul 17

Jamey, Father V(ictor)
(Opelousas, Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

After a lot of promises to write, and lies, Mr. Bignon has just told Jamey through Mr. Delavigne that he did not wish to give an account of Father (Flavius Henry) Rossi's estate until next year. Father (Joseph) Billon is much liked but Jamey thinks it would be well for him to be an assistant for several more months. He does not know the country or the means to take to do good. With all the zeal and devotion of the Lazarists (Vincentians) the parish of Natchitoches is suffering. Father (John) Timon, (C.M.) has just taken away Father (Anthony) Penco, (C.M.) to send him to Philadelphia. Jamey believes the Jesuits and Lazarists are extending themselves too far. Fathers (Joseph) Giustiniani, (C.M.) and Pascual (Pascual, C.M.) are in poor health and discouraged. Cloutierville and I(s)le (Bravel) are almost abandoned. The Protestants are getting ready to build a church. Father (Peter J.) Ver(h)aegen, (S.J.) has no doubt already spoken to Blanc about the letter he received from the General recommending that he arrange to relieve the Jesuits at Grand Coteau of the burden of the Convent. Jamey's desire and need to return to France is extreme; it seems to him that the opportunity is very favorable. Billon, staying here several months more so they can work together, could then take over the parish. Louisiana has become unbearable for Jamey.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
15


1841 Jul 17

Soller, S.J., Father J(oseph), (St. Charles College)
Grand Coteau, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

Soller has just received Blanc's letter of July 8; he thanks him for paying half the cost of the letters on the "New France." Here are the notes Blanc wanted: Father Joseph Soller, S.J., President; Fathers J. Fr(ancis) Abbadie, S.J., T(heodore) DeLeeuw, S.J., T(heodore) de Theux, S.J., Directors; Fathers (J.B.) Sautois, S.J., J. Walsh, H(enry) Duranquet, S.J., Messrs. Fr. D'Hoop, S.J., J. Boudreaux, S.J., N. Mearns, S.J., Professors and Superintendents; P(ierce) J. Con(n)elly, Professor of English; Mr. Grégoire, Drawing Master; Messrs. Lafargue and Grimmer, Professors of Music.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
16


1841 Jul 19

Bach, Father (Ferdinand Dominic)
Spring Hill, (Alabama)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

Three or four days in the country for a more speedy recovery have delayed Bach's answer. He knows nothing of Father Cessent's background. He arrived at New Orleans last year with a letter from Father Rauzan(?) saying only that he hoped Cessent would be received at their house, that he had wished to make the trip to America at his own expense and that Bach was to see if he could not help him or that Cessent could help Bach. As he seemed full of good will, Bach proposed that Cessent go to Northern Alabama to learn English. Cessent agreed and stayed six months in a house recommended by Bishop (Michael) Portier. He was ill most of the time; he returned to Springhill in a pitiable state. Bach attributed his irregularities to his illness. On June 27 he was seen with a Negress. Cessent counts on Bach to tell the sad story of a priest whom Bach found always ready to do whatever he asked of him. Bach leaves the judgment to Blanc.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
3


1841 Jul 20

White, Father Charles I.
Baltimore, (Maryland)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

A printed form letter asking for a statement of particulars relative to the diocese for publication in the United States Catholic Directory. White has written in the margin asking Blanc to give also a statement of the Temperance societies in his dioceses and the number of persons who belong to them.

V-4-l Printed L.S. 2pp. 4to.
1


1841 Jul 21

O'Reily, Father M.D.
Vicksburg, (Mississippi)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

A poor widow with four children whose Father died on the 11thasks Blanc to admit three of the children into the Orphan Asylum. She would willingly give her services to the institution as a servant. O'Reily has consented to take charge of her oldest boy; he might serve Mass in the course of ten or twelve months. The widow came from New Orleans about 18 months ago and brought a letter from Mr. Mannaught (Father Constantine Maenhaut?); her husband's name was Coughlan. Blanc is to let O'Reily know as soon as he can; O'Reily will have occasion to write Blanc in a short time.

V-4-l A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
3


1841 Jul 22

Armengol, C.M., Father B(onaventure)
Assumption, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Yesterday on Armengol's return to the Seminary a charming young man of 19 presented himself asking to be admitted to the Seminary. He has good groundings, even in English. At the Seminary everyone is forcing himself to speak English since Armengol gave the order after Blanc left. Dominguez said today that he had no intention of becoming a priest and that he wished to leave the Seminary soon. He has tried to get others to follow his example. All Armengol's consultors think he should send him home as soon as possible. While waiting for Blanc's decision Armengol will send Dominguez to Donaldson on the pretext of several days of vacation with Father (J.M.) Masnou, (C.M.). The young man spoken of above has now accepted the advice to take two months longer to reflect on his vocation. Nothing new yet in regard to Paincourt.

V-4-l A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
3


1841 Jul 22

Doogan, Father Robert
Pine Woods, (Louisiana)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

Blanc's letter of July 12 has just reached Doogan; he is truly sorry he neglected to mention the relationship between Numa Gilbert Guillard and Coralie Magdalen Lacour. They are first cousins, double related. When Doogan informed them he would be obliged to write for a dispensation they told him that on such occasions neither Mr. D. nor Mr. F. ever talked of such. The person who left notice in town for Doogan to go on such a day to marry them made no mention of their baptismal names. It would be too far for Doogan to go 35 miles to inform himself; he would have an answer from New Orleans sooner. In regard to the marriage of Jean Mary Armand Lacour and Aurore Marie De Blanc, Blanc misunderstood Doogan's letter. He did not know of their being second cousins until he was on the ground, the party assembled and 35 miles from Alexandria. He therefore acted on Blanc's advice on such occasions: To marry them, and write to Blanc immediately. When he inquired of any relationships they answered that it was far off yet it turned out to be second cousins. He supposes second cousins among French Creoles are looked on as far off relatives. Blanc is to inform him in a positive manner what he should do in the future.

V-4-l A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
6


1841 Jul 23

(Rosati), Joseph, Bishop of St. Louis
Rome, (Italy)

To Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

(Rosati) has not forgotten Blanc's commissions. He will find attached (no enclosure) a copy of the decree of the erection of the See of New Orleans, which after mush research was found in the Archives of the Consistory. Unfortunately this see was erected too late and not endowed as the kings of Spain were accustomed to do. This document could only serve as a history of Blanc's diocese. (Rosati) has searched in vain so far to find a copy of the treaty of the ceding of Louisiana from Spain to France and from France to the United States. He has hopes of finding this document at Paris through the Nuncio. The refusal by Father (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.) of the coadjutorship of Detroit has been accepted. He will remain in Texas as Vicar Apostolic. Father (Peter Paul) Lefevere has been named coadjutor and administrator of Detroit. To avoid delay, the pope did not wish to wait until he had an answer from the Bishops of the United States. (Rosati's) trip will not be all in vain for his diocese. He will have three priests, two clerics, four brothers and 4 Jesuits leaving Livorno for New York in a few days. From Lyons he will have their colony of Clerics of St. Viator. Father (John) Timon, (C.M.) has arrived in Paris. Bishop (John) England is already on the way to Rome. (Rosati) saw Father (Louis) Boué here; he is now at Lyons. Bishop (Ignatius) Bourget of Montreal is now in Rome; he has obtained from the Father General some Jesuits for the missions to the Indians of Canada along the Columbia. Father (Peter) Chazel(le, S.J.) with several other French Jesuits is destined for this mission. (Rosati) has already talked to Blanc about his mission to San Domingo. All his dispatches have been returned. (Rosati) will go to New York and Philadelphia and after the consecration of Father (Peter) Richard Kenrick, his coadjutor, he will embark for Haiti. He learned by chance of Father Jeanjean's death. Blanc cannot imagine how much Pope (Gregory XVI) esteems the (American) Bishops. In an audience on the 11th of this month he told (Rosati) to tell all the bishops that he was very much satisfied with them because of the union among them, their attachment to the Holy See, their Councils, etc. Propaganda has had their four Councils printed and put them into its collection of papal bulls. They have also made an octave edition of which (Rosati) will have several copies for America. (Rosati) will go through Lyons; Boué has asked him to come to his house. (Rosati) is to consecrate Father Janvier's church at St. Julien. Blanc did not yet know there is now a Bishop for California when Father (Peter J.) De Smet, (S.J.) wrote (Rosati) on Blanc's behalf to make known the needs of that country to Propaganda.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
19


1841 Jul 24

Armengol, C.M., Father B(onaventure)
Assumption, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Blanc's letter to the trustees of St. Elizabeth's Church, (Paincourtville, Louisiana) has had happy results. The people blamed their priests' conduct very strongly; they came to the Seminary last Thursday and this was what was decided on Saturday. The Superior of the Seminary will send a priest to say Mass every Sunday and feast day, hear Confessions, prepare the children for First Communion and perform marriage ceremonies. As to the burials, everyone will be free to bury where they wish, either in the parish cemetery or that of St. Elizabeth's Chapel. The trustees agreed to pay the Superior $600 every year in May. Also they leave to the Seminary all the fees of marriages and baptisms; for burials the Seminary will collect the part belonging to the pastor according to the rate at Assumption. For past services they have given Armengol two notes for $400 each, payable in March, 1843 and March, 1844. Father (Peter) Lucas is a little indisposed with the fever.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
3


1841 Jul 24

Blanc, Ant(hony), Bishop of New Orleans
New Orleans, Louisiana

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Blanc has received a letter from Bishop (Richard) Whelan of Richmond in which he tells him that his efforts to find Mr. M. Neilson have been fruitless. There is a record of a William M. Nelson who kept a tavern at Hanover court House, 30 miles from Richmond. Since Blanc has lost Purcell's previous letter he asks for another giving all the information that Purcell can acquire about the subject. Asks Purcell whether Archbishop Samuel Eccleston has written to Rome on the decree of the last Provincial Council on the last wills of the bishops. He has not complied with the decree and feels that it increases, instead of obviates the inconvenience. Unless he hears otherwise he intends to write the Propaganda on the subject. The Rev. J. Audizio, 14 years cure of Lafourche Interieure (Louisiana) has died at forty. Blanc says he was unprepared for this loss. Has lost five priests this year, two by death and three going back to Europe. Some have come in including three seminarians in theology.

II-4-g A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
6


1841 Jul 25

(Hailandière), Bishop Cel(estin de la)
Vincennes, (Indiana)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

(Hailandière) and many others regret that Blanc will not be coming for their ceremonies. He is happy about the recruits arriving for Blanc from Europe. Well chosen young people are a thousand times preferable. Like Blanc, (Hailandière) needs only priests who speak English well but he sees none coming. In regard to Father (John) Lefranc, if he has the courage to undertake their difficult missions and if their cold climate does not discourage him, Blanc could write that (Hailandière) would accept him on trial. If he comes, Blanc is to send (Hailandière) a copy of the letter from the Bishop of Rennes. (Hailandière) regrets what has happened in regard to Father (John Mary) Odin, C.M.; evil is being done for Detroit; only today (Hailandière) received a letter complaining of not having a pastor. There would be time yet to write to Rome; Blanc is known there and he knows Odin. He sends his regards to Father (Maurice) Berel.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
5


1841 Jul 26

Martin, Father J(ea)n
Fausse-Riviere, (Louisiana)

to Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Blanc will have received Martin's last letter of June 27, eve of his arrival at Avoyelles, where he spent a week. The day of his arrival he dined with the pastor Father (N.) Francais; he slept at George Baron's house. On July 3 the cornerstone of the church was laid; it is 62 by 35 feet. The first payment of $1200 is already due; they say the trustees have collected $500 and that most of the subscribers have not paid. They are counting for the first payment on Baron who has bought part of the church land for $1400. Francais seems to insist on leaving Avoyelles. Martin's age does not permit him to return to Avoyelles; they need a young vigorous priest. Right now Blanc would cause great joy to the trustees, Martin's most cruel enemies, if Blanc takes him from Pointe Coupée and cause great dissatisfaction to the majority of parishioners who are dissatisfied with the trustees. So it would not be good for Martin or for religion to leave just now. As soon as Martin's case is settled he proposes to retire to some corner to busy himself only with his eternal salvation. As for the petition presented to Blanc some ladies of Pointe Coupée refused to sign and a great part of those who did are young women or women one sees in church only on big feasts. Martin's reasons for leaving the church at Pointe Coupée are:
1. Because of the evil actions of the trustees toward him;
2. It was prudent to leave a place where he was alone and exposed to malicious tongues and calumny. He goes to the Church there only for burials and services and some of those were held at Fausse Rivière and the bodies taken to Pointe Coupée. When the great heat is over, Martin will have a small building made in the yard of the church at Fausse Rivière for the priest; just now Martin lives at the home of Michael Olinde. Tomorrow he is going to say Mass and baptize at Layment Enet's; Thursday he will baptize at Mrs. Celestin Goudran's and the next week at Widow Simon Porché's and at Mrs. Anthony Decuir's, the mulatto. And then at the big Bayou where they have been asking for him. They have not yet paid him the last dispensation which is $20. Sickness has begun at Pointe Coupée. The pastor of Baton Rouge, Father (Joseph) Evrar(d) has left his parish and Father (P.) Armand has left for France.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. Folio
13


1841 Jul 27

Boullier, (C.M.), Father J(ohn)
Paris, (France)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

Yesterday Boullier received Blanc's letter of June 4. They have been at Paris for about a month and leave next Thursday for Lyons. When he returns to Paris he will carry out Blanc's commissions. Choiselat Gallien let them know that Blanc was allotted $3000 this year. They learned from a letter from Bishop (Joseph) Rosati from Rome that the refusal of Detroit by Father (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.) was accepted by Propaganda who appointed him Vicar Apostolic of Texas with episcopal power. Father (Peter Paul) (Lefevere) Lefebvre of he Diocese of St. Louis, who was theologian to Bishop (Charles Forbin) Janson at the last Baltimore Council, was named to Odin's place as Administrator of Detroit. Boullier is grateful to learn of the zeal of his parishioners in finishing their church. The superior General (Vincentians) has given them hope to bring several with them. Today Boullier saw Father Boguio; he is bored in Paris and would like to return to Blanc's diocese. If he could have a place other than assistant at the Cathedral he would leave quickly.
P.S. Father (John) Timon, (C.M.) asks Boullier to mention that he had hoped to receive letters from (Alphonse) de Saligny of Texas; he does not know what has become of them.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 8vo.
1 12


1841 Jul 27

Timon, C.M., Father J(ohn)
Paris, (France)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

Timon has just received Blanc's letter of May 27. He will bring Choiselat Gallien Blanc's letters tomorrow. Blanc has been allocated 15,000 francs. Father (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.)'s refusal has been accepted but he is named Vicar Apostolic of Texas and Bishop in Partibus Inf(idelium); he will continue thus as superior of the (Vincentians) in that country. Father (Peter Paul) Lefev(e)re, who accompanied their Bishop, named Bishop of Detroit, was once a fellow student with Father (Peter Francis) Beauprez at the seminary. Timon includes a letter to Odin; it will go by Galveston unless Blanc has more certain information of where he is. Timon has sent drafts to place to Odin's credit for $1500 at Messrs. Denoist and Hackney of New Orleans and expects a friend to deposit $400 additional. Father (John) Boullier, (C.M.) also writes to Odin but thinks to give him the same advice by way of Matagorda Bay. Timon will bring a number of clergymen and some of their French priests at his return; this being the time of Sexennial Assembly affairs not connected with it must be postponed. A (Vincentian) priest wishes to speak to Blanc about his brother, a Capuchin who speaks French well, though he is a Spaniard, has taught theology, and is now employed in the Secretary's office of the Archbishop of Toul. He would be willing to teach children in whatever time he might be free. As Timon has received a very favorable account of him, he thinks he might be useful and includes in the letter, this priest's letter to his brother. Timon will try to get the snuff box for Blanc; tomorrow Timon starts.

A.L.S. 3pp.

Enclosure:

--------
1841 Jul 22

(Codina, O.M.Cap.), Father Salvador
Tulle, (France)

To Father Codina, C.M.
Paris, (France)

Today Salvador received Codina's letter. He would not object to going to America if he could be useful. However he would like to know first what he would be doing, where he would be lodged, whether he could make enough to come back in case the climate was not agreeable or his Superiors called him back. Also what language is spoken; would he embark from Marseilles or Barcelona? Codina is to write what the country is like. Salvador has no news of Antonio and other relatives; he has had no further letter after the one written from Madrid. (A pencilled note on the address side of the letter, partly illegible): He has been professed; he writes from the office of the secretary to the Bishop of Toul.

A.L.S. (Spanish) 2pp.

V-4-L A.L.S. (English and Spanish) 5pp. 8vo.
12


1841 Jul 28

Bonniot, Father J.M.
Paris, (France)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Bonniot has not forgotten Blanc's words before leaving - that he was called to do much good in Blanc's diocese. The ennui of which Bonniot spoke to Father (Stephen) Rousselon in his letter from Havre torments him in the midst of his agreeable surroundings. He is convinced that he should consider himself only temporarily in Europe. His confessor, Father Barre, is of the same opinion. Bonniot believes that an active life in the missions would strengthen him. He enters fully into that beautiful prayer of St. Martin with which Blanc inspired him while officiating at the Cathedral seven years ago. In Paris Bonniot is staying at the Foreign Missions Seminary. The old superiors whom he knew, especially Father Dubois, have shown much interest in him. He says Mass at a convent every day and preaches there on Sundays. The promoter finds his exeat a little short. Father (John) Timon, (C.M.) and (John) Boullier, (C.M.) thought they should give him a much more eulogistic testimony but Bonniot wanted one only about his character as a priest. Bonniot asks Blanc to talk to John Labarre who for four years was so devoted to him,.
P.S. There are some little missals selling at 19 francs; if Blanc wants some he is to let Bonniot know.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
5


1841 Jul 28

Chandlery, P.M.P., St. Gabriel College
Vincennes, Indiana

to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Chandlery, with many others, has been anticipating seeing Blanc at Vincennes on or before August 8, the time appointed for the consecration of the Cathedral. Their hopes have been frustrated by a letter specifying some account of Mr. Laucal. Chandlery desires to place himself under Blanc's protection as a person desiring to serve the Church. He has learned that Blanc is much in want of persons to serve some of his missions who speak English. Chandlery was desired by a priest from New Orleans about 12 months ago to come to Blanc; he gave Chandlery a breviary. Chandlery would have been in New Orleans last February but he thought it judicious to try how he could stand the western part of the country for a summer. He has been in college upwards of 20 years; he has studied theology and completed his course. He has been solicited to receive orders since he has been here but refused for plausible reasons. He is not obligatory to the Bishop of Vincennes. Laucal, with whom Chandlery has been principally during his abode in this part, will be able to give Blanc any information he may wish to know. If Blanc approves Chandlery would like to come without delay but he has lent his money to the College and does not know whether he will be able to get it back before the return of the superior, Father (J. Peter Bellier), who is gone to France to secure masters for the College. He sends respects to Laucal.
P.S. Blanc is not to be diffident, thinking that he is taking a subject from this diocese, as Chandlery will not stay here.

V-4-l A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
4


1841 Jul 29

Doogan, Father (Robert)
Pinewoods, (Louisiana)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Doogan recollects that Blanc requested him to give information on the state of his parish. He does not have his papers and registers with him but since his arrival he has baptized about 25 and there are perhaps 10 more under instructions. His stations are: Halloway's Prairie and Plaisance, where churches are to be erected; and Bayou Boeuf and Kelcasieu (Calcasieu). He also goes many other places. He has been out the most part of June and this month as most of his parishioners live in the pine woods. He lives about 3 miles from town in the woods.

V-4-l A.L.S. 2pp. Folio
6


1841 Jul 30

Brassac, Father H(ercu)le
Paris, (France)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louis(ia)na

Brassac received Blanc's letter of April 30 announcing the news of Father (Auguste) Jeanjean's death. He realizes what a loss this is, a bond broken after twenty years. Jeanjean's prudence was aided by his tact and observation. Something happened between Brassac and Jeanjean which left a bitter feeling but during their trip to England and Ireland in 1839 Jeanjean made him forget it. Jeanjean wrote to Brassac last December last December through Sister Regina (Smith, S.C.). Brassac saw Father (P.?) Armand on his way through Paris; he was still suffering. He left very quickly for his country. He wanted very much to get some Sisters of (the Institut) de Bon Secours of Paris to establish them in New Orleans but Brassac did not want to get involved in that without knowing whether Bland had agreed. Father (J.M.) Bonniot is in Paris at the Foreign Missions Seminary. Brassac also received Blanc's letter of June 4 yesterday. Brassac has not the least doubt about the payment of the draft on Mr. D. It could not have been the danger of non-payment which authorized so exorbitant a premium; the need of Voisin and Company was enough to make this draft good. A person for Jefferson college who could also direct the convent is very difficult to find. Of the 12 or 15 priests who have come to Brassac to send to the United States, Brassac has accepted about three but their Bishops keep them or advance them rather than allow them to leave. Blanc knows that Father (Peter Paul Lefevere) Lefebvre of Missouri had been appointed to Detroit and in his place Father (John Mary) Odin has been made Vicar Apostolic of Texas with orders to accept. The (Association of the) Propagation of the Faith has been much less generous this year to the United States. The aid imposed by Rome in favor of the European missions is the cause. Blanc's share is quite small and yet more than 1840 since they allocated 14 or 15,000 f(rancs). Brassac is happy that some observations made to the author of the report have helped in this small increase. This letter will be taken to New York by 5 Religious of the Sacred Heart who are going to rejoin Madame (Elizabeth) Gallitzin; they are to leave the 8thof next month.
(P.S.) Bishop (Joseph) Rosati is still in Italy. Fathers (John) Timon, (C.M.) and (John) Boullier, (C.M.) left yesterday for Lyons and Rome.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
17


1841 Jul 30

Jouanneault, Father V(ictor)
Thibodauxville, (Louisiana)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

The judge of Thibodaux Parish has been in a state of delirium for almost a week. The seals cannot be broken and things are at a standstill until after the election of a new judge. Jouanneault fears the one to succeed Judge Knoblock is one who has sworn hatred to the Catholic religion. Costs are going up so Jouanneault can almost guarantee that the proceeds of the sale will only pay the debts which already amount to 4,000 piastres. In the effects was found an episcopal stole; if Blanc would like to have it he is to say how much he would give for it. Jouanneault has in his room the little chalice which Father (John B.) Audizio bought from the late Father Jeanjean as he knows it was not paid for. Jouanneault will turn over the amount when he comes to New Orleans. Several months ago Audizio told him that it had been a long time since he had an accounting to Blanc and that he had not written down the dispensations. Father (Stephen) Rousselon could verify this and send their account. Blanc told the trustees that the sacred objects could not be sold; Blanc no doubt meant the chalice, ciborium, ostensorium and pyx. They want to buy something but Jouanneault knows that they have no money. Audizio's furniture is in bad shape. The rectory is falling into ruin. Jouanneault is ready for anything except to have the title of pastor of Thibodaux although he would not be sorry to occupy the place provisionally. The general opinion is that a Will will not be found and that the books are in a very bad state. Jouanneault has just received word that the judge has died. He hopes in a week the seals will be broken. Tomorrow there is to be a meeting of the trustees. They have told him verbally that they would continue Audizio's salary; he hopes to have it in writing tomorrow.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
5


1841 Jul 31

Fransoni, Cardinal J(ames) Ph(ilip)
Rome, (Italy)

To Father John Mary Odin
(New Orleans, Louisiana?)

Fransoni does not wish to write about how disturbed he was over Odin's letter refusing the Coadjutorship of Detroit. It was not because of Odin's absence from the mission or of Father (John) Timon, now Prefect, that the Sacred Congregation accepted it but because this mission is to be a Vicariate Apostolic and episcopal powers are to be given to Odin. By the attached letters (no enclosure) Pope Gregory XVI creates the Vicariate and names Odin Bishop of Claudiopolis and Vicar Apostolic of Texas; Odin is to accept for the good of religion.

V-4-l A.L.S. (Latin) 1p. 4to.
4


1841 Jul 31

Whelan, David
New York, N.Y.

To Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Has delayed answering Purcell's letter because he was uncertain as to the course of action he would pursue. He had written to his brother Bishop (Richard) Whelan of Richmond expressing his repugnance to returning to Richmond. The bishop reprimanded him and then told him of an opportunity to study at Paris, if David would go there the Bishop would accede to his wishes. Knowing that Purcell wanted him to go to France he accepted the offer and has arranged to go to France on the ship Baltimore. He goes against his inclination and places the responsibility on Purcell. Asks Purcell's prayers for his safety. Would like letters from Purcell.
P.S. Asks that Purcell send certain books.

II-4-g A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
2


1841 Aug

(Blanc), Bishop Anthony
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Subscription for the building of a church at the corner of St. Claude and Bayou (St. Augustine's). The need of a church in this section of the city is felt everywhere. (Blanc) does not believe they should delay any longer to propose that the faithful unite in building one, each according to his means. Despite the hard times, (Blanc) does not doubt their success if each one will add his offering to the amount (Blanc) wishes to give for the same purpose. Father (Stephen) Rousselon, vicar general, will conduct this undertaking; the lists will be signed by him and the amounts will be payable to his order one month after work is begun.

V-4-l Draft S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
2


1841 Aug 1

Armengol, C.M., Father B(onaventure)
Assumption, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Armengol received Blanc's letter of July 26. Father (P.J.) Doutreluingne, (C.M.) leaves today for Baton Rouge and will return to the seminary at the beginning of September for the retreat if Blanc wishes. The young man about whom Armengol spoke is a Creole of this parish, of a good family. His name is Joseph Simonaux; he has talent. Another who could take the place of Domingues is Joseph Hebert of this parish. His house is opposite the Seminary on the other side of the Bayou. He is 19 and has great talent. He could go to classes with his cousin Blanchard. There are other creole candidates in this parish of whom he will speak to Blanc when he sees him. Blanc will be sorry to know that Father (John) Chandy, (C.M.) has been ordered by Father (John) Timon, (C.M.) to go to Donaldsonville to help Father (J.M.) Masnou, (C.M.). But Armengol will recall him at the end of vacation if the priests that Timon has promised him have not yet arrived.
P.S. (C.) Lucas is well.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
10


1841 Aug 1

Lefranc, Father (John?), St. Mary's Seminary
Barrens, (Missouri)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Blanc)'s letter plunged Lefranc into the deepest discouragement. (Blanc's) considerations are just; it would be desirable to make them before concerning himself with the fate of a guilty one who does not deserve it and to ask for his exeat. Lefranc foresaw it and that is what made him put off his departure for eight months and resist (Blanc's) wishes and cause him dissatisfaction several days before (Blanc's) departure for the synod. Lefranc does not complain of having come here; he has the happiness of celebrating Mass. He will not go to Indiana; he does not know English; he could do nothing there. He will not remain at the seminary. In (Blanc's) diocese he is known only as a priest; he is known to many of the young people of Louisiana who have left the college and returned to their families. He rejects all ideas of entering the Congregation. He does not know what will become of him when he has spent the little he has. (Blanc) perhaps thought after the letter from Mr. Soniat that Lefranc would want to be placed near him; Lefranc would never consent to that. They know, (Blanc) said, around Carrollton that Lefranc was a priest. He fears he may not be able to bear this trial. Father (Joseph Paquin, C.M.) Pasquin has commissioned him to say that his letter is very important, that it contains a receipt for $500; he asks (Blanc) to try to have it delivered safely.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
3


1841 Aug 5

Brogard, Father J(oseph N.)
Natchez, (Mississippi)

to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Brogard has nothing of interest to write since the cathedral is not yet begun. As soon as Bishop (John Joseph) Chanche had the lot the trustees asked him to begin; he told them that it was not he but they who should build it, that he would put his name on the list of subscribers for $1,000 but could not pay it now. This irritated them. Brogard fears if they build it they will also want to take charge of the pew rent. Since Chanche left, Brogard's health has been very bad. Perfect concord reigns among them.
P.S. Mrs. (Felicité) Gireaudeau has let a house for Chanche's use; it has six rooms on the ground floor; the rent is $550 a year.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
4


1841 Aug 5

Holmes, John
New York, (New York)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Chelsea, (Massachusetts)

He writes Brownson to tell him he has forwarded to him a package by Harnden's express. He wonders if Brownson received the package. He asks Brownson to please not form an opinion of him on the strength of his last letter which was written under intense feelings. He has paid great attention to the subject of Political Economy and is much interested in it. He is in a manner disgusted, though, with trade, and would like pursuits of a more congenial nature. But due to entire ignorance of the rules of composition, he cannot at present enter into such pursuits. He is confident of no lack of ideas on the subject, but that he lacks the common mode of conveying them. He does not wish to trouble Brownson by a lengthy answer, and he may feel sure that no offense will be taken whatever may be the nature of Brownson's reply.

I-3-f A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
1


1841 Aug 5

Jordan, Father Paul
Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) du(!) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Jordan is pleased to receive a reply to his letter of July 13. Father (P.J. Doutreluingne, C.M.) has just arrived without a letter either from Blanc nor from the superior of the seminary. Luckily Jordan had met him during retreat; otherwise he would not have permitted him to even say Mass. Jordan asks Blanc to buy six medals and six crosses and he will repay him. In a short time Jordan will begin a subscription for a chapel on the other side of St. John's up above. Everyone finds it too far to come down to the other church. He would take care of it along with the other if he receives Blanc's permission.
(P.S.) Jordan would be very glad if Blanc would charge Doutreluingne's expenses to the administration. The trustees will not pay; they say there is no need for two priests. And if Father (Joseph) Evrard said two could not live, there is all the more reason now. One must trust in God but also do his part. If Blanc could make Doutreluingne understand when he is at Blanc's house it would perhaps be better as Jordan does not want to contradict Doutreluingne or spoil his plans.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
4


1841 Aug 5

Santelli, Father (Toussaint) T. Santo
Mackinac, Michigan

to Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Three years ago the last of August, Santelli arrived in America stationed as a missionary pastor by Bishop (Frederick) Résé in the missions of Mackinac, Point St. Ignace, and Sault Ste. Marie with other adjacent stations. The cold climate and heavy work caused a lung ailment and the doctors assure him that he cannot pass another winter here without endangering his life and that he needs a mild climate like Blanc's diocese or Florida. He would not be useless if Blanc would receive him. He was born in Italy and ordained by the present Cardinal Archbishop of Milan. For 3 years he was rector of St. Viator College in Milan and for 7 years rector of the Imperial College at Lodi and then "dragged" to America by the unfortunate Résé. He has all his papers from Italy and his superior, Father (Francis Vincent) Badin, and all his missions can vouch for him. He knows English passably. Mr. Abbott, the leading Catholic of Mackinac and a friend of Father J(ames) I(gnatius) Mullon could give Blanc information about Santelli.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
5


1841 Aug 6

Young, Father Joshue M.
Lancaster, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Asks that Purcell visit Lancaster to dispel the impression made by his hasty departure in November, that he was angry with the parish. Suggests that in visiting Zanesville he stop and visit the parish for a day or two. The principal cause of Purcell's displeasure has been removed since Mr. Geraghty has given, under the persuasion of Mr. Phelan, the deed of the church in the form Purcell prescribed. Young believes that Mr. Geraghty has been maligned, especially by an article in the Telegraph. Young will be compelled to visit Cincinnati for his mission and for the good of his soul. Asks the time of the annual retreat so he can combine both. Statistics for Lancaster, Columbus, Newark, Logan, Delaware, and other places. Has not yet secured the deed for the church at Logan. He asks that the one who writes the account for the Catholic Almanac, note that mid-way between Columbus and Newark there is an infant Irish settlement expecting to build a church, and offering a suitable place for the emigrant. It is in Jersey Township, Licking County. Asks that his residence be noted as Lancaster. Suggests an episcopal visit to Columbus but more a regular German clergyman. If he visits the place Young asks to be seasonably advised. Was absent on the feast of St. Peter and will make the effort requested by the bishop later.

II-4-g A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
8


(1841) Aug 7

Jamey, Father V(ictor)
Opelousas, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

The power of attorney Blanc received from the Rossi sisters is not in proper form and as Mr. Bignon was afraid of it, Jamey has set about straightening it out. The procuration stated that one of the sisters did not appear before a notary but (before) her religious superior, and it does not prove that they are really sisters of the late Father (Flavius Henry) Rossi. While Jamey was at Attorney Lewis' house Bignon went past and agreed to put it in order, giving notes payable October 1. What is coming to the three sisters amounts to $4248. Father (Henry) Duranquet, (S.J.) having brought the procuration Jamey was convinced that it lacked the essentials. Jamey would like to keep Father (Joseph) Billon longer; however is long trips are made. It is true he would do better here than any other place. St. Martinville with its pretension to be the Versailles of Louisiana differs no less from St. Landry than a good village in France differs from a small town. After Father (Joseph) Evrard's show of character on board the ship on the last trip to France, Blanc will not be surprised at what happened in Baton Rouge. This young man needs to serve as an assistant. Jamey had grave reasons for asking for another curate or a change to Natchitoches. Poor Father (N.) Francais has to live with his mistakes. Jamey was often offered a curate in France but he did not want one. Father (James H.) Joubert's friendship led to his having one in spite of himself. For four years he has asked to go back to France and is not inclined to change his resolution. No parish in Blanc's diocese offers a field as vast and fruitful as the Cathedral and the religious communities with their boarding schools but Jamey repeats he never had the intention of changing through inconsistency or self interest. He desires that God will send Blanc enough priests and that he himself can go back to Besancon.

V-4-k A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
11


1841 Aug 9

Armengol, Magin
( , Spain?)

To Bishop Anthony Blanch(!)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Armengol asks Blanc to give the enclosed to his brother (Father Bonaventure Armengol, C.M.) and nephew at Assumption, LaFourche. (No enclosure).

V-4-l A.L.S. (Spanish) 2pp. 8vo.
2


1841 Aug 12

Bruyère, Father (John)
Bardstown, (Kentucky)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Bruyère writes about the results of his trip as Blanc wished him to at his departure from New Orleans. On his arrival at Bardstown the Bishops thought it good for Bruyère to go to take the mineral waters as a preservative against the illnesses which threaten foreigners in their first year in America. On one hand he is called to New Orleans by the desire to be useful to Blanc and on the other hand he thinks of the difficulties of boredom if he stays at the bishop's. Mr. Raynel (Father Ignatius a. Reynolds?) who is back in the good graces of the court, has offered to be his English teacher. To do so he has to snatch him from the arms of Bishop (Benedict Joseph) Flaget who with his coadjutor, lavishes kindnesses on Bruyère. They seem to want to take him to Louisville with them. Blanc can see his position is delicate. He believes that his ministry at New Orleans would not last long for he knows how soon a permanent place in France would have worn him out. Missionary life suits him. If it is not given to him to stay permanently with Blanc, the case of communication between Louisville and New Orleans will at least give him the satisfaction of making short trips into his territory. He sends Blanc his thanks for all the kindness he has received from him.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
3


1841 Aug 14

Peirce, Isaac B.,
Trenton, (New York)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Massachusetts

He is still in Trenton where he has spent his best days in the service of a people and he is only a looker. He has not preached in Trenton since June of last year. But for some friends in Newport he would be almost altogether out of employment as a minister. His income has now come to about 40 cents a day to maintain himself and his daughters, and to entertain company. He tried to find a home in New England last summer, but he could get no employment whatever as a minister. He says he very much enjoyed his visit to the Brownson's in Boston. He asks for information about Mr. Ripley and Mr. Parker to whom he will probably write. Also about Mr. Robbins, whose ideas, in many cases, pleased him. He thanks Brownson for the copy of "Charles Elwood" and says he enjoyed it. He asks if Brownson will kindly send Miss Marhineau's "The Man and the Hour." He would like also to read the "Review" but cannot get it. All he gets in the way of periodicals is the "Christian Examiner."

I-3-f A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
2


1841 Aug 15

L(ynch), C. A(nne)
Providence, (Rhode Island)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Mass(achusetts)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Mass(achusetts)

She tells Brownson that he is a metaphysician and that she is delighted to know that he is commencing a work on metaphysics. She advises Brownson not to abandon lecturing as it is a vocation for which he is particularly fitted. Prayer to her is an aspiration, a burst of gratitude as grateful emotion, the communion of the soul with the Father of spirits. She does not object to Brownson's attaching the new to the old and denies that the former grows out of the latter, but only objects to reproducing the old in the new.

I-3-f A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
1


1841 Aug 16

Rousselon, Father E(tienne)
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

On August 17 Rousselon gave the nuptial blessing to Henri, slave of Lino de la Rosa and Marie, slave of Joseph Kerr. Witnesses: Mr. Richard, Mr and Mrs. Jacques. Mrs. Kerr was present. Attached is the permission of de la Rosa, dated July 26, 1841; (Kerr is spelled) Carr.

V-4-l A.D.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
5


1841 Aug 17

Beauprez, Father P(ierre) F(rancois)
Vermillionville, (Louisiana)

to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Beauprez has waited to let Blanc know the result of his letter to the trustees in the hope of writing something satisfactory but there is nothing. They have not only not taken into consideration what Blanc proposes about the building of a new church and the enclosing of a cemetery for the Protestants but they are determined to make no change for the better according to what Father (Charles Henry Boutelou de) St. Aubin told him a few days ago. Blanc saw that everything was in ruins. He fears the contractor will have to take away the new kitchen (?) which is still without a chimney because it is not paid for. No one any longer pays pew rent because they know that for 10 or 12 years the rich, and amongst them the trustees, have not paid. They seem to be dissatisfied with Beauprez, probably because he wants to improve things and for that one must make collections. Or rather it is because they want Father (Lawrence) Peyretti who lets them leave everything as it is. If Beauprez had been in Blanc's place they would have been without a pastor a long time ago; there would be no more effective method to remedy it. That is how Bishop (William Louis) Dubourg felt in 1822 and 1824 when he told them he could not send them a pastor until they put the church in a decent condition and provided the things necessary for Mass. Also that they pay a fixed salary of $600 and half the fees. Beauprez showed them the two letters from Dubourg three months ago. Beauprez requested the same basis but they would not consent. Beauprez asks Blanc to give them a salutary punishment and to withdraw him; he can no longer stay. St. Aubin complained that the trustees gave him a salary of only $1200 and that they had appointed Mr. Lacombe singer and sacristan; Beauprez hopes Blanc will hear his just complaints and consider his reasons for wanting to leave.
P.S. Beauprez thinks it his duty to explain it once and for all.

V-4-l A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
6


1841 Aug 17

deTheux, S.J., Father T(heodore), St. Charles College
Grand Coteau, L(ouisian)a

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

DeTheux has recovered from his bilious fever. The rector and two of the teachers who were stricken with the same thing have also recovered. None of the students were very ill except Mr. Ségur who was well on the way to recovery when his Father came to inquire about him. Blanc promised to send the Annals of the Propagation of the Faith for the two groups of this parish; they will be delighted to receive them.
(P.S.) They are forming a third group.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
3


1841 Aug 17

Jordan, Father Paul
Manchac, (Louisiana)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans. (Louisiana)

Jordan must always return to the same subject. He would like to talk only of ascetical things but is sometimes drawn into worldly affairs. He would also like to have an answer to the moral subjects of which he has spoken in different letters. He has received no other salary from the trustees except the burial fees. After all the expenses of the house and telling Blanc how difficult it was, Blanc told him to call attention to it through Father (P.J.) Doutreluingne, (C.M.), his confrere. But the trustees tell him that the treasury is empty, that they cannot keep two priests. He furnished the means for Doutreluingne to go to The Plains but on his arrival the horse dropped dead.
P.S. Jordan is at Manchac to prepare for First Communion.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
4


1841 Aug 18

O'Reily, Father M.D.
Vicksburg, Missi(ssippi)

to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Shortly after O'Reily's return form Blanc's city, he wrote to Bishop (Michael) Portier and requested him to send $100 before the first of the month. As he received no account from Portier O'Reily is persuaded that he did well in applying to Blanc for advice and aid. Under his present circumstances O'Reily could not meet the expenses of going to Mobile however delighted he may be in meeting his former associates and friends. Some weeks ago there was a fierce altercation between the different sects here which originated in the Methodists having taken possession of some school lands. The Episcopal clergyman and one of the Methodist preachers came out against each other in the city papers. In their altercations they gave severe blows to the Catholic Church. O'Reily wrote a few paragraphs in which he stated that it was the least the Catholic clergyman could expect from sects who were striving to cheat each other out of property which did not belong to either of them. He was informed that his card had the desired effect. A writer, supposed to be Dr. Anderson, came out in the "Whig," while O'Reily was in New Orleans, under the signature of "Lay-preacher" and wrote a few pages in behalf of Catholicity. The Presbyterians said it was written to prove to O'Reily that Anderson was a Catholic. O'Reily had the pleasure of summoning the people to church last Sunday by a bell which for 200 years has been used in one of the churches of the patron saint of one of the richest bishoprics in the world, that of Toledo. It was cast in 1623 in the name of Leocadia. O'Reily thinks they can make some improvement on the building.

V-4-l A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
4


(1841) Aug 19

Ladavière, (S.J.), Father A. P(ierre)
St. Michael, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

It was impossible to see Ar(isti)de(?) Le Bourgeois(?) or to get an answer. Bourgeois himself is waiting for an answer from the Citizen's Bank to make arrangements for easy terms in case he buys it all, and in case he does that he was not inclined to give up anything except under exorbitant conditions. Blanc is to tell Ladavière what he wants him to do. The sale will take place on Thursday. The land and the slaves are to be sold in a single lot. If Blanc's man, Mr. Anderson, still wants to take the slaves for himself it will be the only good part of it. People have already asked about renting the houses and stores.
(P.S.) The sale is August 22. His lines suffer a little from the fever which is a rather faithful companion.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
3


1841 Aug 19

Roothaan, S.J., Father Johann, Sup. Gen.
Rome, Italy

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

He thanks Purcell for his good wishes for the Jesuits as well as for his letter of June 16. He hopes that these beginnings will increase slowly and be completed. Purcell knows that the things done so far are only a beginning which were undertaken with great difficulty because of the scarcity of workers. Lately he has sent two fathers to the missionary province capable of teaching and two brothers. May Divine Providence grant that they may be like those that have gone ahead. Purcell will know that the death of Father J. Van Sweevelt of St. Louis University has hurt them very severely. For the Germans something can be done in time. There are not wanting German youths who offer themselves for America, but they are yet youths and are not sufficiently established. Further, the needs of the German prelates is very great as Purcell knows. But there are some who know or learn English, who can leave Germany without so much difficulty to do such great work. Father )Peter) Verhaegen cannot take up the burden which Purcell himself judges to be too great, however, Father Verhaegen thinks he can support all the burdens. Purcell is to trust that they will not forget his goodness. (Manuscript almost illegible).

II-4-g A.L.S. 1p. 8vo. (Latin)
6


1841 Aug 19

Tellier, S.J., Father R.J.
Toronto, Canada

to O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Massachusetts

He asks to be permitted to offer Brownson a small discourse which circumstances caused him to improvise, and which his friends, including Monsignor (Armand Francois Marie de) Charbonnel made him determine to translate and publish in two languages. He is sure that the author of the "Review" will not be displeased, since he perhaps owes unconscious debt to Brownson. He likes to read the "Review." His discourse has been produced in his part of the country by both the French and English press. What sensation it created Brownson may see by referring to the "Toronto Mirror" (July 18). The "Mirror" is a Catholic paper of moderate reform. The "Patriot" is conservative, Tory and Anglican. The pamphlet is out in 3000 copies. He is at Toronto near Msgr. De Charbonnel, preparing to open a college. An enormous debt weighs upon the Cathedral. It must be defrayed. Would Brownson encourage him to circulate a few hundred pamphlets at about a dollar the copy? The idea he doesn't like; but it is necessary for the progress of education. Mr. Sheean, who saw Brownson at Montreal, sends his respects.

I-3-f A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo. (French)
4


1841 Aug 21

Armengol (C.M.), Father B(onaventure)
Assumption, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

On his arrival at the seminary Armengol found the enclosed letter from Father (P.J.) Doutreluingne, (C.M.). Armengol wrote him to come to the seminary when he had finished the missions of which he speaks. Father (Nicholas) Stehlé, (C.M.) is now on retreat; perhaps it would not be proper for him to go to Baton Rouge until Father (Paul) Jordan has left there. Blanc is to send all their necessary papers. Doutreluingne could make all the missions in the hardest places. Everyone here is well; it is not the same at St. Michael. There are many ill at the convent among the Sisters and children.

A.L.S. (French)

Enclosure:

--------
1841 Aug 11

Doutreluingne, C.M., Father P.J.
Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)

To Father (Bonaventure) Armengol
Assumption, (Louisiana)

Doutreluingne does not know what he should do. Jordan complains that he has nothing to live on and has told Doutreluingne several times that he is much surprised that he came there without letters from the Bishop to let him know why he sent him. Doutreluingne showed Jordan the letter Blanc had written Armengol but he was not satisfied. When Doutreluingne saw that Jordan complained about the upkeep of the house he told him that he would be on missions and that it would not cost as much. But Jordan asked if the Bishop no longer had confidence in him since he sent someone to follow his steps; he had already visited all the missions. Doutreluingne told him that the Bishop wished him to stay on this side of the river because no one could understand what Jordan said and hardly anyone came to church. Doutreluingne believes he was imprudent in coming here without a paper to show what he is to do. Jordan says he is there in place of Father (Joseph) Evrard who gave him the letter from the Bishop and so he has nothing to do with Doutreluingne. Doutreluingne will leave next Monday for Plains and Jackson. Jordan lent Doutreluingne his horse for a sick call; after he returned, the horse was found dead.

A.L.S.
V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 5pp. 4to. & 8vo.
9


1841 Aug 23

Jordan, Father Paul
Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) du(!) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Jordan writes to inform Blanc about the new decision of the trustees at West Baton Rouge. Father (P.J.) Doutreluingne, (C.M.) and Jordan had agreed that every time they had to have two Masses at Baton Rouge to go on sundays to the other side since Sunday is the most convenient time for the country people. Doutreluingne prefers that Jordan go since Blanc told Jordan that this is the parish he is to serve and since in his letter of May 28 Blanc said that even before Father (Joseph) Evrard's return there had to be someone there, that Jordan could go sooner to his new parish. There is not work enough here for two priests to live on, as the trustees and Evrard have said. If Jordan is not to stay there it is not worth while to buy wood, lard, etc. Since Jordan goes oftener to the other side, the trustees have decided to draw up a resolution as Blanc will see by the Certified Copy. Jordan has no salary since the baptisms are gratis as are the weddings and burials. They say since he is not engaged there it is no concern of his. Jordan has served there almost six months; they have offered him nothing and he has asked for nothing. But if such abuse is permitted, one is lost and beaten. Blanc is to tell Jordan whether he could encourage the building of a chapel at West Baton Rouge as they wish to do so.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
5


1841 Aug 25

Bonniot, Father J.M.
Paris, (France)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

A few days after sending his July 30 letter to Blanc, Bonniot was called to the bishop's house in Paris by one of the Vicars-General, Father Czeau, who said that he had asked Blanc for letters to enable him to stay in France because he had little hope of regaining his health. But being restored, he believed it would be against God's will if he did not settle and die in a country for which he had received Holy Orders and where he had been so long. The Vicar General spoke about Father Jeanjean with whom he seems to have been connected; he also talked of Messrs.(?) Foucher and Evremond. Fathers Jennesseau and Barra and Father Voisin who gave Bonniot his place as Chaplain of the Sisters of the Cross in Sevres Street, believed it would take at least a year in Paris to restore him. Barra, his confessor, thinks Bonniot would do well to return at once to Louisiana. If Bonniot gets an affirmative reply, he will see again the dear child of whom he spoke in his last letter. The Carmelites have welcomed him and given him Mass stipends; they admired his chalice and he let them copy the medallions. The chaplain of the hospital De Neckré has asked him to preach next Sunday. He has spent most of the 1000 piastres he had left after his trip to procure a missionary kit. Blanc is to tell Mr. Vezian to keep the money which Mr. Rufino will give him; he will need it for the customs. He is paying his passage with money which Jennesseau will advance on his pension. He leaves France without regret; it was not so in leaving Blanc's diocese. Father Permoli often noticed Bonniot's sadness.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
1


1841 Aug 25

Perché, Father (Napoleon) J(oseph)
Portland, (Kentucky)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

During the time Perché spent with Blanc last winter, Blanc indicated that he would like to have Perché in his diocese. If Blanc is still of this same disposition Perché offers his services. The position of the Dominicans in this country does not permit him to hope that he can find religious perfection there and his decision is to leave Kentucky. Bishop (Charles) Montault (des Isles) who has acted like a Father since Perché's childhood gave him a dimissorial which authorized him to return to his diocese whenever he wished, so one cannot say that Perché belongs to Bardstown. The expenditures incurred by Bishop (Benedict Joseph) Flaget for Perché's trip from Europe, etc., he believes he has been repaid by his services. Bishop David is dead; Flaget cannot be long in following him and on his death Perché foresees difficulties. Father (Ignatius A.) Reynolds is vicar general; his antipathy toward Europeans and especially the French would present difficulties. Perché does not wish to return to France. If Blanc does not receive him he will try to get into another diocese. He has not told Flaget yet but if Blanc's reply is favorable he will conclude the affair.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
5


1841 Aug 26

(Chanche), John Joseph, Bishop of Natchez
Baltimore, (Maryland)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Chanche) has Blanc's letter of the 7th. All accounts corroborate Blanc's fears that the dreadful visitor will not spare them this year. (Chanche) had several conversations with Father (Ignatius A.) Reynolds; Bishop (Guy Ignatius) Chabrat has secured Reynolds' future services by appointing him his vicar general. He will probably be the general factotum of the diocese and a good choice it is. Father (James M.) Lancaster who said he had written Blanc about Natchez, still entertains the wish. Much as (Chanche) wants him he could not advise him to quit at once the important station which he fills. (Chanche) is told there are two clergymen from the diocese of Vincennes who have applied but their letters arrived at Natchez after (Chanche's) departure. By an unaccountable mismanagement of Father (Joseph N.) Brogard, (Chanche) has not yet received one word from Natchez since he left it. What he fears is that not receiving an answer, those clergymen will think he does not want them. (Chanche) spoke to Father (Louis) Deluol about the intended novitiate of the Sisters of Charity. Deluol said he had written Blanc that his sentiments agreed entirely with Blanc's. Deluol was waiting for Bishop (Joseph) Rosati and Father (John) Timon who were to bring the modus operandi of the Sisters in Europe. Mississippi needs the assistance of the Sisters. (Chanche) will make the necessary arrangements with Father (Peter) Lucas about Blanc's little debt. (Chanche) will have to draw on Blanc in a few days for 6 or $700. To begin to keep house and to finish a church is no trifling matter. Archbishop (Samuel Eccleston) is not very well. (Chanche) sends regards to Fathers Rousselon and Maenhaut.

V-4-l A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
12


1841 Aug 26

Jouanneault, Father V(ictor)
Thibodauxville, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

A new judge was elected about 10 days ago. He is the best judge they could desire, except for the bad state of his health. The seals are to be broken today and the inventories made; they found no will. They found 60 piastres in money; the sale will bring at least 6,000. But there are 5,000 piastres in debts and if one adds the expenses of the legal proceedings, there will be nothing for the heirs. The lawyer has the papers and the notebook of Masses; Jouanneault guarantees that the administrator will have them said. It seems that Mr. Carlta(?) wishes to be named trustee. It is doubly impossible since another has already posted his petition and must give a bond larger than the inheritance. The trustee must at the same time be the administrator and a very brave man as well as a lawyer. Jouanneault hopes that Blanc will find a better priest than he to fill the important post of Thibodaux. It is very lucrative--about 3,000 piastres so it was bad management that put Father (John B.) Audizio in arrears. Jouanneault would like to know if Blanc intends to leave him at Thibodeaux after the auction either as assistant or pastor pro tem. He has an account of 100 piastres at his disposition but which he would not touch if Blanc changed him shortly. He would like to be able to buy some church ornaments but he does not know if he has enough money.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
3


1841 Aug 27

Badin, V.G., Father Francis Vincent
Detroit, Michigan

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

The people of Trinity Congregation of Detroit want to incorporate under the laws of Michigan. Sunday August 22, they met Father (Martin) Kundig, their pastor, who told them that this could not be done unless the Bishop or his representative agree with them. They then came to Badin to remove the obstacles to such incorporation. Badin says the Council of Baltimore says that bishops unwillingly consent to such incorporation. Asks Purcell what to do.
P.S. Asks what to do with Mrs. O'Reilly's bills. The corporation of St. Anne has published in the city papers Bishop Résé's failure to carry out his duties in the 999 year lease. They are determined not to pay more pew rent. Badin wrote to Cardinal Prefect and sent him the Gazette. Asks Purcell's and Father Henni's pardon for the poor reception they got at Detroit on their visit.

II-4-g A.L.S. 1P. 8VO.
4


1841 Aug 29

Lamy, Father John
Danville, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Asks for a dispensation for consanguinity in the first degree. The church at Mt. Vernon will soon be under roof, with the especial aid of Squire Colopy. Will be a handsome building. They have used already 60,000 bricks. Wants to know what Purcell thinks about having a frame church at Newark. Has been visiting Father (Joseph P.) Machebeuf who is in good health and begins to work at his church. Miss Brent would like to hear of her boy.

II-4-g A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
6


1841 Aug 28

Armengol, Father B(onaventure)
Assumption, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Armengol has received a letter from Father (John) Timon, (C.M.) from Paris dated July 11 in which he announces that a French Lazarist is ready to leave for the seminary. Timon also told him to send a priest to Natchitoches at once. Father (Nicholas) Stehlé, (C.M.) is the only one who is used to preaching in English. Armengol hopes Blanc approves. Stehlé will go to Donaldson to wait for the Rodolphe. Armengol asks Blanc to tell the captain to take this priest at Donaldson. He also asks Blanc to send Stehlé a copy of his faculties. Father (P.J.) Doutreluingne, (C.M.) left on the 23rd to visit the American missions. Father (Paul) Jordan unfortunately is not liked either at East or West (Baton Rouge).

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
7


1841 Aug 28

Seller, S.J., Father J(oseph)
Grand Coteau, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

They were sorry that Blanc could not come for the feast of St. Ignatius. They hope he can come for the distribution of prizes on September 14. All their students are well; they are preparing for their examinations and looking forward to vacation. All who were ill have recovered except Mr. d'Hope (?). If Count de Balderini comes Blanc is to tell him that C(?). Jeunepeaux of Paris has 961 francs for him. If Father Rousselon can come with Blanc it would give them much pleasure.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
2


1841 Aug 29

Doutreluingne, C.M., Father P.J.
Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Doutreluingne received Blanc's letter enclosing 10 piastres for ten Masses which he will say at once. He visited Plains and Jackson. At Plains there were many at Mass and several preparing for baptism. At Jackson he said Mass once at Mr. Cravan's and once at Widow Gleason's; many attended, there were 10 or 11 Communions. He has received a letter from the Superior of the seminary at La Fourche telling him to come there; he plans to go next Wednesday after being at Manchac.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
6


1841 Aug 30

Lefranc, Father (John)
(St. Mary of the Barrens, Missouri)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Lefranc asks (Blanc) to excuse the strong expressions in his last letter. He offers his Mass every day to obtain the grace not to make a false step. He explained (Blanc's) propositions to his director who said they must wait for time. Lefranc has given all his lay clothes to the poor. He knows he deserves a house of detention. His intention in disguising himself was to earn something to pay his board, to retire to France to some retreat house. (Blanc's) diocese is the only place in America where he could be employed; it is closed to him. There is no longer any trust between them. Lefranc asks for (Blanc's) advice but he is not to speak of joining the Congregation. He will always be grateful to (Blanc).

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
1


1841 Aug 31

Lupke, Card. Ant., Bishop of Anthedonen, Adm. Osnabrugi
Osnabrugi, Hanover

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Has received through Father Joseph Dahmann Purcell's letter of May 22, in which he speaks of the Cincinnati diocese and also of a fund of $1000, left by Bernard Kemper of the parish Alphonsen of the diocese of Osnabruges for the poor of that parish. Speaks of his joy at the progress of the church in Cincinnati as well as of the progress of the church in Europe. Has written to the parish priest of Kemper about the other legacy. The priest wrote back that Kemper intended to found perpetual masses from which the poor would be taken care of. For this purpose he turned over $1000 to the bishop for 100 years at 6% interest. Suggests that Purcell have the treasurer of the Association of the Propagation handle the money for them. Asks about Father (William J.) Horstman and Father (Augustus) Brickwedde, who are from that diocese.

II-4-g A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo. (Latin)
5


1841 Sep 1

Jones, R.
Steamer Baton Rouge

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

He hoped to enclose the favor which Blanc had accommodated him with but the trifling amounts he came in possession of were not enough to cover his current expenses. He hopes that after the epidemic is over times will brighten.

V-4-l A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
1


1841 Sep 1

(Loras), Mathias, Bishop of
Dubuque, (Iowa)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

Blanc's letter of July 23 arrived August 18. A little trip to Galena kept him from answering sooner. (Loras) has consulted his lawyer who assures him that there aliens can inherit. He appoints Blanc his universal heir. Today (Loras) is 49 years and 2 days old, sane and sound. He is pastor at Dubuque as Father (Joseph) Cretin has gone on a long mission to the Sioux around For Pierre. (Loras) has learned that a young priest from Lyons has arrived in Baltimore and will come without delay. He expects two from Belley, one from Belgium and one from Germany. He refused the young Eudist from Vincennes; he had no certificate. They must be very prudent; there is another scandal at Buffalo, New York, an Irish priest indicted three times. The famous (James) O'M(e)ara of Chicago, after the departure of Bishop (John Baptist) Purcell who could have suppressed the schism, officiated on the following Sunday in the presence of six people. Madame Exley is at Burlington where she has opened a school. Loras is glad that Miss Collins is well placed; her sojourn in the community will perhaps merit heaven for her. (Loras) would like Madame Ste. Arsenne to show Blanc his letter. He has had no alms from Lyons this year; he needs them badly. This great Indian mission needs much help. He will stop buying land and building churches. Blanc talks of building in the city. As soon as Blanc knows anything about Detroit, he is to send it on. Wisconsin and Galena weigh heavily on him.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
10


1841 Sep 1

Martin, Father (Jean)
Fausse Rivière, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

He will never wait for a letter as he did for Blanc's of July 24. Blanc's opinion of him has changed. Martin attributes it to the lies told by his enemies. Last night Martin received a letter from Father (Stephen) Rousselon in which he told of receiving the petition signed by members of the congregation. He sets little store by these petitions by the trustees, Jean Laurent and Gusta(ve) Delamare and by Alexandre Chitz and Laurent Chitz, ex-trustees. If Martin insisted on remaining at Pointe-Coupée a little against Blanc's will it was in the interest of religion and episcopal authority so often held in contempt. Delamare has said several times that they did not recognize the authority of the bishop; that they could send away a pastor if he did not suit them. And all the parishioners feel the same. But today all were convinced by a good lesson in the court room. The judge of the district who had gathered some information both at Mr. Tailor's where he lives, and elsewhere, stated that he absolutely did not believe what was said about Martin. Blanc is the only one to judge and decide. Martin will not leave the parish until he is cleared. They will welcome Blanc; Mrs. Ferrier has told Martin that her house and carriage are at Blanc's service. Michael Olinde has said the same. Martin would like to know in advance when Blanc will make his episcopal visit in order to prepare several children for First Communion and Confirmation. Last week he had 39 baptisms; last night he made a sick call to a house where all had signed the petition.
(P.S.) Mrs. Valery Ledoux and young Provosty acted very badly toward Martin; the first said they did not need a priest; the second said they had never had a good priest at Pointe-Coupée.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
12


1841 Sep 4

Kohn, Daron and Company
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Father (Edward) D'Hauw
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Receipted bill for $172.48 for a church bell.

V-4-l A.D.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


1841 Sep 5

Armengol, (C.M.), Father B(onaventure)
Assumption, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Armengol received Blanc's letters of August 27 and 30. They will not go to New Orleans during the sickness; Armengol fears for Blanc and for the (Vincentians) who seem about to arrive from abroad. Father (Nicholas) Stehlé, (C.M.) has said the Masses. After reflecting on Blanc's letter of the 27th, Armengol decided to go to B(aton) Rouge with Stehlé. He saw that Father (P.J.) Doutreluingne, (C.M.) had done much good there. Armengol gave the trustees Blanc's letter and they allotted his confrere $50 a month. Father (Paul) Jordan was to go to the West (Baton Rouge) yesterday. Arrangements with the administrators give him $800 a year. Father (Peter) Lucas again has the fever.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
8


1841 Sep 5

De la Hailandière, Celestine, Bishop of Vincennes
Vincennes, Indiana

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

He is slow in writing to Purcell but he desires often to be able to thank Purcell for what he has done for the poor diocese of Vincennes. The good God has blessed the charity which prompted Purcell to take a hand, and it seems that the wicked doer of Chicago is at vile end. Would that he could lift himself up only to be converted and to leave. Father (John) Larkin will tell Purcell of the success obtained during the retreat preached by him and Father (Lewis) Petit at Vincennes. About 700 received the sacraments. There is much however to be done. He hopes that they will have the same success at Cincinnati. He awaits Father J.P. Bellier and the Brothers of St. Joseph (Congregation of Holy Cross). He has bought an old house in order to start a seminary. He fears at this moment he has nothing but thousands of dollars of debt without any resource but the Association of the Propaganda, but these establishments are indispensable. He asks Purcell, now that he has seen him and spoken with him to tell him what he ought to change and correct in himself for the good of the diocese.
P.S. He asks Purcell's permission to add a few lines on another page for Father Larkin.

II-4-g A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo. (French)
9


1841 Sep 8

Montgomery, Father Charles P.
Somerset, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Acknowledges letter of Purcell in which he expressed regret that Montgomery did not state what censures Father (John)Alliman was under. Montgomery States that he is under the same one due to his taking off his religious garb and saying Mass while under suspension. The Dominicans he says would willingly pay Purcell any debts owed in Justice, but he cannot see why the Order should pay since it has received nothing. The property does not yield a cent, and the farm at Somerset was given to them before the diocese existed. The only income they have is from the congregations under their case, and this would not support their family if the amount asked by Purcell were deducted. Purcell would deny responsibility where it arose by false representation. Montgomery maintains that Bishop Résé was sent to Rome for the purpose of making the diocese but in setting forth the property owned by the Dominicans the various parishes were set forth as very valuable possessions. As a result the Cardinal prefect demanded that the Order pay an annual income to a bishop who was not a Dominican. Says that Purcell has violated the agreement himself by not letting them receive lots in their own name. Fears scandal will arise since it is already "buzzed" about that the Dominicans will be broken up because they cannot pay their debts to Purcell. The people know of their work. They may be suppressed in the United States but they will not permit their rights to be taken away from them. Affirms his respect for Purcell's episcopal dignity. They are preparing the congregation for Bishop (Richard P.) Miles to give confirmation. Hopes that Purcell will not demand that they attend the retreat at Cincinnati, and will inform them of new decrees that concern the missions.

II-4-g A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
7


1841 Sep 9

(Blanc), Bishop Ant(hony)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Father (Napoleon) J(oseph) Perche
Portland, Kentucky

(Blanc) today received Perche's letter of August 25. Nothing has happened since Perché left to change Blanc's mind about him. Their diocese has some bad things but it also has good. The yellow fever is keeping them all busy. Many have been saved but may have died in spite of the immense resources given by public and private charity; devotion is truly remarkable. Strangers will be bringing it in until November; Perché is to stay up there at least until (Blanc) can report a better state of things. He is to try to arrange everything for the best with the good Bishops. (Blanc) has talked to no one about it, even Father (Stephen) Rousselon, but he knows Rousselon's sentiments about it. Rumor has it that Perché will return this fall.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
2


1841 Sep 9

(Purcell), Bishop J(ohn) B(aptist)
Cin(cinnati, Ohio)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

(Purcell) thanks Blanc for his letter of July 24. It is important that his name or this place not be so much as hinted at; his former letter is to be destroyed. The name is W(illia)m H. Neilson, engaged in wholesale dry goods in Louisville, Kentucky from 1822 to 1828 or 1830; also in the purchase of tobacco. He had a brother in New York, another in Norfolk and another in Petersburgh or Richmond, Virginia. As the sum in question is pretty large it is important that he be identified. Father (Timothy) O'Brien, so long in Richmond, might hunt up the man. (Purcell) also wrote to the Archbishop about the will-decree of Propaganda; it is most ill-advised but he will submit as soon as required. So three of their reverend brethren have been raised to the episcopal bench without their knowledge or observance of the established rules. The Vicar General of Detroit wrote (Purcell) today that the Marguilliers published in their City Gazette their determination to take the temporalities of the Cathedral into their own hands again as Bishop (Frederick) Résé had not fulfilled his word to them. The Germans are doing the same there. Father (John?) Larkin, formerly of St. Sulpice, now of the Jesuit noviceship, is preaching a retreat for (Purcell's) congregation. Vienna is treating them very shabbily; Lyons is ever true though their allocations are curtailed. Negroism is disturbing their city. Mrs. Judge Boyer of Red River County left yesterday with her husband; she cannot live long.

V-4-l A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
7


1841 Sep 11

Calhoun, J(ohn) C., Senate Chamber
(Washington, D.C.)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
(Boston, Massachusetts)

He sends enclosed his speech on the distribution bill. He regards the measure as the very worst ever passed by Congress. He hopes Brownson will press the subject in his Review. He fears (John) Tyler will take a middle course on the distribution bill. If he should, it would cause a great confusion in which the Republican party and its principles will suffer greatly. Calhoun will cheerfully give support to Tyler as far as his principles will admit.

I-3-f A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
3


1841 Sep 11

Courbet, F(ran)c(oi)s
Lafayette, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
(New Orleans), Louisiana

Relying on the kind reception Blanc gave him today, Courbet sends the statement of the aims of the instruction Courbet wishes the administrators of the Catholic Asylum of New Orleans would confide to him. He also encloses a certificate given him by the administration of the Asylum at Lafayette to be added to a petition addressed to the administration of the public schools of New Orleans. He calls attention to the salary fixed at 30 piastres. Courbet spent his youth at Besancon College; he was directed there by Father Babé and before that by Father Guyotte of Lyons whom the revolution had forced to seek refuge among old friends of whom Courbet's Father was one.

A.L.S. (French)

Enclosure:

An outline of a course of study.

A.D.S. (French) 7pp.
V-4-l A.D.S., A.D.S. (French) 9pp. 4to.
2


1841 Sep 13

Robery, Dr.
Fausse Rivière, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Leblanc(!)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Robery wrote Father (John) Power and told him of Blanc's welcome of his protégé. He read Blanc's letter to Marcelin Sicard; he was much flattered by Blanc's recommendation. Blanc is to write to Sicard and to indicate to whom he wishes to recommend Robery.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
3


1841 Sep 14

Bellune, Duchesse de
Versailles, (France)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

She received (Blanc's) letter of July 7 two weeks ago in which she learned of her husband's departure from New Orleans. The last letter from her husband was of June 10 saying that he had just drawn on her for 3500 francs to make his trip to New York and then to Italy. He had promised to let her know about Miss I(zabel)'s fate. The papers told of the disaster on the steamer Erie between Buffalo and Chicago. She believes that among the persons who saw her husband last there must be someone who would know his route. She asks (Blanc's) help in getting this information. She begs him also to give her news of M.I. There have been so many contradictions in the behavior of her family since her arrival that Bellune no longer understands it. She often asks herself, "Has The Talma brought her back"?

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
2


1841 Sep 16

Beauprez, Father P(ierre) F(rancois)
Vermillionville, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Beauprez received Blanc's letter of September 1. He has perhaps humored the trustees too much as for 8 months he has not spoken of a new church except on the occasion of Blanc's letter. There is no one in the parish except a few evil ones who have any serious complaint against Beauprez. Blanc also says in his letter that he cannot be of Beauprez' opinion about leaving this parish without a pastor for some months, to interdict it and to ask the neighboring pastors to visit from one time to another. Father (Joseph Soller, S.J.?) Solei and Father (Charles Boutelou de) St. Aubin were of that opinion. Ten days ago, Honoré Beraud was delegated to come to ask Beauprez to play cards at the home of John Greig, cashier at the bank. Beraud played Beauprez such a nasty trick that he left the game. His friends told the parish judge who has been his worst enemy because of a marriage. In revenge the judge made Beraud hit Beauprez in the face. The pastors of St. Martin and New Iberia urged him to pursue the case as an example. He will await Blanc's advice. His affair was discussed at the distribution of prizes at St. Charles College by the Jesuits and Fathers Jamey, St. Aubin, and Priour. On their return St. Aubin and Priour told Beauprez that the Bishop ought to deprive them of a pastor and send his vicar general with a letter of interdiction.
P.S. Beauprez is not in the habit of playing cards.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
5


1841 Sep 16

Connelly, P(ierce)
Gracemere, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Connelly is sure that the little prairie of Grand Coteau often gives (Blanc) happy thoughts. He hopes (Blanc) will see the indefatigable Father (J. Francis) Abbadie, (S. J.) to have an account of the examination and prizes. Connelly wrote (Blanc) two months ago of Mary (Peacock's) having gone into the convent and of Mademoiselle thinking of following her. Mary took the veil on the Assumption and Mademoiselle went in as a postulant the same day. (Cornelia Peacock Connelly) manages without them. (Blanc) has heard of Connelly's brother, John (Connelly's) confirmation by Bishop Flaget in July. John went to the Jesuit College in Kentucky, made a retreat under Father Murphy and was baptized. May his wife soon follow his example. P(ierce) had a letter from Mr. Spencer on July 28 telling of the Catholic feeling among the High Church clergy in England. P(ierce) looks forward to (Blanc's) building a church for the American families. He hopes (Blanc) will make a Catholic layman act as agent for the Dublin Review. They are establishing a parish library; $200 are already subscribed.

V-4-l A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
5


1841 Sep 18

E(vrard), Father J(oseph)
(Brusly, Louisiana?)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

He will not wait any longer for an answer to his letter of August 8. He will repeat only what was most important in it. After speaking of his bad health he had asked Blanc to replace him at B(aton) R(ouge). He still suffers from a stomach ailment and dysentery. He cannot return to Baton Rouge or take charge of a parish now. He had thought that with time he could have conquered his repugnance to returning to Baton Rouge but after what the new Pharisees of the fabrique have done since his departure he could never return there. If he stays away it is not because of a refusal to obey. But Blanc knows what was the fate of Father (Joseph Tichitoli) Tiquitoli. After the bad season E(vrard) thinks he will go to Vicksburg. His successor can take what furniture he wants and E(vrard) will sell the rest. (On the address side of the letter) Mr. P. Walsh, kindness.

V-4-l A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
4


1841 Sep 19

Bruyère, Father (John)
Bardstown, (Kentucky)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

Bruyère is already linked with Blanc by a most lively interest in all that concerns him. He sends a small offering to add to his resources. Bruyère sent a Catholic lawyer the instructions which Blanc sent to him. Bruyère is happy to have his humble part in the devotion of those spending themselves for the salvation of their flocks. At present he can only look toward New Orleans but he hopes his ashes will not repose in Kentucky. While waiting he is attacking English. Next Monday he will go to St. Thomas (Seminary) which is to again become the seminary for the theologians. Bruyère will be in charge of the direction of this establishment until reinforcements come for the Jesuits. In case of impossibility the (Vincentians) seem inclined to accept. At the same time they will have an elementary school. His is only an interim job until spring or later. He hopes to profit no less than his students by having to speak a language he scarcely knows.
P.S. A letter from Lyons told about their Cardinal (Louis Jacques Maurice de Bonald) who is loved by the laity and clergy. Bruyère sends his respects to Father Rousselon.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
4


1841 Sep 20

Armengol, (C.M.), Father B(onaventure)
Assumption, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Armengol has just received Blanc's letter of the 14th and is grateful for his solicitude for his confreres (Vincentians). He was sorry to hear of the loss of the Sister of Charity. He does not know the name of the Lazarist whom they are expecting. They wrote from Paris that 12 Lazarists in Italy would soon set out for America. Since the sickness broke out Armengol wrote to Paris and if his letter arrived in time no doubt they will delay their departure. He thanks God all are well there and at the seminary and parish. He tried out Father (J.) Mignard; he sent him to Bayou B(o)euf where he had 36 Communions. He went again this week for two marriages. This encouraged Mignard and made him give up his plan of retiring to France.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
3


1841 Sep 20

R(ousselon), Father E(tienne)
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Arsene and Marie Aimée, slave of H. Brugier received the nuptial blessing. Witnesses: Colin, Alfred and Madeleine.

A.D.S.

Attached to the above:

--------
1841 Sep 19

Brugier, H.
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Brugler gives permission to his Negress Marie Aimée to marry Arsène, a free man of color.

A.D.S.

V-4-l A.D.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
1


1841 Sep 21

Abbadie, (S.J.), Father (J.) F(rancis)
St. Michael, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Abbadie thanks Blanc for his letter sent by B. Jourdan. Father (Joseph) Soller, (S.J.) has forbidden Abbadie to go down into town; the measure is a prudent one but difficult for him. Soller had given him permission to give the retreat to the Ladies of the Sacred Heart but since Father (A. Pierre) Ladavière is giving it Abbadie will return to the College tomorrow and go down again to bring the students.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
3


1841 Sep 23

Dupuy, Father Enn(emond)
Iberville, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisia)na

Dupuy is well pleased that his cross and his holy water font(?) has arrived. He needs to go to New Orleans as soon as he can and will take them. If he has an opportunity he will send payment for them before he comes.
P.S. Zenon Labauve told Dupuy the Sisters of Charity of Charity will be paid next March for the Doyle account.

V-4-l A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
2


1841 Sep 25

Tschenhenss, C.SS.R., Father Francis X.
Norwalk, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Since he has come from Danville the German families have been zealous to fulfill their religious duties. He was assisted by Father (John) Newman, who came as an angel aiding him with the people and enabling himself to make a retreat. They presumed him to have jurisdiction because he had previously worked in Steubenville and because of the great powers given Father (Peter) Czakert, when these Redemptorists were there before. The schism continues somewhat but he hopes that it will soon be dispersed. There are only about fifteen families staying with Father (Joseph) Freygang. Some of these are leaving him now and Tschenhenss wants to know what penance to give them.
P.S. Desires the Telegraph.

II-4-g A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
8


1841 Sep 27

Sanduier, Fred(eri)c
Lyons, (France)

To Bishop elect (Peter Paul) Lefevere
(Detroit, Michigan)

Sanduier, Secretary of the Central Council of the Association of the Propagation of Lyons, informs Lefevere that pursuant to the allocation granted his missions by the council, Lefevere is authorized to draw on Messrs. V. Guerin and sons of Lyons a draft of ten thousand four hundred twenty-one francs payable eight days from sight. In accordance with the accounting methods of the Lyons Council Sanduier sends Lefevere under this cover the said draft asking him to fill it out, date it, and put the sum above his signature in all letters. The Council's banker is obligated to pay only on drafts detached from the council's book to a stub such as that here attached.---------------
Postscript:
The balance of an old allocation due Detroit, 581 francs, plus the allocation of 1841, 9840 francs, totals the disposition stated above, 10,421 francs.

III-2-g A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
3


1841 Sep 29

Jouanneault, Father V(ictor)
Thib(odaux, Louisiana)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Blanc is perhaps expecting to hear news of the late Father (John B.) Audizio's sale but nothing has been done since the day of the inventory and will not be for 6 or 7 weeks. In five weeks there will be a meeting of the creditors. If Blanc cannot come he could appoint Father (Bonaventure) Armengol, (C.M.) or Jouanneault to represent him. He fears there will be several law suits. Jouanneault has heard that Audizio's successor has been named. He has never had the least pretension to the post. The successor should be told to make arrangements with the trustee before accepting the post or he may repent of it. The uncertainty in which Blanc leaves Jouanneault is embarrassing. He needs many things in the house but fears he may have to leave it all at the end of several weeks. He asks Blanc if he cannot hasten the conclusion and tell him how much longer he can stay at Thibodaux and if he will again be an assistant when he leaves there. He is resigned to Blanc's decision; he only wishes to know it.
P.S. Audizio only asked 3 piastres for a dispensation from banns. Jouanneault does not dare ask for more for fear they will accuse him of wanting two more for himself. In the statement of 163 piastres is included 16 piastres for the mission chalice sold by Father (Auguste) Jeanjean but not yet paid for. Jouanneault has the 2 volumes Blanc claimed.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
4


1841 Oct 1

(Belinaye), Marquis de la
London, (England)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

His first duty is to express the gratitude of the whole family. They again implore his support through the uncle of the young person (Miss Izabel) for whose welfare (Blanc) has taken such pains. (Blanc) no doubt knows that on arriving in Nantes from New Orleans she found a letter from her aunt who offered her refuge in Paris. The ship, The Talma, arrived at Nantes on March 28. More than two weeks afterward they learned of her condition. Her aunt's house would not hide this disgrace and so her Father decided to write her to come to England to a country house rented especially for her. Her grandmother and (Belinaye) will do what they can to ease her position. The police said she had left Nantes and arrived in Paris and that a man met her. Her passport has not reached police headquarters. The opinion is that the "assassin" of their family is still directing the movements of his victim. The police in London have been alerted but fruitlessly. Inquiries in France lead them to believe that she has gone to Bordeaux to return to New Orleans on the Talma in command of Captain Murray, not Cayol. The Talma arrived in New Orleans July 13 and returned September 8. If this young lady comes back repentant, she will find pardon; (Belinaye), her uncle, will receive her with kindness. This man (Victor Beauclerc), Father of 8 children and about 50 years old, lived in London for several months, and left, robbing the Prince who had confided his inheritance to him and leaving his family with 150,000 francs in debts. (Belinaye) has read and reread the letter of July 23, 1840 to his Father, whose death he caused in Spain, saying he would disappear forever.
P.S. (Belinaye's) name is the same as that of the young lady.

Mail is to be addressed to Charles Stokes in London.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
6


1841 Oct. 1

Capelle, B(ar)on (Guillaume Antoine Benoit de)
London, (England)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Blanc) will be surprised to receive a letter on a subject so delicate, from someone unknown to him unless he has read his name in the newspapers among the ministers of France who after the "tempest of 1830" followed their princes into exile. (Blanc's) efforts have contributed to bring back a strayed sheep. She made only a short stay in France, not wanting to come to London. She has again disappeared to plunge again into the abyss of perdition where her abductor awaits her. When sought in Nantes and Paris they learned that she had embarked again for New Orleans. Capelle has spent most of his time in this noble family and saw (Miss Izabel) carefully brought up and tenderly loved. She was a second mother to her younger sisters. Capelle cannot understand how she could be the victim of this infernal seduction. She has brought sorrow to an adoring grandmother, her mother, and two young sisters, and to her Father. All is not yet lost if the guilty ones yield to (Blanc's) efforts.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) pp.. 4to.
2


1841 Oct 1

Lefranc, Father (John)
(St. Mary of the Barrens, Missouri)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Lefranc does not regret being put back on the path he should never have left; it is the fear of being obliged to leave it again which troubles him. The first time Lefranc fell into the sin he prayed that religion would not suffer. He became hardened and spent several years in the crime. He left France resolved never to exercise his ministry. By chance he became acquainted with Father (John Francis) Brasseur who urged him to write to Blanc and to the Jesuits. Brasseur talked to Blanc about him when Blanc gave confirmation at St. Martinville. At New Orleans Lefranc's confessor talked to Blanc about him. Lefranc was surprised at the softness with this Blanc and his priests treated him. He had been refused by the Bishop of Soissons; Mobile refused a priest a hundred times less guilty. Blanc's dealings with the Bishop of Vincennes forced Lefranc to tell Blanc things of which he would not have spoken. Bishop (Celestin de la) Hailandière in taking him did not know that soon Lefranc's whole life would be known in his diocese. The bishop's cousin, Father Louis Ducoudray, unfortunately very imprudent, has no secrets form his sisters who came to live in America. They knew Lefranc's life; if one wants to make something public all you have to do is to tell o ne of them. Lefranc decided to make known to Blanc the real reason for his refusal. He will stay at the seminary some time longer; he believes (Anthony) Andrieux, (C.M.) will not take his place until after finishing his novitiate. There are four Lazarist brothers who are studying English and several novices who are at Cape Girardeau; it would not be in the interests of their college to have secular priests. Lefranc will leave the seminary only when they order him to or when his money runs out.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
5


1841 Oct 3

Saxton, J.A.
Deerfield, (Massachusetts)

to (Orestes A. Brownson)
Boston, Massachusetts

He encloses a paper which contains the substance of two lectures recently delivered in their Lyceum. If it is rejected he will feel no offense, but, rather, satisfaction if only it expresses their sympathy with Brownson's views which is felt by several people here. There are many persons in this town and in the vicinity who would like to hear from his mouth what they read from his pen. He thinks that Brownson might do some good if he lectured here. There are many intelligent advocates of his views, and some are convinced of their truth. They don't expect him to come on his own charges. They will not readily relinquish the pleasure of having him.

I-3-f A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
2


1841 Oct 4

O'Neill, Father P(atrick)
Charleston Neck, South C(arolina)

To any of the priests of New Orleans or elsewhere

O'Neill certifies that he has known the bearer, Rosali(e?) Carnet, for 5 or 6 years. Should she need advice they will confer a favor on O'Neill by giving it. (On the address side of the letter) N(ichlas) D. Labadie, Galveston.

V-4-l A.D.S. 2pp. 4to.
2


1841 Oct 6

Hoste, Father L(ewis)
Nashville, (Tennessee)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

His health restored, Hoste is at last able to carry out the plan of which he talked to Blanc at Lyons; he is in America. He has never lost the desire to rejoin Blanc. Although he told Cardinal (Louis Jacques Maurice) de Bonald of the agreement made with Blanc, Bonald decided to send him to Nashville where the needs are greater and whose Bishop (Richard Pius Miles) was then in Europe. He arrived several weeks ago having accompanied (Miles) from Belgium. He is very happy there and is learning English. He sends this slight proof of his remembrance of Blanc's goodness toward him.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
3


1841 Oct 7

( )
Bordeaux. (France)

To Baron (Guillaume Antoine Benoit de) Capelle
London, (England)

(The signature of the writer of this letter is indecipherable). He has received Capelle's letter after many years during which he has shared the afflictions of Capelle's family by inquiring about him every time he met someone who could give him information. Baron de Bourqueney must have received, in reply to the letter he wrote ( ) on September 9 about Madame de Beaumont, the instructions which her family requested him to ask of ( ); ( ) sent them on the 16th. This lady left Bordeaux aboard the Talma on May 13, arriving in New Orleans on July 3. During her stay in Bordeaux awaiting the departure of the ship she was very retiring, associating only with some respectable women named Dufour. She also saw Mr. Chabaud, the owner of the boarding house and Father of the doctor who accompanied her. Since Capelle's letter arrived ( ) has read that the Talma has returned under the command of Captain Dillingham. Mrs. Beaumont stood the trip well and was not confined although they had feared it at her departure. On her arrival in New Orleans Mr. Beaumont paid her fare and took her into the country to escape the yellow fever. Bishop (Anthony) Blanc became interested in her and was prepared to give her family news of her. ( ) did not answer M. De la Belinaye, thinks that de Bourqueney would have shown him ( )'s letter. ( )'s wife sends her regards. ( )'s six children are doing well; his oldest daughter is married. His oldest son is 21 and is finishing law this year; the second son is taking political science; the third is at St. Bar(bara's?); his two daughters are at home. ( ) wishes that he, like his brother, had been able to see Capelle in Paris on the quite rare trips that he makes there. Emile is roaming around the world, he is told; ( ) regrets that he never runs into him or sees Capelle's other children.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
8


1841 Oct. 8

Beauprez, Father P(ierre) F(rancois)
Vermilionville, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Beauprez just received Blanc's letter in which he asked Beauprez to take a trip to Avoyelles to make arrangements with Father (N.) Francais. Beauprez cannot accept the post because, on the advice of his director, he would be too far from a confrere and the roads are impassable for 4 or 5 months of the year. Also he would be obliged to see his servant Hannah who followed him to Attakapas only with the consent of her husband. Father (J.) Priour, who ought to know Thibodeauxville well, told Beauprez that it would suit Beauprez perfectly. Father (Victor) Jamey, learning at Grand Coteau that Beauprez could not go immediately according to Blanc's orders, came to see Beauprez. He examined everything and left this morning to see the president of the trustees about calling a meeting for next Thursday. Beauprez would have to have a little time to arrange his affairs which would delay his departure 2 or 3 weeks.
P.S. October 9. Jamey would like very much to have Beauprez leave immediately. Beauprez would leave if Jamey would take all Beauprez's belongings in payment of most of his account and a note payable next March. Jamey came there with an authoritative air and Beauprez has heard that he told the president of the trustees that the parish should be vacant next Monday.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
4


1841 Oct 8

Downer, Cha(rle)s A.
Little Rock, Ark(ansas)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

Downer sees Blanc's name in the New Orleans Pica(y)une as a reference for St. Joseph's College, Bardstown. He wishes to know if it is a good college and if the teachers try to influence the scholars to the Catholic religion or any other.

V-4-l A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
2


1841 Oct 9

Connelly, Pierce
Gracemere, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Connelly thanks Blanc for his letter with all its news of new Bishops and the Jesuit Fathers. He also thanks him for inducing Mr. Daron to act as agent for the Messrs. Casserly for the Dublin Review. Connelly does not agree in its political views but it is the principal organ of Catholicity in the English language. Connelly will have The Tablet sent to (Blanc). Bishop (John Baptist) Purcell, with all his Irish predilections, thinks it one of the best edited papers in the world. They have organized their little St. Charles library and named the Bishop and the pastor of St. Charles the patrons. If America would only give Bishops and clergy to rival the ones France and Ireland has sent, the divided labors would leave leisure for all things profitable. Dear holy Bishop (Joseph) Rosati! Connelly hears his mission is a sad and laborious one. Nearly all the religious have made their retreat; (Cornelia Peacock Connelly) took Adeline and the baby along with the servant to the Convent and went regularly through the ten days. The day after she came out Pierce began with Father (Theodore) de Theux, (S.J.) and the English half of the fathers and brothers at the College. So Blanc sees that they are quite as much at liberty as if they had lost none of their household.

V-4-l A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
7


1841 oct 11

Roullemet, Virgil, N. Sinnott, Jr., and William L. Giles
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) LeBlanc(!)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

At a meeting of the Young Men's Howard Association they were appointed a Committee to wait on Blanc with the accompanying resolutions (no enclosure) and to ascertain whether a similar application has been made by any other of the Benevolent Associations of the city.

V-4-l A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
4


1841 Oct 11

Williams and Co., E.P., (Sunday Morning Chronicle office)
(Boston, Massachusetts)

to O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Massachusetts

At the request of subscribers not only in Boston, but in neighboring cities, they take the liberty to ask his permission to present a likeness of him in their column. It is for the benefit of the Democrats of the Paper Union that they want to present the likeness of so distinguished a laborer in the cause as Brownson.

I-3-f A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
2


1841 Oct 12

Cantrelle, J(acques?) X.
St. James, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

During the three months that Father (Charles F. Moracchini) Moratigné fulfilled, jointly with Father (A. Pierre) Ladavière, (S.J.) the pastorship of St. James Church, they appreciated his good qualities and character. They ask Blanc to appoint him pastor of their parish. They have nothing but praise for Ladavière but see that it is beyond his strength.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
3


1841 Oct 13

Dugué, F(rancois)
Jefferson Parish, Louisiana

Judge Francois Joseph Enoul Dugué Livaudais authorizes Father (Louis Moni) Mony to marry Francis Hughes and Mrs. Julia Duggin.

V-4-l D.S. 1p. 4to.
4


1841 Oct 13

Ladavière, S.J., Father A. P(ierre)
(St. Michael, Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

It is probably the sickness which has deprived them of seeing (Blanc) as they had hoped; will they see him before All Saints? If he must delay longer Ladavière asks him to tell him if he thinks it proper to repaint the wood of the steeple. The Convent should have the pews of the church painted; that was the agreement and Madame (Louisa) Leveque, (R.S.C.)will have them painted right after All Saints. The priests are passably busy. There is no sickness there. The Ladies at the Convent are as usual. Their invitations did not come until several days after the festival; the post is disgustingly uncertain.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
2


1841 Oct 14

Fleury, Théodore
Donaldsonville, (Louisiana)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

From St. Charles Fleury came to Donaldsonville seeking employment. The little furniture work he had at St. Charles after leaving New Orleans was only enough to live on for a few months. The pastor of the parish of St. James Convent gave him one piastre to get to Donaldsonville where he has been for two weeks living on the charity of the inhabitants and the two priests of the parish. Fleury asks Blanc to use his influence to make up a subscription to buy him some clothes so that he will not arrive too miserably in France at the home of his parents. The subscription could also finance hid departure for France around the end of November or before. He asks Blanc to write to the pastor of Donaldsonville, Mr. Massenot (Father J.M. Masnou, C.M.), to see about means to go to New Orleans from where he could leave for France. If Blanc has any news from Fleury's parents he could send it to him or to (Masnou).

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
2


1841 Oct 15

Mullaney, Henry P.
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Not being willing to trouble Blanc now he is occupied the more during the prevalence of the yellow fever, Mullaney writes to ask Blanc to purchase some books which he is obliged to sell or remain there until he hears from his mother. A captain there will take Mullaney to New York for $20 if he can make up that sum. (He lists the books) and asks Blanc to assist him.

V-4-l A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
1


1841 Oct 16

Doutreluingne, C.M., Father P(eter) J.
Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He has just received (Blanc's) letter of the 2nd with the 20 piastres for Father (Paul?) Jordan and Doutreluingne for 10 Masses each. Jordan has been at West Baton Rouge since the 5th. There is a post- office near the church there. It has been more than 2 weeks since he has seen Jordan. Doutreluingne made a mission to Manchak where there were more than thirty Communions. He is grateful for the news (Blanc) gave him of his confreres, Fathers Odin, Timon, and Boullier.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 1p. 4to.
2


1841 Oct 18

Everett, A(lexander) H., Jefferson College
St. James Parish, L(ouisiana)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Mass(achusetts)

He will thank Brownson to tell Mr. (Benjamin H.) Green to make him up a complete set of the (Boston) Quarterly (Review). He wants at least the two numbers containing his articles on Currency. He is curious to see the development of Brownson's theory of government. They want nothing so much in this country as a thorough discussion of principles of government. They are looking to Brownson for a restoration of political science. He has never been able to get through a single canto of the "Revolt of Islam." He sees that Brownson has become the organ of Orpheus (A. Bronson) Alcott. He asks does this mean "The Dial" is defunct. He doubts whether the presence of Orpheus will do much good. He imagines how it fares with transcendentalism.

I-3-f A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
4


1841 Oct 18

Jamey, Father V(ictor)
St. Landry, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Jamey found no opposition among the trustees of Vermilionville; all he asked was granted. They are now repairing the gates at the church, the cemetery, and rectory. There is $2776 owing to the fabrique; $2000 could be collected in two months. There is much more generosity than Jamey has found in Opelousas. The new pastor will have $300 salary and a quarter of the pew rent. (Jamey lists the fees for burials and other services.) At Opelousas Jamey has $400 and one fourth of the pews and other variable fees. So the pastor of Lafayette will have more than Jamey and Jamey has enough. Father (Pierre Francois) Beaupre(z) will leave this parish with much regret and as late as he can. Jamey thinks that the sooner there is a priest at Vermilionville the better things will go.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
5


1841 Oct 18

Querbes, (C.S.V., Father Louis-Joseph)
Vourles, (France)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Six Clerks of St. Viator are going through New Orleans on their way to Kaskaskia in the Diocese of St. Louis. It will be good for them to find a Christian welcome; they will plant a seed in Blanc's adopted country from which Blanc may profit some day.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
3


1841 Oct 19

Ladavière, S.J., Father A. P(ierre)
St. Michael, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

St. James Church has just received the new bell and they would like to have it blessed next Sunday if (Blanc) will authorize Ladavière to do it. The pupils are arriving slowly at the convent especially those from up above.
(P.S.) If (Blanc) commissions Ladavière to bless the bell he is to send the reply on the steamboat Colorado as they have only one mail a week.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
2


1841 Oct 19

Leviton, ( )
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, Louisiana

Arriving in the city from the North, Leviton asks (Blanc) to place a young man of 16. The young man speaks German, knows French very well and English passably, for in the year Leviton has lived in this country he has paid for his board and school. He asks (Blanc) to take an interest in this young man for Leviton can no longer do anything for him for in the week he has been in New Orleans he has not been able to find a job in his line, which is gardening. If the young man could be placed where he could teach French to young people, his Father would be only too happy.
(P.S.) The young man has not yet arrived but Leviton expects him from day to day.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
1


1841 Oct 21

McElroy, Father John, Mt. St. Mary's College
Emmitsburg, Maryland

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Has just returned form Baltimore. He received Purcell's of 1st, but did not see Mr. Piott. Notices the changes in the college, the absence of Bishop Brute, Father Hickey, Mother Rose, etc. He did not think that such an article would appear in the Herald which he says suffers from changes of editors. Bishop-elect Peter Kenrick was at Frederick for a retreat the first of the month and awaits Bishop Rosati to be consecrated. Hearing that Purcell was to cover his cathedral with copper he offers his experience in which he found copper costing too much in comparison with shingles. Speaks of dangers of copper in wind storms, of appearance of cracks in the copper and of the ease with which copper is cut. Adds to this the noise of rain on the copper. Completes the letter at St. John's Frederick, Maryland. Is happy that Mr. Springer is gone to Rome, and that the altar has arrived.

II-4-g A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
5


1841 Oct 22

Bonnecaze, L.
Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

As soon as he received Blanc's letter of the 6th he set about the matter of which it treated. The lands which up to now had been the legal property of the late Judge Lawrence were sold by P. Hicky to Adam Winthrop who never paid for them, which puts Hicky in the position of paying taxes to prevent seizure of the property. If it had been paid for, Bonnecaze would have paid the taxes in order to keep it for the widow and Winthrop, as a friend of Lawrence would have willingly gone along with the sale. But now it is out of the question. Bonnecaze's wife, Leontine, and Jules send their respects.
(P.S.) Mrs. Duplessis, the mother of Mrs. S. Allain send their respects; she would have liked very much to have the widow Lawrence keep these lands but she sees it is impossible.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
6


1841 Oct 27

Duplessis, P.L.A.
New Orleans, Louisiana

to Milne Asylum for Destitute Orphan Boys
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

A summons to comply with the accompanying petition. Succession of Alexander Milne, Sr. on plea of Dative testamentary Executor for a sale of certain property. Witnessed by Joachim Bermudez, Judge of the Court of Probates.

D.S. 1p. 12mo.

Enclosure:

A copy of the petition of Francois Feuillas Dorville, dative testamentary executor, describing the lots and buildings which form a part of the estate of Milne, Senior. The lots are described as in a plan by L. Bringier, surveyor general. Lot Number 1 is bounded by Mr. Lacroix's property. (Description of the other 11 lots follow). The petitioner prays that a new appraisement be made and that the court issue an order for the sale of the lots, to be made by W(illia)m F.C. Duplessis, Register of Wills. "Signed" E.A. Canon. Order: All parties interested are to show cause why this petition should not be granted. "Signed" J. Bermudez. The petition is dated October 26, 1841 and signed by P.L.A. Duplessis. The name of Bishop (Anthony) Blanc appears on the back of the petition.

Copy S. 4pp. Folio
V-4-l D.S., Copy S. 5pp. 12mo. & folio
9


1841 Oct 27

Gaux and Company
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To (Bishop Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Receipted bill for $179.70 for ordos.

V-4-l D.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1841 Oct 27

Martin, Father (Jean)
Fausse Rivière, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisia)na

Martin has just been absent for 10 days. He went on horseback to St. Michael where he saw Father (A. Pierre) Ladavière, (S.J.), superior of the Seminary, and Father (J. Francis Abbadie, S.J.) Abady and all his confreres and other acquaintances. He visited Jefferson College and the Convent of the Ladies of Sacred Heart. The reason for his trip was that several lawyers who are indignant at the way the trustees treated Martin, advised him to go to see (John H. Ilsley) Esuley, a lawyer at Donaldsonville who took his case; he said if he lost at Pointe- Coupée he was sure to win in the supreme court. He asked Martin to get him the ecclesiastical law and Martin found it in the library of Father (Ennemond) Dupuy at Iberville. Now Martin would like to have the canon law reports to see what the customs were under Spanish rule. He begs Blanc to go to Pointe-Coupée before court which convenes November 15 to justify Martin canonically for all the calumnies of the ex-trustees and present trustees. He asks Blanc to send the two petitions and all the documents some days in advance, addressing them to Mrs. Séverin Porche. Blanc is to stay at the Widow Porche's. Senator Pierre Porche is in favor of Martin.
(P.S.) Martin would like to know where poor Father (Joseph) Evra(r)d is.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
9


1841 Oct 27

Verhaegen, S.J., Father P(eter) J.
St. Louis, (Missouri)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisia)na

Verhaegen received Blanc's letter of the 13th. Blanc says he will soon be relieved of part of his burden; Verhaegen has wished for that for a long time. They cannot count on Bishop (Joseph Rosati's) letters; he has written so many things about leaving Rome. Is it true that Father (Peter Richard) Kenrick has accepted his nomination? They say he will not accept and then (Rosati) will have to take new steps to procure a coadjutor. It has been very cold for several days; Verhaegen hopes it will penetrate to New Orleans and stop the terrible epidemic. Father (J. Francois) Abbadie, (S.J.) did well to stay on the coast. Verhaegen has just received a letter confirming the good news Blanc gave about the health of the (Jesuits). He can see how St. Michael may cause Blanc some anxiety but it is only a passing storm. He believes the changes made last year by Madame (Elizabeth) Galitizin, (R.S.C.) will not be entirely as she expected. The number of pupils at Sacred Heart at St. Louis has diminished considerably, there are only about 30; before vacation there were 50. Verhaegen does not know what to say just now about Blanc's affair with (John) Mullanphy. He believes that sum is not lost; he will try to see the judge in a few days. The piece Blanc gave Father (James Oliver) Van de Velde, (S.J.) will be returned when this affair is settled if Verhaegen finds it among his papers. Father (Peter Paul) Lefev(e)re has not yet arrived. Six young candidates arriving in St. Louis on the 9th told them that Lefevere left for Anvers two days before they left for London and that he was accompanied by some ecclesiastics for St. Louis diocese. The "Missouri Republican" announced 5 or 6 days ago that five priests destined for St. Louis had arrived in New York. His nomination was unknown to Lefevere when he left. Rosati, who had promised him a festival in Belgium the day of his consecration, will be terribly disappointed. Rosati wrote that he was to give a series of lectures on the episcopal ceremonies in France. Their six missionaries have arrived in the Rocky Mountains after a trip of two and a half months. The benefactors of Father (Peter) De Smet, (S.J.) will hear this news with pleasure. Verhaegen is awaiting the orders on the usual conditions.
P.S. He sends regards to all; he does not know when he will find time for a visit.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
10


1841 Oct 28

Wiseman, Nicholas, Bishop, Birmingham, England, St. Mary's College
Birmingham, England

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Apologies for his failure to write before. Though he did not write he published in England the news that a new edition of Digby's works was being published in Cincinnati. Is sure that the happening in England, the Oxford Movement, is of interest in America, since he feels sure that it will effect the Episcopal Church in America. Every day gives greater promise, but there are two parties in the Catholic element one of which wishes to be severe. The other to which he belongs believes that they are one in heart with the Oxford leaders and that they can be won by kindness. Has had assurance of this in the conversion of Rev. R. Sibthorpe of Ryder whom Wiseman received into the church. Mr. Sibthorpe will take orders after suitable preparation. Asks for prayers for England.

II-4-g A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
2


1841 Oct 29

Armengol, C.M., Father B(onaventure)
Assumption, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Blanc knows Armengol's difficulty about Thibodeaux. Today one of their priests went there. Blanc once asked Armengol if he thought the (Vincentians) would accept this parish; now Armengol can say that if Blanc cannot otherwise provide the needs of the diocese, they will take it par interim. For that he will need Father (P.J.) Doutreluigne, (C.M.). He is tired of Baton Rouge and would be very happy at Thibodeaux for he would be near the seminary and have a confrere with him. The little seminary has made their retreat; also the community. Now it is the turn of the grand seminary. Armengol plans to come to New Orleans; he asks if it would be proper to bring Momus St. Clair whose parents wish to see him.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
5


1841 Oct 30

Nicholson, John
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Anthony Blanc
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Printed from letter with the semi-annual statement of the Carrollton Bank of New Orleans. On the back of the letter is written Maria King, 17; Susanna; Anna, Ann, the oldest.

V-4-l Printed L. 3pp. 4to.
3


1841 Oct 31

(Calhoun, John C.)
Fort Hill, (South Carolina)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
(Boston, Massachusetts)

Brownson's article is in the right track and very able. There is scarcely a view expressed in which he does not fully concur. He hopes it will give a practical direction to the rising spirit of liberal inquiry that is manifest in New England. Calhoun has made some progress in a regular and scientific development of his views of government. He will look for Brownson's treatise on metaphysics. He is gratified to learn that Brownson has a prospect of a seat in the Legislature; it indicates the strong hold that Brownson has on those around him. He anticipates much pleasure in Brownson's article on the Distribution bill. Its repeal must be insisted on. The utter overthrow of the Whigs marks an important step in political history. The question is how to secure the fruits of the victory. Calhoun would not accept the highest office, if proffered without opposition, but from a sense of duty. He would not decline if it was thought that he was the most capable.

I-3-f (Signature cut out) 4pp. 8vo.
4


1841 Nov 2

(Chanche), John Joseph, Bishop of Natchez
Baltimore, (Maryland)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

He is still here, a distant looker-on of the afflicting scenes taking place in New Orleans and Vicksburg. To go down now would be folly. Ten days after he starts he will be in Natchez. He has not been able to obtain anybody from the North to accompany him. Bishop (Celestin) de la Hailandière has refused to grant Father (Julian) Delaune and Father (Jean Claude) Francois the permission they requested to labor in (Chanche's) diocese. Delaune would have suited very well. (Chanche) wrote a second time; perhaps the Bishop will be moved by his forlorn situation. (Chanche) may yet have some hopes from Kentucky. They have no news yet of Bishop (Joseph) Rosati; what delays him? He is, (Chanche) supposes, the bearer of the Bulls for Father (John Mary) Odin as he is for Father (Peter Richard) Kenrick. If he came in time (Chanche) might be the bearer of Odin's to New Orleans; (Chanche) will be happy to be in New Orleans in time for the consecration. (Chanche) gave Blanc's message to Archbishop (Samuel Eccleston). (Chanche) does not think he will accept the invitation for this winter but if (Chanche) succeeds in building his church during the coming 18 months he would (not?) Be surprised if he was to come down for the blessing. (Chanche) will give Mr. Elder an order on Blanc for $600 in a few days.
(P.S.) Thus far he has fixed the 8th for his departure.

V-4-l A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
10


1841 Nov 2

Dupuis(?), Father
Pointe-à-Pitre, (Guadeloupe, West Indies)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans. (Louisiana)

Dupuis writes in behalf of an artist and lawyer, Mr. Boilinière who wishes to settle at New Orleans. He has been Dupuis' organist and has edified his parish by his irreproachable conduct. The memories Blanc has left in their colony are so favorable that Dupuis has a very high opinion of his goodness. Dupuis succeeded Father Pouvet. Circumstances are becoming more and more difficult in this social transformation. One must be more of a politician than a missionary. E offers Blanc his help as he needs workers. He could even bring two priests who, like himself, are disgusted. But they would not wish to be separated. They would have to be placed where French is spoken. For reference Blanc could write to the Prefect of the colony. But if he has no formal intention of attaching them to his clergy, it would cause great injury to Dupuis as in the eyes of the French government he would be a deserter. He writes with frankness; if he becomes one of Blanc's clergy, Blanc will see that it is his sole merit.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
3


1841 Nov 2

Francais, Father (N.)
Avoyelles, (Louisiana)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Francais received Blanc's letter announcing the visit of Father (Pierre Francois) Beauprez. If he has not written oftener it is because of the cares of his position. Father (Robert) Doogan visited him a month ago. By a resolution passed by the trustees Francais has thrown off their yoke. They left him the fees from burials, services, and marriages, obliging him to furnish all the candles. If Francais desires to leave here it is for the reasons given to Blanc before and not to go elsewhere especially near Father (Victor) Jamey; he was with Jamey long enough to know his conduct toward him. Beauprez is a second volume of Father (Constantine) Ma(e)nhaut. Beauprez does not fit Avoyelles at all; it does not offer enough to mammon lovers. Beauprez spent All Saints with Francais; he offered $1000 for Francais' property which has already cost him $1050 and his furniture estimated at $200. Francais would let it go for $1200. It is impossible for the parish to build a house for the pastor; they will do well to pay for the church. His church should be done by December 1; he would like a confrere to bless it. Francais believes that Father (Charles Henry Boutelou de) St. Aubin would suit here; he is gentle and patient. If the pastor who replaces Francais cannot buy his property, he will sett it at auction to pay his debts.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
6


1841 Nov 2

Wood, James Frederick
Rome, Italy

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Acknowledges Purcell's of August 29. Has just finished a retreat of which he speaks at length with great fervor. A letter from William Montfort and James McCallion indicate that both have given up the idea of being priests. Speaks of the bloodshed in Missouri and Mississippi, and Covington and blames the trouble on the monied affairs. Speaks of danger to the Cathedral from the Negro. Thinks that the impending war with England will unite the factions of the country. His sister Ellen speaks of his return in a year from Easter, but he says that it will be two years. Supposes that Purcell wishes him to follow the regular course of theology. Is happy that the Sisters of Charity prosper. Asks if Father Edward Purcell is still likely to be made bishop. Speaks of a falsehood published by Webster about Bishop Résé, whom he understands is in Germany. Speaks of a letter he wrote to Lieut. Duke. Speaks of his mother's financial position. Has plenty of money.
Nov. 5: Has reopened to say that Father (James) Vandevelde has arrived with Mr. Collet, and has given him Purcell's letter.

II-4-g A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
4


1841 Nov 3

Lefranc, Father (John)
(St. Mary's of the Barrens, Missouri)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Lefranc will let (Blanc) know his intentions as soon as he hears from Bishop (Celestin de la Hailandière) of Vincennes. Lefranc would not be here long if he came only to learn English but the Will of God brought him here. The Superior congratulated him several days ago on the fine reputation he had acquired at the Barrens. The seminarians like his society well enough, they say, but he is an "impertinent frater." Lefranc asks explanations of their language and like a good Frenchman he does not believe in letting them scoff at his language. They are all Irish and talk only of their country with which there is nothing comparable.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
2


1841 Nov 3

(Loras), Bishop Mathias
Dubuque, (Iowa)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

(Loras) received Blanc's letter of September 27 on October 27. The recital of Blanc's disasters is deplorable. They have enjoyed perfect health. They are poor but they have many good things. He asks Blanc, if it is not too late, to insert in the ordo for the Diocese of Dubuque, on October 29 the feast of St. Cessian, Martyr. (Loras) brought his body from Rome with the above privilege. He wants 18 ordos; he would also like some Mass intentions; their missionaries' needs are great. He must make great economies in order to support several missions he wishes to make in the spring among the Indians in three points of the diocese. Several ask expressly for Catholic priests and (Loras) suggests their including this clause in their treaties with the United States. (Loras) is alone at Dubuque.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
2


1841 Nov 4

Lynch, C. A(nne)
Providence, (Rhode Island)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Mass(achusetts)

She says that Brownson has tried hard to make something of her and she has tried to do and be that which her higher nature tells her to do, but it is of no use and so she sets herself down as a "splendid failure." She says that in some things she is not wholly without fanaticism. She rejoices that Brownson is about to build up the Reformed Church and wants him to give an account of the work he is writing and tell her his plan. She has no scholars at present but expects 2 or 3.

I-3-f A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
2


1841 Nov 5

Conrey, Peter Jr.
N(ew) Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Conrey submits the enclosed letters (no enclosures) relating to a circumstance which he had hoped their efforts had terminated by the return of the lady (Madame de Beaumont) to Europe. If Blanc can again aid Conrey in attaining the object her friends have in view, he will confer a lasting obligation on a distressed family who make an appeal to aid in the restoration of a beloved child.

V-4-l A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
2


1841 Nov 6

Conrey, Peter Jr.
N(ew) O(rleans, Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
N(ew) Orleans, (Louisiana)

This morning Conrey examined at the Custom House all the papers having references to the names of the passengers who arrived in the Talma in July but could ascertain nothing relative to the lady in question (Madame de Beaumont). He also examined the list as reported to the Mayor's office with no better success.

V-4-l A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
2


1841 Nov 9

Hailandière, Bishop Cel(estin de la)
Vincennes, (Indiana)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Hailandière has just learned that one of his priests, Father (Francis M.) Masquelet is in New Orleans to collect for a chapel he is to build. Hailandière has not authorized this priest; he expressly forbade him to do it. He has written him to come back at once. He hopes this will merit him permission for another more in need than Masquelet. Father (John?) Lefranc has written that he has decided to come to them; Hailandière will try to make the best of it.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
3


1841 Nov 9

O'Reily, Father M.D.
Vicksburg, Missi(ssippi)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Blanc's letter of the 3rd came yesterday. Bishop (Michael) Portier wrote that he would deposit $100 for O'Reily with Blanc. The yellow fever never raged with more unabating violence since the first week of September. The white population may be computed at 700 at most; the number of dead is at least 300. Of these, O'Reily has lost 47. Last week he buried a man whose exemplary conduct drew particularly his own countrymen to the practical observance of their religion. He was gaining over many of the Dutch; this year O'Reily baptized and married as many Dutch as Irish. He has never had such difficulty in the money way as he had since he returned from New Orleans. The congregation bought the bell but since the $50 has not reached his hands. The people are exceedingly poor and few, if any, escaped the sickness. O'Reily received a letter from Baltimore which told that Bishop (John Joseph) Chanche was to be the consecrator of a new church of that city on November 1. O'Reily concludes that Chanche will not be in Vicksburg before Christmas as he intends coming by sea.

V-4-l A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
4


1841 Nov 9

Timon, C.M., Father J(ohn)
Paris, (France)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Timon returned to Paris from Rome a few days ago and yesterday received Blanc's letter of September 22. Bishop (Joseph) Rosati sailed from Liverpool on November 4; before this reaches Blanc, Timon hopes his estimable coadjutor will have been consecrated. While speaking to (Pope Gregory XVI) Timon looked on his table and saw but one snuff box; he could not ask for that. He told His Holiness that the Bishop of New Orleans requested him to obtain a memorial. The pope sends a silver cross, presenting one at the same time to Timon and Father (John) Boullier, (C.M.). The Superior General (Father Jean Baptiste Nozo, C.M.) has been very unwell; he gave Timon Blanc's letter of August 12 requesting Timon to thank Blanc for his paternal regard toward the (Vincentians) in his diocese. (Nozo) regrets he can give no precise answer about Thibeaudoville and the establishment at New Orleans before Timon's return which will be very soon after the receipt of this letter. They start in a few days; 5 priests, 2 students, 11 brothers. They hope to find Father (John) Odin, (C.M.) with Blanc and perhaps assist at his consecration. Timon has labored much for Odin and so has Boullier. They bring many articles. Blanc is to tell Odin to write; Timon has a good sum of money for him though not as much as he could have had, had Odin written more. They saw Father (Stephen) Rousselon's brother, a truly holy man. Father Rousselon's commissions have been executed and they will bring returns from Lyons to him.

V-4-l A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
8


1841 Nov 13

Viel, Father (Alexandre)
Paris, (France)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

It is nearly 24 years since they were in Pittsburgh. Blanc knows of the accident which happened to him when a doctor gave him arsenic drops which poisoned him. Since then he has suffered but now for 3 years the foremost doctor of Paris has ordered him to lead a purely animal life as it was his brain which was affected by the arsenic. He must still have two years more of perfect rest. His only means of existence are Mass intentions and the sale of a book of which Bishop (Joseph) Rosati has accepted the dedication. If Blanc could place some in his diocese it would be a signal service to Viel. fathers (John) Timon, (C.M.) and (John Boullier, C.M.) Bouillé will bring Blanc a copy of "La Voie du Salut." Blanc is to accept it as from a friend who will never forget him for his good heart and admirable qualities. The vicars-general of Metz wrote Viel that he was too modest about this book which they found excellent.
(P.S.) A letter can be addressed to Father (Jean-Baptiste) Etienne, (C.M.), procurator-general of the Lazarists.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 8vo.
5


1841 Nov 14

Hecker and Brother, (Isaac and John)
New York, New York

to O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Massachusetts

They were much pleased at a note from him through his radical friend Mr. Partridge and would feel gratified to hear from him at any time. Little has been done about the project of getting him to give a course of lectures here. They had an interview with the President of the N(ew) Y(ork) Lyceum when they were arranging for lectures. He said Brownson's peculiar opinions were unpopular and injurious from a pecuniary point of view. Their friends of Reform are few in number and poor. The Heckers have no faith in the lecture-going people of New York, unless the subject be a peculiar one - which would bring an audience. They will hire a hall and give publicity to any subject he may select. The best time to lecture would be after the holidays. They'll cooperate with him in anything that will create a stir and enthusiasm. They send copies of the two last sermons of Dr. Dewey, which they heard before the latter's departure for Europe.

I-3-f A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
4


1841 Nov 15

Bellune, Duchesse de
Versailles, (France)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Bellune wrote (Blanc) two months ago when she was so worried about her husband from whom she had no news. Today she has news but her heart is full of sorrow. Again she asks (Blanc) to show her husband that he will be lost forever, as well as his family, if he continues in the path into which he has strayed. In her last letter Bellune was awaiting her husband's return to Europe and her thoughts were already on the possibility of Miss I(zabel's) departure for America. She inquired at Bordeaux from whence the Talma left, whether Mrs. Beaumond had taken passage; the answer was affirmative. At the same time she received a letter from her husband from Pensacola, July 10, part of which she copies for (Blanc): "In her letter of April 25 she promised another very soon so he put off his departure for Europe which he had planned for the first days of June. In the interval he received news from Miss de L(?), which forced him to decide to prolong his stay until next year. Miss de L.'s letter, dated May 10 which reached him June 30, confirmed what Bellune had reported, that she did not want to put herself in her parents hands. She had found refuge with persons interested in her. Her parents demanded that she return to England, they threatened to do away with her child, they pictured Bellune to her as an enemy. So she decided to trust herself to persons whom she had met during her stay in Nantes. She fixed the time of her confinement as the beginning of August. He is reassured about the fate of the child; he asks Bellune's care and protection for it and the mother. He wrote thus to Miss de L; he enclosed a draft for 1500 francs which will suffice until November. After sending this money he does not have enough to establish himself in Italy. He will remain in this country until Bellune sends him the necessary funds, that is, until January. It is possible he may settle in Pensacola. Bellune is to write him in care of Baron Jules Burthe of New Orleans. He wants news of their children and of their finances. Here and in beginning his stay in Italy he will need at least 800 francs a month; it will be less when he is established near Florence." Bellune fears he was not frank with (Blanc). He cruelly abuses her devotion. If he persists in this shameful life, the scandal will finally reach his children and oblige her to make a break. Her husband's fortune is little enough for so large a family. It is what is left of his inheritance which would be around 40,000 francs and of which they can touch only interest. Her husband has already used 7600 francs since the death of his Father. He says he needs 800 francs a month; she could not send that amount to him alone but she could not in conscience impose a sacrifice on her children to anyone but their Father. She will see whether she can find 3000 francs. If her husband insists on remaining with Miss I. she asks only 500 francs be given him a month. If a new separation is decided on, the money is to be used as (Blanc) judges fit. If Miss I. does not wish to return to Europe, her husband could return at once leaving her enough to live on until a decision is made. The last news from her husband was August 21 from Biloxi; he said nothing of Miss I. Burthe would know his true position.
(P.S.) Information taken at Bordeaux and given by Mr. Cayol:
Madame Beaumont was accompanied on board the Talma by Mr. Beaumont who said he was her husband and she went to Nantes. Cayol did not see her again until his ship was to return to America. She took passage. Cayol, wishing to stay some time at Bordeaux, gave over his command to Mr. Morey who said that on arrival Mr. Beaumont met his wife and paid for the crossing. During the trip the alleged Madame Beaumont told Morey that on her arrival in New Orleans, she and her husband thought they would settle in Canada.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 7pp. 4to.
8


1841 Nov 20

Rappe, Father Amadeus Louis
Toledo, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Speaks in answer to Purcell's letter of his visit to Toledo, Maumee and Athens. Found them poor but of good will. Believes that they should have a priest. Has more than a hundred families in Toledo and there are more in the country. Spent a few days in Providence and Napoleon. At Defiance Father (Joseph) McNamee was to visit. There are more than 140 workmen there. (Mss. torn) Speaks of the peoples desire for a church in Toledo. Have chosen a lot but have not title. The owner lives in Cincinnati. Is willing to remain at Toledo permanently. Has also promised the people of Portsmouth that Purcell will visit them on his return to Cincinnati.
P.S. Encloses some reflections on the situation of the diocese. Hopes he will preserve it without sending it to the Propaganda.

II-4-g A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
9


1841 Nov 20

Doutreluingne, C.M., Father P(eter) J.
Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

He found in one of Blanc's letters, a note for 5 piastres for which he will say 5 Masses. Father (Paul?) Jordan has had the misfortune to have an altercation with a servant and he was obliged to dismiss her. She took him by the neck and tore his shirt and pants.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
2


1841 Nov 21

Whelan, David, Seminary of St. Sulpice
Paris, France

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Acknowledges letter from Purcell of October 10. Speaks of his trip across to Havre, his landing on Sunday. Visited Rouen. Then up the Seine to Paris. At the seminary he met another American named O'Brien from Boston. Is as happy as one could expect under the rigid French discipline. Fears he may not have a vocation. Speaks of difficulty involved in his lack of French. I pleased with the good news from Cincinnati. Wishes he could get some French priests for the diocese of Richmond. Speaks of his friends in Cincinnati, and of his French experiences. Has seen Abbe Brassac, who is pushing the departure of the Franciscans. Saw Bishop Rosati in Paris on his way home. Notes that this letter took a week.

II-4-g A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
3


1841 Nov 22

Brogard, Father J(oseph) N.
Natchez, (Mississippi)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Brogard regrets that he cannot announce the return of Bishop (John Joseph) Chanche to his diocese. On leaving it was understood that if Natchez did not have yellow fever he would return by October 15. In September Brogard wrote him twice that they had escaped this plague. Now he has been gone five months. The cause of his absence is appreciated but discontent if beginning to rise. Chanche rented a house at $1500 a year for Miss Marcilly of Baltimore. She was to open a boarding school on November 15. Several people have kept their children home with the intention of supporting this school. It seems that three nieces of Chanche were to teach with Marcilly. People are also asking if the alms from France are to be used for that. Chanche also pays $500 a year for his own house on which $100 is already due. Two days ago Father (Jean Claude) Francois arrived from Vincennes. He showed Brogard a letter from Chanche inviting him to Natchez. Francois intends to join this new diocese; he is a subject of Propaganda.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
4


1841 Nov 24

Perché, Father (Napoleon) J(oseph)
Portland, (Kentucky)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

The person who brings this letter is a respectable person of Perché's parish who is leaving Kentucky to start a boarding house in New Orleans. She had one in Louisville for a long time. She has been twice widowed within a few years. She retired to a small piece of land in the parish but decided to go to New Orleans to be nearer to her children. Her name is Mrs. Lease, formerly Mrs. Giving. Her house was always open to the priests of Louisville at the beginning of the congregation. Perché could not reply sooner to Blanc's letter of several months ago because he was waiting to let Blanc know when he could come to New Orleans. He hopes to be there for Christmas; he has not told his parishioners.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
3


1841 Nov 26

Dugué, F(rancois)
Jefferson Parish, Louisiana

Judge Francois Joseph Enoul Dugué Livaudais authorizes Father (Constantine) Maenhaut? Manon to marry Edward O'Brien and Mrs. Suzan Bridey. (In the margin is written) married November 27.

V-4-l D.S. 1p. 4to.
4


1841 Nov 26

Jordan, Father Paul
West Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) du(!)Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Elij Landry, whom Blanc knows well, says he cannot wait for a dispensation and if Jordan does not marry them soon, they will go to the judge. Jordan asks Blanc to send a dispensation from the banns for Landry and Mrs. Adèle Guedry to avoid scandal after everyone had been edified at the death of his half-brother, Mr. Urssen(?). Jordan would like to have news of Father (Joseph) Evrard as he owes him for several things he took from Baton Rouge or Jordan will pay when an occasion arises or when he goes to New Orleans for necessities for his household.

VI-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
5


1841 Nov 28

Anduze, Father M(athew) B(ernard)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Mother St. Angèle, (R.U.)
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Anduze sends the list of the best modern works to form a library for the use of her house. It is important to know the current publications, especially those which show the alliance between science and religion. The price of the different works would not be over $1 a volume in France. (The list contains 58 titles).

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
1


(1841?) Nov 28

Jamey, Father V(ictor)
Opelousas, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Jamey takes the opportunity of Jourdan's going to send back the young man that he brought from town. One week was sufficient to show that he is a greedy, sulky boy. Being absent all week Jamey can judge only from the reports of Jourdan and of Jamey's brother. Jamey can affirm that several times he could hardly get him up for Father (Joseph) Billon's mass and then his eyes are continually sore. Last Thursday Jamey was at Lafayette where he hopes to take Billon next Friday. The repairs will not be finished but Billon wants so much to go. Also Father (Theodore) de Theux, (S.J.), who is called every week two or three times, finds the trip so difficult that he asks that a pastor be sent. All the priests are convinced that this is one of the better parishes of Blanc's diocese and Jamey has only praise for the trustees. Jamey hopes to write more fully in a week.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
4


1841 Nov 28

Ladavière, (S.J.), Father A. P(ierre)
St. Michael, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

As he feared, Ladavière did nothing at Pointe Coupée. He found things in an unfavorable condition. Now the trustees are going to law to demand 3,000 piastres in damages from Father (Jean) Martin. It is not true that Martin could have had 6,000 piastres at the trial in May. The trustees pleaded to refuse him everything; his lawyer presented the case badly. The judge approved withdrawal of the case. Ladavière found Martin's books in excellent order. Mr. Isley told Ladavière that there was not the slightest doubt about Marti's rights. Ladavière had two talks with (Gustave) Delamare; he is badly disposed. Ladavière went with some strong prejudices against Martin; they are not justified. Father (Charles F.) Moracchini collected the 65 f(ranc?)s.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
6


1841 Nov 29

Bellune, Duchesse de
Versailles, (France)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

The letter which she had written and which comes with this one was delayed because the service of the 18th was canceled. For the last 12 days she has been trying to procure the 3,000 francs she spoke of in her preceding letter. Finally Maurice Richard who is in charge of her Father-in -law's estate, placed this sum at her disposal. But it is impossible to obtain a draft on New Orleans. Father (Hercule) Brassac will ask Blanc to arrange to get the 3,000 francs in New Orleans. She repeats that her husband is to have only 500 francs a month if he does not break with Miss I(zabel).

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
4


1841 Nov 29

Caretta, Isabelle
Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

She does not know to whom to write to find Miss Delatre; she fears she has not received her letter. Mrs. Barker, at whose house Caretta is, wishes to have another teacher for her establishment and Caretta wants to get the position for Delatre. Barker wants someone to teach French and needlework. Delatre should be at Clotilda Burnette's. By sending the enclosed letter either to Mrs. Griffon who has a boarding house or to Mrs. Gaillard in Sevres Street, Blanc will greatly oblige.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
6


1841 Nov 30

Martin, Father (Jean)
Fausse Rivière, (Louisiana)

Father (A. Pierre) Ladavière, (S.J.) arrived at Pointe Coupée on the 22nd. His mission was not as successful as Blanc expected. Martin is very glad he came; perhaps his visit will reform some ideas suggested to Blanc by 3 or 4 individuals. Blanc's presence here would be a proof to Martin's parish of Blanc's care in examining the complaints against Martin. They would see whether the trustees of Pointe Coupée recognize episcopal authority or not. Their lawyer L(oui)s Janin recognized it in their petition against Martin. At Blanc's request they would hand over the records and keys of the two churches which by order of G(usta)ve Delamare, president of the trustees, are in the hands of their beadles. Friday morning coming off the boat where he had taken Ladavière, Blanc's letter to give to the court was handed to him. Martin's lawyer says his case will not appear in this court, that he needs certain documents which he can find only at New Orleans. Martin asks Blanc to send him by Mr. Bineaud, his teacher and singer, the two petitions sent him. Ladavière told him that the diocesan status under Spanish rule had not been found; it would be well to write to the Metropolitan of Havana to have a copy.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
6


1841 Nov 30

Verhaegen, S.J., Father P(eter) J.
St. Louis, (Missouri)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisia)na

Verhaegen has received the ordos for their diocese and for Vincennes and Dubuque which he will send on. He did not find the document in Father (James Oliver) Vandevelde, (S.J.)'s papers. He thinks it is in the hands of his lawyer and since the affair will go on for some time, the amount will be turned over to Blanc. This letter will be brought by Father H(ilary) Tucker of their diocese whom Verhaegen promised some time in the South for his health. He has succeeded in building a brick church at Quincy, (Illinois). Tucker could perhaps be of service to Blanc. As he has a debt on his church, Verhaegen hopes Blanc will permit him to ask some charitable people to help him. Bishop (Joseph) Rosati was to arrive in Philadelphia on November 24. Their coadjutor (Bishop Peter Richard) Kenrick was to have been consecrated today.
P.S. Tucker wishes to get a bell; would Mr. Daron have one for sale? Verhaegen just received a letter from Rosati saying he arrived in Boston the 18th after a 15 days crossing. His health is excellent.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
6


1841 Dec 1

Brogard, Father J(oseph) N.
Natchez, (Mississippi)

to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Brogard announces the return of Bishop (John Joseph) Chanche. He arrived yesterday morning accompanied by three Misses Marcilly and two of his nieces. Next Monday these ladies will open their academy. Brogard again begs Blanc to receive him into his diocese. Now that his replacement is here and several others have offered their services, Brogard believes his desire will soon be accomplished. Chanche will try to keep him; Brogard asks Blanc not to acquiesce.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
4


1841 Dec 1

Génin, Amédée
Sarrebourg, (France)

To The Pastor of Hazelbourg
(Sarrebourg, France)

The Prefect of Meurthe, informed of the unsparing attention given to the people of Hazelbourg during the epidemic, is cognizant also of the fine example given by the pastor. He asks Génin to thank the pastor in his name. Génin joins with the first magistrate of the department in his tribute of praise.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
0


1841 Dec 1

Machebeuf, Father Joseph P.
Lower Sandusky, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Not being aware that Purcell was away he wrote to him at Cincinnati. Now sends this note by Mr. Dickinson. As he mentioned in the previous letter Mr. Wilfred Morice has given 52 acres for a church. Mr. Morice's will has been filed and by it all his property goes to the widow and at her death to the Roman Catholic Church of Sandusky County. Further the widow seems well disposed to become a Catholic. At Sandusky City the frost has stopped the work but the church should be finished in a short time in the spring. Has visited Father (Amadeus) Rappe in Toledo. He found him well and engaged in starting the erection of a church. Asks that Purcell send him Mass music.

II-4-g A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
6


1841 Dec 1

Montgomery, (O.P.), Father Charles P.
St Joseph's, (Somerset, Ohio)

to Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

The bearer of this letter is Father Joseph (S.) Alemany, (O.P.), commissioned to ask alms in behalf of their new church. They commenced it about this time three years ago. They succeeded in getting it under roof. They now have a debt of $1700 which they are unable to collect from their poor congregation.

V-4-l A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
3


1841 Dec 3

(Chanche), Bishop John Joseph
Natchez, (Mississippi)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Chanche) arrived Sunday night last, safe and well. He finds matters much as he left them. Whether he can persuade the people to build a church will be decided in a few days. Prospects do not seem promising. Has Father (John Mary) Odin received his bulls; when is the consecration? Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefev(e)re has received his bulls for the coadjutorship of Detroit; he was to be consecrated on November 21 in Philadelphia. Bishops England and Hughes were to assist and Bishop Kenrick perform the ceremony. The Archbishop received a letter from Bishop (Joseph) Rosati before (Chanche) left Baltimore. He told he would leave Paris about the beginning of November, go to England and take a steamer for America. He would consecrate his coadjutor and proceed himself to his mission to Haiti. (Chanche) found at Natchez, Father (Jean Claude) Francois who left the diocese of Vincennes without his Bishop's permission (Chanche) caused him to write an apology and beg for an exeat or permission to return; (Chanche) is afraid he could not be of much use to him. (Chanche) received an allocation of 24,600 francs from the Propagation. Could Blanc send him some or all the funds by the bank of this city?
(P.S.) (Chanche) is keeping house; he will have a room prepared for Blanc when he comes to visit.

V-4-l A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
6


1841 Dec 5

Doogan, Father Robert
Alexandria, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Doogan asks Blanc to order a box of bread for him as he has but a few hosts. He will start early tomorrow for one of his missionary stations so asks Blanc to excuse his not giving some intelligence respecting his parish.

V-4-l A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
1


1841 Dec 5

(Hailandière), Bishop Cel(estin de la)
Vincennes, (Indiana)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

(Hailandière) received Blanc's letter of the last of October only a few days ago. He also wrote Blanc a few days ago in regard to Father (Francis M.) Masquelet saying that he had not sent him. His intention was not to give a bad impression of Masquelet nor to give the idea that his needs were not real. He wished only to let Blanc see that (Hailandière) was faithful to what Blanc had asked - not to send a collector. However he promised to let Father S(tanislaus) Buteux visit Blanc. He will tell how great his needs are and how small their resources. Seeing what (Hailandière) has given Buteux to sell to make some money, Blanc will see the poverty of the Bishop of Vincennes. (Hailandière) is sending Father (Peter) Lucas' exeat. Mr. Troné will probably also come to Blanc as (Hailandière) has refused to ordain him at least until proof of more piety. There is also something in his dismissorial which makes it nul. Blanc would do well to refuse him. He speaks English well and could get the ecclesiastical spirit in a seminary. (Hailandière) cedes him to Blanc if he presents himself. Father (John?) LeFranc is there; he will send him tomorrow to St. Mary's near the bridge. (Hailandière) sends regards to Father Rousselon.
P.S. One of his priests Father (Auguste) Bessonies, following Jeanjean's advice said Masses for the price of a barrel of white Mass wine. It has not been sent; it could have been addressed to Evansville.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
7


1841 Dec 5

(Rosati), Bishop Joseph
Philadelphia, (Pennsylvania)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

The priest arrived day before yesterday; (Rosati) will take him to Santo Domingo as his secretary. If things can be arranged he can stay there. Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefevere, administrator of Detroit, was consecrated by Bishop (Francis Patrick) Kenrick on November 21 and (Rosati) consecrated Bishop (Peter Richard) Kenrick as his coadjutor on November 30. Among those at the ceremony were Bishop (Charles Forbin) de Janson who has already returned to France and Bishop (John) England, who preached. The little group of Clerics of St. Viator will perhaps have arrived in New Orleans when Blanc received this letter; (Rosati) gave them another for Blanc. (Rosati) saw with pleasure how well affairs of religion are going in Boston, New York, and Philadelphia. Bishop (Benedict Joseph) Fenwick is at present building 12 churches; Bishop (John) Hughes has a fine college with 40 students and 26 seminarians; Kenrick has 35 seminarians in his seminary which he has confided to the Lazarists. The Sacred Heart boarding school in New York has 42 pupils; they also have some postulants. What pleased (Rosati) most is that Bishop (John) Dubois is much better and is very happy to see the good done by his coadjutor. (Rosati's) coadjutor and Lefevere will leave Wednesday for Pittsburgh, the first to go to St. Louis and the second to Detroit. Father (John) Timon should now be at sea. (Rosati) has not yet postponed the day of his departure for Haiti; he will go at the first good occasion. Blanc is to pray for his mission.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
11


1841 Dec 6

Doutreluingne, C.M., Father P.J.
Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

He has been waiting for the pastor to take his place since the beginning of the month. He would like to know whether he is to spend the Christmas holiday here so that he can be prepared as well as the people. All of Father (Joseph) Evrard's furniture is here and Auguste Leveque will wait until the pastor's arrival to dispose of it so that he will find all he needs.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
3


(1841 Dec 7)

(Miles), Bishop Richard Pius
Nashville, (Tennessee)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
N(ew) Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Miles) directs to Blanc's care a letter for Father Joseph (S. Alemany) Allemani who is going on the quest to Cuba and will call on Blanc on his way. (Miles) reached home early in October to renew the dispiriting labours of his poor diocese. He finds their company has received some increase, Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefev(e)re is consecrated Bishop of Detroit and Bishop (Peter Richard) Kenrick for St. Louis; they will make quite a show at the next council.

V-4-l A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
4


1841 Dec 7

Regas, Pedro
Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

After years spent in the place to which he was consigned by the laws of this state, four years ago, he cherishes the hope that this letter may experience the reception which (Blanc) gave to letters addressed to him previous to Regas' departure. The sentence passed on him was 10 years at hard labor. He must suffer this if some one will not aid him. He is a stranger far from his native country and those on whose assistance he could depend. The charge against him was for the death of Matilda Patton. He treasures the promises of those to whom he is indebted for having escaped the death to which he had been sentenced. He hopes (Blanc) will lend his weight to his friends should they make an effort for his pardon.

V-4-l L.S. 3pp. 4to.
2


1841 Dec 8

Kiernan, Bernard
Russelvill(e), Illinois

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc for Father (Bonaventure Armengol) Armingol
New Orleans, L(ouisi)ana

Kiernan returns his thanks for Armengol's kindness to him when he resided there and Blanc is a cherished personage in his memory. Since Kiernan's departure from Assumption parish he has been teaching school among the sectarians. It would be a source of pleasure if Armengol could get him a situation where he can enjoy his religious sentiments in unity with his Catholic brethren. That person who lied about him to the bishop must be possessed of the spirit of lying, whether a priest or not. Kiernan does as much service to his fellow man in instructing the ignorant as in being a priest. Intermingling with heathens all the time Kiernan has no chance to attend the rites of the Catholic Church. He is not so penniless now as when he was there; he has money and property. He was but a boy when there. He asks for a reply and to let him know how his friend is, Mr. Shawnessy(?), who was studying theology in Lafourc(h)e with him.
P.S. These various sects appear to be strict in attending to the requests of their brethren which prompted him to address Blanc who would help him to once more enjoy the rites of the Catholic Church.

V-4-l A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
2


1841 Dec 10

Lucas, F(ielding) Jr.
Baltimore, (Maryland)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

The moment the almanac for next year was ready Lucas sent them by the Brig Porpoise as per bill of lading annexed. Lucas' bill is for $18.75, the bill of lading is signed by Washington Jordan, Master. Folded inside the letter is another page with numbers from 1 to 16.

V-4-l A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
2


1841 Dec 11

Bellune, Duchesse de
Versailles, (France)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Bellune wrote a long letter on November 30 in which she told (Blanc) that since her husband would need money in January and to prevent him from drawing on her, she arranged with (Blanc) to draw on Father (Hercule) Brassac for 3000 francs. But four days ago she received a letter from her husband from Biloxi, dated October 16 accompanying a letter of exchange for 5000 francs to be paid in February. (This letter is in bad condition and it is not possible to complete sentences). ...his majority consists of 21,200 francs...2,000 francs in interest. The estate is not yet settled and they must wait 10 months for a payment. Eleven months after his Father's death, her husband will have spent for himself 12,200 francs. If he is in New Orleans she begs (Blanc) to counsel him. In his last letter her husband told her that he had decided to return to Europe. But can she believe it since she knows that Mrs. Beaumond arrived at New Orleans on board the Talma and was met by Bellune's husband who paid her passage. Baron Burthe has just written a few words in order to send her a letter from her husband which had gone astray a long time ago. His words may make her husband decide to take a part in the welfare of his family. She asks (Blanc) to have him read it. She thanks (Blanc) for the promptness with which he answered her letter of September 14.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
4


1841 Dec 13

Armengol, C.M., Father B(onaventure)
Assumption, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Father (J.M.) Mignard, (C.M.) returned from Thibodeaux day before yesterday, Father (Charles Boutelou de) St. Aubin not having returned to his post any sooner. He returned there today the pastor having to be away to make final arrangements for his change. Mignard assisted a little Negress of 13 who was hanged. He baptized her and she went to her death as to a festival. Her crime was throwing her little mistress of 4 or 5 years into a well; the latter suffered no injury at all. John's sight is growing weaker; he must go to New Orleans at the first occasion for an examination. All goes well at their seminary. Mr. Berger will remain there until a place is found for him; he asks Blanc to send his trunk. Armengol sends respects to Fathers Rousselon and Maenhaut.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
5


1841 Dec 13

Lamy, Father John
Danville, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Asks for a dispensation for two cousins married before the squire, and method of applying the dispensation. The congregation at Newark, has not commenced their church. Mr. McCarthy has not delivered the dead. Asks Purcell to write to him about it lest some of the parish lose interest. Father (George) Wilson of Zanesville offered cheap the windows, doors and altar of his old church, and Lamy thinks he will accept the offer. The church in Mt. Vernon would have been enclosed two months ago but for an accident to Mr. Brophy, who fell. Mr. Colopy has been unwell, so that Mr. Morton was the only one left. Purcell has mentioned that he wanted Mr. Boyle to plaster the church at Cincinnati. Lamy asks the price a yard at Cincinnati. Suggests also having him plaster the church at Germain. Some in Danville and Newark have joined the temperance society. Has made sick calls that brought people to church. Has baptized a lady who was a Baptist.

II-4-g A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
5


1841 Dec 13

Lynch, G. A(nne)
Providence, (Rhode Island)

To (Orestes) A. Brownson
(Boston, Massachusetts)

She is happy to hear that Brownson is so deeply engaged in his thoughts, studies and writings. She says she cannot say that she has really given herself up as a hopeless case but almost despairs when she thinks how little has been done. Nothing would give her more pleasure than to visit Chelsea but at present she cannot leave home. She has been reading another book on magnetism. It is interesting and confirms her faith if it need confirmation.

I-3-f A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
1


1841 Dec. 15

McLaughlin, Father Peter
Cleveland, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

He does not like law suits and until he received Purcell's letter he did not know of Mrs. Golden's appointment of administrator of her husband. As to the price for the pew building he had not been asked for it and consequently had not paid. Speaks of the question of paying the $1000 balance, he does not believe that he can force the congregation to pay. They say that they did not have the choice when it was put up, and they do not feel any obligation to pay for it. Is pleased that Purcell is pleased with Lawyer Waldron and hopes that Purcell will pray for the conversion of his mother. Thinks that Purcell should not try to force payment from the disunited congregation of St. Mary's, Cleveland, but should wait until the people will pay out of a sense of gratitude.

II-4-g A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
2


1841 Dec 16

(Chanche), Bishop John Joseph
Natchez, (Mississippi)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Chanche) has just received Blanc's letters of the 10th and 11th. He regrets that Blanc is prevented form coming to Natchez at this time. He will keep in readiness to go to New Orleans for the consecration of Bishop (John Mary) Odin. (Chanche) can give little satisfactory news in relation to the building of the church. (William St. John) Elliot says he is sick; Major (Henry) Chotard could not obtain $5000 in subscriptions. The trustees had written the Archbishop that (Chanche) should want nothing and he has yet to see the first cent. (Chanche) has taken a house at $550 a year. Father (Joseph N.) Brogard showed (Chanche) the letter he received from Blanc this morning; (Chanche) requested him to wait till after Christmas and Brogard has consented to do so. (Chanche) knows nothing against Father ( ) Brunel in Baltimore he was esteemed for his regularity. When (Chanche) goes to New Orleans he will draw on Blanc for $2000; he paid Mr. Lucas $18.75; $34.37 for Father (V,) Jouanneault and $3 for the Monitor(?). Father (Claude) Francois is here waiting for letters from the Bishop of Vincennes. (Chanche) is awaiting Father (Guillaume) Labbé who accompanied Bishop (Charles Forbin de Janson) in his missions in Canada; he has offered his services. He sends regards to Fathers Rousselon and Maenhaut.

V-4-l A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
11


1841 Dec 16

Cummiskey, Eugene
Philadelphia, (Pennsylvania)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Cummiskey received Blanc's favor of November 16. He sent a case of books to Mr. Pifferi (?). He sent all the books he could procure of those Blanc wished him to send to the Fathers of St. Charles College (Grand Coteau). He sends Blanc a copy of the Universal reader just published for Catholic schools. If Blanc thinks it a good book Cummiskey would be much obliged to Blanc to use his influence in having it introduced in his schools. Blanc will see by the Catholic Herald that Cummiskey is publishing a series of reading books for Catholic schools; he hopes to be encouraged by the Bishops and clergy.

V-4-l A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
2


1841 Dec 18

De Theux, S.J., Father T(heodore)
(Grand Coteau, Louisiana)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

De Theux discovered an impediment in a marriage performed some time ago and asks if what he has done about it is sufficient. He also wishes to know what to do about marriage during the closed season. The number of associates for the Propagation of the Faith is now 6 complete groups and 2 begun. He will shortly send Blanc the amount of their subscriptions.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
2


1841 Dec 18

Kelley, William D.
Philadelphia, (Pennsylvania)

To (Orestes A.) Brownson
Boston, Massachusetts

He has wanted to write many times since his return from Boston, but the thought of Brownson's heavy correspondence kept him from doing so. But now he must write, for since Brownson's visit with him the townspeople think that he is advised of all of Brownson's intentions. Now that their lecture season is fairly open some of them call on him to ask whether Brownson will visit them this winter. There is a growing desire to hear him and his lecture would be well attended. If Brownson could do this, he is invited to come on Sunday and preach to the small but rapidly growing congregation of Transcendental Unitarians. He congratulates Brownson on the way in which he triumphed over the small-fry who thrust themselves between him and the young men in whose hearts he holds the first place. (B. H.) Brewster asked him to find out from Brownson if he would like an article on the political life and writings of Milton, which he has written. He asks Brownson to let him know when he will visit them and what he will do while there.

I-3-f A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
2


1841 Dec 19

Fenwick, Benedict, Bishop of Boston
Boston, Massachusetts

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Is pleased that Father John Corry has applied to Purcell to transfer to the Cincinnati diocese. Fenwick has no objection but is rather pleased at the idea of the change because he feels that Corry can do no more good where he is. Requests that if Purcell accepts Corry that the change be made as soon as possible to prevent Corry raising further difficulties in Providence, (Rhode Island). Purcell had written to him for some of his church music books. The old copies are gone but he has a new edition with additional pages, and new matter, and additional music which he offers at the same price, $2.50. Will send Purcell 30 or 40 which he can distribute at $2.00 a copy. (Manuscript deleted here) Is sorry that (Father) Hoffman is acting queerly in Lyons. Suggests that Purcell write there to acquaintance to put them on their guard.

II-4-g A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
4


1841 Dec. 19

(Hailandière), Bishop Cel(estin de la)
Vincennes, (Indiana)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

His reply to Father (Francis M.) Masquelet was as Blanc requested. He thanks Blanc for his kindness to this poor priest. Blanc is not to keep him too long; there are Germans waiting for him here. Blanc's letter arrived too late to stop Father (Stanislaus) Buteux. (Hailandière) does not know how to express his embarrassment except by explaining his fear of failing. The Propagation of the Faith is absolutely their only resource and they are to receive very little this year.

V-4-l A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
3


1841 Dec 21

(Purcell), Bishop J(ohn) B(aptist)
Cin(cinnati, Ohio)

To Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

W.H. Powell, a painter who has attained much celebrity in cincinnati and New York and is highly esteemed for his moral qualities asks for a line to Blanc. Bishop (Peter Richard) Kenrick left yesterday for St. Louis. Their senior brother (Bishop Joseph Rosati) wears the cappa magna. He is consoled by his tour in Europe for many a year of privation in his extensive missions along and beyond the great Father of Streams.

V-4-l A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
4


1841 Dec 21

(Purcell), B(isho)p J(ohn) B(aptist)
Of Cin(cinnati, Ohio)

To Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefevere, (Coadjutor and Administrator of Detroit)

Purcell welcomes Lefevere to the West and the government of the Diocese of Detroit. (Bishop Peter Richard Kenrick), Coadjutor of St. Louis, stayed (in Cincinnati) until yesterday. Purcell invites Lefevere for a visit. Meantime, Lefevere has for himself whatever powers Purcell himself possesses whenever duty or accident may bring him within the limits of this diocese (Cincinnati). The Sisters of Notre Dame and Purcell thank Lefevere for the packages from Antwerp. He sends his respects to Fathers (Vincent F.) Badin and (Martin) Kundig.

III-2-g A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
3


1841 Dec 30

Dubalut, J.A.
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To The Sisters (of Our Lady of) Mount Carmel
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Two receipts, one for $5.25 dated December 24, 1841 and one for $3.50 dated December 30. (On the back of the receipt) Sister Ste. Thérèse (has written): Received from Father E(tienne) Rousselon the $8.75 on January 26, 1842.

V-4-l A.D.S. (French) 2pp. 16mo.
3


1841 Dec 30

(England), John, Bishop of Charleston
Charleston, South Carolina

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Introduces the bearer Dr. Telfair, a resident of Ohio, a member of a respectable and ancient southern family. England has known him only lately but has long known his family. Hopes that he will be received into the church by Purcell as many of his relatives have been received by himself.

II-4-g A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
1