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Calendar: 1861 July

(1861 Jul ?)

(Odin, C.M., Archbishop John Mary of
New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Apparently in Odin's handwriting). Dispensations for mixed marriages: 1854-14; 1855-47; 1856-41; 1857-27; 1859-19; in the first degree of affinity 2, in the collateral line; 1859-46, in second degree of consanguinity 2; 1860-31; 1861 to the end of June-10. Of mixed marriages, about 15 for disparity of cult.

VI-2-e A. Note (Latin) 1p. 4to.
1


1861 Jul 1

d'Asti, O.S.F., Father Augustine
Houston, Texas

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He received Odin's favor yesterday upon his return from Austin where he gave the congregation an opportunity to attend to their religious duties. Desiring to see some of the old missions of his order he included San Antonio in his trip. The Benedictines have yet a great deal to do in order to have a religious house at San José; it struck him that they have undertaken too much. The trip improved his health. He visited the Orphan Asylum in NewBraunfels and found it really poor. He does not believe that Mother Felicitas will succeed there as the people are against her. There is $400 yet to be paid on the house and upon her return if she does not pay she may lose it. He and several of his congregation would like a little convent, but they do not know where to get the means. Someone urged him to beg (Odin) to borrow some money for them, but he doesn't dare ask so much. Their building is getting finished slowly and the debt on it about $800. They hope to increase their numbers soon for they expect Father Emilian (Wendel, O.S.B.?) to come with some other Franciscans from Italy. Father Felix (de Connobio, O.F.M.) is well and pays his respects.

P.S. They are celebrating the 26 Masses and thank (Odin) and Father (Stephen) Rous(s)elon for the favor.

VI-2-e A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
11


1861 Jul 2

Foltier, Father E.J.
Vermillionville, (Louisiana)

To Father (Stephen) Rousselon
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

He believes he should write to Father (Émile) Hillaire to give him a clear idea of his situation. Hillaire does not understand because he was not treated shamefully. However that was only because of Foltier's entreaties among the people. He asks Rousselon to take notice of the letter and then to seal, stamp and mail it as he knows everything without Hillaire suspecting it. The Superior of the (Carmelite) Convent sent him a letter which Hillaire wrote to Miss ( ) Pierson; he sends it to Rousselon so that she may rest easy. Hillaire should not write any more unless it is under cover.

P.S. He has been subpoenaed for next Saturday to pay a $69 debt contracted by Father (J.) Mégret. If he loses he will appeal to the court and inform Archbishop (Odin) who should take note of it. It is a test; since the estate is bankrupt they wish to fall back on the church. He seeks a dispensation to marry W.O. Smith, non-baptized, and Belvire Chargois, a Catholic.

A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 8vo.

Enclosure:

--------
1861 Jun 26

Hillaire, Father É(mile)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Miss (Pierson
Vermillionville, Louisiana)

He regrets having left Royville without saying good bye and thanking her for her help. He did so fear that the thousands of calumnies which ingratitude no less than wickedness has spread about him would paralyze his ministry. Furthermore, in his opinion the want of a village was a great obstacle. He was well-received at (New Orleans) and believes he will soon be given a new post. If he has an opportunity to utilize her zeal and devotion, he will not hesitate to call upon her anew. If heaven does not inspire her with new thoughts about the religious life she should persevere in what she has.

A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 8vo.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 8vo.
8


1861 Jul 2

Ste Marie, (R.U.), Mother de
San Antonio, (Texas)

to Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.)
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

She has received all his letters. She is pained that he has not yet accustomed himself to his separation from Texas. Their isolation is complete, not being able to hope to have Father (Claude M.) Dubuis, (C.M.) who has always been a visible providence for them. They are unable to find either (Ursulines) or servants to assist them. Two lay sisters are working, one in the kitchen and one in the laundry. Every week it is difficult to find the means to carry on their work without having Sister Ste. Martine, (R.U.) fall sick of fatigue. With Sister Ste. Ursule, (R.U.) in bed for three weeks she has been obliged to give the day students a two months' vacation. They will keep the boarders until the end of the month. Father (Stephen) Mackin promised them a lay sister but she appears to have changed her mind since his departure. Mother Ste. Seraphine, (R.U.) does not appear at all disposed to give them anyone. She wonders if (Odin) might find one or two good subjects in (New Orleans) with the help of the Redemptorists. The distress causes many families, as well as workers, to leave for Monterey. F. Giraux left. She doubts if his mother, who is very feeble, will survive the trip. Mrs. ( ) Campbell also thinks of leaving. Her difficulties are inexpressible. Poor Kate looks for some way to earn her living. She was astonished that Mr. ( ) Forstall presented (Odin) with an account of $115 as she thought that he held a silver note for $73. She hopes that with the $130 which Father (Michael Sheehan) Shean sent (Odin) he will have enough to pay (P.) Rotchford and Forstall without drawing on the latter. She asks (Odin) to tell them where they stand in this regard. Sister Ste. Madeleine, (R.U.) makes a mountain out of a mole hill and she has good reason to believe that she can not assist her for a long time. Her illness persists despite a vigorous diet for the past six months. She is going to reply to Dubuis' letter and will send him some notes so that he can settle with Forstall if that is possible.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
14


1861 Jul 3

Bryant, (Doctor) John
Philadelphia, (Pennsylvania)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Brownson's fourth article on the Great Rebellion has caused the writer to abandon some of his own thoughts. The article signed "W.J.B.", perhaps Brownson's son, shows great promise in the author. As Brownson's former physician, Doctor Bryant is concerned about his eyesight. He recommends gradual reduction in the amount of tobacco used; he believes this will relieve the eye trouble and also clear up the intestinal disturbances from which Brownson suffers. The eye trouble is not an organic disease. Doctor Bryant submits six points, with regard to the poem he is writing, for Brownson's criticism. He does not agree with Milton's portrayal of Hell in "Paradise Lost" it is a pagan concept of eternity. Secondly, Satan is the successful hero of "Paradise Lost." In the "Redemption" both points are reversed. Thirdly, "Paradise Lost" involves the pagan gods and goddesses to assist its muse. "Redemption" scorns this weakness. Fourthly, all critics agree that the "machinery" of poetry should be subordinate to, and less in bulk than, the human agents of the poem. Here "Paradise Lost" must yield to the "Redemption." Fifthly, according to sacred history, the second Eve, Mary, is superior to the first. The "Redemption" makes this point more clearly than "Paradise Lost." Lastly, there is but one passage of pathos in "Paradise Lost," this the repentance after the fall; whereas the "Redemption" abounds in the pathetic. In conclusion, no comparison between the two poems can be made since the "Redemption" is totally void of drama. It is a mere narrative of a single act of redemption.

I-4-A A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
1


1861 Jul 4

Seton, Robert
Uplands, (Ill)inois

to Wil(liam) Seton
(East Chester, New York)

He is at last in the West, far from the stifling thickly populated city. He is delighted to breathe fresh air. Carleton, Grace and he arrived here yesterday. Last evening he and Carley took a bath in the Rock River. He expects to try his hand at woodcock shooting but this morning he contented himself with firing a rifle at Carley's fence. The quail are provokingly tame. Someone stole Carley's boat leaving only an old scow. After dinner he and Carley are going into Dixon. He met the Quartermaster at Brookes. He wants to be remembered to the Colonel and to Henrique's. He took a subscription to the Herald for Will. After leaving Newport News he spent three days at the home of Captain Fred Chatard. Fred is now a Commander in the Rebel Navy. Although he was treated very kindly Robert felt an intense bitterness towards all coercionists as Northerners are called. Robert asks Will not to call on the Chatards because he was distinctly given to understand that the Captain's family would not receive anyone even their dearest friend if he came as a Northern soldier. Father hears from Will often, Robert bought a skye terrier. Robert Seton notes that Will was called the "Hunter."

II-1-a A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
2


(18)61 Jul 5

Ste. Séraphine, (R.U.), Mother
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

She asks him to give Father (Napoleon Joseph) Perché the permission that Archbishop Blanc ordinarily gave him on his return after an absence to pay a short visit to the (Ursuline) community. She also hopes they will see (Odin) from time to time.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
3


1861 Jul 6

Cassiano, Jose
San Antonio, (Texas)

To Archbishop J(ohn) Mary Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

He wishes to inform Odin that he is sick and is to leave for Mexico, that his son Ignace is going with him, and that his son Fermin will remain to care for all his interests and to receive the interest on the three obligations which Odin gave him on September 21, 1860 and which will fall due on September 21, 1861. If he dies, each of his children - Ignace, Isabel, and Fermin - is to have a part.

(P.S.) The three obligations amount to $3,600.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
1


1861 Jul 6

De la Croix, Father C(yril)
Iberville, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.)
N(ew) Orleans, (Louisiana)

One of his friends at New Orleans wrote him yesterday that he heard from the Superior of the Brothers that Odin had written twice to order him to come to the city and that Odin was surprised that he failed to reply. He assures him of his submission, but he explains that with the exception of Odin's pastoral he has received no letters from him. He intended to go to pay his respects but he was always prevented by some work. Last Monday he was about to go but was so sick that for four days he was not able to say Mass. For some time he has had many sick people in his parish and there are now three in danger. He will visit them today and if their state permits he will come next week. Otherwise he will ask Father (Francis C.) Follot of Plaquemine to look out for his parish so that he can come early the following week.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
2


1861 Jul 6

Hayes, S.C.
Philad(elphi)a, (Pennsylvania)

To (James Alphonsus McMaster)
(New York, New York)

Hayes seeks pardon for the liberty he took in writing this letter. He is a Presbyterian of long standing, but he was amused and pleased with McMaster's facetious strictures, on the Presbyterian General Assembly held in (Philadelphia), as they were reprinted in "The Presbyterian." He believes the Presbyterian Church is ambitious, a fact that is disgusting to him. Some commonly say that the "Know Nothings" would have everything under control if it had not been for the traitor Wise and the South in general. It is his opinion that Protestant clergy are responsible for the present national troubles. He has expressed this opinion to many, and has for this reason, stayed away from his church and attended the Catholic Church. At the latter one can hear the pure Gospel free from politics. The only pulpit effusion, of which he has knowledge, that breathes the spirit of the gospel of the Prince of Peace was that of Bishop John Hughes, which he read in the "New York News." He admires Hughes and states that many Protestants believe him superior to anyone in the polemic field. The actions of the Know Nothing party has made him realize that he must either become a Catholic or else wander into infidelity. He is a native of Virginia, and states that until the closing of the mails he had written to his Southern friends and told them that the only non-partial church was the Catholic Church. When Hayes was asked his advice by Southern Presbyterian Clergy and Elders, with reference to their coming to the General Assembly his answer was negative. His reason for such an answer was that the spirit was the same as that which instigated the burning of the Convent in Charlestown, (South Carolina) in 183_. He condemns the principles that caused the removal from the City Gas Works and other places, of all men of foreign birth and such natives as had an O or an Mc in their names. This was done by a narrow minded sect of bigots, he thinks, in midwinter. He is opposed to the War, and firmly believes the South will acquire its independence, unite with Mexico not by conquest. He hopes we will then have a country free from isms. He believes his opinion that Protestantism has shipwrecked the country, if the opinion of the thousand or more southern born men in (Philadelphia). He has also received letters from the south confirming this merely to give McMaster an idea of the feeling prevalent among Hayes' class of men. Hayes is an Elder in the Presbyterian Church, and since the southerners must express their views in whispers, to each other, if his views were made public his situation would become very uncomfortable. He states that he has a letter from a high southern authority, not a Catholic, who is in agreement with the opinion of the folly and madness of the Protestants. After Hayes had written the preceding letter he thought he had better not send it. Before going to dinner he went to bring the "New York News," and he also asked for the "Journal," which they did not have. He went to Peter Cunningham, subscribed for the "Journal," and stayed a minute to read Cunningham's copy. He found in it an article, "Wisdom Calling to Men," expressing the very idea Hayes tried to express in this letter. He knows nothing of the backing McMaster can receive from the Church. He wants McMaster to mention a book which would enlighten him. His porter, Oven Kane, promises to introduce him to Bishop James Frederick Wood, and Hayes may learn from the Bishop what he desires.

I-1-m A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
2


(1861) Jul 7

Shannon, (R.S.C.), Madam A.
St. Michael's, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

She invites him to their (Religious of the Sacred Heart) distribution of prizes on August 12. Since he intends to confirm their pupils, they may reasonably expect his presiding at the ceremony. If it suits him, he might come sometime before and stay for several days. Unless some pupils leave before vacation about 40 will be prepared for Confirmation.

VI-2-e A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
2


1861 Jul 8

Claris, Father J. J(osep)h
New York, N(ew) Y(ork)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.)
N(ew) Orleans, (Louisiana)

Odin knows of his loss of $1200 occasioned by the burning of the chapel at Morgan City. Odin holds to his account $200 and Father Perché sent him a subscription of $29. He still owes to various persons $1000 plus interest. He wishes that circumstances permitted him to seek nothing for this loss, but they do not. If Odin thinks it proper to authorize a collection for a brick church he can send him a letter immediately. He is going to Canada and then to Europe perhaps to return to New Orleans for All Saints. In this case it will suffice to send him a check on Paris. He will await his reply until July 20th.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
2


1861 Jul 8

Gutton, Father Ph(ilibert)
St. Martinville, (Louisiana)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

After a severe illness brought on by fatigue, he was placed with Father (Ange Marie Felix) Jan eight months ago to complete his convalescence and remain as an assistant. However Jan and the trustees said they could not meet the expense. He remained there doing all that was asked and receiving only a Mass stipend or two a week. If it were not for a fever which strikes him intermittently he would go to (New Orleans) to speak to (Odin) directly but the doctor said it would be unwise. Last week Jan having learned that Father (N.) Francais curé at Anse Sauvage, wished to leave for France, told him that he might arrange something. He wishes to find a fixed position be it as assistant or alone, or learning English, but he does not want to influence the decision of his superiors. Francais told him he would like to stay for a while to arrange certain matters. Gutton, if destined for the post, would prefer that (Francais) be far away because he does not wish to live with the almost white mulatresses whom (Francais) wishes to free and give a piece of the church land so that they would then come to render him services. Gutton fears that if this is not to commit evil at least it formally authorizes it. That such difficulties have occurred in regard to a neighboring confrere, of whose sad history he has heard, rends his heart.

(P.S.) Perhaps (Odin) would know a little about Gutton if he said he were the schoolmate of Father (Claude) Jacquet, Father (J.S.) Valois, Father (Andrew) Farges, and Father ( ) Corgié.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
9


1861 Jul 8

Pabisch, Father Francis J.
Rome, (Italy)

To Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Pabisch looks forward to Purcell's arrival. He made his examination for degrees of baccalaureate and licentiate on the vigil of the feast of Sts. Peter and Paul. He describes his course of study. Dr. (William) McCloskey did not interfere in the nomination of the Archbishop for New Orleans. The Propaganda states that the newly consecrated Archimandrite of the newly converted 10,000 Bulgarians has yielded to Russian pressure, apostalized again and deserted, but the people are still in the Faith. The Congregation of Holy Inquisition has not yet decided Purcell's question about clandestine marriages. Pabisch relates concerning the health and activities of the Pope. He also mentions some debts that he owes and asks Purcell to send the money to pay them if he cannot come to Rome himself. Father Rudolf shall get the desired faculties next week. Pabisch sends regards to the clergy at the cathedral, St. Mary's, St. John's St. Mary's, Fathers Hengchold, Elkmann, Hahne, Kuhr, and Kromer. Pabisch hopes the United States will get peace.

II-5-a A.L.S. 4pp 12mo.
2


1861 Jul 9

Abadie, Laure
(Thibodaux, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

She writes in the name of all the children in their quiet little (Carmelite) home to express the hope that he will grace their exhibition in August with his presence.

VI-2-e A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
2


(18)61 Jul 9

Chambodut, Father L(ouis) C.M.
Galveston, (Texas)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.)
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Last Thursday he received a letter from Mr. ( ) Berthier of Liberty announcing that Father (Peter) Berthet had fallen to the altar while preaching. He asked Father (Charles) Padey to take his place and send him to Galveston. Yesterday Berthet arrived much better; as soon as he is recovered he will return. He is sorry to hear that Father S(tephen) Rousselon and Father (Napoleon Joseph) Perché are so ill. Last week someone told him that if (Odin) did not moderate his zeal he could not remain (at New Orleans) very long. He is happy to know that Father (Claude M.) Dubuis, (C.M.) is getting better and he wonders if they will see him soon. He has seen Mrs. (Chapuy) Chapuise and he performed (Odin's) commission. She thanks (Odin) for having seen Guittet & Co., and she does not wish them to send it because the boats are not sure and the other way costly. Yesterday at 5 p.m. Dr. ( ) Heard asked him for the (Ursuline) College to make a military hospital of it. He asked 24 hours for reflection and told him that in times of war the state has a right to take but he has a right to protest. (Heard) told him Mother (St. Pierre Margaret Harrison, R.U.) had offered the convent for a hospital and her nuns for nurses. The news surprised him and he wonders what he should do. His sister (Sister Marie Thérése Chambodut, R.U.) is a dupe of Mother St. Ambroise's (R.U.) intrigues and will never recover her health at Liberty under the present regime. (Mother de) Ste. Marie, (R.U.) of San Antonio would like to have her, and Mother St. Pierre says that she would receive her with pleasure. Times are very hard. Galveston will soon be a deserted city. It is said that Captain (James) Alden who conducts the blockade is a polite, keen gentleman, a smart, cunning Yankee, able for his mission. He has around ten small boats, but it appears that he does not wish to take prisoners. Mr. ( ) Sheldon is colonel and Judge ( ) Thompson his lieutenant; it is too bad that they are at odds.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 8vo.
18


1861 Jul 9

St. Bernard, (O.Carm.), Mother
Thibodaux, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

(The Carmelites) invite him to attend the distribution of prizes preceding some literary exercises in their establishment on August 1, at 9 in the morning.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
2


1861 Jul 10

Buteux, Father (Louis) S(tanislaus)
Bouloire(?), (France)

To Mr. Reynès
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Before last January Buteux wrote to (Thomas) Layton giving him the reasons why he did not wish to receive the Propagateur Catholique January 13 or 20, and asking him to communicate them to Reynès. He left for Rome and returned ten days ago. He was greatly astonished to find at Bouloire(?) that they continued to send it to him. He has said only one of the six masses that he agreed to say. When he subscribed at New Orleans it was understood that he would have to say only six masses in lieu of paying $6 and he would receive it free of charge. He has not received a single number that has not been taxed at least 3 cents which he had to pay. By November he will renew his subscription for six masses for the following year provided it will arrive free of charge. Having addressed Reynès as a man of business he now speaks as a friend. He has written directly several times and often through others and he wonders why Reynès has not written a single word. Several days ago he dined with a Marquise de Narp who knew Reynès and his first wife at Paris. The Marquis died 2 or 3 years ago. He was a military intendant, an excellent man, and a strict Christian. His wife and children follow in his footsteps. He wonders what they are doing at New Orleans. He has just taken a trip and his heart was happy from one end to the other. He visited many sanctuaries in Spain, Italy, Austria and Bavaria, and he prayed especially for Reynès and his family and for Joe Kennedy at all of them; nor did he forget Mrs. Jourdan and Mrs. Le Baron. He sends his respects to them and he asks Reynès to send word about his subscription through Layton. He especially wants to know how many masses they will expect of him.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
7


1861 Jul 10

Dubernard, Father (John Honoré)
Breaux Bridge, (Louisiana)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He received (Odin's) letter informing him of the date when he intends to come to confer Confirmation. He wonders if (Odin) might come on August 20, instead of the 22nd as both the First Communion and the feast of the patron of their church, St. Bernard, are set for the 20th.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
2


1861 Jul 10

(McKey, Mother Angela Joseph)
Grand Rapids, Mich(iga)n

to Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere)
(Detroit, Michigan)

She delayed an answer until Father (Thomas) Brady would carry out instructions Lefevere sent him by letter which Brady did not tell her about; had Lefevere not written about his letter to Brady she would have acted contrary to Lefevere's directions. In Father (Martin) Marco's absence they went to confession to Father (Henry) Ri(e)vers. The two girls left on June 16. Brady brought a man and wagon to carry out the trunks. She was told the man was Mr. Courtney. On July 2 Brady came and demanded money to go for a girl in Milwaukee. Since Mother Angela did not have the money Brady said the girl will not come there. The mother of the girl came with her and turned her over to Mother Angela asking that her daughter go home with her and return with another girl. (Letter incomplete).

III-2-j A.L. (Incomplete) 3pp. 12mo.
4


1861 Jul 11

Gaudet, O.M.I., Father A(ugustine)
Brownsville, (Texas)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin,
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He received (Odin's) letter of June 20 on July 10. He returned from Port Isabel where he spent a dozen days in order to take some sea baths with Brother Pierre Jean René Roudet who, fatigued by the Mexican exiles, fell sick and received the last sacraments. He left him there for at least two more weeks for although already well enough, his strength returns slowly. (Odin's) proposition (for the Oblates of Mary Immaculate) gives him the greatest pleasure. If he could go to N(ew) Orleans, he would leave immediately in order to see (Odin) and to take a stroll at St. Michael's. His superiors have the last word but since he for some time has had all the powers of a vicar of the missions, he can take all the first steps for the foundation of a new establishment assured that everything will be ratified. Thus he must gather information so as to make only engagements worthy of being ratified. The state of the Republic places him in a cruel perplexity. He does not know how to send a letter to Europe. Thus, they would not refuse since the other religious communities (at New Orleans) do so.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
5


1861 Jul 11

Hecker, (C.S.P.), Father I(saac) T(homas)
New York, (New York)

To Bishop (Francis P. McFarland of
Hartford, Connecticut)

Since the beginning of the war (the Paulists) have had several invitations to serve as chaplains, especially from Archbishop (John Hughes) of New York but they have not found themselves in a condition to accept. He has been forced to reconsider on receiving McFarland's letter of the 9th but they find that because of their small numbers they cannot a post without seriously crippling their community and imperiling the interests of the missions. As to sending a Father until the missions begin, the labors of the mission are so taxing that no other task can be undertaken during the summer. They hope that the Bishop will understand. They will pray for the Bishop's mother whom they remember with respect.

I-1-a A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
3


1861 Jul 11

Hewit, (C.S.P.), Father A(ugustine) F.
N(ew) Y(ork, New York)

To Bishop (Francis P. McFarland of
Hartford, Connecticut)

McFarland granted faculties of his diocese to Father (George) Deshon, (C.S.P.) and Hewit when they visited any of the clergy. Father (R.B.) Tillotson is thinking of visiting Father J. Synott and has not received faculties from McFarland. They ask that they be given at Father Synott's request.

I-1-a A.L.S. 2pp. 32mo.
3


1861 Jul 11

Kenrick, Francis Patrick, Archbishop of
Baltimore, (Maryland)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C,M,)
N(ew) O(rleans, Louisiana)

(Odin's) favor of (June) 25 has just reached him. He apprised the Holy See of his acceptance which he learned from the secular papers. He shall urge the transmission of the pallium, and support (Odin's) recommendations for Galveston. He has no suggestion to make in regard to them. Archbishop (Anthony Blanc) was accustomed to pay $50 yearly towards the relief fund for Rev. (Levi Silliman) Ives. Bishop (William Henry Elder) of Natchez gave $25. He hopes (Odin) will induce Bishop (John Quinlan) of Mobile and Bishop (Augustus Martin) of Natchitoches to do in like manner and forward the whole amount by September 1. They have again recommended Father Anthony D. Pellicer for Savannah. Three others have been added by Bishop (Patrick Neeson Lynch) of Charleston, Bishop (John McGill) of Richmond, and Bishop (Augustin Verot), vicar apostolic of Florida: Father James Hasson, Father Bernard McManus, and Father Henry F. Parke. He does not think McManus qualified. Parke is very delicate. Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell) of Cincinnati has sailed for Rome intending to ask for Father S(ylvester) H. Rosencrans for his co-adjutor. The bishops of the diocese are unwilling that the right of succession should be secured to him.

VI-2-e A.L.S. 1p. 4to.
16


1861 Jul 11

Patrizi, Cardinal Bishop, Prefect of the Sacred Congregation of Rites
Rome, (Italy)

Because of the great virtues of Saint Angela Merici which Saint Charles Borromeo praised and since she has been made a saint and a sodality has been organized under her name and that of Saint Ursule, virgin and martyr so that great benefits have been derived by the Church from them, the Fathers of the Sacred Congregation of Rites have heard the petition of the Cardinals and Bishops that the office and mass of Saint Angela Merici be placed in the calendar and they have decided that it will be celebrated by the universal church as a double of minor rite. (In the papers of Archbishop John Mary Odin of New Orleans).

VI-2-e Printed Document 1p. 4to.
1


(18)61 Jul 12

Boffard (?), H.F.
Frederick, Maryland

to (Orestes A. Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Bofford thanks Brownson for his efforts on behalf of the Union. The Protestants in Maryland are already saying that they have been deceived with reference to the Church. Only identify the Church with the Union and our prosperity and success in the United States will be assured in defiance of England or any other power.

I-4-a A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


(18)61 Jul 12

Chambodut, Father Louis C.M.
Galveston, (Texas)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He intended to answer sooner but it was so warm, the times were so bad and there was so much to do. He has little news and that Father (Louis M.) Planchet can give him in person. He asks (Odin) to persuade Planchet to change his mind about leaving the mission. Last week he blessed the flag of the Zouaves and afterwards he had scruples. He wonders how he ought to act in the future. Father (Charles) Padey is in good health and speaks often about returning to France. He has not been at Liberty although his sister (Sister Marie Thérèse Chambodut, R.U.) has had a serious relapse. The (Ursuline) Convent grows rapidly. He just received a letter from Father ( ) Hardy who asks to come (to Texas). He had written to (Odin) five or six months ago but he had told Chambodut to write him not to come. He wishes (Odin) to persuade him to remain where he is. Father (John J.) Magee wrote June 17 that the people (at Corpus Christi) had received him well and had subscribed well on to $1000 in lumber, brick, work and money to build him a house. He said that Father (Antoine) Borias had just left and that he was living with the son of Mr. ( ) Parnassus (?). Father (Augustine) D'Asti (O.F.M.) and Father (John) Gonnard went to the mission at Austin and from there as far as San Antonio. It appears that Mother Felicitas wishes to leave New Braunfels. The Franciscans invite her to Houston or Harrisburg. Father (Nicholas) Feltin at Spring Creek, Gonnard at Hidalgo, Father (Victor) Gury and Father (Peter) Tarrill(i)on at Frelsburg as well as Mother Felicitas write him to find out what he thinks. Before saying anything definite he wishes to know what (Odin) thinks.

N.B. Father (James) Giraudon seeks a dispensation from the first degree of affinity between Jean Ortis and Maria de Jesu Fariat(?).

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 16mo.
20


1861 Jul 12

Kelly, Colonel Henry B., Camp Pickens
Manassas Junction, Virginia

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

At the suggestion of several officers of his regiment he has requested the Secretary of war to appoint a Catholic chaplain to the 8thRegiment, Louisiana Volunteers. He asks (Odin) to recommend one. A very large portion of the regiment are Catholics.

VI-2-e A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
2


1861 Jul 12

(Kenrick), Peter Richard, Archbishop of
St. Louis, (Missouri)

To Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.)
N(ew) Orleans, (Louisiana)

He congratulates him on his promotion to the see of New Orleans and he promises to write to the Cardinal Prefect in support of the nominations contained in his letter.

VI-2-e A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
1


1861 Jul 12

Magee, Father John J.
Corpus Christi, (Texas)

to Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, Louisiana

He arrived on June 1 and commenced building a few weeks after; seeing that their Dissenting Brethren were becoming somewhat attached to him he thought better to build a fine house out of their pockets. People say it will be at least the most commodious residence in Corpus Christi. He still needs flooring lumber and wainscoting with other material for finishing and does not know where to find money. He wishes Odin might cause somebody in (New Orleans) to collect $100 for him as he has exhausted the programs of everyone. He is domiciled with the Poet which he considers a very severe purgatory. One says that he is much more insane than ever. Times are hard; a worm has eaten nearly the whole cotton crop. He is sorry he is not with (Odin). He never enjoyed life with so much zest as when with him.

VI-2-e A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
2


1861 Jul 12

Usannaz, S.J., Father A(nselm)
Grand Coteau, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He received (Odin's) letter of the 6th announcing his pastoral visit for September 8. He asks him to come on August 19 for the distribution of their prizes and those of the Ladies of the Sacred Heart the day before. Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc always did so and he hopes that (Odin) will not refuse especially this year when they have been so sorely tested. There are also at the college and convent a number of children who have not received Confirmation, which has not been administered there for three years. It would be good to have it for them before they leave, either on the 15th or 18th. Father (J. Francois) Abbadie, S.J. wonders if the two chapels which (the Jesuits) serve, Plaquemine and Junction will enjoy the same privilege as Grand Coteau. He wishes to know in order to prepare those to be confirmed.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 1p. 4to.
6


1861 Jul 13

Foltier, Father E.J.
Vermillionville, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Foltier received Odin's letter announcing his pastoral visit and asking him to go to Royville. He announced that Odin will confirm on August 27, thinking that he would like to rest on the 26th. He believes that the scandal given at Royville will not have any fatal consequences if Odin sends a pastor there as soon as possible. In fixing the boundaries, the 6 mile radius, for which the parishioners plan to ask, will suffice. Foltier has always said there are all the necessary elements to form a fine congregation. Mr. Chaix, the bearer, always accompanies Foltier when he goes to Royville, and he can certify that the property had been given to Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc. Foltier made arrangements with a lessee to watch the property. The said lessee in return for giving his place to the pastor (Father Émile Hillaire) asked for $350. Foltier paid $150 at Easter leaving $200 for the new pastor who promised to pay. However, it was necessary for Foltier to borrow $180 and pay in his place, selling or taking for himself (Hillaire's) furniture. Still he claims nothing from Royville. As for the school Odin knows something from the overtures made by Father (Stephen) Rousselon. Foltier has been at Lafayette for 4 years and he has had enormous expenses. By reason of these expenses, the creation of Royville which cost him more than $1400, the creation of the school and of some religious societies, he owes $500 to Z(éphyrin) Martin and $1200 to B(arthélemy) Seris. Adding $350, it would be $450 if he counted what he already advanced to him, plus $85 just paid for a law suit brought against the church makes a total of $2135. He asks authorization to sell the school in order to pay his debts. He paid for it from his own pocket and gave it to the archbishop to prevent it from passing to his heirs. The archbishop accepted knowing that there was $1500 to pay and suggested a subscription. However people will not subscribe. The separation of Royville and the addition of Carencro to Grand Coteau have so diminished his revenues that he cannot meet the expenses of the church property. Furthermore the school does not do any good because all the older pupils and the rich go to Grand Coteau leaving only 24 poor children at $4 per month. At St. Martin(ville) the pastor bought some property to place some Brothers there but he resold it. He wonders why he cannot do the same. Finally with Chaix leaving , the school falls once again. Odin can see for himself the opposition he faces. He encloses the details of a law suit brought against him representing the Church. It involves two great difficulties, the source of continual recriminations:

--------
(1) the estate of the late Father (Anthony D.) Megret which, he believes, only paid 60%, and

(2) the contested title of the property.

He wonders if Odin is its owner-administrator. All the Fr(ee)mas(ons), sustained by the lawyers say no. Alex(ander) Mouton, the president of the convention, is the leader and the most headstrong.

P.S. Rousselon reproaches him in a friendly way for the little zeal which he manifests, but he is immersed in so much bitterness that his plan is to settle his affairs and seek another position. He wants very much to be in the city. (Enclosed is a ) Summary of a law suit between Foltier and Claude Coulouvrat for $79 for candlesticks sold to the church at the time of Father Megret. Judgement for Coulouvrat.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 10pp. 4to.
16


1861 Jul 14

D'Hémécourt, Victor, St. Mary's Seminary
(Barrens, Missouri)

To Father S(tephen) Rousselon
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

The interruption of communications prevented him from writing upon learning of Archbishop (John Mary) Odin's appointment. He begs Rousselon to present his respects to Odin. He is also happy to learn that Rousselon, despite his desire to be discharged of the burden will continue as vicar-general. At the end of (June) they had their annual exams and they are now on vacation. He has remained there not knowing whether it was prudent to go to New Orleans. However he does not know if he has done well because the Superior told him that he was capable of entering philosophy having finished his humanities and he does not know where (Odin) wishes him to go to study. St. Mary's has only humanities. Following the advice of his superior he will go next week to Cape Girardeau to study until he receives (Odin's) orders. His superiors are content with him.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
3


1861 Jul 14

(Harrison, R.U.), Mother St. Pierre (Margaret)
Galveston, (Texas)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

The Lord has visited (the Ursulines) with many crosses this year and she has need of his paternal advice in this time of war. Everyone (at Galveston) agrees that they are completely at the mercy of the enemy who can take them when he wishes. She wonders if it is true that Wilson's company from Sing-Sing will be let loose on them and, if so, what will become of the women and especially the nuns. Most of the influential people have left with their families, some in order to return alone to fight. It is asserted that General (Earl) Van Dorn is determined to raze the city rather than let it fall into the hands of the enemy. She asks (Odin) what she ought to do. Several Sisters, especially, Sister Ste. Agnes and Sister Ste. Felicité, (R.U.) are terribly afraid to remain while she fears to leave their poor and well- loved home. Father (Louis C.M.) Chambodut and Father (Joseph) Anstaett are not agreed. Chambodut believes there is no danger but Anstaett believes there is and has left for Washington to see the Spanns about obtaining a suitable house for them. Their doctor, Dr. ( ) He(a)rd has offered them his three brick houses in Washington.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 16mo.
10


1861 Jul 14

Poyet, Father J(ean) A(rthur)
Abbeville, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He had hoped to come to (New Orleans) to pay his respects but work always prevents him from doing so. Therefore, he congratulates (Odin) on his promotion. He will receive him at his house with pleasure and he is going to prepare his children to receive Confirmation immediately.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
1


1861 Jul 15

De la Croix, Father C(yril
Iberville, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He was happy to see that his fear that his silence or apparent disobedience had given a bad impression was needless. He hopes to go (to New Orleans) today but he suffers terribly from sciatic rheumatism. Since (Odin) plans to leave shortly for Attakapas he will await his return to visit him.

(P.S. Latin) He seeks a dispensation from mixed faith and three proclamations of the banns for Robert Isbell and Maria A. Hebert, widow Lauve.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
3


1861 Jul 15

(Quinlan), John, Bishop of
Mobile, (Alabama)

To Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

After an absence of about six weeks in the northeastern part of his diocese, he returned a few days ago and found Odin's letter. If he had received it earlier he would have deferred his visitation in order to meet Odin and his episcopal brothers at New Orleans. He knows no priest at present whom he could recommend for Galveston; he heartily endorses the choice of candidates mentioned by Odin: Father (Claude M.) Dubuis, (C.M.), Father Peter (Parisot), O.M.I. Parizot, and Father (Louis C.M.) Chambodut. They are taking measures for the immediate erection of three new churches. Father (Daniel) Houlahan left Mobile before Quinlan reached there; under no circumstances would he receive him to a trial; one scandal does more harm than a thousand virtuous acts. He starts his missions again about August 1st to be absent about two months.

VI-2-e A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
6


1861 Jul 16

Martin, Father Ambroise
Opelousas, (Louisiana)

To Father (Stephen Rousselon
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He arrived at (Opelousas) without some things of prime necessity thinking that in time he would be able to procure them. However, the mass stipends upon which he counted are completely inadequate. He does not wish to speak to Father (Gilbert) Raymond because he does not know on what conditions he is (at Opelousas) and also he sees that those who ask him for money never get it. He begs (Rousselon) to send him some Mass stipends. He awaits Archbishop (John Mary Odin's) next visit with great impatience for the manner of acting there displeases him and he is not the only one to suffer.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
3


1861 Jul 16

Semmes, Dr. A.J.
Warrenton, Virginia

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

The (8th) Regiment (Louisiana Volunteers) did not leave Camp Moore, 70 miles above New Orleans, until three days later than anticipated and then under orders from Richmond. They were seven days en route to Lynchburg, Virginia where they found a telegram from the Secretary of War countermanding the first order and ordering them immediately to the enemy lines at Manassas Junction. He was taken sick with inflamation of the lungs and removed to this village 20 miles from Manassas where he is spending a few days with his relations for the recovery of his health. He paid a flying visit to Richmond and called on the Secretary of War in reference to a chaplain for the Regiment. He was indisposed and not visible. Semmes wrote the Secretary a letter enclosing an application for a Catholic Chaplain signed by Colonel (Henry B.) Kelly, Lt. Col. (Francis T.) Nicholls, Major (John B.) Prados and himself as surgeon, and by Dr. Duffel as assistant surgeon. Their application asked for a priest of the diocese of Louisiana as may be recommended to the War Department by (Odin). Semmes suggests that he write to the Secretary of War, L(eroy) P. Walker, stating whom he would recommend and stating also that there is a large number of French Creoles who need one who speaks their tongue.

VI-2-e A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
3


1861 Jul 16

Tarrillion, Father (Peter)
San Bernard, (Texas)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.)
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

He expresses regret over the loss of Odin as Bishop of Galveston. Everything is normal in their parish and their missions. He has applied the power a radice, which Odin gave him, at Belle-ville and he has reconciled the Catholic party.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1861 Jul 16

Thebaud, S.J., Father Aug(ustine) J.
St. John's College, (New York)

To Bishop (Francis P. McFarland of
Hartford, Connecticut)

Thebaud asks when the Bishop wants the two retreats given to the Sisters of Mercy. They will be ready as soon as he wishes.

I-1-a A.L.S. 1p. 16mo.
1


(18)61 Jul 18

Ste. Marie, (R.U.), Mother de
San Antonio, (Texas)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin. C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

She begs him to leave a check for $500 with Father (Stephen) Rousselon so that she can draw on him in case of necessity. Things are so bad that (the Ursulines) cannot collect what is due. The boarders are decreasing and she does not know who will return after the vacation. She will try to make an arrangement with Mr. ( ) Guilbeau. It is said that Lincoln plans to take them by the river. Their convent has been sorely tried and more than ever it is crushed under the feet of calumnies. A storm broke loose among the Protestants when one wished to place a child with them. Poor Mother St. Pierre (Harrison, R.U.) is very pained that she can no longer communicate with him and says she is very tired. She fears that soon they will not be able to write. There are two warships at the entrance of the harbor. In one day they took five schooners. They seized the mails which they opened and sent to Galveston. They have no news, not having received the "Propagateur (Catholique)" for a long time. She asks him to tell Father (Claude M.) Dubuis, (C.M.) that she has received the tinplate. All are on their feet at the Convent. Sister Ste. Ursule, (R.U.), who worried them greatly, is recovering her strength. Sister St. Alexis, (R.U.) walks a little despite a swollen foot and leg and does all she can to make herself useful. The need for Sisters is great.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
9


1861 Jul 19

Cummings, Father J(eremiah)
New York, (New York)

To (Orestes A.) Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

There are parties at work to injure Brownson with the authorities at Rome. Father Cummings asks Brownson to come to his home so that he may give him some information about the accusations that have been made against the Review in Vatican Circles. The last article on the Papal question has put the Review in a bad light with the Roman Church Authorities because they are puzzled as to his position. He seeks to interview with Brownson with the knowledge and consent of the authorities at Rome.

I-4-A A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
1


(18)61 Jul 19

Larnaudie, S.J., Father F(rederick)
Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He write in regard to the affairs of their church. Expenses from February 1861 to February 1862 amount to $4,872; receipts to $3,000, leaving a deficit of more than $1800. There is only one remedy. The ownership of the church must be transferred to the diocese. The lawyers whom he has consulted told him that there were only two ways to make the transfer: to obtain an act of the Legislature or to sell the church at public auction. A public auction offers the best possibility of overcoming resistence especially if, as he hopes, the trustees agree. A lady whom he knows very well appears disposed to purchase it herself in order to make a gift to the diocese. However, he cannot count absolutely on her promise which was only conditional. Since he is almost sure of leaving the post in October, he would prefer to let things alone and to have his successor assume the responsibility. On the other hand things are urgent enough and the trustees seem to be favorably disposed. He asks (Odin) to tell him what he ought to do and he wishes to have Father (Aloysius) Curioz, (S.J.) informed of his orders. He asks permission to bless a pyx.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 8vo.
3


1861 Jul 19

Thebaud, S.J., Father Aug(ustine) J.
St. John's College, (New York)

To Bishop (Francis P. McFarland of
Hartford, Connecticut)

Father Jouin will be in Providence August 5 to give the retreat to the Sisters of Mercy. Since the Bishop has made him "easy" about the other retreat he will send no one for so small a number, because they have so many retreats to give. He is doubly sorry to learn the reason why the Bishop did not come on July 10, but he is sure that the Bishop's mother is with God. He has prayed for her.

I-1-a A.L.S. 2pp. 16mo.
1


1861 Jul 20

(Anstaett, Father Joseph
Galveston, Texas)

to Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Anstaett) promised to keep Odin informed about the new building (for the Ursulines). Mr. Hussey has finished. (John) De Young is laying the roof. The total disbursed by Odin before his departure was $2509.14 and by (Anstaett) until this morning, $2909.74. During (Anstaett's) absence they thought of digging a cistern of 15,000 gallons. Hussey contracted with Mother (St. Pierre Harrison, R.U.) for $376. (Anstaett) would have been thankful if Father (Louis C.M.) C(hambodut) had prevented it. The mason came yesterday and (Anstaett) told him that there was no need for the cistern at the moment, that it is too difficult to get the money, and that a cistern having at least double the capacity would be required. The mason went to tell (Mother St. Pierre) that (Anstaett) wished a cistern two times bigger and she approved it. He went to stop Hussey from continuing it until he has Odin's advice. All is well at the convent. When the blockade began he told (Mother St. Pierre) what to do in regard to the children and she had them write to their parents that the distribution of prizes would take place later. Capt. (James) Alden of the South Carolina only confiscates the boats he can catch and turns them into ships of war. Colonel Sheldon's advice is that the South Carolina has much powder and cannons. (Anstaett) wonders if Alden could bombard Galveston, or if he will receive reinforcements with orders to take Pelican Island and the customs house. He also wonders what General (Earl) Van Doren will do. The general has not yet arrived and it is said that he is sick at Eagle Lake. Their 2,200 men are very reduced. The upper class families are no longer in the city. The merchants are selling quickly. Calm reigns in the city. There is much drumming and trumpeting and many reviews. The regulars do good service at Fort Pelican and the fort at the east end. There is an excellent regiment of German Tourneurs from Houston behind the convent. The volunteers make patrols and mount the guard. The middle classes are not very afraid. The religious have confidence in God. The troops of San Rosa Island are dying quickly. He went to Washington to look at a two story brick house offered without charge by Dr. Heard in case of necessity.

VI-2-e A.L. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
11


(1861 Jul 20)

Anstaett, Father Joseph
(Galveston, Texas)

to Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

He is going to Houston this morning in order to collect some debts due the convent. Yesterday the distribution of the prizes took place. The blockade began July 2. Many good families have left. They are completely at the mercy of the enemy. In order to save the (Ursuline Convent) in case of bombardment, Mother (St. Pierre Harrison, R.U.) offered it as a military hospital. Since the feast of St. Peter there have been some bricks. Today the spaces between the windows on the third floor were bricked. There are many poor in the city. Fortunately, none of his German Catholics are suffering yet. Mrs. Chapuy thanks Odin for the information about the cases of shoes. She thought they were lost.

P.S. He asks Odin to say hello to the widow Mrs. Adolphe Perrier for him.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
6


1861 Jul 20

Marigny, Colonel M(andeville) de
Camp Moore, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, C.M.
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Having learned that Father (Hippolite Gache, S.J.) Gauche is willing to act as chaplain of the 10th Regiment, (Louisiana Volunteers), he requests his appointment.

VI-2-e A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
3


1861 Jul 20

Mathis, Ch(arles) J.
Frelsburg, (Texas)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He and his wife congratulate (Odin) on his elevation but at the same time the thought of not seeing him again distresses them. (Odin) knows the reasons and they have become stronger and more numerous since his elevation. The enmities continue. Two weeks ago Father (Victor) Gury announced at the Church that a house should be found for Mother Felicitas who is now at New Braunfels so that she might open a school for the girls and according to what he has heard they will also take the boys. In effect their end is to ruin him and force him to leave since if he only has the boys he will not be able to live on what they pay him. This year he has both the boys and the girls and yet the school fees do not amount to $300. He has only his 13 acre farm. He cannot work. If he explained to others all his sufferings he knows that most would be for him, but he wonders if he ought to do that. Even (Odin) might then regard him as a revolutionary. He has just asked Gury for the rest of the money due to him for service to the church for last year but Gury wishes to charge him for work done by another woman which he wanted his wife to do. For three years his wife has laundered the church linen for nothing and now they wish to charge him for the time that she did not do it. All this explains the talk of Father (Peter) Tar(r)illion at St. Bernard's: he wishes to ruin him. With all this hostility it was not possible to make his Easter duty. Father (John) Gonnard promised to come to see him after his return from Austin but he has not yet done so. If (Odin) cannot help him he will be lost. He retracts the desire expressed in his other letters that (Odin) say nothing to the priests; they cannot do him more harm than they have already.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
6


1861 Jul 24

( )
N(ew) O(rleans, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.) and the Members of the Archiepiscopal Council
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

He sends the following information on the Chapel of St. Rose and the expenses for its construction. He hopes that the said property will keep to its actual destination or at least be employed for a pious end useful to the congregation. He is ready to cede it to the diocese for a moderate price and on very liberal conditions. Expenses (itemized) total $4,787.25 without counting several objects that he has paid for totaling about $100. He asks $3750 on terms of $750 down, and balance in 3 years at $1000 each year or 6 years at $500 each year with the ordinary interest. The lot is now worth double what he paid four years ago and is covered by many fruit trees which also have their value.

VI-2-e A. L. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
2


(18)61 Jul 24

Chambodut, Father L(ouis) C.M.
Galveston, Texas

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

They have no mail, no news either. The misery is very great: many families are reduced to beg or starve. There is no work, money is scarce, and provisions are at the highest prices. The exodus from Galveston is very great. The (Ursulines) got so scared that they called on J(ohn) DeYoung to make boxes to pack up their goods. The boxes were made and (Father Joseph Anstaett) was gone up country looking for a shelter before he knew a word. He went tp see (Mother St. Pierre, Margaret Harrison, R.U.) and pacified her. Things are at a standstill until (Odin) decides differently. Father (Peter) Berthet is sick again. Father (Louis M.) Planchet went as far as the Sabine on his way to France and came back thinking it was not safe. Chambodut is afraid he is sick and will keep him (at Galveston) to let his mind settle. Father (Charles) Padey is going tomorrow to Hallettsville to see his friends and raise some money to go to France. The Brothers (of Christian Doctrine) have given a vacation. So have the (Ursulines). No sickness yet.

N.B. He paid J.P. Davie this morning $282.25.

VI-2-3 A.L.S. 3pp. 16mo.
11


1861 Jul 24

Gardet, Father A(ugustine)
Victoria, Texas

to Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, C.M.
N(ew) O(rleans, Louisiana)

He still has Odin's order for $204 on P. Rotchford but he does not know if the money is safe and he would prefer that it should be in Odin's hands. He has just written to Mrs. B. Egan of N(ew) O(rleans). When she was in Victoria she offered to make a present to their church of the organ built by Mr. ( ) Lochner, if he were willing to sell it for $300. It has been placed in the church. If Odin has occasion to see her, he requests him to advocate their cause. She has not yet been paid for her league of land; Mr. Glass is to receive the money for her. Father (John W.) Brümmer is still with him and he wishes to build a little house on the Coleto near the chapel or make the chapel larger, and he wishes to get the money from Munich. Gardet does not know if they might get it from Father (Louis C.M.) Chambodut. He intends building a school-house for girls and then he will need the $204. He visited San Antonio with Father (Joseph) Quérat. Father (J.A.) Faure's health seems to be on the decline. They get no newspaper from N(ew) O(rleans) and they are totally ignorant of what is going on in the United States. There is hardly any coffee or sugar left in the stores in Texas. Fortunately the crops are good.

VI-2-e A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
8


1861 Jul 25

(Elder), William Henry, Bishop of
Natchez, (Mississippi)

To Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

He encloses a check for $25 which he asks Odin to send to Archbishop (Francis Patrick) Kenrick of Baltimore. He owes the Seminary of Baltimore, Father J. P(aul) Debreul, $143.44 which he asked (Thomas) Layton to send. He writes him now that if he has not yet sent it he might ask Odin to send it with his remittance to the Archbishop.

VI-2-e A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
4


1861 Jul 25

Prevost, Father J.H.
Montreal, (Canada)

To Father (Stephen Rousselon
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Several months ago, Father J.O. Paré, the Bishop's secretary, wrote asking (Rousselon) for the death certificate of Armantine Ruinette Bourdeau who had died at New Orleans. (Rousselon) has replied that the cemetery records made no mention of her. Bourdeau was not at all surprised for he said his wife had died during an epidemic so that her name might have been forgotten. He assured him that a number of people in (New Orleans) could certify to her death, among others, Mr. ( ) Noel, Theophile Desgrais, Pierre Ravin, Raphael Vincent, Adolphe Boulanger, etc. He asks (Rousselon) to consult them since the ecclesiastical superiors refuse to let Bourdeau marry until they have more certain proof that he is free, and this delay disposes him to go to a Protestant minister.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 3pp.12mo.
8


1861 Jul 25

Wood, Fernando
New York, (New York)

To J(ames) A(lphonsus) McMaster
(New York, New York)

Wood expresses thanks for the article, which was truthful and in the Catholic spirit, which appeared in this week's (Journal). He wishes that the country had men, more brilliant and with clear heads, to guide it through the gloom.

I-1-m A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
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1861 Jul 26

Elder, B(isho)p William Henry
Natchez, (Mississippi)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Bishop Elder received no answer to his last letter. He has the July number of the Review and is interested in the article on Polemies. Brownson should not expect Bishops to publish their sentiments regarding articles in the Review; their time is too much taken up with other matters. He does not understand why Brownson has resolved to pay no attention to newspaper articles, since some of them contain constructive criticism. Catholic papers are not "official organs" but are used by Bishops to promulgate laws and directions. In the article on "Catholic Polemics" Brownson states the case far too strongly. That the clergy and Bishops as a body are sometimes so noisy as to be conspicuous is an assertion which, if he were a man of the world, he would not discuss quietly with Brownson. Brownson is mistaken in regard to the spirit of the clergy. Brownsons poor explanation does not detract from the charge he makes. Brownson says he is censured because he avails himself of science and charges the clergy with having the spirit of pride and narrow mindedness. Brownson's fault lies in the fact that he never explains himself until after he has been censur4ed. It is the cause of prejudices formed against him following his articles on the temporal power of the Pope. Brownson should not denounce those who disagree with him, but he should reason with them and explain his position. The topics Brownson proposes on page 371 are suggested by his partiality for a "synthetic method" and a synthetic method or theory that contradicts fact is not good, for theory must be built on fact. Brownson's spirit is one of grumbling and general censure of the clergy when they do not support him. Brownson leaves the impression that if examination should result in establishing that eternal punishment is a fact revealed it will contradict the love and mercy of God. Brownson asks questions, but they can convey statements as well as direct assertions. It would have been better had he made the examination instead of merely proposing it, or else left the matter alone. His conclusions could be either assented to or refuted. The questions Brownson proposes on Sacred Scripture convey the impression that Theologians, at least in America, have the most narrow and untenable ideas on Inspiration, the Vulgate, and Interpretation and Progress of Biblical Science. Bishop Elder has never heard of anyone in authority blaming Brownson for discussing them. Cardinal Wiseman's works are known too well and too respected for any prominent Catholic to credithim with so narrow a spirit. It is desirable that all Catholic Clergy and Laity should acquire as much science as possible and use it on behalf of religion, but practical circumstances hinder this. Brownson should use his own great maxim, "We must take men as they are." If there is not sufficient zeal for science Brownson should tell them in an earnest and respectful manner and not grumble and heap abuse on them. Bishop Elder feels he may have said some things too sharply; it is impossible for him to rewrite it, so he asks Brownson to eliminate anything disagreeable in manner and incorrect in apprehension. It is not enough to have good intention; we must practice good. If Brownson's Confessor approved the article on Polemies he is not a discreet, practical guide for one in Brownson's position. Bishop Elder thinks that in the article on "The Great Rebellion" Brownson could have been more discreet and friendly in criticizing the spirit of Catholics. He hopes Brownson will be preserved from all error in truths both natural and supernatural.

I-4-A A.L.S. 8pp. 8vo.
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1861 Jul 26

Hewit, (C.S.P.), Father Aug(ustine) F.
Bridgeport, (Connecticut)

To Bishop (Francis P. McFarland of
Hartford, Connecticut)

He thanks the Bishop and Father (R.B.) Tillotson for his letter. They are staying there and enjoying themselves as much as bad news from the army will let them. He is very sorry that they could not depute a number of their priests as chaplains. The soldiers ar all extremely eager to have priests with them. Some officers tols his brother that there was a priest with the 69th who had the respect of the soldiers and the whole body attended services, including the Protestants. He hopes the Bishop can send a priest with the Connecticut Brigade. He thinks that Dr. (John) Mulligan or Father (B.D.) Coit would fill the part. He must beg pardon for offering his advice.

I-1-a A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
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1861 Jul 28

(Martin), Aug(ustus) M(ar)ie, Bishop of
Natchitoches, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.)
N(ew) O(rleans, Louisiana)

He will continue to offer his contribution of $25 for (Levi Silliman) Ives. He wonders why the rich provinces of the east have not procured a suitable lot for this generous man. A 4th company raised in the parish of Natchitoches leaves tomorrow for the war zone; a fifth will go in a few days. He has not received any news of Father (Felix) Dicharry since his regiment left fort Smith for the frontier of Missouri. With him is the flower of their most noble Creole families. Father (Emile) Hil(l)aire is at the post assigned to him as assistant at Alexandria; Martin does not count on him, his pretentions are above what Martin can do for him. He counts rather on Father (Anthony) Carius in spite of his faults. If his improvement continues Martin expects him to arrive during the week and will keep him for a time before sending him on a mission.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 8vo.
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1861 Jul 29

Bouchu, Father (Francis)
Medina, (Texas)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He has arrived from Santiago and he is finally convinced that a chapel will not be built there; the people are colder than ice. Since Christmas, Juan Rodriguez and Antonio Sequin have had charge of collecting the subscriptions, but they have not yet collected a cent. They do not merit a priest. In January he bought all the wood necessary for the chapel and a suitable house for $50. Since then the deed of donation for Mr. Speth's land was signed by Mr. Gray and his wife and registered, but everything ended there. There remains $50 of the $100 which (Odin) gave for the chapel and he wonders if he ought to give it to Father (J.A.) Faure or use it for the chapel at Carmen which is being repaired. (Drawing enclosed). The people of Carmen are ten times poorer than those on the edge of San Antonio but their small subscriptions are effective. Not having money, they are giving animals sufficient to cover the cost of the bell tower. However the $50 would help in regard to several things for which he cannot give animals in exchange. If (Odin) does not agree he hopes that he will persuade Father (Louis C.M.) Chambodut to help him.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
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1861 Jul 30

Cochin, Augustin
Paris, (France)

To (Orestes A. Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Brownson will soon receive two volumes entitled "De l'Abolition de l'Esclavage which Cochin has just published. The first volume contains the resume of France's and England's experiences in slavery. Both countries solved the question without losses or trouble. From the material, religious, and moral view, the benefits of abolition are great. The second volume is concerned with the United States. Brownson's name is mentioned very often in it, as well as his quotations; slavery in Brazil, Holland, Spanish colonies, Portuguese colonies, and Africa and the influence of Christianity on slavery. Cochin wonders about Brownson's opinion of his views on the United States. He wishes Brownson would give him his criticism. He also wishes to have the work noticed in the Review. If translation of the work would help, Cochin would have it done. All Europe is interested in American affairs. Cochin believes the South will lose in the end. He also prays that slavery will cease. Cochin has been able [unable?] to contact Brownson's son neither on his way to Angers nor on his way from there. Orestes' picture, which his son brought to P. Chastel, has been lost.

P.S. Cochin saw Montalembert in Paris yesterday returning from a trip through Germany.

I-4-a A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
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1861 Jul 30

Hewit, Father Augustine
Bridgeport, (Connecticut)

To (Orestes A. Brownson)

Hewit is spending a fortnight with Fr. Tillotson. He has been intending to write to Brownson on his article, "Catholic Polemics." He wonders whether "reprobate angels and men finally attain natural beatitude" is tenable in the Catholic Faith. After much deliberation, he concludes that the statement is untenable as regards the ultimate destiny of fallen angels and men who die in mortal sin. He believes Brownson is mistaken about the ultimate aim of unbaptized infants. He discusses briefly the "poena damni" and "Poena sensus." He believes that after careful study Brownson will be of his opinion.

I-4-a A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
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1861 Jul 30

McMahon, Michael J.
Pointe aux Trembles, (Quebec)

To Bishop (Francis P. McFarland of
Hartford, Connecticut)

He received a letter from his father saying that he had written to the Bishop asking him to pay his college bill for the past year about $40 as he was not able to do so himself. He learns that his father has received no answer. He writes because he has no means to meet the demand. He had to stay in Canada this summer because he could not pay his fare home and back. His father cannot pay for his vacation, the amount of which will be $20. He asks the Bishop to pay the bill, hoping that this will be the last time. (A note) says that (McFarland) agreed to pay the expenses from August 7, 1861.

I-1-a A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
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1861 Jul 30

Thebaud, S.J., Father Aug(ustine) J.
St. John's College, (New York)

To Bishop (Francis P. McFarland of
Hartford, Connecticut)

As soon as he received McFarland's letter he carried it to Father (Remigius J. ) Tellier, (S.J.), their superior, who asked him to write that it would be impossible for them to send another chaplain to the army. They have already given three besides Father O'Reilly who is going to France for a year. As to sending a priest to replace one of his priests it is more conformable to send a chaplain. But they have none to send. As to establishing a house of the Jesuits in McFarland's diocese the letter has been handed to Father ( ) Sopranis, their visitor, who is going to Rome next Monday and will place the request in the hands of the General and from conversation with Father Sopranis, Thebaud thinks the request will succeed. He will do all he can to make it succeed.

I-1-a A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
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