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Calendar: 1861 September

1861 Sep 1

Giraud, J.M.
All-Hallows, (Ireland)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

It was always a pleasure to think that soon he should work under him. Now his hopes are deceived. He thought to have a Bishop whose native diocese is his diocese. At first he could not believe that (Odin) would leave (Texas). He fell into a deep indecision either to follow him to New Orleans or to remain for the new bishop of Galveston. He finally stood for Texas. He heard that Father (Claude M. Dubuis, C.M.) would probably be (Odin's) successor but a few days after he was told from France that Dubuis had come back being no longer able to work there. If he dared he would ask some explanations from (Odin). As regards his studies he gets on very well. This year he hopes to have better, being no more disturbed by English. He asks (Odin) to tell him how long he would leave him at All-Hallows if he were Bishop of Galveston. Knowing how anxious (Odin) is about his studies, he hopes he will receive this English letter with much more satisfaction than if it were written in French.

VI-2-e A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
2


1861 Sep 1

Rousselon, Father S(tephen
New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
Grand Coteau, Louisiana)

He is obliged in conscience to tell (Odin) that he cannot reasonably continue his visitation. His health requires rest that can be found only at New Orleans. He should therefore return with Father (Gabriel) Chalon. When he is fully recovered he can complete his visitation.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
2


1861 Sep 2

Foltier, Father E.J.
Vermillionville, (Louisiana)

to Father (Stephen) Rousselon
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.) after having confirmed 222 in the church of St. John the Evangelist on August 25 and 149 in the chapel of St. Stephen, Royville, has been forced to rest. Humors, massed by excessive fatigue, threatened to paralyze one of the nerves of his face. Sister Ste. Marie, (O. Carm.), applying a violent remedy, produced an eruption and relieved him. He leaves for Grand Coteau today. Under the doctor's advice he has decided to postpone the Confirmation at Abbeville and to remain at Grand Coteau for 2 or 3 weeks if necessary, to become acquainted with St. Landry's parish and to rest, for if the nerve is attacked again, the paralysis will become incurable. (Odin) is determined to send an assistant to Royville and thinks of Father (Auguste Barthélemy) Langlois, an excellent choice. It would be deplorable to abandon a chapel which is necessary for the salvation of so many souls although its poverty exacts sincere devotion and sacrifice. (Odin) has transmitted to him the decision of the council in regard to the school: Foltier mus pay for it after having made immense improvements on the property, creating a new parish, in a word, distributing for the good of the diocese that which he earned by the sweat of his brow. The debts amount to $2,165. He has all the revenues and he can sell the little he has acquired, but it will be hard to come to such an extremity ten years of hard work. The pastor of (blank) in New Orleans does better: his church is bought for him. Undoubtedly he comes from Gascony or across the channel. Foltier has too much Boeotian spirit to ever succeed in the subtle calculations of parsimony and selfishness. However, he has never lacked respect for Rousselon who is designated his universal legatee according to the custom introduced by Father A(nthony) D. Mègret, his predecessor. He hopes his generosity will touch Rousselon, if not on the question of the school, at least on another question. The $2000 owed will be paid with the $3000 from the pews. No doubt (Odin), by reason of Rousselon's recommendation, is going to call him to the city. He would prefer a church already built since when he buys or builds he does not know how to economize. The parts of the priest and the diocesan administration should be very distinct. Where the priest enjoys all the revenues it is reduced to nothing for him. The distribution of prizes at the (Carmelite) convent went off well. Their retreat is around the 15th.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
9


1861 Sep 3

Hamilton, Rev. Dr. Geo(rge) A.
Charlestown, ( )

To (James Alphonsus) McMaster
(New York, New York)

Hamilton expresses his regret upon the suppression of the ("Freeman's Journal") and wonders at the cause of this action. He found that the Journal defended the Union and the Constitution instead of having a tendency to treason. He encloses five dollars to renew his subscription, and offers as much as fifty dollars to McMaster, which can be received upon request. He extends his best wishes to McMaster.

I-1-m A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
1


1861 Sep 3

Poyet, Father J(ean) A(rthur)
Abbeville, (Louisiana)

To Father (Stephen Rousselon
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He seeks a dispensation from the third degree of consanguinity for Oliver Hébert son of Oliver Hebért and Eveline Faulk; and Anastasia Mouton, daughter of the deceased Sylvester Mouton and Adelaide Cormier.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (Latin) 1p. 4to.
5


1861 Sep 4

Gresselin, (Rev.) C(harles)
Boston, (Massachusetts)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Father Gresselin is displeased that Brownson published his letter without his consent. In the future, he asks greater respect for the secrecy of letters. He advises Brownson to employ a lawyer to collect the accounts of subscribers who fail to pay after final demand for payment has been made. He disapproves of Brownson's plan to discontinue the Review. Father John Bapst invites Brownson to visit them and to stay as long as he wishes. He tells Brownson to have Edward read this letter for him. God chastises them he loves.

I-4-a A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
3


1861 Sep 4

McCloskey, Father W(illia)m (G.)
Gensano, (Italy)

To Bishop (Francis P. McFarland of
Hartford, Connecticut)

He has received McFarland's letter with the draft for about 170 pounds. He gave Dr. Kirby 50 pounds for Mr. O'Farrell. He will send the accounts of the Bishop's students at the first opportunity. They are spending the vacation in the country. At the concursus the students did very well considering their disadvantages: for many it was their first in Roman style. They carried off medals for scripture, church history, logic and metaphysics. Other lost by lots. Next year they will have to work hard because the Propagandists feel they were routed by the Irish and the Americans. He opposes any spirit of self indulgence. During the past year Mr. Hart suffered from temporary illness but was able to attend classes. Mr. Charlton is delicate but he will watch him closely. Students coming there should be prepared to enter philosophy. Mr. Hughes is a fine man; Mr. Sheridan is also excellent. Things are calm there. The Holy Father is well. They had a very agreeable visit from Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell lately. He recaptured one of his seminarians who, after ten years, had joined the papal zouaves. He regrets to learn that the Director of the Seminary at Mt. St. Mary's has left and that Mr. Obermeyer is likely to follow. He has affection for the Mount. Old Father Bermingham is in Rome with two years leave of absence from Bishop Lynch.

I-1-a A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
3


1861 Sep 4

Menard, Father Ch(arle)s M.
Thibodaux, (Louisiana)

to Father S(tephen) Rousselon
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

The inevitable difficulties of the last days, concerning the opening of the college, have prevented him from answering Rousselon's letter. He is completely extricated from the unfortunate affair in which the little accident had placed them. He regrets only one thing, not being able to accompany Rousselon to the station in his little buggy. The next morning the buggy was repaired and carried him to Labadieville. The college opened Monday with 18 pupils of which 6 are boarders. Everything augurs success. The opposition school has only 12 pupils of which one should come to him next Monday. It will probably close before the two months which he gave it. His professors are of the best disposition. All are practicing Catholics. Father (P.S.) Blain presents his humble respects. Josephine is in good humor. The books are selling. She also presents her respects.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
3


1861 Sep 5

McCloskey, (Father) William
Gensano, Italy

to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell
Cincinnati, Ohio

He had not yet delivered the beads to Madame Bontonslinn so he went to the Villa Lanti because he knew she would be glad to hear from Purcell, and wanted to be remembered in McCloskey's answer. She gave McCloskey a letter to be sent to Purcell. McCloskey gave the Rector of the Propaganda Purcell's message. The Propagandists have a hard lot as their villa is now occupied by the French. The American College received two medals in the concursus. The Propagandists were beaten by the American and Irish Colleges. He intends to visit Father (Francis) Pabisch as soon as things are settled. He had called on Pere Birmingham who is in Rome studying Italian. He expects Father L. Obermeyer to leave Mt. St. Mary's College since Father (John R.) Byrne left. McCloskey read some of Father (William) Barry's articles in Brownson and liked them. He asks Purcell to inform him how things stand concerning the War. He sends his regards to Purcell's brother, Father Collins and Mr. Barry.

II-5-a A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
2


1861 Sep 5

Seton, Robert
Cragdon, N(ew) Y(ork)

To Will(iam) Seton
( )

Father received Will's letter. Robert has received a letter from their old friend B. Smith who wants Will to write him. Robert thinks he should write to him. Robert spent two months out West. He did not enjoy himself very well but didn't say anything. Carley and he went up to Iowa to see Will's property. They went by rail to Cedar Rapids, and drove to Moungo the same night. At Moungo they slept in a small country inn. They took a cab the next day and drove some eight miles out of the village, right on to Will's property. Four acres might become valuable. They are prairie land, not a tree diversified the landscape, and about a mile and a half from habitation. Aubarn, a little hamlet is 3 miles away. Previously an attempt was made to plant a settlement but the settlement broke up and was transferred to Moungo. There is enough water on and adjacent to the land to supply cattle and afford snipe shooting. Robert advised Will to hold on to the land, since all the taxes have been paid. The trip home was very pleasant. He met Bishop (James R.) Bailey and Father Loane and they asked for Will. Father is well and sends love. Lily is visiting friends on Staten Island.

II-1-a A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
1


1861 Sep 6

Bacon, David W(illia)m, Bishop of
Portland, (Maine)

To Bishop (Francis P.) McFarland of
Hartford, (Connecticut)

A priest named Mangan, formerly of the diocese of Hartford has written from Keny, Ireland asking to be received into his diocese. He says that ill health forced him to return to his native soil but having greatly benefitted he would like to come to America again. He said he has received an exeat. Bacon asks McFarland if the statements are correct and if he is sober, zealous and of good morals, and whether he would advise him to adopt him.

I-1-a A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
2


1861 Sep 6

(Odin, C.M.), J(ohn) M(ary), Archbishop of New Orleans
Grand Coteau, (Louisiana)

To Father (Stephen Rousselon
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He thanks (Rousselon) for his interest in his health. He is almost cured; a day or two should suffice to make all the pimples disappear. He was happy to see Father (Gabriel) Chalon who leaves without him. If he experiences the slightest relapse he promises to return to New Orleans. (P.) Rotchford wrote that the house occupied by the Sisters of the Good Shepherd was badly damaged and that it might be advantageous to keep the insurance money and sell the house. He asks (Rousselon) to decide and gives his approval in advance. (Rotchford) also says that a larger plot of land can be had for the religious on Canal St. and that he will take back the land on Bienville St. and reimburse the sum already paid.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
5


1861 Sep 7

Dubernard, Father (Jean Honoré)
Breaux Bridge, (Louisiana)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
Grand Coteau, Louisiana)

Since (Odin's) departure from Breaux Bridge he has reflected on the temporal affairs of his church and the decision they had reached. It will be impossible for him to make an absolute cession of the $4,182 which he furnished from his own pocket to repair the church properties. First of all, this money cannot in any sense he considered the revenues of his ministry during the four years he has spent at Breaux Bridge. He encloses (no enclosure) a copy of his accounts to show this. Further he does not know what the Lord plans for him. If he has to leave the diocese he will find himself literally destitute and even more so for his family. The latter would be even worse off if he should die. He does not ask a pure and simple reimbursement but only that he be given a more important post where he can reimburse himself in a determined time. The change need not be immediate. Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc to whom he made the same request several months before his death replied affirmatively in a letter which he takes the liberty to send him (no enclosure).

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
3


1861 Sep 7

Mittelbronn, Father (Francis)
Point Coupée, (Louisiana)

To Father (Stephen) Rousselon
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

He has just seen Father (F.) Marion at Chenal and Marion has positively decided to leave the parish where he has begun so well. The reason for his departure is the feebleness of his health which will not permit him to remain any longer. His doctor advised him to write his bishop for a less tiring post. Marion awaits the arrival of Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.) in order to confer with him. There is also another matter which decides him to leave. He is having a quarrel with one of his parishioners from the most numerous and influential family of his parish. There will be grave consequences if he remains. If Marion leaves, he asks for Father (Peter) Lacour who is the perfect priest to replace him considering the character of the parish.

P.S. Marion will be in (New Orleans) next Monday or Tuesday.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
5


1861 Sep 7

Smith, (S.C.), Sister Regina, Charity Hospital
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Father S(tephen) Rousselon
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

She informs him of the death last night of Sister Lydia Donahoe, (S.C.) whose funeral services will take place this evening at 3 o'clock.

VI-2-e A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
2


1861 Sep 8

Martin, Bishop Aug(ustus) M(ar)ie of
Natchitoches, (Louisiana)

To Father S(tephen) Rousselon
N(ew) O(rleans, Louisiana)

Martin accepts the note for $50 and will pay it but he is not only astonished, he is disconcerted. If it is his, he does not remember it. Before he writes to Mr. P(ierre), he asks Rousselon to send him the note and tell him to whom he paid it. He asks him not to pay any draft in the future without his direct advice. He is truly distressed by what Rousselon tells him about Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.). As for Father (Napoleon Joseph) Perché he fears they will be condemned to losing him, or if he lives, that his infirmities will force an end to his long and generous struggles for the Church. In order to satisfy Rousselon's wishes in regard to Father (Felix) Dicharry he encloses (no enclosure) his last letter written since the battle. Rousselon can use it as he wishes and return it later. He has been back two days; he left sick and is not any better. Today a company of 100 men are to leave for N(ew) O(rleans). All have confessed and have taken the scapular and medal of the Immaculate Conception. It is the 6th from their parish and a 7th, plus one of the cavalry, is being organized. He received the Canon Missa and the small package from the children.

(P.S.) He awaits a reply to the letter he wrote to Rousselon from Avoyelles and sends friendly greetings to Father Chalon.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 8vo.
5


1861 Sep 9

(Baraga), Frederick, Bishop of Sault Ste. Marie
Sault Ste. Marie, (Michigan)

To Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefevere
(Detroit, Michigan)

Baraga reminds Lefevere that when Baraga was in Detroit the first part of May, Lefevere had promised him to contribute $200.00 towards the support of the Indian missionaries in 2 or 3 months. Now 4 months have passed and he requests again the above amount.

III-2-j A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


1861 Sep 9

Menard, Father Ch(arle)s M.
Thibodaux, (Louisiana)

to Father (Stephen Rousselon
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Public rumor and the "Propagateur Catholique" inform them that it is doubtful that Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.) in view of his poor health, can continue his pastoral visit. He wishes to know if he ought to expect him on the 22nd for Confirmation. The college continues to be very quiet. Two new pupils arrived this morning and others ought to follow them shortly. The persons who obtained the dispensation from the third degree of consanguinity are Baptiste Benoit and Mathilde Benoit.

P.S. Father (P.S.) Blain and Josephine send their respects.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 21mo.
5


1861 Sep 9

(Odin, C.M.),J(ohn) M(ary), Archbishop of New Orleans
Grand Coteau, (Louisiana)

to Father (Stephen Rousselon
New Orleans, Louisiana)

His health improves from day to day. Yesterday he confirmed 100 persons at (Grand Coteau). Today he visited the Sisters of the Sacred Heart. Tomorrow he will go to confirm the children of the chapel at Grand Junction and Thursday those of Plaquemines. If nothing unexpected occurs he will go to Opelousas on Friday and he will arrive at Thibodaux on the 21st. Father (Joseph) Roduit, (S.J.) left this morning to give the retreat to the (Carmelites) at Lafayette.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 2mo.
4


1861 Sep 10

Barnabo, Alexandro, Cardinal Prefect of The Sacred Congregation of Propaganda
Rome, Italy

to Archbishop John (Mary) Odin
of New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Since there has been proposed to the Sacred Congregation a doubt whether Catholics can be magistrates in case by that office they have to witness marriages between persons of color or no color in good conscience, the Fathers of the Council ask Odin to get for them information on the force of the law and especially of the civil laws in each of the States in so far as they bear on Catholic magistrates who by reason of their office have to or do assist at marriages of Catholics, non-Catholics, infidels or non-baptized persons and also at marriages between persons of mixed or the same color and especially about peculiar laws to which there could be a canonical diriment impediment not accepted by the civil laws. They wish this information as clearly stated as possible. Capalti signs as secretary.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (Latin) 1p. 4to.
1


1861 Sep 10

Galtier, Father
(Fourvieres, France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Galtier has received the letter which (Odin) sent to Bishop (Joannes Francisco de Paula) Verea of Linares for him. He shares in the pain which (Odin) experienced in leaving (Texas). They have received a letter from the Sisters (of the Incarnate Word) of Brownsville announcing the results of their election and they can only applaud what has been done. They hope that (Odin) will continue his paternal kindnesses for the Sisters. Verea has come twice to the convent with the new Bishop (Franciscus Ramirez) who was consecrated to govern the newly formed part of the diocese of Linares. Their precipitate departure did not permit him to charge them with his reply which he sends by Father (P.A.) Désga(u)ltiére.

P.S. He sends his respects to Father Rousselon.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
5


1861 Sep 10

Rousselon, Father S(tephen)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
Opelousas, Louisiana)

Thanks to Father (Gabriel) Chalon they have news of (Odin's) health, and they see with pleasure that it improves so that he can at least continue a part of his pastoral. He hastened to see (P.) Rotchford and they decided that the house should not be sold but repaired. The lot on Bienville St. will be kept. It is not the time to undertake these great transactions. Father (F.) Marion is at (New Orleans). He is ill and asks for another post. Father (Francois) Berthaud, who had left for France, has just returned and he desires a post. He is a capable, trained man but lacking in energy. Mr. (Ch.) Faget is very sick. He has been given the last rites. His wife, who has just had a child, is still at Mandeville with all her children, Father (Claude M.) Dubuis (C.M.) arrived yesterday and he is well. Everyone is well at (New Orleans). Politics are quiet.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 8vo.
7


1861 Sep 12

Duplay, Father
Lyons, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Duplay has the money deposited with him by the pastor of St. Colomba and he awaits the messenger whom (Odin) announced in order to send it to him. He understands that (Odin) fears the burden which the Holy Father places on his shoulders. (Odin) is old and infirm but so was Abraham when God wished to make him the Father of a great people. (Odin) should abandon himself to God. He is embarrassed to give advice to a great archbishop and therefore he falls silent.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 8vo.
1


1861 Sep 12

Kehoe, Lawrence, "Tablet" Office
(New York, New York)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Elizabeth, (New Jersey)

O'Gorman thinks there will be no difficulty in making them pay. Brownson had better send all the letters from them to O'Gorman so that he can proceed in the proper manner to effect settlement.

I-4-a A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


(18)61 Sep 13

Chambodut, Father L(ouis) C.M.
Galveston, (Texas)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He should have written ten days ago but the turmoil, the work, sickness, etc. left him no time. Tuesday he went to Liberty and Thursday at 2:00 in the morning he arrived at Galveston with his very tired and weak sister, (Sister Marie Thérèse Chambodut, R.U.). He gave her the room occupied at times by Dr. (J.B.) Jordan. Louise placed her in bed where she remained unable to get up until today. This morning he went to the (Ursuline) Convent with a heavy heart for the community sent him a letter saying that she could stay where she had spent the preceding night. He went with Father (Joseph) Anstaett but it was in vain. The council replied that they would not receive her. He wonders what he should do and if he should send her to San Antonio. Mrs. ( ) Rogers will take her for a few days. All the (Ursulines) at Liberty are sick. They have given the new convent building at Galveston for a military hospital. Colonel (John C.) Moore has promised to build a fence so there will be no communication with the convent except in case of need. The time for the bombardment of Galveston seems to be approaching and he wonders if it will be necessary to evacuate the religious. Neither Mrs. ( )McClellan nor Thomas Henrietta have given him the money which (Odin) advanced them. People at Galveston cannot pay their debts. The collections are reduced to little or nothing. Mr. ( ) Sheldon is at his plantation with his family. The Brothers (of Christian Doctrine) will open their school next Monday. General (Paul O.) Hébert arrived today at Galveston. (H.) De St. Cyr's nephew is a prisoner of Captain (James) Alden. He sends the newspaper so he can read the details. Father (John W.) Brümmer is leaving Texas; his health remains without hope. (James P.) Nash continues to take his dinner at the bishop's. Father (J.A.) Faure is very weak. He almost regrets having humiliated himself this morning by begging Mother St. Pierre (Margaret Harrison, R.U.) to receive his sister. He believes it is scandalous on their part. It is not St. Pierre who refuses but some others who bear him grudge from long ago.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
17


1861 Sep 13

(Odin, C.M.), J(ohn) M(ary), Archbishop of New Orleans
Opelousas, (Louisiana)

to Father (Stephen Rousselon
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He has just arrived at Father (Gilbert) Raymond's and he found everyone in good health. The addition to the church is completed and it is very fitting. The (Jesuits) at Grand Coteau have (done) him a thousand kindnesses. He spent a very agreeable time there and his health is much improved. However the face is still a little swollen and the nerve is still a little numb. He has great hopes of continuing his itinerary. In his letter from Grand Coteau he erred on the number confirmed. September 10, in the Chapel of St. Francis Regis at Junction, 151; September 12 in the chapel at Plaquemine, 99.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
7


1861 Sep 14

Anastasie, (R.U.), Sister
(Galveston, Texas)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

She writes to him as Secretary of the (Ursuline) Chapter as directed by Mother (St. Pierre - Margaret Harrison, R.U.) to inform him of a strange thing. Two months ago Father (Louis C.M.) Chambodut, desiring to withdraw his sister from Liberty, asked Mother (St. Pierre) if they would receive her. Mother (St. Pierre) assembled the chapter and they agreed because it did not seem suitable to allow a professed religious to dwell in a secular house when there was a convent, and they even added they would admit her if she recovered her health after a suitable testing period. Chambodut was satisfied and said if obstacles prevented her reception he would take the first good occasion to make her return to France. Last Tuesday he left for Liberty and returned Thursday morning with Sister Marie Thérèse (Chambodut, R.U.). They waited all day in vain which gives a very poor idea of her vocation. The next day Mother (St. Pierre) wrote Chambodut that the chapter, having consented to receive his sister to avoid scandal, she felt relieved of her promise by her conduct and that he should keep her until he could place her elsewhere. She also said that since he had dispensed her from such an important rule without a legitimate reason she would always fear that he would dispense her from many others. Chambodut came at once and requested the revocation of the decision. Mother (St. Pierre) called the council, two voted for and two against. Mother (St. Pierre) voted against and went to tell Chambodut that it was impossible to take back that which had been written. Although she voted for indulgence, she is satisfied with Mother St. Pierre's decision. She asks him to pray that those nasty ships of war will allow them free passage for their elections in October.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
5


1861 Sep 14

(Odin), J(ohn) M(ary), Archbishop of New Orleans
Opelousas, (Louisiana)

To Father (Stephen Rousselon
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He has just received the letter of the 10th and regrets that Doctor (Charles) Faget is gravely ill. Perhaps the Lord will preserve him for a long time for his numerous family. He is very glad that (Rousselon) arranged matters with (P.) Rotchford. Upon his return to New Orleans there will be many posts to fill and he will submit to the council the request of Father (F.) Marion. Everyday he learns more about the needs of the diocese. Since he has several places to visit until the end of October, he believes it best not to make any changes until his return, and for the same reason he cannot offer Father (Francis) Berthaud anything until his return. As (Rousselon) knows they spoke about him in the council and in respect to the resolution taken then he does not wish to do anything until consulting them anew. Father (Ambroise) Martin will leave for New Orleans next Tuesday to remain with (Rousselon) pending new orders. He appears humble enough and (Odin) hopes that he will have leisure enough for salutary reflections. He has not censured him.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
6


1861 Sep 15

(Brownson), Sarah M.
Newburgh, Ohio

to Sarah Healy Brownson
Elizabeth, New Jersey

Sarah intends to give up teaching; consequently her mother should expect her home any day. She would not make up her mind so soon had it not been for being ill and an added burden to the folks. She shall teach one more week so as to give them a quarter. Upon arriving home, Sarah would like to be petted until she gets sufficiently recruited to go about something else.

I-4-g A.L.S. (Photostat Odiorne Collection) 1p. 8vo.
1


(18)61 Sep 16

Faure, Father J.A.
San Antonio, (Texas)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

The other day Firmin Cas(s)iano asked him to pay the interest owed by (Odin) on the sum lent him by his Father because his Father was sick in Eagle Pass and he had to go see him. He paid him and took his receipt. The money used was: $40 which Father (Matthew) Sarry had for (Odin), $42 which he had obtained for dispensations; $2.50 for Propagation of Faith; $8,50 of Sarry's church money which he marked to the account Sarry owes (Odin); $5.00 money on hand; $190 borrowed from Brother (Andrew M.) Edel, (S.M.) which he requested that (Odin) pay on his account to (A.) Poincy, his supplier in New Orleans. Sarry who had gone to take thermal baths at Montclouva has returned with improved health. Bishop (Joaquin) Madrid left last Wednesday for Laredo to wait for a pass from (Santiago) Vidaurri to go to Monterey. He will soon get it if (Faure) is to believe the report brought by Sarry. Madrid's health has failed very much (at San Antonio) and he could not stand it any longer. His sermons have done a great deal of good. All is quiet. The convent and college have plenty of scholars.

VI-2-e A.L.S. 3pp. 16mo.
8


1861 Sep 16

Hewit, H.S.
St. Louis, M(iss)o(uri)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Hewit is sorry he did not have time to explain his leaving or to say goodbye. He told Mrs. Hewit to write and explain. He does not know his destination but is there awaiting orders. He has seen none of the clergy but is told the Bishop is staunch. He is looking forward to the October Review. He will write later about the town and what news he can gather.

I-4-a A.L.S. 3pp. 16to.
1


1861 Sep 17

Koch, Peter G.
Grand Rapids, (Michigan)

To Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere
Detroit, Michigan)

The Church suit has been settled by the Circuit Court in Lefevere's favor. Father (Thomas) Brady is utterly beaten, must pay a big bill of cost and repent of his many sins which he won't do. The church may now be consecrated. Mrs. Koch is painting a picture, Jacob's Dream, and wishes to send it to Lefevere, but hesitates to do so; would the bishop write his acceptance? The Irish Regiment is to be organized, with Father Brady as chaplain. Father (Martin) Marco is being persecuted by some German rebels under the disguise of religion and hypocrisy. The idea of dragging a poor clergyman into court is, for such a trivial cause, a shame.

III-2-j A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
3


1861 Sep 17

O'Reilly, Father Bernard
Hannibal, M(iss)o(uri)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

A short time ago Father D(aniel Houlahan) Holihan arrived and gave a history of what led to his removal from (Odin's) jurisdiction. While he confesses his errors, he says they were ungenerously exaggerated. By some accident he lost the exeat on his way (to Hannibal). His health is broken and O'Reilly fears that he has but a short time to live. He is now under the care of the Sisters at the Hospital, St. Louis. If he do(es) recover he plans to spend a few weeks with the Jesuits and then to enter a new field. O'Reilly asks (Odin) to send him the best letter that he can. He believes his intentions are pure and good. It was his misfortune to have had difficulties with Father (Hector) Fig(a)ri and with Father (J.D. Flanagan) Flanigan. Archbishop (Anthony Blanc) decided in his favor in the former and as (Odin) knows the nature of the present case, O'Reilly is sure he will do his best. He sends this and expects a reply through Bishop (Martin J.) Spalding.

VI-2-e A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
6


(18)61 Sep 18

Chambodut, Father L(ouis) C.M.
Galveston, (Texas)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He sends (no enclosure) the papers which Mr. ( ) Guilbeau just sent him; it appears that he was unable to obtain anything. Ernest Parisot left Tuesday for New Orleans. The newspapers tell of his imprudence. His sister, (Sister Marie Thérèse Chambodut, R.U.) gets better from day to day. Father (John) Gonnard was requested by the (Ursulines) to preach the retreat and Chambodut agreed. The new building is now occupied by sick soldiers. Father (Joseph) Anstaett is well. Clem and Louis are well. Mrs. (Chapuy) Chapuis deposited $1000 for which she said (Odin) promised 10%. He fears they will be obliged to evacuate Galveston before the end of October. It has become a military camp. Ben Quirk came to reclaim some money but as he did not find him on the list of creditors he asked him to wait.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
10


1861 Sep 18

Dubuis, (C.M.), Father C(laude) M.
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
Thibodaux, Louisiana)

After long reflection and after having tried for more than eight months to be of some service, his strength abandons him. He has consulted Dr. ( ) Thierry who assured him that he must follow a strict diet and he cannot hope to do so in the missions. It is therefore urgent for him to return to France and he seeks (Odin's) permission. Yesterday he received a letter from Mother (de) Ste. Marie, (R.U.) and one from Father (J.A.) Faure. Mother de Ste. Marie is still working to reestablish the reputation of the Convent and she announces her success. The (Ursulines) are well and Sister St. Alexis, (R.U.) does not bear any traces of her wound. The pupils return to the two establishments in great numbers; the Brothers (of Mary), so few originally, continue to increase; Faure appears dismayed by the void created about him by the long absence of Father (Matthew) Sarry followed by the departure of Bishop (Joaquin) Madrid who was to have left San Antonio on the 12th for Eagle Pass where a safe-conduct from (Santiago) Vidaurri should take him to the interior. Faure wonders if (Odin) has been notified of a deposit of 600 francs at the Paris office by a (A. Cagnion) Caignon in favor of his brother residing at Castroville. Upon being advised Faure will pay the sum which will be sent to Dubuis for the account of Mr. ( ) Dweyr(?). Both letters bring news of the great scandal given San Antonio by the apostasy of W( ) Elliot who has publicly joined the Methodists. Mother (de) Ste. Marie says his mother is inexpressibly afflicted. In return a boarder at the Convent is to be baptized in the chapel with full consent of her parents. No doubt Father (Charles) Brun gave him news of the city and of the ceremony which took place at the Ursulines' on August 17. Father (Napoleon Joseph) Perché and Father (Gabriel) Chalon send their respects. If his health should be restored a little it would give him great pleasure to assist (Odin) in whatever way he can.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
16


1861 Sep 18

Meline, Col. (James F.)
Cincinnati, (Ohio)

To O(restes A.) Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Meline is interested in "L'Unite' de l'Espece Humaine" of Quatre farges. The work is a series of articles published in the "Revue des Deux Mondes." He asks if Brownson intends "to notice it." Brownson's slavery article, he feels, comes at an opportune time during the Fremont-Lincoln "imbroglio." The London Tablet is a greviant of the truth. Meline believes Gen. Scott should have deserved the gallows for the massacre of Massachusetts troops in Baltimore. He believes Archbishop (Francis Patrick) Kenrick's order about the prayer for the "authorities" is good. The patriotism of the Catholic Telegraph is a joke.

I-4-a A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
3


(1861?) Sep 18

Newbury, Lieutenant Samuel S.
Ft. Hamilton, (New York)

To (James) (Alphonsus) McMaster
(New York, New York)

If McMaster was formerly a member of Union College and of the Kappa Alpha society, Newbury feels that McMaster will allow him to render assistance consistent with the situation of both, and allow him to procure such necessities as McMaster would need during his stay there. He asks McMaster to notify him. (In what seems to be McMaster's handwriting, is added a note: that Lieutenant Newbury was afterwards very polite to Gertrude ( ) and her two little girls; and "fell victim to the vile war.")

I-1-m A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
1


1861 Sep 18

(Odin, C.M.), J(ohn) M(ary), Archbishop of New Orleans
Opelousas, (Louisiana)

to Father (Stephen Rousselon
New Orleans, Louisiana)

These lines will be brought to (Rousselon) by Father (Gilbert) Raymond who is leaving for Ohio. He will give (Rousselon) the news. (Odin) has great hopes of completing his itinerary. September 15 he confirmed 141 in the church of St Landry; September 16, 66 at Washington; September 17, 45 at Villeplate. He is leaving for Thibodaux where he hopes to arrive Friday evening.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
5


1861 Sep 20

DeNeve, Father J(ohn)
Louvain, (Belgium)

To Bishop P(eter) P(aul) Lefevere
Detroit, (Michigan)

DeNeve is presenting two deacons for the priesthood; they will be ordained tomorrow at Malines. They are (Ferdinand) Allgayer of Ravensberg, Wurtemburg, and (John) Friedland, a Prussian. He hopes they will arrive towards the end of November or the beginning of December. They wish to visit their parents, and to have acquaintances furnish them equipment necessary for mission work. It is useless to give Lefevere news of the College, as (Father Peter) Koopmans, Father (John) Van Gennip and the bearer of this letter can tell him that God has blessed their work. He has received 11 of some 20 who have applied. He would like to know how many subjects Lefevere wants. He has seen on the list that Charles D. Bolte of Detroit is at the minor seminary. Would it not be good to send subjects from there, if there are any? That would give more life to the College, a wonderful occasion for the English language, and DeNeve would receive subjects for whom the Bishops would pay at a much lower cost than in America (including voyage). Will Lefevere check his account book for November, 1859, to see if DeNeve has forgotten to remit money to Lefevere from his mission for the Propagation of the Faith? (A note in pencil states that) DeNeve paid $18 on November 19, 1859. He has waited for news of the content of Barnabo's letter. As DeNeve has received nothing, he thinks that he can foresee that there is nothing in it concerning him.

P.S. Cardinal (Engelbert Sterckx) proposes to take Father (Edward) Dumon(t) for his regent.

III-2-j A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
8


1861 Sep 20

Hecker, Father I(saac) T.
New York, (New York)

To Archbishop John Baptist Purcell
Cincinnati, Ohio

He feels quite disappointed at missing Purcell when he was in New York. He learns from Mrs. (Sarah) Peters that Purcell had a gratifying visit to the Holy City. He asks what time Purcell would like his mission. November would be the best month for them.

II-5-a A.L.S. 2pp.12mo.
2


1861 Sep 20

McCloskey, Father W(illia)m
Gensano, (Italy)

To Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio)

Young Dutton will no doubt make a good year's theology. O'Regan is doing well. Miss Seton spoke of the pleasure she enjoyed from Purcell's visit to Viterbo. Father (Francis J.) Pabisch is spending a week with them at the villa. Pabisch will send the relics as soon as possible. They have great fun with Pabisch; he is so good hearted. Old Father Birmingham is still at San Bartolomeo's studying Italian. McCloskey asks about the progress of the war and the future of Archbishop (Francis Patrick) Kenrick in case of separation. Reports say that General Rosecrans is hemmed in by the enemy and short of water for his troops. He thinks Lee is the best officer in the Southern army. McCloskey asks about Mt. St. Mary's College. Father (John B.) Byrne it seems has gone to Philadelphia and probably Father Francis J. Obermeyer will follow. McCloskey would be delighted to hear that Father Edward Fitzgerald is director of the seminary. He understands that the President, (Father John McCaffery) is a secessionist.

II-5-a A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
8


1861 Sep 20

(Martin), Bishop Aug(ustus) M(ar)ie of
Natchitoches, (Louisiana)

To Father S(tephen) Rousselon
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Martin thanks Rousselon for his letter and the copy of the P(astoral) L(etter), for his approval, and also for the care which he took to have it printed so well. He does not know when he will receive it. There is no longer any other way as sure as the mail; not a single boat from Shreveport to Alexandria and between the latter and New Orleans sometimes one every two weeks. Fortunately, the draft is genuine; also unfortunately, because it warns him that his mind is beginning to ramble. His indisposition is a nervous affliction of the stomach. It has become a little more manageable but still will not tolerate solid food. Tomorrow he will have to ordain a priest. For the first time in seven years he will find himself without seminarians. He learned with pleasure the improvement of Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.). Rousselon knows the ardor of Odin's zeal and the scorn with which he treats his person and should try to make him understand that he ought to have pity on his diocese and not endanger the entire body by jeopardizing the head. They are not in France where for a dead bishop there are ten in line. He has received the two circulars from Propaganda about rules for the election of bishops and about artificial wine.

(P.S.) He has received a letter from Father (Felix) Dicharry by Captain Brazeale of their Pelican Rangers. He is very well. That adventurous life is better for his health than a more comfortable but regular life. (Martin) will be a priest for 36 years tomorrow and asks Rousselon to pray for him.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
3


1861 Sep 21

Perché, Father N(apoleon) J(oseph)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.
Thibodaux, Louisiana)

He has received a letter from Mother St. Pierre (Margaret Harrison, R.U.) of Galveston whom he reproached for offering the (Ursuline) convent as a hospital on her own. He will speak to Odin at greater length about it when he returns. She also said that she thought the elections ought to take place in October during the octave of St. Ursula. Odin should write to Father (Louis C.M.) Chambodut so that he will place no obstacles to this affair over which he ought to preside. He thinks that Bishop (Augustus Marie Martin) in publishing his declaration in regard to the war has given a good example. It is urgent that Odin fix the precise time for the pastoral retreat so that his priests cannot complain that they have not been notified in time. He has not yet been able to participate in the work of the committees for the limitation of the parishes and he doubts that the other members have been occupied with it. For the three weeks since his return to (New Orleans) he has been able to do his ordinary work although with much fatigue. In regard to the printing office and ("Le Propagateur Catholique") he has paid part of the debt and had intended to make a gift of it to the diocese after having paid it in its entirety. However, he doubts that he can even make ends meet this year and he may find it necessary to liquidate and abandon them. With few exceptions the priests have shown little zeal and little benevolence. When he sees him they will talk at great length about that and other affairs.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
6


1861 Sep 21

Rousselon, Father S(tephen)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
Thibodaux, Louisiana)

He has receive the letter of the 13th announcing (Odin's) arrival at Opelousas and also the letter of the 14th in which he spoke of Father (F,) Marion, Father (Francois) Berthaud, and Father (Ambroise) Martin. In regard to Marion it is urgent to change his post. Pointe Coupée is the most unhealthy region of all Louisiana and he cannot live three months if he remains there. Father (Francis) Mittelbronn said that Father (Peter M.) Lacour would be a perfect replacement. Berthaud appeared a little affected by the cold reception which Rousselon gave him. He went with Father (D. André) Cauvin to St. Bernard and he has not yet been able to give him (Odin's) reply. Cauvin is determined to remain at St. Bernard. Martin arrived Friday but he has seen him only for a moment. It appears that he has spoken to their priests a great deal complaining about the conduct of Father (Gilbert) Raymond in his regard and pretending that Raymond gave him only $30 and that he does not pay the other priests any better. He thinks it would be good to put Martin with a pastor who will watch over him closely and make him work. Mrs. Sarah Desmond returned to ask for $100 in gold. (P.) Rotchford gave it to her and then she said that she wishes the balance in gold. He told her that he could not pay in gold at the moment since the value of gold had risen 5%. He hopes the crisis will not last. If payments should be made, he asks (Odin) to advise Rotchford. He asks (Odin) to tell him his route. Everything id quiet except that gold is a fancy and silver a myth, but in their place they have notes of the Confederation. He is glad (Odin's) health is improving and he can complete his pastoral visit. Then with full enough knowledge of the diocese, he can little by little make the reforms he judges suitable. Raymond arrived Friday and he is going to try to go to Cincinnati. He brought (Odin's) letter but it was too late to send his note to the "Propagateur (Catholique)" Dr. (Ch.) Faget is better: he is at Biloxi. Raymond told him he had given $90 in all to Martin. It is not enough.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 8vo.
13


(18)61 Sep 21

Smith, (S.C.), Sister Regina, Charity Hospital
N(ew) O(rleans, Louisiana)

To Father S(tephen) Rousselon
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

They have sent ten of their Sisters of Charity to Richmond to take care of the wounded and sick soldiers as it is impossible for those in the North to get permission to pass into Virginia. The Sisters have received permission to have Mass in the hospital but find great difficulties in procuring the necessary article. She wonders if he has an altar stone as they find it impossible to get one.

VI-2-e A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
2


1861 Sep 23

Butler, Edmond
New York, (New York)

To (Orestes A.) Brownson
Elizabeth City, N(ew) J(ersey)

Butler has talked to (Charles) Dana, as Brownson requested; Dana believes the affair can be taken in hand by one of Union Clubs. Presumably, Brownson does not object to lecturing under the auspices of a Union Club. A letter addressed to Butler in care of the man in whose care Butler has enclosed this letter will reach him. The Sadliers mistakenly thought that Butler would make no attempt to reply to their attack against him.

I-4-a A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
3


1861 Sep 23

Monroe, J.
New York, N.Y.

To (James Alphonsus McMaster)
New York, N.Y.

Monroe was out of town until this morning and was going in this afternoon to see McMaster but Kiernan is going in instead. He sends this note by him and may not call today. He saw Mr. Budy this morning and on Saturday Mr. H( ) and Father H( ). Mr. Kiernan is in favor of the paper's going on as he will find out and for McMaster's benefit. He is very clear and divided in his views. Budy, Monroe finds is of the same mind. It seems that they can hardly have any activities directly with McM(aster). Mr. H( ) and Monroe thought that McMaster could convey his views to him and bring his in return. Monroe presumes McMaster has seen Mr. H. They thought McMaster would do well to delay his visit to Ft. L. until something was fixed that is in case the permit to go twas limited to let one trip. Monroe promises to see McMaster tomorrow afternoon if not today.

I-1-m A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
1


1861 Sep 23

(Odin, C.M.), J(ohn) M(ary), Archbishop of New Orleans
Thibodaux, (Louisiana)

To Father (Stephen Rousselon
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Father (Charles) Brun has just arrived with (Rousselon's) letter of the 21st. His knowledge of Father (Peter M.) Lacour does not permit him to confer an important post on him. Left to himself (Lacour) is completely inactive, even indolent. If Father (Francis) Mittelbronn could visit the post occupied by Father (F.) Marion from time to time it would enable the inhabitants to have patience until November when they will make changes. (Rousselon) should write to Marion to return to New Orleans to recover his health. If Mittelbronn cannot visit them he asks (Rousselon) to inform him whom they can send. He wants Father (Ambroise) Martin to remain without a post until he returns to (New Orleans). He needs to be humbled. (P.) Rotchford has Mrs. (Sarah) Desmond's money. He gave it to him in $20 pieces so he should not object to giving her the gold. He is leaving for St. Marie. Tomorrow he will give Confirmation in the chapel. Next Sunday he will be at Houma, October 2 at (Labadieville); October 6 at Assumption, the 13th at Paincourt(ville), the 20th at Donaldson(ville), and the 27th at St. Michael's. From there he will return to (New Orleans).

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
8


1861 Sep 23

Scollard, Father J(ohn)
Jackson, (Louisiana)

to Father S(tephen) Rousselon
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Some time since he was requested by the doctor in charge of the Lunatic Asylum at Jackson to officiate in the afternoon on two Sundays every month for the patients. The service consists of the Rosary, some short instructions, and the litany. He has no choir nor is there any Catholic to play the melodeon. Hence there is no singing. Yet the doctor attaches the principal importance to singing. He wonders whether he might allow the Protestant choir who attend on other Sundays to sing their own hymns according to their own music when he attends. Everything is going on quietly. He visited St. Helena Parish and met with a number of very respectable and good Catholics. He made arrangements to visit them regularly. He will continue the free day-school for the non-Catholic as well as the Catholic children. They are all anxiously looking forward to a visit from Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, C.M.). The Catholics being few and scattered, he regrets the reception cannot be such as they would wish. He will find a great unanimity and contentment of mind between the priest and the people.

VI-2-e A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
4


1861 Sep 24

Anstaett, Father J(oseph)
Galveston, (Texas)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He promised Mrs. Medard Menard to write (Odin) today to announce the edifying death of her son, Capt. Peter Menard. All who saw the deceased during the last four weeks of his illness are convinced that his conversion was a miracle of grace. Knowing (Odin's) interest in him, he knows that some details will please him. Captain Menard fell seriously ill at Houston. Mrs. ( ) Styles urged him to pray but he refused. He arrived at Galveston on August 2, the same night when they had a false alarm of the descent of the enemy. Both Mr. and Mrs. Menard came looking for a priest as it was the opinion of Dr. ( ) Lancton that he would die that night. Father (Louis C.M.) Chambodut was at Liberty so Anstaett went. However, it was only on his third visit that Menard mad a confession of faith, prayed and received Extreme Unction. The next day he received Holy Communion. His sincere conversion made an immense impression on all the family especially on his brother-in-law, Adolphe Leclerc, who had need of such an example. (James P.) Nash could not conceal his astonishment and, inflamed by holy zeal, he converted one of his friends, a Protestant named Mr. ( ) Rice who later died with all the consolations of the Church. Father (John) Gonnard being (at Galveston) to give a retreat to the religious, Anstaett was at Houston for the affairs of the Convent when Mr. Peter faced the last crisis. Shortly before his death at 4 o'clock Friday morning he asked for his two new friends, Anstaett and Chambodut. One thing that should not be forgotten is that he charged Mr. Menard to write to (Odin) that he had been converted. The work on the new (Ursuline Convent) is stopped and it has been converted into a military hospital. Mrs. ( ) Chapuy regrets to learn that (Odin) has been ill. It appears that the new General, General (Paul O.) Hébert, is going to declare martial law and have 5,000 more men come. There are already 3.000 regulars.

P.S. Mrs. Menard sends $10 for (Odin) to say masses for the deceased.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 8pp. 12mo.
13


1861 Sep 24

Raymond, Father G(ilbert)
Nashville, (Tennessee)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He is with Bishop (James) Whelan who arrived from Cincinnati. (Whelan) had a rather difficult time which did not however, prevent him from leading two or three Dominican Sisters into the middle of all these difficulties. Raymond plans to leave tomorrow with a Dominican priest of the diocese. All of Kentucky is aflame. Ex-Governor (Charles S.) Morehead has been arrested. The present Governor, (Beriah) Magoffin, has wihdrawn, whereto is not known. It is said that (John C.) Breckenridge would do well to think of himself for he will probably be quickly placed out of the state to work for the South. It is rumored that there are nearly 30,000 Northerners fortifying Paducah and nearly 40,000 Southerners to attack it. The Southern troops and the Northern troops each occupy their end of the railway from Nashville to Louisville. The Southerners have formed a camp in the southern part of the state. They are going to see acted out in Kentucky the drama taking place in Missouri. (Lieutenant-) General (Simon Bolivar) Buckner, who commanded the state militia, resigned and now commands the southern troops at Bowling Green. He promises not to molest anyone for his opinion. Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell is expected this week at Cincinnati from France. This is the best news he could have. Things will be arranged more easily with him.

P.S. He will not lose a moment but difficulties may delay him longer than he thinks and he may not arrive on the precise day for the opening of the convent classes in which case it will have to be delayed for several days.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 8vo.
10


1861 sep 24

Verot, Augustin, Bishop of
St. Augustine, (Florida)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Verot sends a letter which one of (Odin's) diocesans gave him at St. Charles where Verot made a visit in the course of a trip which the suspension of postal service obliged him to take during August. Verot begs (Odin) to fulfill the desires of this young man in regard to his mother. At Baltimore he saw in "L'Ami de la Religion" that he was transferred from Danaba to Savannah and that Odin was transferred from Galveston to New Orleans, as proclaimed at the consistory of July 22.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 8vo.
2
1861 Sep 25

Hewit, Mrs. C.S.
Bridgeport, (Connecticut)

To (Orestes A. Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

He has just received the October number of the Review, and one for the Doctor, also. She is pleased that this is the end of a volume and not of the publication. Several days ago she wrote to her godmother. Next month she intends to visit New York. Her children are well, --- as was the Doctor (H.S. Hewit) on his letter of the 20th. He was awaiting Fremont's orders.

I-4-a A.L.S. 2pp. 16mo.
2


1861 Sep 25

(Odin, C.M.), J(ohn) M(ary), Archbishop of New Orleans
Thibodaux, (Louisiana)

to Father (Stephen Rousselon
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He has returned to Thibodaux. Father (Cletus) Urcun had neglected to prepare the children of Lockport for Confirmation and had even announced that (Odin) would not come. This annoyed him greatly but he is resigned to defer his visit to another time. He has just written to Father (Napoleon Joseph) Perché to consult with (Rousselon) about the time for the pastoral retreat. He wants it to take place in November. Father (Gabriel) Chalon is to announce it in a small printed circular. A letter from Father (Claude M.) Dubuis, (C.M.) announces that he is ill again. (Rousselon) should persuade him to remain at the house and to discontinue the Covington and Mandeville missions. Dubuis wishes to leave for France but that will be difficult and he believes that with a little rest he will recover completely. September 22 he confirmed 89 at Thibodaux, and on the 24th, 75 in St. Mary's Chapel. This morning he felt like paying (Rousselon) a little visit but he has so many letters to write that he had to renounce the idea. (Rousselon) should busy himself with the parish boundaries of (New Orleans). It is urgent. Upon his return they will work long on the regulations for the country parishes.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
9


1861 Sep 26

McCaffrey, Father John, Mt. St. Mary's College
(Emmitsburg, Maryland)

To Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

McCaffrey writes that he fears the union is lost and that only ruins will be left. He hopes Purcell will do all he can to save it. Maryland is no longer free and the people's rights under the Constitution are gone. Mentioning the imprisonment of Parkin Scott, S.T. Wallis, and the commissioners, he comments on the treatment they receive in Maryland from the organization of "Plug-Uglies". He accuses the Northern President as having been the ruin of the country. The Plug-Uglies and Lincolnites have made a bonfire to celebrate the suppression of our Legislature of thirty thousand copies of Mr. Wallis' report. They say it is treason but it contains only facts of protest against unconstitutional wrongs. McCaffrey asks Purcell if Catholics are not making a mistake in supporting any suppression of rights. Mrs. Joseph Bougher and her grandson, Henry Purcell Gallaher send their respects to Purcell. McCaffrey asks to be remembered to his friends.

P.S. McCaffrey says he does not favor secession but wants only peace.

II-5-a A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
3


1861 Sep 27

Rousselon, Father S(tephen)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
Labadieville, Louisiana)

He has received (Odin's) letters and duly notes everything he recommends. He sends a letter from a Major or Colonel of a regiment who wishes an answer as soon as possible. He is recommended by Father (James Ignatius) Mullen, Father (J.D.) Flanagan, Father ( ) Moynihan and Father (Richard) Kane. There is nothing new at New Orleans. They are going to begin the 40 hours on the 6th.

A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.

Enclosure:

--------
1861 Sep 27

Edmonston, Major J ), Headquarters Battalion, Light Infantry
N(ew) Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

He submits his authority to organize a battalion for the Confederate States Service. With the aid of General ( ) Grivot, he has nearly completed it. He asks (Odin's) aid in recruiting the 5th Company from the Catholics of New Orleans.

(P.S.) The bearer, Captain ( ) Kavanaugh, is most suitable and qualified to raise said company.

A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
VI-2-e A.L.S. (French and English) 3pp. 12mo. 4to.
8


1861 Sep 27

Sorin, C.S.C., Father E(dward)
Notre Dame, Ind(iana)

to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

He acknowledges with pleasure Purcell's confidential lines. He is glad to hear of Purcell's safe arrival after his voyage across the waters. There is no change for the better in the condition of the country. The gentleman Purcell refers to has not been to Notre Dame thus far. They are building the foundations of the missionary home; but there Sorin's little funds will be nearly exhausted.

II-5-a A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
2


1861 Sep 27

Spalding, M(artin) J., Bishop of Louisville
Louisville, (Kentucky)

To Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio)

He rejoices that Purcell's resignation was not accepted. It is perhaps as well that Father (Sylvester H.) Rosecrans' appointment is deferred; he is still young. The news was received that General (William) Rosecrans' army had been surrounded and the general wounded and taken prisoner. It is out of his power to send the Pallium to Archbishop (John M.) Odin. The first battle will probably be fought near Louisville and on it depends the safety of the city.

II-5-a A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
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1861 Sep 30

Hughes, John, Archbishop of
New York, (New York)

Cardinal Alessandro Barnabo, Prefect of the S. Congregation of Propaganda
Rome, I(taly)

The report given Barnabo about the July issue of (Orestes A.) Brownson's Review is entirely true. In the October issue Brownson has made a kind of retraction because his words were given a meaning he did not intend. He has been assailed by the Baltimore Catholic Mirror and the Pittsburgh Catholic. Hughes does not think it would be useful to open a dispute with Brownson who likes to argue. Hughes has himself published his views on the Temporal Power in the Metropolitan Record and Brownson has not challenged them. He has not taken up with him or the despotism of the Church. He has not thought it necessary to warn the clergy or the faithful against Brownson because

--------
1, the Review is in decline;
2, there are few Catholics in the diocese who subscribe to it;
3, Brownson has no more influence even among Catholics.

He would not attack Brownson because this would revive interest in the Review. After his conversion the Boston Clergy admitted Brownson to too great familiarity. When he moved to New York he asked Hughes to censure his articles but Hughes refused. Brownson has made the acquaintance of several young priests, especially those who have studied in Europe, and in their conversations they criticize the Church from the Supreme Pontiff on down. They attacked Hughes only once or twice and then by anonymous letters. This no longer exists. It is an imitation of the Lamennais school in Paris. But they have had their difficulties: two priests have apostatized, and the only priest who admits to familiarity with Brownson is Father (Jeremiah) Cummings, and Hughes is not sure that he has been consulted about the articles. The faithful are so well informed on Matters that the slightest importance attached to him by the Sacred Congregation would be harmful and do no good.

I-4-g L.S. (French) (Magnaprint of microfilm from the Archives of Propaganda Congressi, Amer. Setts., Canada, 1858-1861, Vol. 7, fol. 687r - 692v.) 12pp. 8vo.
10


(1861 Sep 30)

Poyet, Father J(ean) A(rthur)
Abbeville, Louisiana

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
Bayou Terrebonne, Louisiana)

The parish of Vermillion seems to toy with misfortune. The last time Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc visited Attakapas he was unable to go as far as Abbeville because of illness. This last mishap chagrins him to the last degree and for many reasons. He would have been happy to pay his respects to (Odin) and receive his encouragement and advice. For four years his parishioners have not seen their bishop and they have not had Confirmation. He hopes (Odin) will come soon. He is aware of the suffering caused him by the infection. For his own part he is far from well.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
3