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Calendar: 1862

1862

(Ann de Salles, S.C., Sister), St. Theresa's Church
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Archbishop John Mary Odin, C.M.
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

A financial statement for St. Theresa's Church for the year 1862 showing income of $3,677.36, expenses, including Father (J.D.) Flanagan's salary, of $1,812,60, and a surplus of $1,864,76.
(Notation on back:) Wine, oil, and labor not included.

(Enclosure:) She understands that formerly Father (J.G.) Bellier and Father (Hector) Figari sent to the asylum, after a funeral service, $5 and often as much as $20 for the orphans. (Flanagan) has never sent to her knowledge a single dollar as a compensation for lights used.

VI-2-f A.I. 12mo.
5


1862

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
(Frederick City, Maryland)

To (Sarah Nickolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Ned wishes (Sarah) would write to Jesse (Healy) and tell him he wants nothing but an A. No. 1 horse. He does not want it sent however until it can be sent free or for a very small sum. Persons in Washington (D.C.) are continually having horses sent to them. He asks that Uncle John (Healy) be informed as to the kind of horse he wants. Ned is satisfied with her letters. He has ridden fifty miles since yesterday morning and rode about ten miles the day before. As a result, he has just about all the riding he wishes for some time to come. He would like to have a Review sent to him as early as possible and asks that she tell Pat to send him his paper prepaid and regularly. He is desirous also of receiving the Tablet. Mr. Howell and he had a good deal of fun together.

I-5-i A.L.S. 1pp. 8vo.
1


1862

(Convent of the Ursulines?
New Orleans, Louisiana)

(A list of names): Amelie Rixner, Olympe Brand, Louise Legendre, Marie Sel, Edwidge Fortier, Marie Guérin,, Alice Nicaud, Louise Carriére, Adelaide Commandeur, Cécile Smith, Amelie Faget, Rosa Daverzac, Kate Gora, Alice St. Amand, Louise Camus, Arelia Durand. (Added in another hand): Marie Collet, Elizabeth Gant, Pauline Orget, Johanna Barone, Celestine Richard, Euphrasie Mend, Hortense Lepra, Helène Dieudonné.

VI-2-f A.D. (French) 1p. 12mo.
25


(1862?) ( )

Goddard, Madeleine Vinton
New York, (New York)

To O(restes A.) Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Goddard reminds Brownson that he has promised to lend her one of the works of Cortes to translate. She can call for it on the next Wednesday at the house of Brownson's friend, Rev. George McCloskey, if Brownson will leave it there. She would like to see Brownson and if Wednesday morning is pleasant she will make a call at 12 noon in the hope of seeing him. She wants to leave town on the next Friday night.

I-4-b A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
1


(1862?) ( )
Hogan, Charles J.
New York, (New York)

To (Orestes A.) Brownson

Hogan is sending Brownson a manuscript for an article in Brownson's Quarterly Review. Brownson had published an article of Hogan's around October, 186(0) on the occasion of a visit to Ireland. He has long been influenced by the Review. He is an Irishman, by birth, contrary to what some of Brownson's critics assumed him to be, a few years under 30, and a mechanic "by trade." (Enclosed: portion of a manuscript dealing with the relationship between the clergy and the laity).

I-4-b A.L.S., A.D. (Incomplete) 9pp. 4to.
3


(1862?)

Kehoe, L(awrence)
(New York, New York)

To (Orestes A. Brownson
Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Kehoe sends the enclosed (no enclosure) letter from London. (Brownson) should let them (The Catholic Publishing Co. of London?) settle with his lawyer. They will have to pay. Brownson should come in and they can answer them.

I-4-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
2


(1862?)

Kehoe, L(awrence)
New York, New York

to (Orestes A. Brownson
Elizabeth, New Jersey)

The draft on London has been returned protested at the expense of $3.88. The answer the rascals (The Catholic Publishing Co. of London?) make is "The Drawer Unknown." When (Brownson) comes to town he should bring their letters and have them sued.

I-4-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
2


(1862)

(Lefevere, Bishop Peter Paul)
(Detroit, Michigan)

To Mother Angela J(oseph) McKey of St. Bridget
Grand Rapids, Mich(igan)

Her kind letter of the 7th was received but not answered immediately because of a severe cold. It was always Lefevere's intention to guard and protect her community in that diocese and he would be pleased if Mother Angela wrote him from time to time about any difficulty. (Sisters of St. Bridget).

III-2-j A.L. (Draft) 2pp. 12mo.
2


(1862?) ( )

Miller, Rutger B.
( ), ( )

To James A(lphonsus) McMaster
(New York, New York)

Since McMaster expressed a desire to hear from Miller often, he is resuming their correspondence which was broken off by his attempt to find a Northern statesman able to appreciate the spiritual as well as the temporal symptoms of (the South). But under philanthropic sympathy for the Negro he discovered not only avarice and ambition, but also hatred in the spiritual, temporal, political, and religious matters, guaranteed in the Constitution of the United States. James Madison and Edward Livingston both held that the right of private judgment was reserved by the states in their character of sovereignty in certain extreme cases, it being an inalienable prerogative essential to their existence as states. (Miller gives reference to the writings of Madison and Livingston). The South assumed the risk of all the penalties attached to an unsuccessful resistence to established authority by (Miller quote Livingston in the spiritual, temporal, political, and religious matters, guaranteed in the Constitution of the United States. James Madison and Edward Livingston both held that the right of private judgment was reserved by the states in their character of sovereignty in certain extreme cases, it being an inalienable prerogative essential to their existence as states. (Miller gives references to the writings of Madison and Livingston). The South assumed the risk of all the penalties attached to an unsuccessful resistence to establish authority by (Miller quotes Livingston) asserting "the natural right which every people have to resist extreme oppression." Regarding these risks and penalties, Miller finds that President Lincoln (Miller quotes a letter of Secretary Seward's) admits that the Federal Government cannot reduce the seceding states to obedience by conquest, and so coerce them. Nor (Miller quotes another of Seward's letters) can slavery be abolished under the Constitution. While this was being said the South was duped into the belief that no attempt at coercion would be made. (Miller refers to Judge ( ) Campbell's letter as evidence). The South was invited by semi-official sources to assume the risk of secession and had a right to infer that Abolitionist and even Democratic sympathies would favor it. Greeley, Gerrit Smith, Horatio Seymour, and Lyman Tremaine all bear evidence of this fact. If the South could have foreseen the events of the past two years it would have seceded in any case, for in extreme cases collective as well as individual character must be defended at all hazards, and the right to judge the extremity of the case is not delegated. The North is the aggressor in the war, as Judge Campbell's letter proves, and all Christiandom sustains the justice of the Northern cause and hopes for the success of the North in its"Holy War," but Miller does not see how Abolitionists and Democrat s can support the war, or how Catholics can sanction it. He sees only two alternatives, separation with recognition and reconstruction on the one hand, and a counter-revolution in the North on the other.

I-1-m A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
1


(1862 ?)

(Raymond, Father Gilbert
Opelousas, Louisiana)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Raymond) asks (Odin) to recommend to the two young priests he is sending them:

--------
1. That they regard the parish as a mission, and are ready to live as missionaries.

2. (Raymond) will do his best for food but because of the state of war, there will be little privations.

3. That they learn to ride a horse.

4. That they learn English.

5. That they be on guard in regard to women.

6. That they avoid idle visits here and in Washington.

7. That piety and their work make up their lives.

8. They are to be on guard against avarice.

9. Their salary: $300 a year; $1 stipend for the Masses they will say for (Raymond's) intention, and Masses in homes. The priests are to bring ordos for them.

VI-2-f A. Note (French) 2pp. 12mo.
3


(18)62(?)

(Rigollet, Father Clement
Ville Platte, Louisiana?)

To (Archbishop John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Accounts: Salary at $500 a year, $1042; Masses, $54 and $18; services here $20, at Bois Malette, $21; a loan $44; stolen by the servant girl, $40; laundry and cleaning, $25; coffee, milk, etc., $25; Villeplate, $1(?); for teaching $100. Received at different times,$82.20. (In another hand on this paper): Alleged account of Mr. Rigolet.

VI-2-f A.D. (French) 1p. 8vo.
3


1862 Jan 1

Fitzgerald, (Father) Edward
Columbus, (Ohio)

To (Archbishop John Baptist Purcell)
Cincinnati, (Ohio)

Fitzgerald found a place for the orphans about whom he previously wrote Purcell. In 1857 he received a written statement from Father (James) Meagher which was to be a full account of the church debts. Since then a claim for $65 was made. Meagher says the claim is valid but shows the account of where it was spent. Fitzgerald ignored the claim and is now faced with a lawsuit. He desires to know if he should stand the suit or pay the claim for which there is no account or note.

II-5-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
2


1862 Jan 1

(Harrison, R.U.), Mother St. Pierre
San Antonio, (Texas)

To Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Mother St. Pierre received his letter of December 22 and was astonished that he said nothing about the demand he made on her by Father (Claude M.) Dubuis, (C.M.) to have Sister Ste. Félicité, (R.U.) at San Antonio. Mother St. Séraphine, (R.U.) wrote to Mother (de) Ste. Marie, (R.U.) and Sister Ste. Félicité on this subject. She is happy to give her; she has been truly one of her crosses because of the letters she has written to the Mothers of the (Ursulines) who are prejudiced against her enough without that. The talk at San Antonio is that Dubuis is bishop of Galveston. The Lord could not send them a better one. If true, they are sure of returning to Galveston, but if it is not true she asks Odin to tell her what to do. She ardently desires to return there around the 15th or 20th of this month.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
6


1862 Jan 1

Marco, Father M(artin)
Alpine, (Michigan)

To Bishop P(eter) P(aul) Lefevere
Detroit, (Michigan)

(Note under place and date) Absent from Grand Rapids since 4 weeks and 3 days. He wishes to inform Lefevere of the persecution and the difficulties of the German congregation of Grand Rapids. He lists the damage done to the church and its contents. These Germans, especially Mr. Schaeffer, are the ones who have written Lefevere. In Berlin, falsehoods have been told about Marco, such as his intention to destroy or carry away church goods. Some prominent people from Grand Rapids have come to Alpine to annoy him during divine service; also to gather in the house to perform in ridicule the ceremonies of a priest. Marco has postponed the baptism of two Protestants, due to the action of the Bertes, Cordes and Hake, but only for 3 or 4 weeks when they will be better prepared. All his other missions are satisfactory. What he desires and asks of Lefevere is his support, to stop these calumnies and falsehoods. The letter sent Lefevere came from a young grocery clerk by the name of J. Bertes, who has no more faith than John Cordes, his next of kin. Marco is not conscious of any fault that might give scandal.

III-2-j A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 8vo.
5


1862 Jan 1

Nash, James P.
Galveston, (Texas)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

The news is scant save that they have great hopes that (Abraham) Lincoln, the ugly fellow, is getting entangled in the meshes of John Bull in the Mason and Slidell affair which in all probability will take off the blockade, a part of the drama in which England is most interested. As to the Negro question England's sympathy is to the Northern side. He thinks Lincoln and his minions are disappointed and now find it impossible to conquer the South. (There is) nothing to be seen but a soldiery and he is almost tempted to say a mercenary one. 7/8 of them are of barbarian refinement, not as well trained as animals of the brute creation in Europe. The camps were called in from the prairie and placed in the vacant houses with a promise t not one cent will they pay. He let D. Howard of San Antonio have the Hill cottage at $20 per month. After five weeks he was removed to Houston and paid nothing. He placed a poor man in the Boylan house to keep the soldiers from going in. All the money he gets as rent is $12.50 from (John B.)Root, $10 for Boylan's and the one next. All his own are empty. Carried away by the panic like all other citizens, he sent eleven boxes of goods from (the) store to Houston and 4 to Brazoria where his family is at present. He has written for them to come back. Should business soon open again and any good family apply to (Odin) for information about business in Galveston, he would gladly rent the store together with the dwelling. He likes living at his country house better than to stay in Galveston, with his children. They are constantly expecting to hear of the arrival of the bulls in New Orleans and anxious to know who will be (Odin's) successor. Although the priests left to administer the religious affairs of the diocese are fervent and zealous, there is a vacancy felt.

VI-2-f A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
6


1862 Jan 2

Stone, James M.
Boston, (Massachusetts)

To Ed(ward) P. Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Stone has received his letter and it is definitely settled that Doctor (Orestes A.) Brownson will lecture January 22nd. Stone's letter to Doctor Brownson asking permission to change the date of the lecture was written to accommodate another lecturer, but since this is now impossible the original date will be kept.

I-4-b A.L.S. 1pg. 12mo.
2


1862 Jan 3

Foltier, Father E.J.
Vermillionville, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Odin's) circular arrived and Foltier hastened to conform. Supposing the revenues of Lafayette to be $4,000, $200 are for the Jus Cath(edraticum, $800 for the pastor, $1,000 for the expenses of worship, and $1,000 for the fund. He has examined what accrued to the church for rental of pews. He has a right to nine months in order to pay his debts, but there remain three months at $250 each for a total of $750 until Easter. Anticipated expenses are $120 for the organist; $400 for the singer, sacristan, choir boy, care of the cemetery and repairs incumbent upon the tenant; for the laundering and ironing of the church linen and for cleaning, $60 per year. This makes $580 or $48.33 1/3 each month, he has chosen for the administrative council Zéphyrin Martin, Onésime Mouton, and Vincent Bertrand. When all is organized, as he will have paid his debts in three months, he hopes (Odin) will not forget he promised him a pastorate in the city.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 8vo.
5


1862 Jan 3

Graves, E.A.
Lebanon, K(entuck)y

to (Orestes A. Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Graves is the man who introduced Brownson to the Lebanon audience two or three years ago. It was his whiskey that they drank at Ben Spaldings at that time. Graves has no money with which to pay the nine dollars bill due for the Review. However, he would like to send Brownson a quantity of his whiskey at $1.25 per gallon to pay for the Review. The whiskey usually sells at $2.00 per gallon. He would also like to settle his sister Mary's account in the same way, and if Brownson agrees to this arrangement, he would like the surplus credited to his account so that he can continue taking the Review, depending on how much whiskey Brownson orders.

I-4-b A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
2


1862 Jan 3

Hart, Father Matth(ew), College de Juilly
Damartin, Seine et Marne, (France)

To Bishop (Francis P. McFarland of Hartford
Providence, Rhode Island)

Hart received the Bishop's letter on New Year's day. He is sorry to learn that the Bishop has a bad cold. The wants of the diocese lead him to return to the diocese as soon as the weather permits. He has thought that of Chester and Branford missions, Branford and the places on the railroad should be annexed to St. Patrick's and Chester with all the Haddams to Middletown or Colchester. Little schools could be instituted at Branford and Chester by the revenue which is too small to support a separate priest. His health is better. He should have told the Bishop of the death of Father Duffy last month. There is a report that the Holy Father will hold a council on the occasion of the canonization of the Japanese martyrs in May. He has received a letter from Father (Bernard) Smith telling about the arrival of the student at Propaganda. Affairs on the continent and in Italy seem better and they begin to hope got peace for the Holy Father. Victor Emmanuel is supposed to come to Paris for aid. The radicals do not love the Pope or religion and they have become contemptible and will bring the utter ruin of Italy. There is better feeling between the Pope and Napoleon III and the Emperor will not withdraw his troops from Rome. The American troubles with England will not be settled as easily as the American papers think. War or the surrender of Mason and Slidell is the alternative. All Europe is laughing at the North and its do-nothing policy. Archbishop (John Hughes) is still in Paris making the Emperor mind his own business and keep out of ours. But the French say that the Archbishop's presence is not felt and will not profit Uncle Sam. It may be useful later to say that the Archbishop was sent there by some one.

I-1-b A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
3


1862 Jan 3

Outendirck, Father J.
New Iberia, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Following Odin's circular letter Outendirck believes he ought to ask permission to complete the bell-tower which he has begun; he still needs about $100 of materials. In regard to the $25 which Odin leaves to the pastor for repairs, some think they can make repairs several times each year if each does not exceed that sum, others think they cannot exceed that sum in the whole year without seeking an authorization. Outendirck cannot understand that Odin places the country pastors under the same conditions as those of the city. He should understand that a pastor needs a horse which costs at least $250, and that it costs those who need two at least $400, without figuring that they also need a servant. If he deducts this from what he has allowed them there will not be enough to live.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
1


1862 Jan 3

(Rappe), A(madeus), Bishop of Cleveland
Cleveland, (Ohio)

To Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell)
of Cincinnati, (Ohio)

The difficulty between Rappe and Purcell is not an affair of sentiment but a question of principle. The question is to know if Father M(ary) A(nthony) Meyer, on leaving his religious community, remained a subject of the diocese of Cleveland and if on leaving the diocese he received his exeat. Rappe will furnish to the judges the necessary proofs. It is impossible for him to come to Cincinnati for the meeting of the bishops. He asks that Purcell excuse him as a testimony of the profound respect that Rappe has for him.

II-5-b A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 8vo.
2


1862 Jan 3

Scollard, Father John
Jackson, (Louisiana)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

A Catholic member of the state legislature and Scollard have been deliberating today relative to the Sisters of Charity being invited by the Legislature to take charge of the Insane Asylum in Jackson. The same arrangement (as) between the Sisters in charge of the State Hospital in Nashville and the Legislature of Tennessee might be satisfactory viz. the Sisters to have entire control and the State to pay a stipulated amount for every pauper patient. C.N. Gibbons, the member he refers to, would be pleased to hear from (Odin) on the subject. He has received but one communication from N(ew) Orleans since the retreat, the circular relative to the financial affairs of the diocese. He has not heard of any action on his petition to be affiliated to the diocese, nor has he received the Propagateur since he subscribed. He spoke to that wealthy Catholic lady in Bayou Sara about (Odin's) intended visit to this mission. She was greatly pleased and became quite excited when he told her (Odin) was particularly acquainted with Archbishop Kenrick.

VI-2-f A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
5


1862 Jan 4

Browne, D(octo)r W(illia)m Faulkner, United States Steamer Mystic
River Rappahannock via Fortress Monroe, V(irgini)a

to (Orestes A. Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Doctor Browne had to leave suddenly and had not his ship been detained in Philadelphia he would have had to go without baggage. To Brownson he owes all he knows of Catholicism and, in a great measure, his present position. They are blockading Virginia waters. Last Sunday they ran aground while chasing a rebel boat; a few days later they went twelve miles up the river. There are four rebel steamers there but they did not see them. He is sorry the government has given up the traitors, Mason and Slidell. One man died of yellow fever, and since he was a Catholic, Doctor Browne read the De Profunis and a large part of the burial office at his burial in the sea.

I-4-b A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
1


(1862 Jan 4)

Dinnies, J.C.
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.)
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Dinnies regards (P.) Rotchford's visit last night as providential. Either of the memorials which he submitted would have inevitably defeated their common wish. The writers could have had but little knowledge of the temper of their Legislature. Supposing, from the views Odin expressed to him when his collector was a candidate for the Legislature, that Odin was opposed to Catholics moving in the matter at present, he had paved the way for the subject being initiated by Protestants and had some hope of getting Dr. Palmer enlisted in the matter. Yesterday he received a note from Rufus Dolbear saying that Dr. Knapp, a member of the Legislature. Wishes a copy of the Texas School Law, and remarking that now is the time to act. Dolbear leads him to believe that their memorial will receive strong support from the Protestants.

VI-2-f A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
5


(1862) Jan 4

Elder, Basil T.
Saint Louis, (Missouri)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
New York, (New York)

Elder has been a subscriber to the Review for seventeen years. He has been a staunch defender of the publication. Brownson's views on the war are diametrically opposed to his. For this reason he feels he is bound to decline the continuance of his subscription after the last two articles in the Review on the war. He abhors Brownson's means to the end. Elder does not wish to see the country ruptured by Northern Puritans and fanatics. He believes reunion impossible. He is of Maryland ancestry. It grieves him that Brownson places himself on the level in the Lovejoy, Hale, and others in Congress. He would like Brownson to "recall that diabolical hint of a servile insurrection." The Negro's freedom would be his curse. He encloses nine dollars for full payment.

I-4-B A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
1


1862 Jan 4

Follot, Father F(rancis) C.
Plaquemine, (Louisiana)

To Father (Stephen Rousselon
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Sister (Marie de) St. Benoit, (C.S.C.) wrote a letter which Follot sent to Rousselon. Follot begs him to reply in order to quiet her and himself, or better to tell him what he should do on this subject.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 1p. 8vo.
2


1862 Jan 5

Booth, Mary L.
New York, (New York)

To Orestes A. Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

She asks which number of the Review contains the passage quoted in French in the second volume of Cochin's work, page 145. She cannot find it and does not want to retranslate it. She is preparing the second volume; the first goes to press in a few days. Brownson must have received the copy of the "Results of Emancipation" which she told the publishers to send him. Many people believe it will be a power weapon in their cause.

Brownson notes: "I have not received the work."

I-4-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
1


1862 (Jan?) 7

Bedini, Cardinal G(aetano)
Viterbo, (Italy)

To (Robert) Seton
(Rome, Italy)

Bedini thanks Seton for his letter, especially since it is the only one he has received from a young American. He reciprocates Seton's good wishes for the new year. He is glad that Seton has succeeded in being admitted to the noble Academia. (Seton adds on the back of the letter that it is) in answer to a letter of congratulations on elevation to the Roman purple.

II-1-a A.L.S. (Italian) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Jan 6

Quérat, Father (Joseph)
Refugio, (Texas)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Quérat knows from experience that (Odin) will not scorn to reply. Since (Odin's) departure he feels like an orphan in a strange land. Everything seems to combine to make him melancholy and almost disgusted with life: the loss of (Odin), the death of several who gave him the highest hopes for his mission, and illness. Since September he has not enjoyed almost a single day of health. Nevertheless, he must travel more than ever. Never has he seen so much sickness. Several days ago he buried (Augustina) Adams whom (Odin) baptized at Galveston about two years ago. Every time he went to Mr. Fagan's to say Mass she came although she lived more than 18 miles away. Entirely surrounded by Protestants, she had already had a very great influence on them. Her neighbors sent for him but he arrived too late; however only a few days before she had approached the sacraments. Last week he saw Father (Augustine) Gardet who now enjoys very fine health. Father (Antoine) Borias has become so big that soon he will not be able to ride a horse. Finally, he asks (Odin) to send him an ordo and he places a dollar in gold in the letter.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 8vo.
6


1862 Jan 6

Rubi, C.M., Father M.
Donaldsonville, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Yesterday Rubi was called to see a sick woman and found that she had been married six or seven years ago by a judge to a first cousin. He called for her husband and told them that he could do nothing for her unless they would repair the scandal that they had given. As she was very sick he thought it best to give them the dispensation, to marry them and to administer the last sacraments. He told the man that as he was very poor in everything except children, he would not charge for the marriage but that he had to pay for the dispensation.

VI-2-f A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


1862 Jan 7

(Kramer), O.S.B., Father Amandus
San Antonio, (Texas)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Kramer) speaks of the loss of (Odin) in Texas. The most interesting thing for (Odin) would be if (Kramer) could inform him that San José is improving but he cannot. If he considers the time, circumstances, and the means, how much could have been done and what a nice home (the Benedictines) could have had in Texas. Every communication with Abbot (Boniface Wimmer, O.S.B.) is cut off. The wall is up as far as the second story but Father (Alto) H(o)erman(n)'s, (O.S.B.) idea is always for three stories as he heard; but since last summer (Hoermann) had to stop his work because he had no money. The wall - without roof - the church just as before - is all the improvement of San José. In regard to Ho(e)rman(n)'s debts, he never hears one word from him, only what they occasionally find out by other people. He knows one man from whom he borrowed, he guesses, $800. If there are any more he does not know. On December 13, 1861 Father Gallus (Erhardt, O.S.B.) informed him that H(o)erman(n) was going to Mexico to collect money. (Kramer) wanted to see him before he left so he came. He said he would come back in 4 or 5 months. He does not know what to think of Ho(e)rman(n). He supposes (Odin) knows about the change in Castroville. Father Peter (Baunach, O.S.B.) is in Fredericksburg and is well satisfied. He is building the church. Father Emilian (Wendel, O.S.B.) is in Castroville and is doing very well there. They are all well and happy. He is anxious only for one thing - a church for the poor German congregation in San Antonio. He knows nothing can be done in matter for the present.

VI-2-f A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
10


1862 Jan 7

Raymond, Father G(ilbert)
Opelousas, (Louisiana)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Raymond thanks him for his letter of January 1 and for announcing the arrival of Bishop (Augustin) Verot. He is grieved that he cannot leave Opelousas at this time; his two recent trips to the North, his brother's (Father J. Francois Raymond) recent absence, and the return of his brother's fever prevent it. If after Verot preaches the retreat at Natchez he returns through New Orleans, he could then go there. He would also like to see (Odin) about several things concerning the parish. The first thing is about Calcassieu which is waiting to be formed into a parish by (Odin). Since his return he has not been able to go there. He would be happy to send Father (Hyacinth) Gonellaz or Father (Clement) Rigol(l)et but he fears they do not wish to go. Since three months ago the necessary works of the parish has greatly diminished; only the burials are nearly the same. The revenues of the parish have considerably diminished also. Everything is expensive. He says the prayer for peace with great fervor and hopes that, alone or with foreign intervention, they will soon force the North to seek peace. Outwardly, Gonellaz seems very well; he does not know what he thinks inwardly; Raymond does all he can to satisfy him. Father (E.J.) Foltier had spoken of Gonellaz's nomination to Royville; Gonellaz would prefer New Orleans. For the rest he cannot complain of him. Without having great piety, he believes him to be solid. As for Rigol(l)et, he can only say that he appears full of zeal and good will although a little too sly. It is not bad will, but character; and it does not detract from his other good qualities. However, he lacks ability. With this exception he is a good ecclesiastic. (Odin) gave permission to a man who came to see him at the time of the Confirmation to build a chapel at Jakétaique(?). It is a fine choice to be a parish later. He has not yet begun because of financial difficulties. It is the same with the chapel of Port Barré. As soon as business recovers, they will be constructed. He is writing to Bishop Verot and asks (Odin) to give it to him.

P.S. Several days ago a very sick priest, Father (Richard B.) Hard(e)y arrived at Washington. Raymond knew him 20 years ago at Boston; later at Vicksburg. He was afterwards in Ohio. He does not find his name in the Catholic Almanac. He is with one of his relations. Raymond has seen him and he said he forgot his papers. He wonders what he should do about him in regard to Mass if he recovers.

January 8. He has seen Hard(e)y and it is not thought that he will recover. The enclosed $20 is the product of the Christmas collection.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
12


1862 Jan 8

Bussmann, A.
Lancaster, Erie County N(ew) J(ersey)

To (Orestes A. Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Bussmann has neglected to read the end of the last volume of the Review. He sends three dollars for his subscription. There is a difference between the opinions of the Church Fathers and the faith of the members of the Church; and nothing is truly Catholic unless declared so by the Church to all.

I-4-b A.L.S. 1p. 10mo.
1


1862 Jan 8

(Flanagan, O.P.), Mother M(ary) John
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Mother M. John wishes to see (Odin) at his earliest convenience as she wishes to have an explanation about the (Dominican) Sister with whom he had a private conversation on last Monday.

VI-2-f A.L.S. 1p. 16mo.
2


1862 Jan 8

McCloskey, Father William
Rome, (Italy)

To Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

McCloskey acknowledges Purcell's letter of the 2nd of December with a 10 pound draft enclosed. He saw the Cardinal who is going to see the Pope today and McCloskey hopes tomorrow to be able to send Purcell the faculties he asked for. He met Father Bonaventura and his troops have all dispersed too few to hold together. Miss Seton is in the United States. Madame Bontonslinn asks Purcell's prayers for a sick friend. Rosecrans has been appointed to the Coadjutership. The rumor has it that next Spring there will be a grand gathering of all the bishops of the world in Rome for the beatification of the Franciscan martyrs. Archbishop (John) Hughes, wrote that he would spend the Christmas holidays in Rome but he is still in Paris. Pabisch took the painting and some relics and no doubt the painting is on its way. O'Regan, Dutton, and Richter are doing well. McCloskey mentions the injury suffered by Father Xaupi. The Pope is well and sang Masses during Christmas. Two Canadian bishops, Jacket and Gigues left this morning. Dr. Ullathorne of Birmingham preaches tomorrow at San Andradilla Valley and Dr. Manning, on Monday. McCloskey mentioned the francs to the Cardinal but he understood the mistake. The Propagandist Students were not obliged to stay in Rome during the vacations. They joined others in the Albon Hills. McCloskey hopes Pabisch has succeeded in gathering his Litany documents. The Congregation of Propaganda is divided into East and West with cardinal Barnobo retaining the Western division. McCloskey sends regards to friends and congratulations to Bishop Rosecrans on his consecration to Bishop.

II-5-b A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
(Part of manuscript is torn out)
3


1862 Jan 8

Stone, James M.
Boston, (Massachusetts)

To Ed(ward) P. Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

The Anti-Slavery Society meets on the night fixed for (Orestes A.) Brownson's lecture. The members of the Anti-Slavery Society are desirous of hearing the lecture, so Stone hopes the suggested change can be made. An answer by wire collect is requested.

I-4-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
2


1862 Jan 9

Hackspiel, (Father) John
Sandusky City, Ohio

to Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell)
(Cincinnati, Ohio)

Hackspiel has been trying to enter a monastery for a year and each request is turned down by Bishop (Amadeus) Rappe of Cleveland because of the need of priests. He desires to know if he will be suspended if he leaves without license, since he promised to enter the monastery and cannot obtain dismission.

II-5-b A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
2


1862 Jan 9

Quinlan, John, Bishop of
Mobile, (Alabama)

to Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.)
N(ew) Orleans, (Louisiana)

Quinlan received Odin's favor of the 1st. He would gladly be in New Orleans as Odin desires, were it not that he has to be at Forts Morgan and Gaines next Sunday to say Mass for the soldiers. He rejoices that Bishop (Augustus) Martin and Bishop (Andrew) Byrne are convalescing. Odin's "regulations" are characterized by fairness and a just desire for a very salutary and necessary reform.

VI-2-f A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
6


1862 Jan 10

Brownson, O(restes) A.
Elizabeth, (New Jersey)

To Catholic Publishing Co(mpany)
London, (England)

Brownson's draft has been returned unprotected. He is not certain what his clerk wrote, but the charge was sent to Charles Dolman, whom Brownson supposed still to be manager of their house. It must have been received since it ordered the "Evening Mail" stopped, and it has been stopped. Brownson credits them with $50 advanced to Henry Brownson in France, and the Evening Mail for one year, 3L, 12S. This leaves a balance in his favor of $441.72 and 5L.8s since they owe him for 1275 copies of the Review, an expense on a protested draft and an overcharge on the Evening Mail for two and one half years. Thus according to the rate of exchange when the draft was drawn, they owe Brownson 99L.16s.

I-4-b A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
4


1862 Jan 10

(Flanagan, O.P.), Mother M(ary) John
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Mother M. John hopes she has not left (Odin) under a wrong impression with regard to the matters about which he spoke last evening. As far as mention was made of frequent visits, Father (Jeremiah) Moynihan is in no way to blame as it was by her invitations that he came. He was most exact not to interfere with their duties or rule. As (the Dominican Sisters) were strangers, he came to look after different matters. He left no part of the cottage or ground which they considered to require improvement undone. When planning and building the new convent, a visit from him once a week or month would not have been sufficient. She thinks it her duty to mention these particulars as well to remove any imputation against Moynihan as also to allow that the statements made by Sister Mary Ursula, (O'Reilly, O.P.) about frequent visits are not untrue. Since she was fully aware of the remarks of dissatisfaction amongst the Sisters, Moynihan arranged to come in but once every week and never in the evening. In regard to speaking to him about affairs of the Community or sisters, she considered she had (Odin's) approbation, for when he was asked if Moynihan might act towards him as the Community in Cabra does with Father (P.) Dowley, he gave full consent. To speak candidly, if she were to judge from Sister M. Ursula's discontented manner and haughty demeanor, she could scarcely suppose that in making these complaints she was actuated by any other motive than a mere desire to leave. From what she can conclude from her remarks, she considers she was deceived in joining the Community at Cabra. She is convinced that the Sisters would be better pleased if others were placed in their offices, for it is evident that the Sisters have no confidence whatever in her. (She and Mother Sub-Prioress) resign their offices and beg him to appoint other superiors as there are not seven professed to make an election.

VI-2-f A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
5


1862 Jan 10

Francais, Father (N.)
Charenton, L(ouisian)a

to Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

to Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

When Francais saw Odin at Charenton he told him about his infirmities. Far from diminishing, they have increased greatly, and consequently he sees that he is useless and far from able to exercise the holy ministry. He begs him to send a priest to take care of the congregation.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Jan 10

Juncker, Henry D., Bishop of
Alton, Illinois

to Archbishop (John) B(aptist) Purcell
Cincinnati, (Ohio)

Juncker, so busy he could not find time to write, now offers his wishes to Purcell for a happy New Year. He will accept Purcell's invitation to visit him if it is possible for him to leave Cairo, (Illinois) at that time. Fathers C.F. Smarius and Arnold Damen with others are giving missions within the Diocese, and Juncker will have to give Confirmation after each mission. These will be the first missions given for the English people there and Juncker asks Purcell for prayers for their success.

II-5-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
4


1862 Jan 10

Kelley, W(illia)m D.
Washington, (D.C.)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Adverse circumstances have prevented Kelley from acknowledging Brownson's letter to him. It is now in (Martin F.) Conway's hands. Conway cannot but believe that in the case of separation, slavery, and not freedom, would prevail. Kelley does not know where to look for leadership since Lyon's death and Sigel's resignation. He sends Brownson the copy of a short speech made in s current debate, and fifteen dollars for eight subscribers, whom he lists. He hopes to extend the list.

I-4-b A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
2


1862 Jan 10

(Rappe), A(madeus), Bishop of Cleveland
Canton, (Ohio)

To Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell)
of (Cincinnati, Ohio)

He had hoped that Purcell would accept his proposition to submit their difficulty to an impartial tribunal. He respects Purcell's conviction that Father M(ory) A(nthony) Meyer is his subject. But they cannot be the judge of their own cause. He asks Purcell to permit the matter to be submitted to their confreres, one selected by Purcell, the other by Rappe.

II-5-b A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
2


1862 Jan 10

(Seton, Elizabeth)
Cragdon, (New York)

To (Robert Seton
Rome, Italy)

(Elizabeth) received (Robert's) letter of December 20 this morning. They also received a letter from Harry Seton containing photographs. Will(iam Seton 4) writes almost daily; they expect "the Hunter" some time this week on a flying visit. Since they have the ponies they attend Mass at Fordham. Father (Isidore) Daubresse, (S.J.) asked Nell (Helen Seton) and (Elizabeth) to sing in the choir. They frequently go to town to take singing and piano lessons. (Robert) seems interested about the dogs so (Elizabeth) gives full particulars. Will was called to Washington to meet General Rosencrantz and was most kindly received. General (Farquhar) Barry, their Father's cousin, was in town and proposed visiting Bill at Havre de Grace. They hope Will will be appointed in the regular army. (Robert) is lucky in being privileged to enter the Academia Ecclesiastica. Father (Bernard) Smith has certainly been very kind to (Robert) and Bell (Isabel Seton). (Elizabeth) sent (Robert) the November dividend, $100. Mr. Glover is now negotiating to sell (Robert's) mortgage. It being so near the time of falling due he seemed unwilling to sell. (Robert) will get about $800; if he could lend $300 to Bell, their Father would be much obliged. They cannot spare her any just now. (Robert's)Robert's February dividend will soon . . . .

II-1-a A.L. (Incomplete) 4pp. 12mo.
9


1862 Jan 11

Alemany, Joseph S., Archbishop of
San Francisco, (California)

To Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell
(Cincinnati, Ohio)

Alemany knew of Father (Terence) Smith's coming to San Francisco from Father Thomas Bennett. Bennett said the physicians did not approve of Smith's remaining in Ireland and suggested California. Alemany offered Smith much hospitality because of his letters from Purcell, and he thinks it proper to inform Purcell of the matter. He received the papers of the Propaganda which Purcell sent containing the articles about Judge (Peter) Burnett. He suggests that Purcell have his brother see to the publication of the lives of the Irish Saints, which he thinks would be widely read. Alemany wishes Purcell a happy New Year.

II-5-b A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
4


1862 Jan 11

Shackford, C.C.
Lynn, (Massachusetts)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Can Brownson lecture before the Lyceum in February? If he can, at what time?

I-4-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


1862 Jan 11

Spalding, M(artin) J., Bishop of Louisville
Louisville, (Kentucky)

To (Archbishop John Baptist Purcell)
(Cincinnati, Ohio)

Spalding is in need of Chaplains for the troops and the hospitals. They soon expect to have a dozen hospitals. The Sisters are already taking care of four hospitals. One priest baptized five dying soldiers in a week, that being all he could instruct and prepare. Spalding asks if Father (William O.) Higgins has arrived in Kentucky where he is needed as there is but one priest in the main column on green river. In each of the two divisions of Thomas and Nelson there is but one priest, and more are needed. Bishop (James) Whelan of Nashville passed through en route to Cincinnati and the East and mentioned the need of another priest among the Confederates at Bowling Green (Kentucky) but Spalding has one priest stationed there who is so busy he cannot even attend his ordinary duties. Because of the extension of the diocese over the military lives Spalding cannot get any cooperation. He asked Whelan to bring back a Dominican Father. Disease is now taking more lives than the battle. Spalding likes the change in the appearance of the Telegraph but disapproves it devoting so much space to politics. He was shocked at the little article in #8 of the Telegraph concerning the advising of Catholics by Charleston to leave the city as they expected the Harbor to be ruined by the blockade. He considered it bad taste, and written by an irresponsible writer. Bishop (Patrick N.) Lynch of Charleston, South Carolina lost his home and most of his library. The rescript he published settles the questions of the Litanies.

II-5-b A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
4


1862 Jan 12

Berthaud, Father F(rancis)
Terre aux Boeufs, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Berthaud has withdrawn to (Father D. André Cauvin's) as he had forewarned (Odin) and he is waiting for the letter which he hopes (Odin) will send him. He intends to leave at the first favorable occasion. He regrets having left the post which (Odin) had assigned him but, placed in the material impossibility of remaining there any longer and not wishing at first to complain except to those who could produce a remedy, he could not hesitate in his determination. He feels the need to go to breathe a sweeter air, both morally and physically.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 1p. 4to.
2


1862 Jan 12

Hart, Father Matth(ew), College de Juilly
Dammartin, Seine et Marne, (France)

To Bishop (Francis P. McFarland of Hartford
Providence, Rhode Island)

The story of the coming Council after Pentecost is more than rumor. All the Bishops have received an invitation to the canonization of the Japanese martyrs at Pentecost. It is not openly said that there will be a Council but it is believed that the occasion will be used for one. It is rumored that the French ambassador has objected and said that if it is held the French troops will be withdrawn. The Nuncio has not left Rome for Paris. Hart has received a letter from Dr. (Bernard Smith) that McFarland has been invited to the canonization. Hart hopes that McFarland will accept the invitation and offer his travel experience to him. If the Bishop does not come Hart will return home without going to Rome. They are pleased with the news that Mason and Slidel have been released and war with England deferred. The raising of the Southern blockade will be the next step if the Grand Army of the Republic continues to do nothing but boast. In Europe they are looked upon as a pack of cowardly braggarts. Preparations are afoot in England to feast Mason and Slidell. His Grace (Archbishop John Hughes) continues to keep the Tuileries at bay. He has had no reception yet. Thurlow (Weed) is around but even with the aid of the Archbishop cannot make as good a thing as at Albany or Washington. The South has the whip hand all over Europe chiefly because of bombast. General (John Smith) Phelps proclamation will destroy any sympathy that remains among the Catholic populations for the North.

I-1-b A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
5


1862 Jan 12

McMahon, Father A(braham)
Notre Dame, Indiana

to Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell)
of (Cincinnati, Ohio)

He regrets that he has been the primary cause of the complaints mentioned in Purcell's letter. But he will endeavor to make atonement. He left Cincinnati at Purcell's direction to come to Notre Dame for a few weeks with the hope of returning to Cincinnati again. He cannot have peace unless he is under Purcell's direction. He will undertake to pay off all the debts on the church and will keep a scant five or six dollars a week for his support. He collected $4000 while the church was building in a space of seven months. It is reasonable to suppose that he can pay off all the debt in a short time. The only earthly consolation he seeks is that Purcell will take him back.

II-5-b A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
2


1862 Jan 12

Martin, Aug(ustus) M(ar)ie, Bishop of
Natchitoches, (Louisiana)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.)
New Orleans, Louisiana

He only received (Odin's) invitation for the 12th on the 10th. He would certainly be at New Orleans if navigation was open or if the state of his health permitted. In leaving him in this little inaccessible corner of His vine, the Lord has imposed upon him numerous privations. His health is not as bad, the river is rising a little, and they hope to regain navigation for the beginning of February. He will take advantage of the first opportunity to spend a few days with (Odin), bot being able to have any prolonged absence because of his lack of priests. He thanks (Odin) for sending the copy of his circular. It is a great step in the way prepared by (Archbishop Anthony Blanc). Like any such reform it will meet obstacles at first, but the rule will be established and in the future will benefit the general good and the welfare of the individuals themselves. Although having posed the principle of Jus Cathedraticum in their synod, he has no hope of ever being able to apply it himself. The numerous needs of his poor priests make his position most difficult.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
3


1862 Jan 13

Dubernard, Father (Jean Honoré)
Breaux Bridge, (Louisiana)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He encloses $20 from yesterday's collection in church conforming to the notice inserted in the official journal. The weather being horribly bad, there were not many at the Mass, but the result of the collection surpassed his expectations. Conforming to (Odin's) circular of Dec. 6, he has named Charles Delhommes, Joseph Cailler and Henry Rees to the administrative council. He submits their names for (Odin's) approval.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 1p. 4to.
5


1862 Jan 13

Henni, John M., Bishop of Milwaukee
Milwaukee, (Wisconsin)

To Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell)
(Cincinnati, Ohio)

Henni sent his apologies to Father (Joseph) Ferneding. Because his attention will be needed concerning some money matters about the first of February, he will not be able to accept Purcell's invitation to his Celebration, but will pray for him.

P.S. Henni thanks Purcell for the photograph of the Pope, brought from Rome.

II-5-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
2


(18)62 Jan 13

Larnaudie, S.J., Father F(rederick)
Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

One of his parishioners who has just completed his studies in a Catholic college in the North appears decided to become a priest, but his parents cannot pay for his education. He does not want to engage himself for any Southern diocese as he wishes to rejoin his uncle who is a distinguished priest of the New York diocese as soon as possible. Larnaudie wonders if (Odin) would allow him to make his theological studies gratuitously without formally engaging him to remain in (New Orleans).

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
7


1862 Jan 13

Mudd, Sam(ue)l A., M.D.
Bryantown, M(arylan)d

to O(restes) A. Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

He has not subscribed to the Review since 1859. He has ordered it stopped twice; it has not been stopped and he has received bills for money which he does not owe. The first time the Review was continued he considered it a mistake, the second time an inducement to further subscription. Brownson's encouragement to the revolutionary men of no religion of Europe, his condemnation of a national party, his influence given to Sectionalism and his fear of making himself unpopular in the North have had much to do with the present condition of the country. The North refused the South States Rights granted her by the Constitution. The South is opposed to abolitionism in national politics; it is allowable as a state organization. The South desires union and war will not cause it. Those of the South have a high sense of honor, forbearance and endurance, while the people of the North are hypocritical, deceptive and cowardly and will use any means to attain their end. Thus the North cannot inspire in the South the confidence necessary to a union. He regrets the lack of patriotism in the administration of the North. He asserts that were there any other man at the head of the government, the revolution would cease so far as the South is concerned. Brownson and Bishop(John) Hughes are on the same footing, both having destroyed all that was accomplished. Slavery can be abrogated only by State, and not National, will. The North, through high protective tariffs placed in the South, has grown rich on slave labor. Christ found slavery at His coming and made no command against its practice. These remarks are directed more to the non-Catholic North. He fears Brownson and Bishop Hughes will bring about an unkind feeling between members of the Church.

I-4-b A.L.S. 8pp. 10mo.


1862 Jan 13

Waldron, E.Q.S., Borromeo College
Pikesville, M(arylan)d

to O(restes) A. Brownson
New York City (Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Waldron formerly took the Review through McGrath of Philadelphia. He encloses $6.00 for two one year subscriptions, one for himself, the other for Henry S. Rennolds of Baltimore. He has received the January number and asks that the other copy be sent to Baltimore. Doctor Rennolds is also a convert, a native of Virginia and believes the rebellion must be put down at any cost. Waldron respects a man who is faithful and honest and hopes the opinions of Archbishop John Hughes will not suppress Brownson's right to think and speak. The mistake Brownson made in his first article on the reprobate is unfortunate, but it is best to let the matter rest. He encloses a circular which he recently established near Baltimore.

I-4-a A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
2


1862 Jan 14

Barney, R.D.
Cincinnati, (Ohio)

To Orestes A. Brownson
Elizabeth, N(ew) J(ersey)

The Young Men's Mer. Lib. Association does not feel able to accept Brownson's terms but submits the following; an equal division of the net proceeds with Brownson, with a minimum guarantee of fifty dollars as accepted by Bayard Taylor. They hope Brownson can plan his western tour so that he may accept their invitation; they will arrange a date convenient for him to lecture in Cincinnati.

I-4-b A.L.S. 2pp. 10mo.
1


1862 Jan 14

Luers, J(ohn) H., Bishop of
Fort Wayne, (Indiana)

To Archbishop J(ohn) B(aptist) Purcell
of Cin(cinnati, Ohio)

He is much obliged to Purcell for the invitation to be present at the celebration of the St. Aloysius Orphan Society. Luers received a letter from the Holy Father thanking him for the small collection which he gave him.

II-5-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


1862 Jan 14

Sorin, C.S.C., Father E(dward)
Notre Dame, Ind(iana)

to Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell)
of (Cincinnati, Ohio)

The best way for Purcell to put his eight bells into a chime is to send an exact description of each to some house in Europe for the casting of a cylinder and other fixing. He suggests writing to Ernest Bolles of Le Mans, (France), the founder of the bells at Notre Dame. The Brothers merely put up the parts they received from Mans. Now they have succeeded in installing a keyboard. Three of the Fathers (of the Congregation of Holy Cross) are chaplains in the Washington army and another in Jeffersonville, Indiana or in Kentucky. They were all commissioned by the Department at the request of Colonels who knew them before. Mother Angela (Gillespie), (C.S.C.) is in Mound City, (Illinois) where she has the care of a very large hospital. She also attends the hospital at Cairo, (Illinois) and another at Paducah, Kentucky. She wrote that the sisters had baptized 37 dying soldiers. Cardinal (Alexander) Barnabo sent the blessings of the Holy Father for the work of the Missionary's Home.

II-5-b A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
7


1862 Jan 15

Conway, M.F.
Washington, (D.C.)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Conway thanks Brownson for allowing him to read Brownson's letters to (William D.) Kelley concerning the subject on which he spoke before the House. Conway thinks the South cannot be defeated by military force; his hope lies chiefly in the moral forces. There is danger that the South will become greater as a nation than the North. He foresees a recognition of the confederacy and a temporary peace. The problem will then be to keep the South from controlling the results of northern elections. He wishes he could talk to Brownson in person and discuss these and other questions. His inexperience in Congress and the arbitrary rules governing the House render him powerless to inaugurate any important measures. He has received the Review for January, and though not a Catholic he always read Brownson's writings before moving from Baltimore to Kansas. He had heard Brownson lecture in Baltimore but could not hear him in Washington because of an indisposition.

I-4-b A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
2


1862 Jan 15

Putnam, Edw(ard)
Northwhitefield, M(ain)e

to (Orestes A.) Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Putnam sends Brownson his work, part of which Brownson has seen prior to this date. It has been published. Putnam is pleased the way Brownson handled "his Grace," in the last Review. He believes the Irish Catholics have been "left in the lurch and are disgraced in the present political crisis." He is inclined to believe Brownson goes too far, in his criticism of the punishment of the reprobate. Physical punishment is a part of the integral whole. Putnam believes in reparation of Church and State. The Church must be militant. The Christian's first duty is to the Church, next to the State. He is pleased that the paper, "Fact of Liberty" was not published. He considered the work carelessly done.

I-4-b A.L.S. 4pp. 16mo.
1


1862 Jan 16

Bush, Geo(rge) W.
Wilmington, (Delaware)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

The Institute is sorry Brownson has been ill and unable to come to lecture to them and suggests January 22nd. If he can, they want him to reply immediately so they can proceed to complete the details of his lecture in Wilmington. If he could not come then, they could not engage him until February 13th.

I-4-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Jan 16

Palfrey, John G.
Boston, (Massachusetts)

To (Orestes A.) Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Palfrey has received a copy of the January Number and greatly enjoyed it. He does not know whether he is expected to send remittance or not but he wants to tell Brownson of his pleasure in reading the Number.

I-4-b A.L.S. 1p. 16to.
1


1862 Jan 16

Wood, James F., Bishop of
Phila(delphia, Pennsylvania)

To Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell
(Cincinnati, Ohio)

Wood is sorry he made Purcell repeat his invitation for February 2nd and he will gladly come to the Silver Jubilee of St. Aloysius Verein.

II-5-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


1862 Jan 17

Berthaud, Father F(rancis)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Berthaud is not satisfied with the papers that (Odin) sent him any more than he was with those that Father (Stephen) Rousselon had sent him. Upon his arrival in (New Orleans) he gave Rousselon an exeat in due form and some good letters of recommendation. He had obtained it from his bishop in order to enter the diocese of Paris where he had been offered a post by Father ( ) Boutain to whom he had rendered a year of service. However, he wished to see if America offered the field which he desired. He was to return to Paris after a year. Five years ago he presented himself to Rousselon. When he wished to leave Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc was opposed and even wrote him that he had the right to forbid him. When he left last year he had not requested an exeat because he planned to return. He was anxious about his parents and wished to pacify them. However, when he decided not to remain he did request an exeat. It is true that at the time of his last trip he asked to reenter, as a matter of right, his own diocese, and it was granted. He was told that before returning to New Orleans new letters of testimonial would be unnecessary. He believes this should explain his conduct which perhaps has been strangely disfigured in (Odin's) eyes. When he left the first time he was disgusted, but he had too much dignity to reveal the causes of his disgust. When he left last year he was even more profoundly disgusted, although satisfied with the marks of esteem and affection that he had obtained from the people. He had been insulted and assailed by a confrere without having either provoked or merited it. He gave pardon. He even worked to save confrere in whose favor at least his youth pleaded. He did not think he would be imposed upon again. They intrigued against him and wished to tire him out. He kept silent. Moreover, the pastor of St. Augustine's whom he replaced (Father J.B. Jobert?) took in advance and carried away the money which the diocese gave each month for the upkeep of the house. Berthaud spent 8 months; it was $800. Jobert left him some things of value and Berthaud took $200 in advance on the pews for the following year, but he still claimed $250. His accounts were in order and he submitted them to Rousselon but it was useless. In all this he blames only the weakness of authority. He sacrificed himself and left to return, awaiting a stronger or less embarrassed authority. He does not know if in his absence (Odin) was deceived about him. It is possible. He therefore withdraws freely complaining only of Rousselon's lack of memory: last year he had rendered him some services for which Rousselon said he would be grateful.

P.S. (Odin) should send his exeat to St. Bernard.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
6


1862 Jan 18

(Flanagan, O.P.), Mother Mary John
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Mother Mary John asks him as a special favor to accept her resignation as she is quite inadequate for the duties of prioress. She is assured that the change would in every way contribute to the preservation of union and charity amongst all the (Dominican) Sisters. She feels she is an obstacle to their perfection and happiness and she is persuaded that the Sister from whom he received the unfavorable report of this community would have acted differently if she had another prioress.

VI-2-f A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
2


(18)62 Jan 18

(Harrison, R.U.), Mother St. Pierre
San Antonio, (Texas)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Not having received a reply from either (Odin) or Father (Napoleon Joseph) Perché and not wishing to consult either Father (Louis C.M.) Chambodut or Father (Joseph) Anstaett because it is for having done so that she is far from their dear (Ursuline) convent, Mother St. Pierre leaves on the 21st in order to return to Galveston. She will leave the novices with Mother (de) Ste. Marie (R.U.) until they have some children (at Galveston). She asks (Odin) if it is fitting for Anstaett to receive letters from Mother Ste. Séraphine, (R.U.) for Sister St. Stanislas, (R.U.) and Sister Ste. Félicité, (R.U.) and to give them to them without the knowledge of the legitimately elected superior. This appears to have been the case since July. She has not the slightest confidence in Anstaett and she desires another confessor for the community. She awaits (Odin's) reply and she asks him to present her respects to Perché who appears to have abandoned her since these secret correspondences.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 16mo.
9


1862 Jan 18

Heyden, Father Thomas
Bedford, (Pennsylvania)

To (Orestes A.) Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Father Heyden recognizes the outstanding position Brownson occupies in the Catholic Church in America. He directs attention to his letter about his deceased friend, Prince (Demetrius) Gallitzen, a distinguished convert and missionary. Surely Brownson will give this communication a prominent notice in his Review.

I-4-b A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
2


1862 Jan 18

Raymond, Father G(ilbert)
Opelousas, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Raymond wrote several days ago that Father (Richard B.) Hard(e)y, who was very sick, had arrived at Washington. He saw him again but as he seemed better and did not speak of receiving the sacraments, Raymond believed it better to wait. This morning he was told that Hard(e)y died last night; it appears to have been unexpected as no member of the Offutt family with whom he was living was with him when he died. Perhaps Father (Anselm Usannaz, S.J.) Ussana who saw him a few days before his death heard his confession. Raymond is reassured since Hard(e)y told him that he had said Mass in Father ( ) Moynihan's church before coming. The collection for the burning of Charleston amounted to little as there was not enough advertisement. He will make it again and send it to (Odin). He sees from the newspapers that Father (Stephen) Rousselon narrowly missed being the victim of a criminal assault by a priest. Raymond told (Odin) that he was attacked himself although he was not hit. The guilty party came with the judge of the parish to ask pardon, begging him not to pursue the affair. Raymond did so with a good heart. However he hopes that justice will inflict upon the wretched individual who dared to strike Rousselon a punishment which can serve as an example to others and make him return to his senses. He will have to see (Odin) in order to make some arrangements for the parish about which he spoke in his last letter. His brother (Father J. Francois Raymond) is getting better and he thinks he can soon pay a visit to (New Orleans). He would have liked to have done so when Bishop (Augustine) Verot was there. Father (Hyacinth) Gonel(l)az and Father (Clement) Rigol(l)et are fine and seem content.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
10


1862 Jan 19

McCloskey, (Rev) Geo(rge)
(New York, New York)

To (Orestes A.) Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Brownson is invited to call Monday afternoon to discuss with Father McCloskey a letter he received from Rome concerning Brownson. It is necessary to send an answer on Wednesday, so he urges Brownson to come Monday afternoon, but if that is impossible, to be sure to come Tuesday.

I-4-b A.L.S. 1p. 16to.
1


(1862) Jan 19

Purcell, Archbishop J(ohn) B(aptist)
Cin(cinnati, Ohio)

The Cardinal (Alexander Barnabo) Prefect informed him early in October that Father (Hugh) Quigley had sent a complaint to the Holy See about affairs at Grand Rapids, (Michigan). The Cardinal referred Quigley to Purcell. Purcell suggests that Quigley's portrait be sent to Rome so they may know where to place him. He is told that Quigley has gone to Canada. Bishop (John) Quinlan is to be consecrated in New Orleans on November 27. Purcell thought this deference due to Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc.

P.S. Purcell did not think that regulars should have charge of the American College in Rome. The Sulpicians would be suspected of Gallicanism. Yet the French missionaries and French Bishops are the very best friends the Pope has.

III-2-j A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
6


1862 Jan 19

Purcell, Archbishop J(ohn) B(aptist)
Cincinnati, (Ohio)

To Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefevere
Detroit, (Michigan)

The accompanying letter (no enclosure) is another instance of the manner in which some of Lefevere's people drag him into their quarrels. Would it not be well to select one or two Irish priests and send them to Jackson (Michigan), to examine the charges against Father (Cornelius) Moutard and when found groundless to convince the people they are wrong? Purcell does not answer them at all. Several of the bishops will meet in Cincinnati February 2 and Lefevere is asked to come. It is the silver jubilee of the German Orphan Society, the golden jubilee of Sister Margaret of the Sisters of Charity and will be an occasion to visit the students in the seminary. Bishops (James F.) Wood, (Josue M.) Young, (Martin John) Spalding, (John Henry) Luers and (George A.) Carrell have promised to come. He has no news from their last council from Rome.

P.S. Father (Hugh) Quigley has had to quit Cairo, (Illinois).

III-2-j A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
11


(18)62 Jan 20

Chambodut, Father (Louis), C.M.
Galveston, (Texas)

to Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Ch(arle)s Power is no longer at Galveston, but Chambodut will find his residence and give him the $33 that the Ursulines of N(ew) O(rleans) sent him. Mr. Anstaett left this morning with Sister St. Anne, (R.U.) for San Antonio. It is one of those things done without consulting him. He did not make any opposition because Mother (de) St. Marie, (R.U.) and Mother St. Pierre (Harrison, R.U.) had written to Father (Joseph) Anstaett to send them immediately, at the same time sending $20 for her trip. The convent (at Galveston) is almost closed, having only five or six small French girls who are the poorest in Galveston. At the college there are only 3 or 4 pupils and their poverty does not permit them to pay more than half. At. Houston, Mary (B.) Browne has a flourishing school and the Franciscans soon hope to have the necessary personnel for a convent. Brother Joachim, (F.S.C.) occupies Father (Edward A.) Clark(e)'s old house and conducts his class in a manner so satisfying that for want of space he is obliged to refuse many children. Last week Chambodut made his retreat at Houston. The second week of January he visited Liberty. His health is a little better, the pupils more numerous, and everything seems to take a better turn. Father (Peter) Berthet is always full of zeal and courage. Chambodut gave him $15 in Odin's name; he also sent $15 to Father (John Claude) Neraz) and Father (Sebastian) Augagneur as Odin said. Old Mr. Scott died last week fortified with all the sacraments. Mr. (P.) Dargan married Sara (Byrne) Burns. Mrs. (Chapuy, née Countess Detour) Chapuis is finally preparing to return to France. (H.) De St. Cyr is homesick. Nice is the end of his thoughts and desires. Doctor (J.C.) Jordan is also very sad and unable to obtain a cent from his debtors. Old Mr. Smith is beginning to weaken. (James P.) Nash is in a bad humor; his family is at Brazoria. Father (John) Gonnard is on retreat. Louisa wishes to see Odin. Clem is with Inatio Peralta. Francis has nothing to do. They now have the big guns and their military authorities are determined to abandon Galveston only in the last extremity. Odin says he misses Galveston; Galveston also misses him. (Matthew Waldron) Maume does not want his money. The rules which Odin has made for the temporal affairs of the church will not fail to produce discontent, but it will help him to establish a great number of good works. He sends his respects to Fathers Rousselon and Dubuis.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
29


1862 Jan 20

Conway, M.F.
Washington, (D.C.)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Elizabeth, N(ew) J(ersey)

Conway encloses a completed list of the friends who have subscribed for The Review together with remittance for their subscriptions for 1862. He lists seven subscribers.

I-4-b A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
1


1862 Jan 20

Jamey, Father V(ictor
St. Michael, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

The horrible attack of which Father (Stephen) Rousselon has been the victim so deeply afflicted Jamey that he is still sick. He suffers almost as much for (Odin) as for Rousselon. He asks (Odin) to let him know how Rousselon is. If in going to Baton Rouge it were possible for (Odin) to stop at St. Michael for a day or two, it would be a great joy for all the children and the Religious (of the Sacred Heart). He could then communicate something to (Odin) and (Odin) could reply to the decree of which Jamey sends a copy.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 16mo.
2


1862 Jan 20

Sullivan, J.T.
Wheeling, V(irgini)a

to O(restes) A. Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

The January number of the Review has been returned to New York because he did not order it. The Robesperian spirit of the article "Slavery and War" was sufficient to induce him to discontinue the Review for the present, permanently if the same unChristian, inhuman spirit should continue.

I-4-b A.L.S. 1pg. 12mo.
1


1862 Jan 21

Andrieu, C.M., Father A(nthony)
Donaldsonville, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Towards the end of last December an Irishman from New Orleans came to Andrieu to arrange his marriage with an Irish girl of his parish. He replied that he should have the banns published in New Orleans and he would publish them at Donaldsonville. He wrote down February 20 as the day for the marriage and when the Irishman left he told Father (M.) Rubi, (C.M.) about it. However it appears the Irishman intended to speak of January. Yesterday he came to be married and he said that Andrieu was mistaken about the date, that his friends had arrived, and that all was ready. He had not had the banns published in New Orleans. Andrieu consulted Rubi and they concluded that he should give the dispensation from the 3 banns. He asks Odin's pardon. Narcisse Landry received, as did he, Odin's circular. Odin can count on them.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 8vo.
3


(18)62 Jan 22

Brun, Father C(harles)
St. James, (Louisiana)

The bearer, Jules Dornier, will give Odin $40 from the Christmas collection for the seminary and $41.05 for the victims of the burning of Charleston. Brun learnt with pain of the bad treatment of which Father (Stephen) Rousselon was the victim; Odin's heart must feel the offense and the scandal. The parish which Odin has conferred upon him gives him the consolation that he expects of it.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
4


(1862 Jan 22)

Poyet, Father J(ean) A(rthur)
Abbeville, Louisiana

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Poyet takes advantage of the departure of one of his parishioners, Edouard Broussard to send (Odin the collection for the seminary, $7, and that for the fire at Charleston, $13. He wishes they produced a greater amount but his parishioners are distinguished so little by their charity and generosity that he makes only the commanded collections.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 1p. 4to.
3


1862 Jan 22

(Rappe), A(madues), Bishop of
Cleveland, (Ohio)

To Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell)
of Cincinnati, (Ohio)

He accepts Purcell's offer to submit the affair of Father M(ory) A(nthony) Meyer to the Holy See for solution. He is perfectly convinced that Purcell believes he is defending a legitimate cause. But he wants Purcell to believe that he too is acting in good faith in claiming Meyer as a subject of the diocese of Cleveland. He acts from a motive of order; it is a question of principle, not of sentiment. He hopes to diminish the pain he has caused Purcell in refusing to assume the debt of Canton, Ohio which Purcell constructed before Rappe's promotion to Cleveland. Called to a new diocese with resources Rappe was surprised when Purcell said he owed him $1000 to the German Catholics of Canton. Rappe visited several influential members of the parish who said they would never liquidate that debt contracted without their consent. Rappe knew he would offend Purcell in repudiating the debt. But in conscience he knew he could not impose the debt on the new diocese. He consulted authorities who told him that the mother church according to canon law owed nothing to a portion of the Catholics who desire to found a new congregation. Purcell asked Rappe to pay what he could on the debt. He writes to justify his position. He suffers to see Purcell suffer, the more so since Purcell has defended him against those who try to ruin his reputation. Purcell is offended by Rappe's preference for judges chosen outside of the province of Cincinnati but Rappe knows it is impossible for one prelate to decide against his superior.

II-5-b A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 8vo.
3


1862 Jan 22

(St. Palais), Maurice (de), Bishop of
Vincennes, (Indiana)

To (Archbishop John Baptist Purcell)
of (Cincinnati, Ohio)

He received the sum which Purcell sent him. It came just in time as he needed it to pay his taxes. He is waiting the return of Father (Michael) Marendt in order to visit Cannelton. But he will visit it this spring whether Marendt returns of not if Cannelton survives the war.

II-5-b A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
2


1862 Jan 22

Venissat, Father C(ypria)n
Thibodauxville, (Louisiana)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Theophile Aucoin and Felicie Aucoin seek a dispensation from the third degree of consanguinity. Venissat encloses $12.25, comprising $8.05 of the collection for the burning of Charleston and $4.20 of the collection for the seminary. Mr. Montagnon, the hearer, is coming to New Orleans to prepare to leave for France. Venissat believes he will not be able to pay him in advance of his departure all that he owes him and that he will therefore find it difficult to pay for his wife's and his passage. Venissat continues to have work done on the church. The young pupils remember (Odin) very well.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
5


(18)62 Jan 23

Gaudet, O.M.I., Father A(ugustine)
Brownsville, (Texas)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

As political affairs are far from taking a favorable turn, Gaudet asks (Odin) if the deposit (of the Oblates of Mary Immaculate) is still safe in (P.) Rotchford's hands. He does not doubt Rotchford's honesty, but it is not prudent to expose small resource to a loss which they would feel for a long time.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
3


1862 Jan 23

Manahan, Father Amb(rose)
Danbury, (Connecticut)

To Bishop (Francis P. McFarland of Hartford
Providence, Rhode Island)

Since receiving the Bishop's letter he is relieved of all uneasiness and is hopeful of the prospects in the region. Father (Thomas) Drea left no directions except to a brother who lives in New Jersey. A letter directed to him at Thomastown, Kilkenny, would reach him as it is in the neighborhood of his native place.

I-1-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
2


1862 Jan 24

Bouisse, Fr.
Rome, (Italy)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Bouisse is happy to be able to be useful to Odin again before his embarkation. He received his message and told the priest for whom it was destined about it. That priest cannot leave until next Wednesday and he thought it best to inform Odin of this so that he would not be impatient in waiting for him. He asks Odin to remember him to Father Rousselon.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
1


1862 Jan 24

Connors, Mary
Waterford, (Ireland)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.)
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Mary Connors asks his help in finding her two brothers in New Orleans, James residing there 13 years and Patrick, 10 years. Seven years ago they sent a money order to Dunmore but at that time she was living in Waterford and the postmaster of Dunmore returned the letter and order. A sailor friend of hers met one of her brothers in New Orleans who told him that he thought there was no one belong(ing) to him alive. She got Odin's address from Father (Thomas) English of Waterford.

VI-2-f A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
4


1862 Jan 24

Follot, Father Francis C.
Plaquemine, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Follot asks permission to have a Forty Hours. He would like to have it on March 2, 3, and 4 or on March 7, 8, and 9.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 1p. 8vo.
1


1862 Jan 24

Kelley, W(illia)m D.
Washington, (D.C.)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Kelley is pressed beyond endurance, he can only enclose the note of his friend Dr. (William Henry) Furness. Kelley suggests that Brownson cause the article to be published in a pamphlet upon the cover of which the Review shall be advertised. This is the joint suggestion of Mr. Conway and Kelley. Should this course be adopted Kelley will ask Dr. Furness to apply the sum he proposed to the purchase of copies. Brownson's suggestion as to Rome is not overlooked.

Enclosure:

--------
1862 Jan 23

Furness, W(illiam) H(enry)
Phila(delphia, Pennsylvania)

To W(illiam) D. Kelley
(Washington, D.C.)

A friend of Furness wishes to have Brownson's article, "The Nation's Struggle for Life," printed in a large edition of a thousand or two and will pay the expense. He wonders how it can be done best and cheaply.

I-4-b A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
3


186(2) Jan 24

Larnaudie, S.J., Father F(rederick)
Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Today Larnaudie had a visit from the pastor of West Baton Rouge to whom he spoke of (Odin's) pastoral visit. He said he had not yet received any letter on that subject and that he had scarcely the time to prepare the children in the space of two or three weeks. Larnaudie fears there has been some misunderstanding and that (Odin) presumed he would warn the four neighboring pastors. He seeks a dispensation from the impediment of disparitatis cultus between Clark Sherby, a Methodist, and Julia Price, both colored. If he does not receive any counter-order he will continue to prepare his children for the 9th.

(P.S.) Sunday they will have a meeting about the affairs of their church. He forgot to ask Sherby if he had been baptized and cannot do so before the day of the ceremony, but he believes that he has been.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
4


(18)62 Jan 24

St. Stanislas, (R.U.), Sister Marie de
Galveston, (Texas)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C..M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Sister Marie de St. Stanislas received (Odin's) reply and read it in the presence of all the (Ursulines) at Galveston. She hastens to communicate two things to (Odin). The first is the departure of [Sister Ste. Anne, (R.U.) for San Antonio. The day after her departure, St. Stanislas received a letter from Mother (St. Pierre Harrison, R.U.) which noted her great desire to return to Galveston. She contemplated returning on January 22. Yesterday they received a package from Houston but no letter so that they do not know if she is en route. The letter made no mention of Ste. Anne. The second thing concerns their new building. It appears that the military authorities are going to take it again for a hospital for sick soldiers. Some men came to demand the keys, and when she asked Father (Louis C.M. Chambodut) if they had come by his order, he said yes. That is all that she knows about it except that Chambodut had her say that none of the religious would be employed in their service. January 1, four small French girls asked them if they would take them at the school. She told them to come and now they have a fifth. They are almost all Catholics but as their parents cannot pay, they take what they can give. Fifteen years ago on the 19th their monastery was begun. On that day they received Communion and in the evening Father (John) Gonnard preached to them in French. In regard to Galveston, the inhabitants who went away to do not hasten to return and the military authorities are hastening preparations for war.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4tp.

7


1862 Jan 24

Timon, Bishop John
Buffalo, (New York)

To Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefev(e)re
Detroit, (Michigan)

Timon asks pardon for the negligence of someone in putting into the letter addressed to Lefevere, the circular intended for the Superior of the Franciscan Convent near the Allegheny Reservation for Indians in his diocese. He thanks him for the valuable information given and for the advice to address (Bishop Frederic) Baraga. A letter was sent to him at the same time that Lefevere got the circular. Letters were also sent to most of the bishops of Canada.

III-2-j A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
3


1862 Jan 24

Wood, James P., Bishop of Philadelphia
Philadelphia, (Pennsylvania)

To Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell
(Cincinnati, Ohio)

Wood hopes to be in Cincinnati on Tuesday and will see Purcell. He sends 1/4 cask of Lisbon wine to Father Edward (Purcell) as a token of friendship.

II-5-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
2


1862 Jan 25

Cochin, Augustin
Paris, (France)

To (Orestes A. Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Cochin has been away from Paris up to the first of this month. He was late in reading the October number of the Review in which Brownson his work "l'abolish vu de l'Esclavage." He thanks Brownson for the favor shown him, and is pleased that Brownson is very anti-slavery. He was surprised to learn that two articles had been published in the Monde by the archbishop of New York, (John Hughes), both opposing Brownson's article. Other publications have made much of the fact of the stand taken by this cleric. l'Univers is anti-slavery. The articles this cleric published in the Metropolitan Record are far from being the defense of this social calamity. The principle upon which the archbishop bases the defense is false. Cochin gives further reputation of slavery. Cochin advocates abolition, but without violence. When Msgr. Hughes was in Paris, he told Cochin he had not signed any articles. The archbishop does not see slavery in a favorable light. He favors patience and prudence as a method of solution. He does not wish to see American Catholics divided over the slavery issue.

I-4-b A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
5


1862 Jan 27

Boé, Father (J.)
(Convent, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Boé's health, which has considerably deteriorated, will probably oblige him to resign his duties as chaplain of Jefferson College. He hopes (Odin) will not find fault with this decision.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
2


1862 Jan 27

Lamy, John B., Bishop of Santa Fe
Santa Fe, N(ew) M(exico)

To Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell
of (Cincinnati, Ohio)

He wrote to Purcell last May from St. Louis but received no answer. It happened to be just when troubles commenced in St. Louis, (Missouri). New Mexico has her share of suffering. Most of the young men are enlisted. Two important posts were shamefully given up to a handful of Texans. The volunteers are discontented because they have not been paid. It is doubtful whether they will join the regulars to oppose a larger force of Texans who are now on the Rio Grande 150 miles from Santa Fe. More than 1,000 children have died from the small pox. The savages are worse than ever. He has some checks to send to Kreutzburgh and Nurre but it is not safe to send drafts at the present time.

II-5-b A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
2


1862 Jan 28

Fitzgerald, (Father) Edward
Columbus, (Ohio)

To (Archbishop John Baptist Purcell)
(Cincinnati, Ohio)

Fitzgerald desires to send two orphans to the orphanage if Purcell will permit. He tells Purcell about a young boy of 17 from Ireland who wishes to study for the Church but his Father can give only $200 towards the expenses. Father (Thomas J.) Coppinger is in Columbus and Fitzgerald hopes he will regain his health. Father (B.) Hemsteger is improving steadily in regards to his health.

II-5-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
3


1862 Jan 28

Lefevere, Peter B., Bishop (of Zela)
Detroit, (Michigan)

To Archbishop John B(aptist) Purcell
Cincinnati, (Ohio)

The accusations against Father (Cornelius) Moutard of Jackson, (Michigan) are entirely false and are the work of a group of men who disapproved his closing and re-renting some pews from which they carried on selfish speculations which resulted in a lawsuit. They lost the suit and threatened to see that he was forced to leave the congregation and they are responsible for articles appearing in the papers, and the letters which Purcell has received concerning Father Moutard. Lefevere is pleased that there are many good Catholics in Michigan but those who are not good are worse than infidels, and he looks upon the men who wrote the letter to Purcell as not being good Catholics. Because they may have made some money by the advent of the Canals and Railroads they try to dictate to the priests and bishops and they do not even understand the first principles of Catholic Religion. Lefevere is sorry that he cannot accept Purcell's invitation to attend the Silver Jubilee of the German Orphan Asylum, but he will be busy with some arrangements previously made.

II-5-b A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
3


1862 Jan 28

Meagher, Martin
Auburn, (New York)

To (Orestes A.) Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

(Marked): Confidential. Meagher has been an ardent reader of Brownson's Review for years. He praises Brownson's independent spirit. He was pleased with the article in the last October number on "Various Objections Answered." He believes that Catholic clergymen would be more pleased with a certain low degree of knowledge in the members of their respective congregations than that they should be very learned. He trusts that if the truth of Brownson's review be lost to the shepherds they will be found in the flock. Meagher feels akin to Brownson in many things. His heart sickens when he considers the gross abuses practiced by many Catholic clergy with regard to the temporal affairs of the church. Many clergymen grow fat by robbing the poor of Christ. He is glad that there is one man on the continent who will search out truth. He hopes Brownson lives long and has good health, and he doubts not that Brownson's name will be enshrined in the hearts of the present and future generations.

P.S. He takes the Review in company with Cha(rle)s Conlen.

I-4-b A.L.S. pp.. 12mo.
4


1862 (Jan 29)

Augustine, (R.U.), Sister M.J.
Waterford, (Ireland)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana

Their Mother seeks some news of Mother (de) Ste. Marie, (R.U.) and her community (of Ursulines). At the period of (Odin's) elevation to New Orleans, Sister Augustine heard from San Antonio. The letter was full of sad forebodings. (Odin's) removal, Father (Claude M.) Dubuis, (C.M.)'s being obliged to leave from ill health, together with the impending war, St./ Marie feared would be the ruin of her house. Augustine's greatest apprehension is that St. Marie's health, then in such a precarious state, sank under such accumulated trials. Their Mother said that Father (Stephen?) Mackin would call at St. Mary's during the summer. Sister Augustine prepared long letters in anticipation but he never came. She asks (Odin) to tell St. Marie how anxious they are to hear from her. Meanwhile she asks to hear from (Odin). They all deplore the war and beg God to restore peace to a land which for so many years has been the home of the poor persecuted sons of Erin. She asks (Odin) to send the enclosed note to her traveling companions of 1852, J. and R. Martin, Sister St. Marcellin and Sister Ste. Agathe. Mother M. de Sales, (R.U.), (Odin's) old friend, desires his blessing and prayers for herself and the Community. If (Odin) should meet Mr. O'Donnell, he should tell him that his disinterested kindness is ever gratefully remembered at St. Mary's.

VI-2-f A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
10


1862 Jan 29

Campaux, Theo( ) J.
Buffalo, N(ew) Y(ork)

To Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefevere
(Detroit, Michigan)

Campaux addresses Lefevere as an old and fast friend, and his former spiritual guide. While in Detroit in December on business about his Father's estate, Campaux learned from his mother that Lefevere had said that he and some of his brothers were spendthrifts, squandering the revenue from his Father's estate, and that it was impossible that Campaux could remain sick so long. Had his means been greater he would have recompensed Lefevere long ago for all his favors; he shall still do so if ever he is able. So pressing was his business while in Detroit, he was unable to call on Lefevere as he had intended. After the deaths of R.H. McNiffe and his brother, Joseph Campaux, Jr., his Father's business devolved on him alone for a period of 16 years, yet the small return was so comparatively meager as to discount Lefevere's accusation of being a spendthrift. Due to the large amount of unimproved property and high taxes his Father had at times to borrow money. Campaux asks Lefevere to inform him who told the bishop he and his brothers were spendthrifts and although such accusations could have injured him years ago, it cannot do so now. For 2 years, due to hard work, his health has been impaired. Over this dispensation of a kind Providence he has no control, but he regards it as very cruel for any one to injure his reputation after so many years spent in the service of others.

III-2-j A.L.S. 5pp. 8vo.
1


1862 Jan 29

Chambodut, Father L(ouis), C.M.
Galveston, (Texas)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Since Chambodut's last letter things are the same except that Father (Peter) Tarrill(i)on has come in order to recover his health at Galveston. It seems he has had the fever since August but Chambodut hopes he will recover in a few days. Mother St. Pierre (Harrison, R.U.) did not stay long at San Antonio. She is back again at Galveston where she says (Odin) wishes her. He had asked $100 per month for the hospital from January 1 and it appears that now it is wanted even more. They say it is too dear. Father (John) Gonnard is with him and helps him very much. They have many sick soldiers in the city and at the forts who take much of their time. He has just seen poor Mrs. Ashley who is very sick. Returning from her house he saw the wedding of General (Francis T.) Nichol(l)'s(?) son. It was a great affair. Mr. de St. Cyr, J.P. Nash, and Mrs. (Chapuy) Chapuis send their respects. For three days Chambodut has had a migraine. They learnt from the "Catholic Standard" that Father (Stephen) Rousselon has been insulted. He can only suppose that he was insulted by a bad priest. Brother Joachim (F.S.C.) has turned his class over to Brother Ezéchiel (F.S.C.) and come back to Galveston where he works at placing everything in order at the college. Chambodut sends his respects to Fathers Rousselon, Chalon, and Dubuis.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
10


(1862) Jan 30

Berthaud, Father F(rancis)
(Terre aux Boeufs, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Bertaud encloses (no enclosure) a letter of the persons of the chapel which he has left. (Odin) is the only person who can satisfy their requests which seem very just.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 1p. 8vo.
1


1862 Jan 31

Blight, Atherton
Phila(delphia, Pennsylvania)

To Orestes A. Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

As the friend of Doctor M.H. Furness, who wishes the republication of "The Struggle of the Nation," Blight states his views. He would like every Union man to read the article; hence his wish that it be republished in a cheap form, possibly like that of a Congressional speech, so that one or two thousand copies could be printed at small expense. However if Brownson prefers to have it in a handsome pamphlet form, Blight will take as many copies as he can have for $25.00. How many will this be?

I-4-b A.L.S. 3pp. 16to.
2


1862 Jan 31

Guy, Robert E., (Brother Ephraim)
Warrington, England

to O(restes) A. Brownson
New York, (New York)

Guy has had a change of fortune since his last letter to Brownson. Instead of holding a chair of Philosophy at Louvain, he is an assistant to a missionary Father. He devotes three or four hours daily to philosophical studies. He has read the last two Reviews. He asked Wallis of the Tablet to give a less rabid review of the October No. 2 issue. He would like Brownson to answer the questions in his last letter. He has been helped by Rev. H. Calderwood's "Philosophy of the Infinite." He has not heard from Doctor W.G. Ward for some months. He feels the latter's Education Controversy has hindered his philosophizing. He is working on a paper on Sir W. Hamilton's Metaphysics. He intends sending it to the Dublin Review. The editor will probably reject it. Brownson's possible loss of eyesight grieves him much.

I-4-b A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
3


1862 Jan 31

Rafferty, John
Haggerty, Frank Jos(eph)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Rafferty and Haggerty, as the Invitation Committee, invite Brownson to attend the Twelfth Anniversary of the Brownson Literary Association for the benefit of St. Joseph's Conference.

I-4-b A.L.S. 1pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Jan 31

Van Renterghem, Father H(enry)
Mr. Clemens, (Michigan)

To Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere)
(Detroit, Michigan)

Father (Theophilus) Buyse has told him that Lefevere does not wish Father (Henry) Meuffels to come to Renterghem's place, and he also told him the reason. Today Van Renterghem learned that Meuffels is to come next Tuesday. After what Buyse told him it would be better if Meuffels did not come there. Van Renterghem believes the girl is entirely innocent and that it is rather simplicity and lack of judgment on her part. He thinks Mt. Clemens knows nothing of what was said at Centerline which is one more reason for Meuffels not coming there.

III-2-j A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
3