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Calendar: 1862

1862 Nov 1

Cour(rier) des Etats-Unis
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Proof? of an article entitled) "Journalists and Dictator." They spoke several weeks ago of General (Benjamin F.) Butler's suspension for the third time of the Estafette du Sud. After several days the Estafette reappeared and it was thought that they had to buy this favor by great concessions of opinion. Chance has caused to fall into their hands the letter of their colleagues to Butler and they reprint it:

--------
1862 Aug 4

LeFranc, E., E. Dumez, and E. Lamuloniere
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

To General Butler
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

The editors of the Estafette make a final appeal to his sentiments of justice and equity. The Estafette has been suppressed for having refused to insert an anonymous article having neither individual character nor official authority. That fact was satisfactorily explained to Butler, yet, relying on reasons of tendency, the suspension has been maintained. If he persists in his severity it can be said that his sword has taken offense at their pen and that the commandant of the department of the Gulf has honored several members of the press, that institution formerly sacred on American soil, by considering them redoubtable enemies. Butler's signature at the end of the letter raising the suspension would be an act of force as well as justice. The Cour(rier) article concludes that the permission to reappear is certainly one of Butler's best inspirations since coming to New Orleans and expresses the wish that he would let himself be guided by such inspirations more often.

VI-2-f Printed Document (French) 1p. 1 column
5


1862 Nov 1

Howell, Isaac H.
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Howell enclosed the check and key for Edward Brownson's trunk, brought from Washington by Dad. He has the symptoms of typhoid and has been quite "shipid" until this morning.

I-4-b A.L.S. 1pp. 16mo.
1


1862 Nov 3

Hilton, George H.
Cincinnati, Ohio

to Orestes A. Brownson
Elizabeth, New Jersey

Even though it has been a long time since the last correspondence, Hilton has watched Brownson's course with interest. In regard to his articles on Catholic subjects, they were always liked, but Hilton is a follower of the political school of Calhoun in general features, hence he differs from Brownson. The crisis has only developed their breadth and significance for America, society, life and government. Aside from politics, Hilton hopes Brownson will be elected to Congress, was glad to see such an able Catholic and an American at heart nominated. It is a position which Brownson deserves. "It will give something to your review, that otherwise would not probably have." Hilton realizes that Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell) and his brother, (Father Edward Purcell) are Brownson's enemies and they openly hope Brownson will be defeated and Hilton just as openly hopes he will be elected on the ground that he is a Catholic publicist and a champion of the Church. Even though Hilton does differ on a few things from Brownson the former hopes Brownson is elected. Hilton hopes Brownson's Bishop James R. Bayley whom he met in Rome at a canonization will use his influence. Hilton's whole family wish him success.

I-4-b A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
4


1862 Nov 4

Bogaerts, J(ohn) (B.), Subdeacon, Grand Seminary
Malines, (Belgium)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

In his conversation with (Odin) at the seminary Bogaerts spoke of his desire to consecrate himself to the missions. He has resolved to attach himself to (Odin) and to follow wherever he wishes to send him. He now wants to know the time of departure, some details on the clothing, and what books he will have the most need of. If the departure is fixed at a distant time, he wonders if he could arrive a little sooner because, although the country and his relations are dear, at this time they are kind of a torment. He has not yet sought his exeat, but he will obtain it without a doubt.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
1


(1862) Nov 4

Broadwood, Mary D.
Campagne Vilbent, (near Geneva, Switzerland)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

(Odin) offered to take a small packet for her to New Orleans. If he finds its size inconvenient, he should return it to the Sister Superior at Grand Sacconnex. She gives three addresses, any one of which will do; her sister-in-law, one of his flock, Mrs. Duncan N. Hennen; William Mure, the British consul, her brother-in-law; or Charles F. Caruthers, also her brother-in-law. She hopes that when he returns to New Orleans the war will be rapidly approaching a desirable ending for the South, and that (General Benjamin F.) Butler's reign will be near its end.

VI-2-f A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
5


1862 Nov 4

Martin, Augustus (Marie), Bishop of
Natchitoches, (Louisiana)

to Father S(tephen) Rousselon
N(ew) O(rleans, Louisiana)

On October 12, Patrick Montgomery arrived with Rousselon's letter and those which he had been charged to forward to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.). Only on September 10, by indirect means did he learn of the unexpected death of Bishop (Andrew) Byrne. On October 6, he learned by a letter from Father (Patrick) Reilly, former vicar-general, that an agent sent in July by the clergy to obtain from Odin the nomination of an administrator had not returned and that the dispensing power had been left to no one. As senior bishop of the province, considering the extreme necessity, he believed he should communicate to the priests of Little Rock the powers which Byrne had personally entrusted to him, and, even more, to authorize Reilly to approve the priests he judged worthy and to suspend those evidently unworthy. This letter was already in the hands of a government agent when Rousselon's letter informing him of the departure of Odin for Europe arrived. It placed his conscience at ease. He retrieved his first letter and sent to Reilly his nomination as administrator. He will not tell Rousselon why he did not name Father (Peter Clarke?) whose letter he read. He could not do so in conscience, despite his talents. The choice he made before the arrival of Montgomery was fully justified by all that he said of the one and the other. Nevertheless, if he were mistaken, he will be the first to approve all the measures that Odin takes. The country is in great chaos. However, one thing consoles him: the humble submission and the truly Christian resignation which little by little take possession of souls. This week he is busy making a store at the bishop's to supply the indigent whose number for want of work, increases every day. He is at the bottom of his purse, without means of renewing it, but he is not worried. He is looking for means to ask assistance from the Propagation of the Faith but he doubts that he will be successful. In April he received the remittance from Odin. He immediately repaid the $1800 on which he paid interest since the foundation of the diocese. He bought stones and bricks for the continuation of the cathedral in better times. He will distribute $800 to his most needy priests. He lost Father Y.M. Lecon(n)niat, dead on August 28. Father (Ambrose?) Martin is with him, incapable of any functions and he fears that he will languish like this until his death. Father (Felix) Dicharry is back since August, still the same. (Latin:) Alas, not a priest but an apostate, the most criminal of men. He returns to N(ew) O(rleans) whence he plans to go to the Mexican provinces. Martin is sending Eugene back to his mother; he has desired it for a long time. He has done all he could for the poor child but could not subdue his deplorable independence. He is not evil, but presumptuous and without respect for anyone. Rousselon should have pity on Eugene and not abandon him.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
12


1862 Nov 4

Young, O.P., Father N(icholas) R.
Zanesville, Ohio

to Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell)
of (Cincinnati, Ohio)

He sends $5 for the orphans, the penance imposed for dispensing with the publication of the banns in the case of James Ryan and Sarah Nevil. They would gladly receive any advice from Purcell in relation to that portion of his flock.

II-5-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


1862 Nov 5

Brownson, O(restes) A(ugustus)
Elizabeth, N(ew) J(ersey)

To Father E(dward Frederick) Sorin, C.S.C.
(Notre Dame, Indiana)

Their election is over and resulted, as he expected, in his defeat. He is now ready to listen to any offer Sorin is disposed to make. He can teach philosophy, history, rhetoric, English composition and elocution. As he does not know Latin his lessons will have to be given in English. If, as he gathers from Sorin's letter, Sorin would like to have him connected with his university the only question will be the salary Sorin can give him. Brownson has a wife and daughter dependent on him and they must live. A salary on which they can live economically will be accepted. He does not expect a large salary for at present he presumes that Sorin is not in a condition to offer a large one. He wishes Sorin to name what terms he can afford and to do so as soon as he can, because to become a professor he must discontinue his Review.

I-3-c A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
1


1862 Nov 5

Denavit, Father
Lyons, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans)
( )

They saw Bishop (Claude Marie) Dubuis, (C.M.). He went with the Superior to Cardinal (Louis Jacques Maurice de Bonald) who consented to (Odin's) performing the ceremony of consecration at the seminary. Dubuis desires November 21, feast of the Presentation, or Sunday the 23rd. Catalan requires a Sunday or a feast of an apostle, and Denavit does not know if the consecration can be performed on the Presentation. (Odin) should tell him what he thinks. He is going to write to Bishop (John Paul Francis Felix) Lyonnet to ask him to choose between the two days. Bishop (Armand Francis Maurice de) Charbonnel will also be free. The priests Denavit consulted, and Dubuis, who has read Cardinal Barnabo's brief, believe that (Odin) can perform the consecration in France before the reception of the bulls. Denavit believes (Odin) received the exact copy of Barnabo's letter which he forwarded to Nantes.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
5


1862 Nov 6

Fitzgerald, Father Edward
Columbus, (Ohio)

to Archbishop J(ohn) B(aptist) Purcell
of (Cincinnati, Ohio)

When he was in Cincinnati he called on Purcell at the request of Father (Michael) Hallinan. He thought he owed that much to his old professor and superior. Hallinan states he can clear up the charges made against him. Hallinan can obtain favorable letters from Boston and Philadelphia. His conduct at Columbus was edifying. Father O'Donaghue of Milford says the same thing for him.

II-5-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
2


1862 Nov 6

Hallinan, Father M(ichael)
Milford, (Ohio)

To Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio)

In leaving the Jesuits, the Provincial sent Hallinan a letter to be presented to Bishop (John) Fitzpatrick or Bishop (John) McGill. In reply Fitzpatrick observed that Hallinan had some difficulty with Purcell. Hallinan was not conscious of this. Later he learned that Bishop (James F.) Wood said that Hallinan has left Cincinnati through compulsion. Hallinan cannot understand Wood's feelings towards him. He denies Wood's statement.

II-5-b A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
3


1862 Nov 7

Denavit, Father
Lyons, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans)
( )

They now have Bishop (Claude Marie) Dubuis, (C.M.). He communicated (Odin's) letter to him. Dubuis believes that Cardinal Barnabo's brief is sufficient and he believes that it would be actually more difficult to perform the consecration in America. Bishop (Armand Francis Maurice de) Charbonnel who was to assist, is free only until the 23rd; he is going to preach Advent far from Lyons. It will be necessary to address another bishop. Bishop (John Paul Francis Felix) Lyonnet, who is at Paris, wrote that he would come with pleasure at (Odin's) invitation. The ceremony is fixed for November 23. The Superior (Father Duplay) to whom he read Barnabo's letter is of this sentiment. He advised Denavit to write Lyonnet who cold consult the nuncio at Paris. Dubuis spoke yesterday to the Community in favor of the mission of New Orleans; he said nothing of Texas.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
5


1862 Nov 8

Hallinan, Father M(ichael)
Milford, (Ohio)

To Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio)

He writes again for advice. The woman in question was on her way to visit her aunt. Hallinan acted imprudently in consenting to an interview by letter. As Bishop Fitzpatrick is in Europe, he has little chance to remove the impression made on Bishop (James F.) Wood. His letter impressed the Provincial of the Jesuits very differently than it had Wood. Hallinan held one of the most important posts the Provincial could confer, that of preacher to the Community. His desire wold be to live in some community where he could be of some use, perhaps teaching among the Germans at Minster.

II-5-b A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
3


1862 Nov 8

Le Mené, Father J(oseph) M., General Secretary of the Bishop of
Vannes, (France)

Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

An estimable person has begged Mené to seek some information from (Odin) about Father (J. Outendirck) Ountendirck who left Brittany about 1851 and went to New Orleans where he was placed at Mandeville or in the neighborhood. They wish to know if he is still living, if he likes his adopted country, if he is well, etc.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
2


1862 Nov 8

McMaster, J(ames) A(lphonsus)
New York, (New York)

To Bishop (Francis P. McFarland of Hartford
Providence, Rhode Island)

(McFarland's) name is "writ large" in their mailbook under the Providence heading and he regrets that the Bishop has not received the Freeman regularly. They will try a change in the package and if they still go astray the Post Office will be at fault. He congratulates (McFarland) on his safe return from Europe.

I-1-b A.L.S. 1p. 4to.
1


1862 Nov 8

Marion, Father P.M.
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To (Archbishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio)

Purcell's letter of Oct. 9 causes him to be uneasy about the box containing the chalice and other articles sent by his family. He would be obliged if Purcell would take some steps to find the box. According to Purcell's letter it appears that the box was sent to Miss Florence and her mother. He charged no worth to claim the box. He believes that Miss Florence is lying about the matter. She wrote him that she could not send the box to New Orleans; now she says she sent it. He attaches a list of the articles.

II-5-b A.L.S. (France) 4pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Nov 10

Ceuppens, Francis (X.)
Malines, (Belgium)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans)
C/o the Lazarists, Paris, (France)

About four4 years ago Divine Providence inspired Ceuppens to imitate the missionaries some day. The assistance of grace and his reading of the annals of the Propagation of the Faith nourished this sacred fire in his heart. Bound by friendship with (John B.) Bogaerts who is already engaged to follow (Odin) to America, they encourage themselves in their common desire. (Odin's) presence in the seminary and the attractiveness of his virtues awakened these desires in his heart. Although he is only a subdeacon he made his desires known to the president, to his confessor, and to the canon, Father Dedecker. He believed it his duty to seek admission on into (New Orleans) from (Odin). He was born at Malines on December 22, 1839, orphaned since 1844, and little favored by fortune. However, Providence left his education to a charitable person of the city who gave him a clerical title, and on July 26, 1862 he was ordained subdeacon.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
2


1862 Nov 10

Dens, Father C.B., President of the Seminary
Malines, (Belgium)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
c/o the Lazarists, Paris, France)

Dens believed he should add a word to the letter of his pupil, Francis (X.) Ceuppens, who wishes to follow (Odin) to America. He has sufficient aptitude for his studies; he outstrips half of his fellow students. He has always appeared solidly pious submissive and respectful, and of a gentle and resolute character. It seems to Dens that he would be a good missionary. However as he is only a subdeacon, perhaps (Odin) would prefer that he remain (at Malines) for a year. As for Mr. Fossé, Dens has heard nothing more from him and believes that he will wait until he is a priest.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
3


1862 Nov 10

Deynoodt, Father Lewis
Liverpool, (England)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Deynoodt wrote to Bishop (Alexander Goss) to ask for his exeat a week ago, but he has not yet replied. If he does not receive any reply, he will act as if it were a settled affair at the risk of leaving without an exeat. He wonders if he will need a passport. He would like a letter of introduction to the ecclesiastical authorities at New Orleans. He plans to leave on December 13 on the Cunnard Line from Liverpool.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 16mo.
2


(18)62 Nov 11

"Spes"
( )

To O(restes) A. Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

"Spes" addresses a few words of encouragement to Brownson. One particular statement in his "Essays on the Reformation" elicits his hearty concurrence. It is that the Catholic who thinks has a far better prospect at Rome, than at Dublin, New York, or Baltimore. His principal object is to recall to Brownson a fact which shows how much zeal exists among the Clerical and how much among the lay body. Some seven years ago the children of Catholic parents were snatched from their very arms, fed, clothed and taught psalm singing in the nurseries throughout the city. The clergy were passive as usual. At last the Sunday school teachers of various cities originate a movement which resulted in a Convention of Sunday School Teachers. Eventually the clerics took up the cudgels pro and con and finally denounced the project proposed by the Sunday school teachers. In consequence, thousands of Catholic children in New York, Brooklyn, Jersey City and Newark have been lost to the church have been lost to the church. The native-born Catholics have been driven from the Church by the contempt of the Priesthood.

I-4-b A.L.S. 5pp. Folio
2


1862 Nov 12

Foltier, Father E.J.
Vermillionville, (Louisiana)

to Father S(tephen) Rousselon
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Foltier does not know if the pastor of Thibodeau(x), (Father Charles M. Ménard)was able to forward his letter to Rousselon. The pastor of St. Martin (Father Ange Marie Felix Jan) still has in his possession the semi-annual report and the money accruing to the Archbishop. In that letter, Foltier informed him that the contract of gift being nul, and circumstances requiring the last payment on the school house and greater economy, he sold the said property. However, as a school was necessary Foltier gave a house, paid for by his own money and situated on church land to serve as a school. Thus the school for boys is not abandoned. In this way he believes he has acted with conscience and honesty. When (Odin) returns, he asks Rousselon not to forget Royville; it is impossible for him to care for it as he wishes although he (Jesuits) at Grand Coteau are always ready to come to his aid. The return to the convent takes place slowly, but there are already a sufficient number of students. All the (Carmelites) are well. Sister St. Marie, (O.Carm) was seriously ill, but is now better.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
8


1862 Nov 12

Keane, William, Bishop of Cloyne
Fermoy, (Ireland)

To Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell
if (Cincinnati, Ohio)

All the parties mentioned in Purcell's letter are well-known in Fermoy. Timothy Mead is still living; his residence is in Cork. In the midst of severe temporal afflictions, bishops and priests in Ireland have much reason to thank Providence. They have the gold of strong faith and fervent charity. Time has not yet diminished the luster of this precious treasure. How great in time and in eternity must be the merit and reward of the American missioners who must go as the pioneers of civilization. May God bless the ministry of such priests.

II-5-b A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Nov 12

Seymour, Horatio
Utica, (New York)

To (James Alphonsus McMaster)
(New York, New York)

He received McMaster's letter and enclosure and will see him in New York before Jan. 1. He is recovered from the labors of the canvass and will discuss the subject of their future policy in a few days. He is now overwhelmed with correspondence.

I-1-m A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Nov 13

Le Hir
Quimper, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

For three or four years Le Hir has wanted to consecrate himself to the foreign missions. At first he thought of embracing the religious life but the difficulties he met with from his parents prevented him from putting his plan into execution until now. One of the principal reasons they allege is the poverty to which his determination would reduce them. His last overture in regard to the colonial missions still met with some opposition, but it did not seem as strong. He was still un decided when (Odin's) arrival in their midst fixed his choice. He wonders if the position of a secular priest in (Odin's)diocese would permit him to give two or three hundred francs a year to his parents. If so, he hopes to become one of (Odin's) companions on the trip.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Nov 13

Moreau, (C.S.C.), Father (Basil Anthony)
Le Mans, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Rennes, France)

Learning that (Odin) plans to visit them next Sunday, Moreau asks the precise hour of his arrival at the station in order to send a carriage. By reason of the news of (Odin's) arrival he has just countermanded the departure of one of their priests (Father Florent, C.S.C.) for New Orleans. He was to leave from Bordeaux on the 28th to rejoin Father (Patrick F.) Sheil, (C.S.C.) and to replace the miserable Father (Nicholas) Dessenon who has toyed with them so much.

P.S. He warns the superior of the Grand Seminary of Rennes, where (Odin) now is, that the subdeacon about whom there had been a question before (Odin) as having been ordained in the Congregation (of the Holy Cross), had never been presented by Moreau to any bishop. This observation was prompted by the conversation he had with Father (Th.) Alleau who announced (Odin's) arrival.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
6


1862 Nov 13

Parke, Father H.F.
Parkersburg, Virginia

to Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell)
of (Cincinnati, Ohio)

This letter will introduce Dr. Samuel Walker of Doddridge Courthouse who wishes to have the pleasure of Purcell's acquaintance and to see his cathedral.

II-5-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


(1862?) Nov 15

Brownson, (Edward P.)
( )

To Orestes A. Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Henry is sending, not too late he hopes, a birthday present. The payrolls (apparently enclosed) will be honored by Colonel Leslie, at number 6 State Street, New York City. The army is aiming at Richmond, via Fredericksburg. They will advance at Culpeper, as if going to Gordonsville.

I-4-b A.L.S. 1pg. 12mo.
1


1862 Nov 15

Russell, Geo(rge) P.
Detroit, Mich(igan)

To Bishop P(eter) P(aul) Le(fe)v(e)re
Detroit, (Michigan)

The Commissioner of Internal Revenue at Washington has decided that plate used by a church for religious purposes is exempt from taxation.

III-2-j A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
1


1862 Nov 16

Moreau, (C.S.C.), Father Basil Anthony
Le Mans, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans)
( )

Conforming to (Odin's) advice Moreau will expect him next Monday on the train from Rennes. Bishop (Charles John Fillion), whom he invited to dine with (Odin) but could not because of an indisposition, wanted to place his carriage and horses at (Odin's) service in place of theirs. Moreau told him that he could receive (Odin) upon his arrival and then he could come to the (Congregation of Holy Cross) where his room and a family dinner will be waiting. Moreau announced that (Odin) would give Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament and a sermon to the assembly.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
3


1862 Nov 16

Putnam, Edward
Northwhitefield, M(aine)

To Orestes A. Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Putnam was sympathetic with Brownson after the last number of the Review, in view of the possible attacks from the Catholic Press for his plain preaching. He comments on (Archbishop John Hughes') last letter to Seward criticizing Hughes' impartiality. Putnam has been ailing in health. He wonders why the war seems so "melancholy." He give his personal reflections on the attitude of the Southerner.

I-4-b A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
2


1862 Nov 16

Thévenin, V.S.M., Sister M. Aloysia
Le Mans, Sarthe. (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Paris, France

They have learned indirectly that Odin is in Europe, perhaps even in France, and address this letter to the Father General in Paris begging him to present her humble request to him. She begs him, not only as a child whom he took more than 28 years ago to the missions of America, but Also as a subject of his jurisdiction, to come to see her or to send someone to whom she can say what she would say to him as her metropolitan.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Nov 17

Bogaerts, J(ohn) B., Sub-deacon at the Seminary of
Malines, (Belgium)

To Father (Denavit
Lyons, France)

When Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.) passed through Malines, where he spent three days intending to recruit some seminarians for his mission, Bogaerts could not assure him that he would follow him because of certain obstacles that he still had to overcome. He wrote on November 4, but has received no reply. In case the letter is still at the seminary, he asks (Denavit) to forward it to Odin because, according to what Odin said, the departure will take place at the beginning of December, and in order to arrange his affairs he will have to be notified in time.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
2


1862 Nov 18

Brownson, William
San Francisco, (California)

To General James Shields
(Washington, D.C.)

Brownson asks the help of General Shields in securing appointment to the federal judgeship in California. He hopes the General will give as favorable a recommendation as he can; Judge Coskery will write him about Brownson's qualifications for the office. Brownson is sorry to hear of the General's position because of the war and thinks it an injustice.
(In Orestes A. Brownson papers)

I-4-b A.L.S. 2pp. 8mo.
1


1862 Nov 18

Coskery, Charles
San Francisco, (California)

To Brig. General James Shields
Washington, D.C.

Coskery asks General shields to use his influence to obtain the appointment of William Brownson as U.S. Circuit Judge in California which will be vacated by Judge McAllister who has been charged with imbecility. Brownson is a son of Orestes A. Brownson who brings this letter to General shields. Should the son secure the appointment, Coskery will be named Clerk or Commissioner of the Court. Coskery assures the General that William is a capable, honorable lawyer. Mr. O.A. Brownson will call on Shields to arrange the details.

I-4-b A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
2


1862 Nov 18

Subileau, Joseph
Angers, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Before writing to his parents, Subileau wished to inform his pastor of his resolution. The latter placed before his eyes the position of his poor parents and the difficulty and even cruelty of abandoning them in the state in which they find themselves. He advised him to write to (Odin) to ask him to say again what the position of a priest in America is, and if Subileau could truly come to the aid of his parents. Subileau's director and the Superior find this advice better than the letter (Odin) wrote him. He hopes it will be useful to overcome the last resistance of his parents who must regard as exaggerated the advantages of which (Odin) spoke. He hopes to be able to join (Odin) soon in the company of (Joseph) Viau.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
2


1862 Nov 19

Baillargeon, C(harles) F(rancois), Bishop of Tloa
Quebec, Q(uebec)

To Bishop F(rancis) P. McFarland of Hartford
(Providence, Rhode Island)

Baillargeon would give a good recommendation to Abbé Ducraux, but he has sent him to Chicago to assist Bishop (James) Duggan to take the place of another priest who is ill. He will send on McFarland's letter to Ducraux who may not stay in Chicago. He is sorry he cannot give McFarland a good Canadian speaking both English and French as McFarland asked about in Rome.

I-1-b A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
3


1862 Nov 19

Delafosse, Father A.M., Little Seminary
St. Lo, France

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Vannes, France)

Delafosse has learned by the newspaper of Vannes that (Odin) is now in that city in the interests of his mission. He cannot doubt that he is there for money and for priests. He has no money to offer. He would like to offer his person but he is not free; he is in a congregation. It does not have vows, but Providence led him there and he would rather die than take a step outside of holy obedience. He has more than once exposed his desire to Father Pététot who always replied that he sees in him a true and good vocation for the missions, but that he does not see the moment when he can help him to accomplish his desires. He would like (Odin) to approach Pététot to obtain permission for him to go to work under his direction without ceasing to be an Oratorian. He does not think Archbishop (Louis Anna Dubreuil) of Vannes would refuse to add his authorization. Perhaps he would even give Pététot the means to replace him by according a priest of his diocese, who plans to make the request shortly, permission to enter their small congregation.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
4


1862 Nov 19

Henry, Sub-deacon, Grand Seminary of Quimper
Finistere, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Henry still intends to accompany (Odin) to America. He has obtained the consent of his spiritual director and one of these days he should be receiving the authorization of the bishop. He wishes to know the time of departure because next week he is liable to be called to pass to the diaconate. If he is to leave around Christmas or the first of the year, it would be useless to have his banns published because he wishes to go to spend several days with his family before leaving. If the rendezvous is to take place at Paris or elsewhere, he will not have the money to go that far; he hesitates to ask it of his brothers and sisters who are not rich. He assures him that he will not be the only one from the seminary of Quimper to accompany him; there are two or three others who believe themselves sure of following him.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Nov 19

Mevel, J(oh)n M(a)rie, Student in Theology at the Seminary of
St. Brieuc, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Mevel hopes to be called by (Odin) to convert the poor infidels of the new world. However, there exist great obstacles, which, if (Odin) does not surmount them, will force him not to accompany him. They consist of the debts which he contracted in order to provide his education and of the sacrifices which his brother and sister, deprived like him of their Father and mother since childhood, imposed upon themselves. He owes 1000 francs to friends which he begs (Odin) to help him pay, and he asks him to provide a pension of 800 francs for his brother and sister for one year in order to console them for the loss of a brother they love. He is 23 years of age and has been in the seminary for two years and two months. He is not yet a clerk because of an illness last year at the time of ordination. It is probable that six seminarians of whom there is one priest will follow (Odin) to America from St. Brieuc.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Nov 19

Thévenin, V.S.M., Sister M. Aloysia
Le Mans, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Le Mans, France)

Sister Aloysia begs him to come and see her as she has need to speak to him. Their Mother will also be very honored to see him.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 1p. 4to.
1


1862 Nov 19

Timon, Bishop John
Buffalo, (New York)

To Bishop (Peter Paul) Le(fe)v(e)re
Detroit, (Michigan)

Last summer while returning from Rome, he and the Bishop of Brooklyn (John Laughlin) and the Bishop of Hartford (Francis P. McFarland) visited the American College at Louvain. They were much pleased. Father J(ohn) DeNeve wishes that by some act of the American Bishops, Rome would notice them and grant favors. Lefevere is considered a founder of this noble work, Timon promises his efforts in any direction. He mentions a letter of Cardinal Barnabo to the president of the American College dated 15 April, 1861, expressing willingness to grant a Benedictio Apostolica, but it does not seem that it was granted. Timon offers cooperation in any effort, and thinks he can get a few Bishops to concur in anything for the good of that most interesting institution.

III-2-j A.L.S. 2pp. 18mo.
3


1862 Nov 20

Ceuppens, Francis (X.)
Malines, (Belgium)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

About four years ago Divine Providence inspired Ceuppens to imitate the missionaries some day. Bound by friendship with (John B.) Bogaerts who is already engaged to follow (Odin), they encourage each other in their common desire. He has made his desire known to the President, to his confessor, and to the canon, Father Dedecker. He seeks admission to New Orleans. He was born at Malines on Dec. 22, 1839, orphaned since 1844, and little favored by fortune. A charitable person provided his education and gave him a clerical title, and on July26, 1862 he was ordained subdeacon. This letter was sent November 10 to the superior-general of the Lazarists in Paris but, as Ceuppens received no reply, he wrote a second letter to which they replied that they had not received the first.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
2


1862 Nov 20

Ceuppens, Francis (X.)
Malines, Belgium

to Father (Denavit
Lyons, France)

Ceuppens sends the enclosed letter for Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.) from his director. The latter sent a similar letter twelve days ago in the care of the Superior of the Lazarists in Paris, but he has just learned that it has not arrived.

A.L.S. (French) 2pp.

Enclosure:

--------
1862 Nov 20

Dens, Father C.B., President of the Grand Seminary
Malines, (Belgium)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

A first letter about his pupil Ceuppens, not having reached (Odin), he repeats his earlier recommendation. Ceuppens has appeared to have a firm piety, he is of a gentle character, obedient and respectful towards his superiors. He is ahead of half of his fellow students in his studies; his health is good and Dens believes he would make a good pastor and a good missionary. However, he is still only a subdeacon and is only about to begin his third year of theological studies. (Odin) will judge if this is a reason to make him wait a year.

A.L.S. (French) 2pp.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
3


1862 Nov 21

Causans, Countess de
Avignon, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Causans has learned that (Odin) had charged Miss Lesne of Lyons to find a teacher for a Christian family of New Orleans. For six years she has had a teacher who has completed, with the greatest success, the education of four of her daughters. Her family's position obliges her to work. She seeks information about the position available. (This teacher) is in a state of completing an education, well instructed in history, literature, etc., and an excellent musician. She is 40 years old and of firm piety. If (Odin) thinks an interview is necessary, Miss Vacher would go to such place as he designates.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
3


1862 Nov 21

Kenrick, Francis Patrick, Archbishop of Baltimore
Baltimore, (Maryland)

To Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell
Cincinnati, (Ohio)

Kenrick thanks Purcell for recommending his revision of the Douay Bible and ordering the C(atholic) Telegraph to print a notice of his work. He congratulates Purcell for obtaining a formal sanction of the Congregation of Rites which cured the difficulties of the Litany of the Holy Name. Kenrick found, in the Cathedral Library, a volume given by Bishop (Simon Brutoof) the words of Cardinal Cajetan. It contained a letter dated December 1826 to Archbishop (Ambrose) Marechal dealing with the sermons of the Fathers on the mystery of the Incarnation, Kenrick sent the letter to Bishop (James Roosevelt) Bayley of Newark asking for a more extensive life of Brute and tells Purcell that should Bayley decline, Purcell should see that the life is written because he knew Brute so well. Kenrick says he has not written or sanctioned anything which appeared in the C(atholic) Mirror with regards to Purcell's views on the topics agitating the country, or those of Archbishop (John Hughes) of New York, because he wishes to avoid interfering with the editor. The editor is Courtney Jenkins, a lawyer, and he is aided by Dr. Richard McSherry. His correspondent, "Nemo" is a clergyman in Pennsylvania.

II-5-b A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
7


(18)62 Nov 21

(Seton, E)Liz(abeth)
Cragdon, (New York)

To (Robert Seton
Rome, Italy)

(Robert's) letter of November 4 to Emily (Seton) was received this morning; also one to Will or Father. Liz is still in (Robert's) debt $493. She hopes to replace all before next July. (Robert's) letters to the Freeman('s Journal) they all read with pleasure. Will(iam Seton 4) is not quite over his wounds and is still with them. Hal (Harry Seton) is not well yet and keeps Will company. (Robert) is to thank Father William (McCloskey) for his letter and ask Willie Poole if his sister Agnes and brother Frank cannot spend the holidays with them. If he could write to the Sisters it would be well as they are rather scrupulous about letting her leave the convent. Em and Liz are off to Norfolk this evening; they take Biddy back to the Asylum.

II-1-a A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
6


1862 Nov 22

Viau, Joseph
Angers, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

When Viau spoke to (Odin) at Angers, he made known his desire to associate himself with (Odin's) work. He has conferred with the superior and with his director, and his parents have finally assented. If (Odin) accepts him, he will only have to secure, by his mediation, the permission of the bishop of Angers. He spoke about a debt he had been obliged to contract for the arrears of his pension. He owes 185 pounds. He asks (Odin) to subsidize his feeble means as he had offered. He wishes to know what he should bring with him, the day of departure, and the route from Angers as he desires to spend the last week with his family.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Nov 20

Le Hir
Quimper, (France)

To (Father Denavit?
Lyons, France)

Despite all Le Hir's efforts to obtain their consent, his parents have formally refused. He has therefore decided to wait some time but if God later gives his parents the strength to make this sacrifice generously, he will hasten to Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.) who left such a good memory in their midst. He asks (Denavit) to give Odin knowledge of his letter.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
2


1862 Nov 23

Lamy, Théodore, Deacon, Grand Seminary of
St. Brieuc, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Still persevering in the resolution he made at (Odin's) passage at St. Brieuc, Lamy went several days ago to see Bishop (Augustin) David who promised his consent. He is preparing to receive the priesthood on December 20 and he would like to know if he can wait until then since he wishes to spend a few days with his sisters. He wonders how much time he could spend with his family after ordination. He would like to know as soon as possible the approximate time of departure.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
2


1862 Nov 23

Piacentini, Onésime
Vannes, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

If Piacentini has delayed writing it was because before deciding on his vocation to the missions he wished to examine and to pray for a long time. He has finally decided to complete the seminary at Vannes, and if he feels called, he will not forget that (Odin's) diocese needs priests.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
1


1862 Nov 23

Trumeau, Father U.
Chateauroux, Indre, (France)

To Superior (of the Grand Seminary
Lyons, France)

Last October 27 Trumeau sent a letter to Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.). Before his departure for Belgium and Ireland, Odin had indicated (the seminary) as the place where letters for him should be sent. He wonders if his letter arrived and if it was forwarded to Odin. If it was lost, he would hasten to write another. He wonders also if Odin is to return to France and if he plans to return to America soon, as he told Trumeau.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Nov 24

Bizien, Aym(ard)
Quimper, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

( ) Henry, subdeacon, (John Charles) Férec, and Bizien obtained an audience with Bishop (Renatus Nicholaus Sergent) of Quimper who promised to give them exeats as soon as (Odin) announces that they are incorporated in the diocese of New Orleans. He asks (Odin) to write to that effect to the bishop and to give one of them details concerning the trip. They wish to await the moment of departure with their families.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
4


1862 Nov 24

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick),
Camp near Falmouth, (Virginia)

to (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Ned has begun to write four letters to her in the last two days. He received her last letter day before yesterday. He received a letter from his mother (Sarah Healy Brownson) last night (November 23, 1862) and says that he will answer her very soon. The General has repaid him four stamps now so that he is once more able to correspond. He asks why Sal did not send more gossip about Miss Bartlett. He expects tomorrow morning there will be a fight at the forcing of the river. Today at 7 A.M. they are to place guns in position on the river bank. The Rebels have about 20 guns. Ned fears that (General) Burnside is not the man for the job. He is popular enough but he lacks decision and has become timid. He believes that they should have crossed the river three or four days ago. He tells Sal of an accident he had while crossing a ravine but asks her not to tell of the adventure to his mother. Tomorrow he shall see Rebel guns firing. He assures her that should any accident befall Henry (Brownson) or himself, he will telegraph immediately. However, he does not feel that they are likely to be in any dangerous places. There is a small chance that the town may be shelled. He asks her to tell Pat ( ) that he has never received a Unionist from him. Jesse (Healy's) horse is a failure. Henry sent his payrolls for October to his Father on the 10th of (November). Ned asks to be informed if they are drawn as he wants to know if they have any money in New York. He will perhaps have to go there for money when this month's pay is due so that he may pay John $212 which he owes him for a horse. They are to carry no personal baggage on the march except such as can be carried on their horses. He tells Sal to assure his mother that there is little danger of his being made prisoner on one of his foraging excursions. He is always in the middle of the army miles and miles from the outposts. Ned relates that he has killed his last turkey and has little or nothing left for Thanksgiving mess.

I-5-i A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
3


1862 Nov 24

Buteux, Father (Louis) S(tanislas)
Paris, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of
Lyons, France)

Buteux hoped to see (Odin) at Paris but he is obliged to leave for 10 days. A new letter from (Thomas) Layton, dated Oct. 10, reports that there is no way, except by means of a flag of truce, of communicating outside the Federal lines. Therefore, counseled by the Jesuits, Layton advises Buteux to consider his desired leave of absence from Bishop (William Henry Elder of Natchez) extended as he desired, especially since he has (Odin's) permission. Buteux asks (Odin) to send the papers which he requested to him, care of Mr. de Poincy.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
3


1862 Nov 24

Manoritta (O.P.), Father Gioacchino
Rome, (Italy)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

After waiting for more than a month for (Odin's) reply to the letter addressed to the Seminary of Lyons, Manoritta talked this morning with the Procurator General of the Missions who assured him that (Odin) is now at the Seminary of Lyons where he will be until the middle of December. The Procurator suggested that Manoritta write this letter today in case the first went astray. So he hastens to inform (Odin) again that he awaits the day to leave for the missions. He asks (Odin) to let him know what way to take to join h im. (Odin) can reply directly to Manoritta so that he can go to the French Minister for a passport. He sends the respects of his Archbishop (Emmanuele) Marongiu Nurra and of his spiritual director.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (Italian) 2pp. 8vo.
2


1862 Nov 24

Odin, (C.M.), J(ohn) M(ary), Archbishop of New Orleans
Lyons, (France)

To (John B. Bogaerts
Malines, Belgium)

Bogaert's letter of November 20 just reached him and he is happy to learn that he is determined to join their work. He still cannot fix precise time of departure. He has to visit several seminaries. As soon as he has made the necessary arrangements, he will enlighten Bogaerts and assign the day when he should come to join them at Paris. It will likely be next January. He will charge himself with all the expenses of the trip.

(Notation by J.F. Edwards: Gift of Father Bogaerts, 1897).

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Nov 25

Jamey, Father V(ictor)
Echenoz-la Meline (?), near Vesoul, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Jamey has thought sorrowfully of (Odin) and his unfortunate diocese for several months. He wonders what he is doing and what he is planning to do. The question of whether it is prudent to lead priests to Louisiana at this time, and a thousand others, torment him night and day. He spoke to Cardinal (James Mary Adrien Caesar Matthieu)of (Odin's) plan to come to Besancon, and His Eminence said that he would do everything that depended on him to be useful. Jamey believes it would be possible to find an excellent writer for (Odin's) newspaper. He is Father Désorges, pastor of a small parish of the diocese, who writes in "Le Monde" where he has just had two articles on the Roman question. Jamey has not wished, nor could he conveniently make, very active inquiries without having received new orders, for which he is waiting. He reads the newspapers and the letters he receives from N(ew) Orleans, and he would be afraid to see (Odin) leave with priests before next spring. However (Odin) can judge better. He would like to know what decision he makes and if he is coming to Besancon and near Vesoul.

P.S. Huchette Kernion and his wife are at Paris. (Odin) would give them, as well as their brother-in-law, great pleasure if he visited them.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
4


1862 Nov 25

Keck, Franz Anton
Holy Cross of Le Mans, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

When (Odin) visited Holy Cross, he accepted the proposition that Keck made him, on condition that their superior general (Father Basil Anthony Moreau, C.S.C.) consented. Not being bound by any vows to the Congregation of the Holy Cross yet, he cannot presume that (Moreau) would make the least difficulty, but, knowing his character which is a little brisk, he fears that he will discharge him immediately without permitting him to await (Odin's) reply. Therefore, he asks (Odin) to assure his existence for several days. His resolution is irrevocable and he awaits (Odin's) orders. If (Odin) replies, he should send it to Mr. Farelly, student in theology at the College of Holy cross.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
4


1862 Nov 25

McCloskey (Father) William
Rome

to (Archbishop John Baptist Purcell)
(Cincinnati, Ohio)

McCloskey reproaches himself for having previously written such a tedious letter and any action taken by Purcell in regard to the matter therein mentioned will be satisfactory. He delivered Purcell's message concerning the lottery chances to Mr. O'Connor and imagines it has been attended to. He does not know of Sambucetti's intentions. McCloskey is glad to hear of Frank Dutton's good health and says that Richter and O'Regan are well. He will make O'Regan a Sub Deacon and may be a Deacon by Christmas. O'Regan is studying hard, and McCloskey believes it is for Purcell's sake, to take the Doctorate in Theology. Four new men have come to study making the number 43. Dora Timoter left in July for a trip through France, Germany and is now in Venice. He is glad Father (Francis) Pabisch is doing so well, and he misses him at the College. Father (Charles) Stonestreet, Procurator from the U(nited) S(tates) of A(merica) has finished his business in Rome and is now just lolling around Rome. The Prince of Wales is in Rome and Don Bernardo has his hands full and McCloskey is grateful for Don Bernardo's presence. The new minister, De La Tour D'Anvergne, has arrived and it is hoped he will do great things for the Holy See and also stay longer than his predecessor. He has not seen Madame Bontonslinn since the last of August. Many clergymen from the U(nited) S(tates) are in Rome as well as many strangers. Burnside has replaced McClellan and although there have been many generals there has been little progress. The English are unwilling to meddle in Roman affairs and McCloskey thinks they will have their hands full at home soon. The Pope's health is good but Father (Charles) Stonestreet doesn't think so. Nothing has been heard from Bishop (John B.) Fitzpatrick of (Boston) since his departure and McCloskey imagines Bishop (James F.) Wood of Philadelphia will attend the diocese during his absence. Sullivan, Bishop Wood's subject, went completely out of his head a few weeks ago but is now growing better and will return to Philadelphia. He sends his regards to Purcell's brother, and other fathers, Gilmour, (Francis) Pabisch. McCloskey would like to hear Pabisch's lecture on St. Thomas. Ubaldi sends Purcell his compliments. McCloskey encloses in the letter a bill for Joseph Richter, Dan O'Regan and Francis Dutton. In a post script, November 28, McCloskey asks for a photograph of Purcell as it was requested by Prince Massimo and suggests that he send two so that some day they may have a portrait of Purcell placed in the Portrait Gallery. A student from the Capital of the Southern Confederacy was at the College a few days ago. He is proud of Major General Rosecrans and asks Purcell what he thinks of the future. McClellan's retirement looks bad to those in Rome. D. Smith sends his respects.

II-5-b A.L.S. pp.. 12mo.
4


1862 Nov 25

O'Connor, (S.J.) M(ichael) Bishop
New York, (New York)

To Archbishop J(ohn) B(aptist) Purcell
of Cincinnati, (Ohio)

It would afford him great pleasure to accept Purcell's invitation but it is impossible. He is on his way to Boston where he will while away his time imagining that he will teach something in the Scholasticate. His health is about the same as when he left Pittsburgh. Sometimes an unusual symptom makes him feel a little alarm. He is sorry he missed seeing Purcell at Marseilles.

II-5-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


1862 Nov 25

Thévenin, (V.S.M.), Sister M. Aloysia
Le Mans, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.) of N(ew) Orleans
(Lyons, France)

Sister Aloysia thanks him for the consolation which his few spoken words gave her. She would like to say something more because, her true position not being like that of other persons (at the convent), she had to ask some clarification. God has not permitted her to remain tranquil on the last words Odin spoke to her. She encloses (no enclosure) a letter for Mobile.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 1p. 4to.
1


1862 Nov 26

Degay
Quimper, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Degay was on the point of becoming a soldier when he learned of (Odin's) arrival at the Grand Seminary from several of his old school-mates. Advised by them, he went to see Father(?) Le Gall, a professor of philosophy, who persuaded him to seek authorization from (Odin) to follow him with several of his school-mates. He began his studies in the College of Quimper and he ended them at the Minor Seminary of Pont-Croix. At the end of his rhetoric he passed an exam, to enter the seminary and he was admitted but because of circumstances be did not enter and sought another career. He took an exam for the Highways Department but there was no vacancy. He was 20 years old on August 4, he has a brother a priest in this diocese and two others soldiers. His parents joyfully consent to see him in the ecclesiastical state.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
2


1862 Nov 26

Hétet, J(osep)h
Grand Seminary of Vannes, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Hétet fears (Odin) will be disappointed. As soon as (Odin) departed from their seminary, he took steps to place his project in operation. His superiors approved and advised him to pray so as not to act imprudently. There remained the most difficult task: persuading his mother to consent. His brother, the priest, charged himself with this. She refused but finally agreed to give her consent to everything when he was in Holy Orders. They have talked at the seminary of this and he has consulted his superiors, his brother and others. All advised him to wait for ordination before leaving. Thus, he has reason to say that all is not lost, only deferred. He asks for (Odin's) prayers and the prayers of the seminarians at Lyons amid whom Iodin) is.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Nov 26

Mohre, Maximillien, Novice at Holy Cross
Le Mans, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

In consecrating himself to the ecclesiastical state, Mohre intended to consecrate his life to the apostolic work of the Propagation of the Faith, and he thought to attain that end by entering the Congregation of the Holy Cross. He was very disagreeably surprised to be made master of studies, which does not permit him to prepare himself for that work. After mature reflection he had decided to leave the congregation as soon as circumstances permitted.(Odin's) arrival seemed providential and, since hearing his benevolent words, he has thought only of associating himself with his glorious works. Thus, he has decided to leave at the same time as (Franz Anton) Keck whom (Odin) interviewed. Not yet being bound by any vows to the Congregation, there can exist no moral difficulty, but it is not the same as to material obstacles. He understood (Odin) to say that he would charge himself with the material needs of those he chose, but there is still another difficulty. Their superior (Father Basil Anthony Moreau, C.S.C.), whose character (Odin) knows, could well at the first word of this affair discharge them on the spot without permitting them to await (Odin's) orders at Holy Cross. Therefore they ask (Odin) to assure their material existence for several days incase of this foreseen and very possible situation. They are men of honor, of good faith and they are religious.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
4


1862 Nov 26

Rouxel, Gustave, Clerk Minor, and Aristide Plotin, Tonsured Clerk, Grand Seminary of
Rennes, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

The difficulties which would have prevented their departure have raised. They are ready to respond to his signal. They wish to know the precise time of departure from Rennes, as soon as possible, so that they can go to say their farewells to their families, already saddened by their departure, they wish that the cost of the trip to Paris were not at their expense. They will reimburse him later.

P.S. They wonder if they will need a passport.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 1p. 4to.
2


1862 Nov 26

Wood, James F., Bishop of
Philadel(phia, Pennsylvania)

To Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell
of (Cincinnati, Ohio)

No news from the New York Custom house. He gave the bill of lading to a custom broker and told him to try to get the packages as quick as possible. He has a small box of Breviaries which he will send Purcell. Father Caspar Gerst offers himself to Wood and has shown some of Purcell's letters. Wood asks if the man is sane. Wood's impressions are unfavorable but it seems a pity that one so young should go to ruin. Bishop (Michael) O'Connor has gone to Boston after quite a stay in Philadelphia. Wood thinks O'Connor's appearance in Pittsburgh disturbed the Ordinary.

II-5-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
3


1862 Nov 27

Xavier, Sister Mary, S.H.C.J.
Towanda, (Pennsylvania)

To (Archbishop John Baptist) Purcell
Cincinnati, (Ohio)

The Sisters are pleased to hear from Purcell and hope he will get to Towanda. They ask him to tell them when he will arrive so that they might send a carriage to either of the railroads to meet him. The pupils of both the grade schools of the parish and the young Indian school are increasing. Sister asks that Purcell remember them in his prayers and in the Holy Sacrifice. She hopes that Purcell's intended visit will be soon.

II-5-b A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Nov 28

(Baraga), Frederick, Bishop of Saut Ste. Marie
Saut Ste. Marie, Michigan

to Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefevere
Detroit, Mich(igan)

When Baraga was in Detroit in the summer of 1862, Lefevere had told him that he had to dismiss a certain Irish priest, (Father) Michael McLaughlin from Detroit, because of his drunkenness. Baraga received him into his diocese and he behaved very well for 2 or 3 months. But lately he drank whiskey again secretly. Baraga dismissed him immediately not to let it come to a scandal. But as some persons were dissatisfied with this action, he asks Lefevere to give him a written statement about that priest, that he may show it to whom it may concern.

III-2-j A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
2


1862 Nov 28

Chevalier, Jacques, In Philosophy at Grand Seminary of
Rennes, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Chevalier announces that he is in the number of (Odin's) children. His parents consented to all that he asked. He wishes to know when he can leave. He will go to Louvain. As he will be with his parents, he asks (Odin) to write to Father Allaire, assistant at St. Peter's of Plesguen, Ille et Vilaine.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
2


1862 Nov 28

Harnais, M(athurin), Grand Seminary of
Rennes, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.) of New Orleans
Lyons, (France)

When Harnais inscribed his name on (Odin's) register two weeks ago, he did not do so without the consent of his director. He now regrets to reply that he cannot accompany him. His director told him to wait for a year or two, even three if necessary. It is very probable that in two or three years he will not be free, but at least the consolations of obedience will temper his pain.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
1


1862 Nov 28

Orhant, C., In Philosophy at Grand Seminary of
Rennes, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of
Lyons, France)

Orhant can finally assure (Odin) of his faithfulness to his engagements. He believes himself called by God to follow him for, in addition to his natural penchant for the Americans, the ease with which he obtained the consent of his parents and the encouragement of his director is an almost certain proof. He wishes to know as soon as possible, when he should join (Odin) so as to be able to spend some time with his family, and also whether he will go to Louvain or immediately to America. (Odin) should consult only his own interests and those of religion.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Nov 28

Ruellan, Ul., Grand Seminary of
Rennes, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, CM. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Ruellan was unable to offer himself to (Odin) during his stay at the seminary, but since his departure he has made a definite resolution; the superior agreed to receive him in (Odin's) name and, if he confirms that acceptance, he will be ready to accompany him with his colleagues.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


(1862 Nov 28)

Véron, Louis, Grand Seminary of
Angers, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

On the occasion of (Odin's) little speech, Véron felt awaken the desire, formed long ago, to become a missionary. He prayed, then revealed his design to his director. Obedient to his voice and the need of his own soul, he writes to ask if (Odin) would agree to have him work with him one day. He is now in his first year of theology and he is not yet in orders. He awaits his reply to announce his project to his family from whom he fears the strongest opposition. He wonders if (Odin) would consent to take him without the consent of his parents. He wishes to know what he should do to obtain the consent of his ecclesiastical superiors. He has been raised entirely at the expense of the diocese.

A.L.S. (French)

On the same paper:

--------
1862 Nov 28

Aguesse, Father F.
Grand Seminary of Anger, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Veron, whose director Aguesse is, makes this request with his approval. He is capable of becoming a useful missionary. His talents, without being extraordinary, are above mediocre, his health is good, and in regard to piety he is an edifying seminarian.

P.S. He asks (Odin) not to make him await a reply too long as Veron's parents live at a distance and it will take a little time to obtain their consent by letters.

A.L.S. (French)
VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
2


(1862) Nov 29

Alleau, Father Th.
Tours, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
Lyons, France)

Since he left (Odin) at Rennes Alleau has been fearful for (Odin's) health. Father (Basil Anthony) Moreau, (C.S.C.) wrote that (Odin) is counting on Alleau; Alleau is ready to go with him. He has told no one about his leaving; he did not wish to make it known until (Odin) gave him sufficient certainty. (Odin's note on the back of the letter indicates that the letter was received and answered November 22).

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 1p. 4to.
2


1862 Nov 29

Bouttier, Hegésippe, Grand Seminary of
Rennes, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Bouttier is ready to follow (Odin) to America. Yesterday he received a letter from his parent's which gave their consent. He has not only the assent but also the encouragement of his director. His only fear is that some accident will prevent his departure. He asks permission to spend 12 days or two weeks with his family.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Nov 29

Dilworth, Timothy and Daniel Hegarty, All Hallows College
Dublin, (Ireland)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.) of New Orleans
(Lyons, France)

Seeing that (Odin) left before some had made up their minds as to what they had a right to do and before some, including the two undersigned, had an opportunity to speak with him, they write that they are anxious to become his subjects. They are perfectly at liberty, as, having paid the full fees to date, they are satisfied either to go with him immediately or to remain there. Dilworth having studied in a college before, has a recommendation from the president thereof. They are respectively 20 and 21 .

VI-2-f A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.



2


1862 Nov 29

Férec, (John) Ch(arles)
Seminary of Quimper, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Everything has been accomplished successfully for three clerks a the seminary of Quimper: Mr. Henry, (Aymard) Bizien and Férec. Moreover, his brother, Jean Pierre Férec, also wishes to leave at the same time. He is 21, instructed by the Brothers of Christian Schools, and has been employed as a teacher at the minor seminary of Guérande. He is in a condition to explain the catechism and hopes to become a priest. If (Odin's) resources do not permit him to pay for the trip for his brother, Férec asks him to make the necessary advances, promising to repay him himself. Henry and he have no relatives who can oppose their departure; Bizien has returned from Carhaix, where his parents live, with full consent. They await (Odin's) reply and the result of the letter he should write to Bishop (Renatus Nicolaus Sargent) of Quimper.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
5


1862 Nov 29

McCloskey, Father W(illia)m
Rome, (Italy)

To Bishop (Francis P. McFarland of Hartford
Providence, Rhode Island)

He encloses (McFarland's) account up to April 1862 (no enclosure). During his vacation he wrote to most of the Archbishops stating the affairs of the (North American) College and asking them to do something about it. He felt the delicacy in asking for help when the bishops were in financial straits, but he was advised to do so by the Bishops he consulted at the canonization ceremony. Bishops McFarland, (David Bacon), (John Loughlin), and (John Timon) left sooner than McCloskey had anticipated. It was Archbishop (John) Hughes who urged him to write to the Archbishops. The Bishops of Albany, Boston, and Chicago urged also. He is ashamed to speak of money when he reads of the situation in America which seems to be going from bad to worse. He does not know the resources of the Democratic Party but he expects a conflict between it and the Republicans as fierce as that between the sections of the Union. They are rejoicing too soon on the changes in the French ministry. The Emperor is playing the saint. The Pope is pleased. The American minister (R.M.) Blatchford is there and is pleasing except for his black Republicanism. He is many degrees above the Governor of Wisconsin who left in August. Father (C.H.) Stonestreet is in Rome, and there are other American priests from New York, St. Louis, and Philadelphia. McCloskey was in Perugia and had a chance to see something of the Sardinians. They go about their business as if they had always been under Victor Emmanuel, but they hate the clergy. The government is continually seizing the property of the religious orders and even the nuns are not safe. He doubts that the Pope will ever regain his possessions except there be some war such as followed the French Revolution. In Rome things seem quiet, even the Jesuits are not disturbed. The Pope has a cough. Monsignor Talbot appears much improved. Americans flying from the war are heard on the piazzas but they have such a dose of rebellion that they do not preach it as they did. Four new men have joined them at the College, one from Richmond. Bishop (Patrick N.) Lynch has done better than last year. He asked to be remembered to McFarland. A young man whom McFarland had seen there has gone mad and has been put in an asylum in Perugia, but he has since written a sensible letter. Bishop (John) Fitzpatrick is in Munich or near there. Bishop (Michael) O'Connor is giving a mission in Boston so that Fitzpatrick need not hurry back. He visited Monsignor (Tobias) Kirby but got lost on his way back. Dr. Bernard Smith was at the College yesterday. He has his hands full with the Americans.

I-1-b A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
8


1862 Nov 30

Denis, S.M., Father (Leon F.?), Superior of the Grand Seminary of
St. Brieuc, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Bishop (Augustin David) accords six subjects to (Odin): (Theodore) Lamy who will be ordained on (December) 20; (John Baptist Le Saicherre) Le Séchairre who is a strong subject and will complete his theology this year; (René) Vallée, subdeacon who has less talent than Le Séchairre but will do well; (Hyacinthe) Le Cozic who is very extraordinary and is also finishing his theology; (John Mary) Dénecé who has had a year of theology and will succeed well; and (J.B.) Prand who is beginning his theology and does not lack talent. All will leave at the first signal from (Odin). Denis wonders if (Odin) would accept another subject who is very pious but very mediocre in talents. Altogether, these young men owe about 3,500 and Denis wonders if (Odin) could make this debt good on condition of being reimbursed later in America. He is confident that this first group will not be the only one; several others are thinking of following (Odin).

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
8


1862 Nov 30

Favre, (S.M.), Father J.
Superior of the Marist (Fathers)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

The Marists held a council in regard to (Odin's) request. They accept his offer experimentally and will give him two priests at the moment of his departure. As they are short of money, they count on (Odin) paying the travel expenses.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 1p. 4to.
2


1862 Nov 30

Joanon, A.
Lyons, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

In the absence of her husband, Joanon seeks an audience with (Odin). For about 8 years they have had business agreements in regard to vestments with several pastors of (New Orleans), and several of these priests have become their very dear and esteemed friends. Father (Charles M.) Ménard of Thibodaux among others, is regarded by them as a brother. By his last letter of July they learned of (Odin's) arrival in France. Since then, no news has come and fearing that his stay in Lyons will be short, they seek a moment of conversation about their friends and their position, and still more about Father (Amédée) Béccard whom a spirit, misunderstanding, or embittered misfortune, has advised not to write any more for more than two years.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
3


1862 Nov 30

Lebret, Emmanuel, Grand Seminary of
Rennes, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Lebret sincerely regrets not being among those who are going to follow (Odin) to America, but he hopes to go in a year because he believes God calls him there.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
1


1862 Nov 30

McMaster, James A.
Freeman's Journal

Quarterly return of receipts for advertisements was $338.66 for which no tax was liable.

--------
1863 Feb 28

Quarterly return of receipts for advertisements. No receipts; no tax due.

--------
1863 May 30

Quarterly return of receipts for advertisements. No receipts; no tax due.

I-1-m Printed form 3 sheets 8vo.
1


1862 Nov 30

Raviol, Father J(ohn) F.
Embrun, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Having learned that (Odin) was at Rennes, Raviol wishes to acquaint him with a matter of concern to him. Because of his infirmities he was forced to give his resignation to Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc. A year later Father (Gilbert) Raymond replaced him in St. Landry parish and he retired to his home to care for his health. In leaving the parish he gave Blanc the land and the church at Washington on condition of a pension of $160 at New Orleans or 800 francs in France. While he remained at his home, it was paid by Raymond, but since his departure, no annuity has been paid. He asks (Odin) to calm his anxiety.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
5