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Calendar: 1862

(1862) (Dec)

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
( )

To (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

(First page of letter missing - no date) Ned hopes the war will last long enough to make all their officers regulars. He claims that the privates, with very few exceptions, are not the equals of their officers. Socially, a private is treated with regard to an officer the same as a "nigger" is treated with regard to a white man. Ned wishes his Father (Orestes A. Brownson, Sr.) would ask Sumner and Wilson each for an army register for 1863. The Senate has published it and will not give any copies to the army. Henry (Brownson) wants one and he wants one. He says upon reading the Seward article in the Review he cannot help but notice inefficiency, jauntiness and short-sightedness of Seward. He sends his love to all and asks to be remembered to Bill (Brownson) and Orestes (A. Brownson, Jr.).

P.S. Ned says he tried to locate the Elizabeth, (N.J.) Men while traveling around with Mr. Howell but believes they are at Balls Bluff.

I-5-i A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
3


1862 (Dec)

Hoffer, Father L.
( , Ohio)

To Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell)
of (Cincinnati, Ohio)

Bishop (Amadeus) Rappe wrote him concerning the pain he is experiencing over Purcell's claiming Hoffer as his subject and requesting him to explain how he stands in relation to Purcell. It is true that Hoffer's exeat bore the diocese of Cincinnati as the place where he was to exercise the ministry on leaving his native country. It was Father (J. N.) Thisse who persuaded Hoffer to come to America. Thisse made certain conditions which were not fulfilled as the result of some sorry circumstances which they both regret. After waiting six months Hoffer offered his services to Rappe who accepted them with generosity that he cannot forget. He became Rappe's subject without having the least idea that he was violating Purcell's rights. Thisse, through a sentiment of friendship, has formed a project to bring Hoffer into his neighborhood. But the obligations of gratitude have connected Hoffer to Rappe. These obligations are greater than the human motive of friendship. If, however, according to the laws of the church, he belongs to Purcell, he is ready to obey. He thanks Purcell for his kindness in his regard.

P.S. Here is what he learned about the priest at Dover (Ohio): he has worked to supplant Father (Henry) Fehling at Marges; he felt that he was strong enough to attend to all the missions about Dover, and he wrote to Purcell asking to be changed or that Fehling be removed. He left the diocese of Philadelphia. Hoffer learned that Fehling is loved and respected. Hoffer submits this information but if not certain if it is entirely exact. (Received December 1862, but not dated).

II-5-b A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
5


1862 Dec

O'Brien, D.D., Proprietor of the Southern Pilot
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

To (Archbishop John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

In May, after consultation with the Catholic clergy and other friends, O'Brien purchased the Catholic Standard for $900 which he was enabled to pay by the aid of the following: June, 1862 - Paid J.C. Dinnies, $900; paid for materials, etc. $100; Received from Father E(tienne) Rousselon, $30; Father J(ohn) Hayden, (C,M.), $100; Father A(nthony) Ver(r)ina, (C.M.), $70; Father C(ornelius) Moynihan, $50; Father M(ichael) Sheehan, $25; Father J(eremiah) Moynihan, $50; Father P(eter) McMahon, $25; Father Henry Riordan, $50; Father Richard Kane, $20; Father T.(J.D.?) Flanagan, $50; Father H.(J. Ambroise?) Martin, $20; Father A(nthony) Durier, $10; Father P(atrick F.) Sheil, (C.S.C.), $50; Redemptorist Fathers, per Father J(ohn) B. Duffy, (C.SS.R.),$50; Misters J.M. Brenan, $100; M.B. Brady, $50; Thomas O'Donnell, $50; John Henderson, $50; Hugh McCluskey, $20; P.B. O'Brien, $20; Tho(ma)s King, $20; Margaret Haughery, $10. Total of $920, less discount of $70 on Confederate money leaving $850 plus balance of $150 from O'Brien.
The following is a statement of receipts and expenditures since the paper went into operation in August to December 1862: 16 subscribers paid in advance, viz: $10 each from Thomas Layton, D.P. Scanlan, James Carter, Mr. Nesbit, Ja(me)s Murphy, P.C. Cull, R.J. Druhan, John Kavanagh, W(illia)m Randolph, Thomas Hales, Dennis Cronan, Tho(ma)s L. White, Thomas Fitzwilliams; $9 each from Tho(ma)s Dunn, A. Egan, M. Duffy; 242 subscribers each paid $3; 31 each paid $1.50 for a total of $909(?). Cash from advertising $133. Derelict as many of his subscribers have been, receipts are in excess of the expenditures $43. He has not appropriated a dollar to his own use. As a result this means are expended and he will be obliged to discontinue the publication unless he obtains some aid. The existing crisis once passed and an increased circulation in the country obtained, he would guarantee the issuance of a paper equal in size and ability to any other Irish Catholic Journal on the continent. Persons subscribing funds will be supplied with papers for their friends, or will be repaid in advertising, etc.

VI-2-f Printed Letter 2pp. 4to.
43


1862 Dec

(Rappe), Amadeus, Bishop of Cleveland
Cleveland, (Ohio)

To (Father Joseph A. Heimo)
(Mount Baton, Ohio)

Heimo asks for his exeat for the diocese of Cincinnati. He will grant it since the Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell) wishes to receive him.

II-5-b A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
2


1862 Dec 1

Mancel
Rennes, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

At first Mancel hoped to be able to accompany several of his colleagues who are going to sacrifice themselves to the welfare of (Odin's) people. God decided otherwise. However, he still hopes to reach the end of his hopes.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
1


(18)62 Dec 2

Hirel, Alfred, In Philosophy at Seminary of
Rennes, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Hirel has obtained the consent of his parents to go to Louvain. They prefer that he does not go to America this year, and this is also the feeling of his director. Their conditions are that the expenses of the trip and his maintenance at the mission seminary be taken care of. These are the propositions (Odin) made. He has some small savings and thinks he can pay his passage as far as Paris. He has not yet satisfied the conscription but does not believe it will offer any difficulty. When he receives (Odin's) reply, he will go to spend some moments with his family and then return to Rennes to await the day of departure.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 1p. 4to.
1


1863 Dec 3

Damen, S.J., Father A(rnold)
Chicago, (Illinois)

To Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell)
of (Cincinnati, Ohio)

Father ( ) Schultz informs him that Purcell desires him to give a mission in his cathedral and in St. Patrick's church. Nothing will give him greater pleasure than to be of service to Purcell who has been so great a benefactor to their Society. He can come with one Father to commence the mission after Christmas. If Purcell waits until Lent Father (C.F.) Smarius could come along. Damen does not fee qualified to preach to a congregation so enlightened as that of the cathedral.

II-5-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Dec 3

Damen, S.J., (Father) A(rnold)
Chicago, (Illinois)

To Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell)
Cincinnati, Ohio

Damen reread Father Schultz's letter and perceived therein that Purcell desires the Mission be given before Christmas. It had been announced that Damen would open the mission at St. Gaul's Church in Milwaukee on the 2nd Sunday of Advent, but if Purcell wishes him to commence the mission in the Cathedral he should let him know by dispatch so that he might postpone the Milwaukee mission. If Purcell can wait until the first Sunday in January or the first Sunday after Christmas, it would be much more convenient for him. Father C.F. Smarius (S,J.) left for Leavenworth, St. Joseph's, Kansas City and other places.

II-5-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
2


1862 Dec 3

Keck, Franz Anton
Le Mans, (France)

To Father (Denavit
Lyons, France)

They have received his letter telling them to await Archbishop (John Mary Odin's, C.M.) return patiently. Their resolution is made and the delay will only inflame them more with the desire of devoting themselves to the apostolate. If (Odin) should reject their request, they will not abandon their project but they will await another occasion as they awaited (Odin's) arrival. They ask him to submit this letter with the other two to (Odin) so that he might be convinced that nothing can make them abandon their resolution and that sooner or later they will leave the Congregation (of Holy Cross) in order to embrace a career which answers better to their calling. Finally, they ask him to tell (Odin) of their desire that he address his letter to Mr. Farelly with placing one of their names on the envelope; this is by way of precaution in case their project fails, and in case of success, they do not wish the superior (Father Basil Anthony Moreau, C.S.C.) to learn of their resolution from others, since their letters are opened and read before being delivered to them. (In the New Orleans papers).

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
5


1862 Dec 3

Rochejaquelin, D., Countess de la Ussé, by Chinon
Indre et Loire (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Rochejaquelin saw in the newspaper, L'Union, that he is at Lyons and has performed an ordination. She wonders if she can write to him or hope to see him. For a long time she was worried about him because of the American war. She has only a minute to take advantage of the mail since (Odin) is leaving Lyons.

P.S. His little godson Bertrand is at Menou near Varzy. Unfortunately they are not near the train. Otherwise she could hope that if he goes to Paris he would bring them a blessing. She does not plan to go to Paris before mid-January. She sends her respects to the Bishop of Lyons.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Dec 4

Baroux, Father L(ouis)
Auloiner (Aulnoye?), (France)

To Bishop P(eter) P(aul) Lefevere
Detroit, Michigan

They had an excellent crossing in spite of the storms. They left New York October 11th and debarked the 22nd in Ireland. Baroux arrived in Paris on the 30th, and is resting a couple of weeks; afterwards he will begin to preach for his mission. As he has not preached in French for the last 3 years, his debut will be in small towns, and later in great centers, where offerings will be larger. He hopes to succeed but there will be disappointments and difficulties due to weather and fatigue. Michigan's temperature is a lot like here, but there are more bad days. His address is Laumonier, Caen.

III-2-j A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Dec 4

Bruneau, Father Martin, Superior of St. Vincent's Seminary
Le Mans, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Confidential. One of his seminarians (Jules Bonhommet?) has expressed the strongest desire to follow (Odin). He has spent only one year here and he has only had his philosophy. His qualities are most ordinary. But he wishes to offer this sacrifice, and Bruneau wonders if it is not God who has inspired him with this thought. The least are sometimes called first by the Lord, and experience has encouraged him to send this letter. Added Dec. 5: Another (Francis Mary?)came this morning to express his desire to give himself to (Odin). Bruneau thinks he could be suitable, but needs to know at what time he should be ready before making a definite decision. Bruneau will await (Odin's) reply to give him fuller information. Bruneau is going to join his letter to his. He hopes (Odin) will grant his request.

A.L.S. (French) 3pp.

Enclosure:

--------
1862 Dec 4

Mary, F(rancis), St. Vincent's Seminary
Le Mans, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Confidential. For a long time he has felt a desire to consecrate himself to the missions but he saw that he lacked the talents and virtue. When (Odin) came to the seminary and spoke to them of his need for missionaries, the desire reawakened and he has been unable to put it away. He spoke to his director who advised him to write to (Odin). He knows that God sees his desire and will help him.

A.L.S. (French) 4pp.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 7pp. 12mo.
3


1862 Dec 4

Gautier, F., Grand Seminary of
Rennes, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

It would have been a great happiness for him to be among those who will accompany (Odin) to America. However, Gautier's director has advised him to wait some time. He hopes it will not be far off.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
1


1862 Dec 4

Schwartz, Father, Director of the Grand Seminary of
Angers, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

He sends adjoined, the letter by which (Louis) Chassé asks (Odin) to accept him among the missionaries of New Orleans. He is an excellent subject in all regards. His theological studies are not very advanced. Last year he was in their house of philosophy; this year he is beginning theology. A priest has asked him to ask (Odin) for news of one of his relations, Father (Emile) Hil(l)aire, who left the diocese of Angers to go to America after having been chaplain of a ship in the French fleet in the Crimean War, and then pastor of Bouche-Maine near Angers. He would be thankful if (Odin) in his reply to Chassé, would let him know if Hil(l)aire is in his diocese and if there is good news of him to give to his family. (Notation by Odin): he has replied favorably.

A.L.S. (French) 3pp.

Enclosure:

--------
1862 Dec 3

Chassé, Louis
Grand Seminary of Angers, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Odin's passage at Angers and the words he addressed to them have given birth to a strong desire to go to the aid of so many souls. Following the advice of his director whose letter will give (Odin) the necessary information about him, Chassé writes for advice. If he did not consult with him during his stay at the seminary, it was because he did not wish to give any place to enthusiasm or imagination. He hopes that (Odin) will give him all the information he needs to make a decision and that if he accepts him, he will announce it as soon as possible so that he will be prepared to leave when he calls, and so that he will know whether he can accept an invitation to receive the tonsure at the Christmas ordination. (Notation by Odin): he replied that there is hope he will be admitted.

A.L.S. (French) 4pp.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 7pp. 8vo.
3


1862 Dec 4

Wood, James F., Bishop of Philadelphia
Philadelphia, (Pennsylvania)

To Archbishop J(ohn) B(aptist) Purcell
(Cincinnati, Ohio)

Wood sent by express the box of books from Paris. He is thinking of taking a trip to New York and making forcible entrance into the Custom House with a "passe comitatus"his long detained effects because he would like them by Christmas. Mr. Hugh McNally's efforts to get them have failed. Wood intends to write to the Customhouse brokers and ask them to report the progress, if any, which they making toward obtaining the goods. Dr. Relp of Münster took the 200 francs credit balance from Purcell's account and used it to pay some of the traveling expenses of Wood's students as his account was minus. He sends Purcell a check for $51.29 an equivalent to the two hundred francs, which is a great amount due to the high rate of exchange, nearly 26 cents to a franc, but remits the amount because the rate is the fault of neither. He asks when God will deliver them from the imbecilic president and his companions.

II-5-b A.l.S. 2pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Dec 6

Gurley, John A.
Washington, D.C.

To Orestes A. Brownson
Elizabeth, New Jersey

Representative Gurley inquires if Brownson would deliver two lectures in Chicago for a fee of seventy-five dollars each. If he will, then arrangements can be completed as soon as he informs Gurley what evenings he is free to lecture. One lecture could be on the Civil War and Brownson can choose the subject of the other lecture. War lectures are the most popular as Brownson is aware.

I-4-b A.L.S. 1p. 8mo.
1


1862 Dec 6

Favre, Claude
G(ran)d Seminary of Annecy, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Favre has just obtained from his parents complete freedom to follow (Odin) to the banks of the Mississippi. His heart has nothing more to wish except that (Odin) will count him among his servants, give him information about everything he should bring, and indicate the time and place he should go. He is persuaded that several of his colleagues will follow his footsteps.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 8vo.
1


1862 Dec 6

Pellouas, William, Cl(erk) Min(or), Grand Seminary
Rennes, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Ignorance of certain secret circumstances concerning his mother at first made Pellouas resolve the question affirmatively. Then his mother's position was revealed to him by one of her sisters, a religious, to whom he had revealed his plan. His director decided that he should wait. There would be some inconveniences in leaving now and the obstacle will not last more than a year. This will not delay his ordination since he is only 21, and it will give him time to finish his theology and to ripen his resolution.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Dec 6

Pont, Father F(rancis) Ploudéry, by Landerneau,
Finistére, (France)

To Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.) of New Orleans
(Lyons, France)

It was with the greatest of pleasure that Pont learned of Odin's thorough success at Quimper. Father Le Coll, professor of philosophy, wrote that Odin got 8 or 9 seminarians but only 3 will be able to go now; the others nor being able to get their parents' consent Pont has found another, a priest, ordained 12 years, a man of great education. He has no parents to prevent his going, but he has a disgrace in coming from a large parish where he was assistant into a smaller one. The reason, they say, was that he drank freely. Pont has asked the opinion of most excellent clergymen who affirm that he is no drunkard. Bishop (Renatus Nicolaus) Sergent is very severe with his clergy who are too numerous for the places. On account of that disgrace, some 3 years ago, he wishes Odin to write to Bishop Sergent. Pont is sure that he will be one of the best priests in New Orleans. As for the drinking, he has left it aside long ago. Pont reads the papers daily and does not see that they will soon have an opportunity to return but he will be ready as soon as Odin tells him. The name of the above priest is Father Morvan, assistant at Tréhou.

VI-2-f A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
4


1862 Dec 6
Subileau, Joseph, Grand Seminary of
Angers, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Subileau has the consent of his parents at last. (Odin's) letter produced the effect which he had expected. It is now necessary to obtain the permission of the Bishop of Angers. The superior wishes (Odin) to take care of it because of the arrangements he has made with the bishop. Subileau begs (Odin) to negotiate it as soon as possible so that he can receive the tonsure. What (Odin) does for him, he should also do for Joseph Viau who also awaits only the bishop's permission. Later, when (Odin) makes known the day of departure, he should give them all the necessary information and tell them what it will be necessary to bring.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
2


1862 Dec 7

Lejoly, C.M., J. Fr.
Vannes, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Unforseen circumstance place an obstacle to Lejoly's departure for Louisiana. He sees himself held back for the moment but if these affairs change direction he hopes before long to place himself at (Odin's) disposition.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
1


1867 Dec 7

Marchand, Ad.
Vannes, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Marchand would have been happy to follow his pious plan but the good Lord has decided otherwise; at least he is obliged to wait until later. He is far from renouncing it.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Dec 8

Blanc-Garin, Théophile, Seminary of
Annecy, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Blanc-Garin has not changed his mind and he awaits the happy day which will bring him to Louisiana. He would like to see some of his relatives before his departure but he hesitates to leave the seminary without having received a reply from (Odion). He asks the day of departure and then he will know what time he can give to his relatives.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Dec 8

Harnais, M(athurin), Grand Seminary of
Rennes, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

In approving the letter which Harnais wrote to (Odin) several days ago, his director told him to send it but to wait. He had an ulterior motive and Harnais did not know it. Everything is concluded. According to what his director told him (Odin) will let him know the time of departure; therefore he will not ask fuller details.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
1


1862 Dec 8

Moser, Anna and Margarethe Moser, Caroline Moser and Lissette Moser
Mannheim, (Germany)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Paris, France)

According to the instructions of her brother, P.H. Moser, in Galveston, she writes to (Odin). Because of the military unrest two years have passed since her brother wrote. They are old and often ill. One sister has been ill for the last 13 years. Their brother is their only support. She asks (Odin) to send them 100 fr(ancs) which their brother will repay. Her brother wrote that it is easier to get (the money) in this way than from Galveston. They are all well again except her brother Joseph is in Pforzheim for idiocy. It was impossible to have him with them any longer.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (German) 3pp. 4to.
2


1862 Dec 9

Bouquet Despins
St. Germain L'espinasse, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
St. Germain, L'espinasse, France)

Bouquet just learned of (Odin's) arrival at his sister-in-law's, and he and his wife beg him to grant them what he had not been able to several months ago at his arrival, to see him and to shake hands. Long ago he blessed them and his blessing bore fruit; his two daughters, then so young, are now married and happy and they also are impatient to see him again. (Odin) should let Bouquet know if Bouquet can pay him a visit today and tell him what day he can promise to come to dine with the family.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Dec 9

Henry, Sub-deacon at the Grand Seminary of Quimper
Finistère, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of
Lyons, France)

It will probably be impossible to realize his ardent desire to accompany (Odin) to the missions. The wretched position of his family does not permit him to leave. Furthermore, many priests have made him observe the great dangers to his soul that a secular priest runs in the missions. The latter reason alone would not make him draw back since he is convinced that (Odin) would provide against these perils.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Dec 9

Joubert, Father Alexandre, Le Monestier, Canton of
S(t.) Amand, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans)
Lyons, France)

The assistant at the parish of Monestier of whom (Odin) spoke to Mr. Réveret at the G(rand)d Seminary of Clermont throws himself at (Odin's) feet. It is not only today that he thought of embracing the life of a missionary. At the time of his philosophy his director advised him to take theology at Mont-Ferrand. He did so and the third year he was to leave for New Mexico. He went to ask his Father's blessing and it was refused. His Father told him to wait two years and then he could go wherever he wished. The two years are almost completed. Soon, he will be a priest for a year. He first wrote two letters to Mont-Ferrand, one to the Superior of the G(ran)d Seminary and the other to the treasurer, who was his director, to ask the steps to take to obtain the bishop of Clermont's permission.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
2


1862 Dec 9

(Monnet, C.S.J., Louise), Mother St. Claude
Bourg, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

His very short stay in the midst (of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Bourg) did not permit them to talk to him as long as they had wished in the interest of their sisters in America. Since (Odin's) departure, they have reflected very seriously about everything he has proposed and they feel the necessity of talking to him again. They feel sure that he will not refuse this favor; by forestalling his arrival at Lyons a little the trip should be easy since the distance from Lyons to Bourg is very short.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
2


1862 Dec 9

Veron, Louis, Grand Seminary of
Angers, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

In his first letter Veron revealed his desire to leave for America. Father Denavit's reply made hope that (Odin) would accept him. Following his director's advice he obtained the consent of his parents. Now is (Odin) accepts him, Veron asks him to do what he did for his colleagues, (Joseph) Subileau and (Joseph) Viau. Particularly that which concerns an exeat. The superior of the seminary does not seem to want to take on this matter. He would also like a word of the time and circumstances of departure.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
4


1862 Dec 10

Favre, Claude, G(ran)d Seminary of
Annecy, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Favre has the consent of his parents and of the superiors of the seminary. One thing he forgot to make clear in his letter of the 6th; when he spoke to (Odin), he expressed the ardent desire to go to America quickly. (Odin) gave him hope but said it would be decided at Paris. Many reasons prevented his leaving Annecy before (Odin) gave him this hope for his parents would never permit him to go to Louvain. He would rather remain at Annecy than go to Louvain, but living there, he makes no engagements for later. In Louisiana he would have the immense advantage of being with two seminarians whom he knows particularly and who have offered to give him some private lessons.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Dec 10

Florent, C.S.C., Father Tours, on journey to
Bordeaux, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

As Florent is about to set out for (Odin's) diocese he informs him that he embarks from Bordeaux on (December) 12. When (Odin) visited them (at Le Mans), they thought he could embark on (October) 28. As he has desired for many years to go to a foreign mission and as he joined the Congregation of Holy Cross for this purpose, his superiors send him to (Odin's) archbishopric that he may there be employed in the mission as he was formerly in England. He understands that one or two of their students are to join (Odin's) clergy as, they say, they have no vocation to be religious. Since they have been with them, nothing can be said against them; if they can be constant, they may be useful. However, he has no business in that affair.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
2


1862 Dec 10

Garnier, F., Grand Seminary of
Rennes, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

(Odin) can count on Garnier. For some time he was undecided whether he should ask his parents' consent. Finally, reflecting that he would ask in vain, he followed the advice of his director who urged him to accompany (Odin). Several persons who take an interest in him beg him to inform (Odin) that they wish him to go to Louvain to complete his seminary. He leaves the decision to (Odin).

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Dec 10

Ravirre, Jean Marie, Grand Seminary of
Annecy, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Ravirre has just received the consent of his parents. He asks (Odin) to indicate what he should do, what he should procure, the day of departure, and the place of reunion.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 1p. 8vo.
1


1862 Dec 10

Timon, Bishop John
Buffalo, (New York)

To Bishop Peter Paul Lefev(e)re
Detroit, (Michigan)

Timon thanks Lefevere for the copy of his last Synod. He sends an enclosure, about which the Bishop can take the lead or concur with several bishops of the Province who visited (the American College at) Louvain last summer and returned greatly pleased with all they saw. If he and the bishops can concur Timon thinks they could have quite a number of bishops write in the petition. He wishes Lefevere's corrections and sends a rough draft (no enclosure) in English of what he thought they might ask for with certainty of success. He recalls their earlier life when they were much together .

A.L.S. 1p. 4to.

On the same paper:

--------
1861 Apr 15

Barnabo, Cardinal A(lexander)
Rome, (Italy)

To Father John DeNeve
Louvain, (Belgium)

Barnabo received DeNeve's letter of the 11th, together with a letter from the Bishop of Louisville, (Martin John Spalding) and also signed by (Lefevere) in which they themselves and in the name of other bishops commend DeNeve and the American College to the Sacred Congregation. Barnabo wrote them without delay, but no other letter on the subject from the bishops of the United States has reached him and therefore, so far, he cannot answer the petitions of DeNeve or his predecessor because nothing from the American bishops as regards this institute has been referred to the Congregation. However, with the advantage already perceived by the missions, the above mentioned bishops should consider the evidence and they should not delay. The generosity of the Holy See will be most ready. He writes to DeNeve with a favorable disposition. In the meanwhile he prays that everything fortunate and favorable be given to him abundantly.

A.L.S. (Latin) Copy 1p. 4to.
III-2-j A.L.S., A.L.S. (Latin) Copy 2pp. 4to.
5


1862 Dec 10

(Timon, Bishop John)
Buffalo, (New York)

To Bishop (Francis P. McFarland of
Hartford Providence, Rhode Island)

The President of the American College of Louvain has written asking some action on the part of American Bishops to get favors from the Holy Father. On his visit to the college last summer he promised to see what could be done and he has thought of a letter signed by many Bishops in the spirit of the following. The letter proposed calls attention to the many missionaries now in the American mission who were prepared at the North American College in Louvain. The Bishops ask for certain indulgences on stated occasions.

I-1-b Seemingly a First Draft 2pp. 12mo.
2


1862 Dec 11

Gay, Basile, Grand Seminary of
Annecy, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

At the time of (Odin's) short stay in their midst, Gay revealed his plan to follow him to the foreign missions; he asked only for time to consult, reflect, and obtain the consent of his parents. Now according to the advice of his director, everything is settled. His parents, however, refuse to pay his debts at the seminary which amount to 90 francs. For the rest, he is ready to follow him and asks only the time and place where he should join him and what he will need.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
1


1862 Dec 11

Maume, M(ichael) E.
San Francisco, (California)

To (Arch)bishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Maume asks Odin to forward the enclosed (no enclosure) papers to his brother Mat(t)hew W(aldron) Maume of Galveston, Texas. It is of the greatest importance as property to the value of $50,000 is involved. He hopes Odin will do all in his power for an old Texas parish(i)oner.

VI-2-f A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
2


1862 Dec 11

Spalding, Father B(enjamin) J.
Louisville, (Kentucky)

To Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell
of Cincinnati, (Ohio)

His cousin Dr. Robert Spalding is a surgeon in the Confederate Army. Robert's brother Richard was high sheriff of Union County and Robert was one of the securities of his brother. The sheriff's accounts are much involved and Robert wishes to return to Union county and to the practice of his profession in order to be able to settle the accounts. Spalding asks if Robert can return without being arrested. The matter has been submitted to Gen. Boyle and he directed them to Gen. Wright. Spalding asks Purcell to intercede for Robert. Purcell can assure Wright that Spalding is an honorable man.

II-5-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
2


(1862 Dec 12)

Alleau, Father Th., Grand Seminary of
Lyons, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.)
St. Germain l'Espinasse, France

Not having received any reply to the letter Alleau wrote when leaving Tours before his departure for Paris, and having finished all his business and desiring to see (Odin), he came to Lyons. He asks (Odin) to tell him if he is returning soon, if he should wait for him, or if it would be better for him to come to him. He has a pile of greetings to communicate to him.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Dec 12

Delafosse, C.O., Father A.M., Minor Seminary of
S(t.) Lo, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

The paternal goodness with which (Odin) replied to Delafosse's letter doubled the ardor of his desires. He would like to be in the middle of that vast district. He must admit that God's moments have not yet arrived; however, he has taken new steps. He had placed his last hope in a personal intervention by (Odin) with Father Pétètot, (C.O.) but since (Odin) has not judged it proper to do so he has been forced to act alone. Despite new and recent refusals, he has renewed his requests with so much ardor that he has chances of success. After the first of the year he will spend several days at Paris and he will ask Pétètot's permission to leave. If he succeeds he will hasten to inform (Odin). He asks when (Odin) plans to leave France.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
2


1862 Dec 12

Denavit, Father
Lyons, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
St. Germain les Pinasses, France)

Denavit first sent by train all the letters that have arrived for (Odin) during his absence. They are fairly numerous and except for 2 or 3 defections, he believes that all the replies are affirmative. He replied provisionally to all the letters, except those which gave their resignation, in order to encourage them to be patient. He will send to Ambierle all the letters which arrive up to the 20th. Bishop (Claude Mary) Dubuis, (C.M.) is not at Lyons but they will see him tomorrow and make him (Odin's) agent. Dubuis is planning to go to Coutouvre next week and from there he could easily go to Ambierle. Denavit wishes (Odin) had been there to moderate his zeal a little. He is called upon to preach and to officiate from all sides and he will not refuse. Denavit is worried about his health. The superior and their priests thank him for his plan to come to the seminary for Christmas. (J.M.) Giraud arrived from Dublin and is at Tarare with his uncle. Dubuis hopes to receive from Rome the extraordinary faculties he sought and to be able to ordain him at Tarare.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
3


1862 Dec 12

Felicitas, Sister of the Sisters of the Poor of St. Franc(is)
(Cincinnati), Ohio

to Archbishop J(ohn) B(aptist) Purcell
of (Cincinnati, Ohio)

Sister Felicitas tells Purcell that Father (Anthony) Cauvin, who is pastor of Hoboken, New Jersey in the diocese of Newark, proposed the filial house of the congregation in the town of Hoboken. The Sisters are to devote themselves to the service of the poor and sick. Four Sisters were requested. Sister Felicitas asks Purcell's permission to send the four Sisters. Enclosed is the note of approval from Bishop (James R. Bayley) of Newark. The Motherhouse of Aix-la-Chapelle gives its consent and promises to send the requisite number of sisters who are to be exchanged here for some time with a knowledge of English.

II-5-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
4


1862 Dec 12

Goss, Alexander, Bishop of
Liverpool, (England)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons France)

Father Ambrose Martin waited on Goss today with letters signed by (Odin's) vicar-general, Father (Stephen) Rousselon, and also with a testimonial signed by the second vicar, Father (Napoleon Joseph) Perché. He asks for leave to celebrate Mass and also for temporary employment in (Liverpool) on the ground that his parents are poor and that he has been recommended by the physician to try his native air for the restoration of his health. Goss asks (Odin) to direct Rousselon to say whether these facts are true and whether he is a good and zealous priest. He asks because priests sometimes ask for employment under false pretenses, representing that they are ailing bodily, whereas they too often are ailing mentally.

VI-2-f A.L.S. 4pp. 16mo.
4


1862 Dec 12

Manoritta, Father G(ioacchino)
(Rome, Italy)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Manoritta waited some days to answer (Odin's) letter to find Father Blosio to give him the consoling news, that is, that with a letter of recommendation from Cardinal Barnabo, Manoritta got the free steamship ride to Marseilles. Meantime he will prepare for the trip and Sunday he will begin the spiritual exercises. The only favor he asks of (Odin) is to have him leave soon after Christmas. To this end he will obtain some letters of recommendation so that he can stay in Paris without troubling (Odin) until they leave for America. He wishes (Odin) a happy holiday season and presents the greetings of Bishop (Emmanuele) Marongiu (Nurra) and Father Blosio.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (Italian) 2pp. 16mo.
3


1862 Dec 12

Speth, Father G. Metting, by Phalsbourg,
Meurthe, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

From the age of 16 Speth had the idea of consecrating himself to the foreign missions. His desires carried him toward China. In 1852, (Odin) having come to Nancy to edify them by his recital about Texas, he left and despite his poor health he would be there today except for the unspeakable manner in which he had been received at San Antonio. Returning to France, after having repaired his health a little, he wished to follow his first inclination and he wrote to the foreign missions who advised him to return to Texas. He sends their reply for (Odin) to see. He knows Bishop (Claude M.) Dubuis, (C.M.) and he does not have the courage to live under him. He asks (Odin) if Texas will soon be divided into two bishoprics, in which case he would like to return to San Antonio and join the Brothers of the (Christian) Schools. He also asks if the saintly Father (John) Gonnard is still living and if the blockade permits letters to pass to Texas. He congratulates (Odin) on his new dignity, and also Louisiana, but not poor Texas which has gained nothing.

A.L.S. (French) 2pp.

The above is written on this letter:

--------
1862 Sep 29

Albrand, Father, Superior, Seminary of Foreign Missions
Paris, (France)

To Father (G. Speth
Metting, France)

After examining his request of the 26th, they think that in view of his age, if he should return to the works of the holy ministry outside of France he should go to (Texas) which can better profit from his experience.

A.L.S. (French)

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
6


1862 Dec 12

Thisse, (Father) J.N.
Troy, Miami Co. (Ohio)

To Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell)
(Cincinnati, Ohio)

Thisse went down to Troy to arrange for the deed for the church lot and there he met Messrs. Drury and Donaher who were about to go to Piqua, (Ohio) for the same reason. Purcell's particulars, as sent to Thisse, were not entirely correct, but everything is now in due order. A copy is enclosed for Purcell's signature and Thisse expects Messrs. Butterfield and Co. to call on Purcell. Thisse received a letter from (Father A.) Heimo which contained an Exeat from Bishop (Amadeus) Rappe (of Cleveland) giving him to Purcell and Thisse wonders why Heimo did not send it directly to Purcell but he will send it as soon as he gets back to Piqua. He asks Purcell to pardon the poor paper, but states that, being away from home, it is the best he could find.

II-5-b A.L.S. 1pg. 8vo.
3


1862 Dec 12

Veyrat, Cyprien, Deacon, G(ran)d Seminary of
Annecy, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Veyrat begs (Odin) to agree to the proposition he made to enter his diocese. (Odin's) passage in their midst enabled him to realize the desires which had beset him for so long. He is ready to leave. (Odin) should let them know when they should be at Paris. They also wish to know what papers, books, and linens they should take. He has been obliged to buy some stockings but he did not ask his parents for fear of a refusal because of their chagrin at seeing him leave. He was obliged to take a small loan to pay for books and other debts occasioned by his departure. He hopes (Odin) will pay all the expenses of the trip, as he promised, and that he will send whatever he needs to meet his expenses as far as Paris.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
1


1862 Dec 12

Vulliet, Augustin, G(ran)d Seminary of
Annecy, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

When Vulliet spoke to (Odin) at the seminary, he revealed his desire to follow him to New Orleans. One thing held him back: leaving his mother who despite her great age found herself abandoned by all her family. She declared that she would not venture to oppose his will because he feared opposing God's will. He asks (Odin) to accept him and to tell him when they should rejoin him.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
1


1862 Dec 13

Alleau, Father Th., Grand Seminary of
Lyons, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
St. Germain l'Espinasse, France)

A telegram came yesterday morning permitting Alleau to await (Odin's) return. Bishop (Claude Mary) Dubuis, C.M. should arrive (at Odin's) on Wednesday. Alleau has seen him and told him what he had to communicate to (Odin). He is going to Montpellier where Dubuis will come soon; (Odin) will not be long in returning to Lyons where Alleau will be on his return from Montpellier. His disposition has not changed and no opposition can stop him.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
2


(1862 Dec 13)

Colliard, Jacques, Grand Seminary of
Annecy, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

To leave for the missions has always been Colliard's only wish, but held back by the tears of a mother and the threats of a Father whose consent he could not obtain, he awaited the aid of a charitable hand. (Odin) is the angel sent by God. His parents will allow him to leave only on condition that he takes one of his brothers with him. But this brother is not yet 17 and not yet capable of the third form, and their parents, by reason of their poverty, can no longer assist him. If he could know (Odin's) bounty and find a place in one of his schools of America or Europe, he would be happy afterwards to assist the apostolic work of his benefactor. As for himself he wishes, if (Odin) consents, to finish the year at Annecy and then to leave for wherever he wishes to send him.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 8vo.
1


1862 Dec 13

(Dubuis, C.M.), Claude Mary, Bishop of Galveston
Lyons, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans)
St. Germain L'Espinasse, (France)

Dubuis cannot say when he will arrive on Thursday at the station of St. Germain l'Espinasse. He will leave Roanne by the omnibus train which passes the station closest to noon. He is so anxious to see (Odin) that he will take only the time required to talk a little with (J.M.) Giraud, newly landed at Tarare, to greet his old uncle, and to arrive at Roanne. He has just concluded a new request to Cardinal (Alexander) Barnabo to obtain the faculty of extra-tempore. He also has prepared the list of 11 seminarians who wish to leave with (Odin); Cardinal (Louis Jacques Maurice de) Bonald asked him for it so as not to assume all the responsibility upon himself.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
4


1862 Dec 14

Bruneau, Father Martin, V(icar-) G(eneral), Sup(erior) of the Seminary of
Le Mans, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Bruneau believes there is nothing to prevent (Odin)'s granting the request of the two seminarians whose letters he sent. They are not yet very advanced; being in their preparatory theology course. Bishop (Charles John Fillion) gives them to (Odin) with regret. Bruneau consents to their departure.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
2


1862 Dec 14

Hugon, Deacon, (Grand Seminary of) Mount-ferrand
(Clermont, France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

The obstacles opposed to Hugon's departure for America have been judged insurmountable for the present. He is given to hope that later he can put his project into execution.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Dec 15

Albrinck (Father) J.C.
Reading, (Ohio)

To Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell)
(Cincinnati, Ohio)

Albrinck wishes to tell Purcell of his stewardship at Reading since the time Glendale (Ohio) was taken off his hands. He tells in detail of the Sunday masses in the Convent Chapel and in the church. For those who can attend neither the Convent nor the nine-thirty mass he invites to the Church at seven-thirty Mass to perform their devotions for Mass, which the schoolmaster performs with the congregation. Sunday afternoons he has Catechism and vespers, and when this is done he goes to the Convent to give Benediction. He says three Masses in the church and three in the Convent during the week, alternating each day. He hears Confessions in the church on Saturday afternoons and evenings. He tells Purcell that his salary is $380. The reason for his explicitness is that some of Albrinck's congregation do not approve of the arrangement. He reminds Purcell of that he approved the arrangement when it was first made. He thinks two members of the parish, Mr. Hemberger and Mr. Frecks, will call on Purcell to ask for a different arrangement. He tells Purcell that he will be indifferent to any decision they make, but that he is drawing the salary of one priest for the work of priest. If Purcell decides that the parish needs another priest, Albrinck hopes that the means for obtaining another priest will also be supplied because although the church income is sufficient to pay expenses, interest, and a little on the principal of the debt this will not continue long because of the necessity of building a new school. For this reason Albrinck feels that there will be little left for an increase in the pastor's salary and asks Purcell to excuse his encouraging the two men to call on him but did so only to retain peace at home.

II-5-b A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Dec 15

Babel, Father
Grand Saconnex, (near Geneva, Switzerland)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
St. Germain l'Espinasse, France)

They are happy to learn of his return near them. Their happiness would lack something if they were deprived of seeing him a second time. They invite him to come on Christmas day. They pile up all their prayers; those of the Sisters of Charity, of the parish, and of its pastor.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Dec 15

Damen, (Father) A(rnold)
Milwaukee, (Wisconsin)

To Archbishop John Baptist Purcell
Cincinnati, Ohio

Damen received Purcell's letter and will be in Cincinnati the Saturday after Christmas to begin the Mission. He asks Purcell to request the religious communities of the city to pray for the success of the mission, because prayer is more powerful than preaching.

II-5-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


1862 Dec 15

Denavit, Father
Lyons, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, O.M. of New Orleans
St. Germain l'Espinasse, France)

Denavit sends him two very pressing letters (one enclosed) which he received from Angers. They concern (Odin). He presumes he received the box containing all the letters. They expect him for Christmas. Bishop (Claude Mary) Dubuis, (C.M.) should be at Tarare today, and at Ambierle with (Odin) next Thursday.

A.L.S. (French) 1p.

Enclosure:

--------
1862 Dec 13

Houbart, Father B.
(Grand Seminary of Angers, France)

To Father (Denavit)
(Lyons, France)

Three or four seminarians of the diocese of Angers plan to follow Archbishop (Odin). They lack only the agreement of Bishop (William Lawrence Louis Angebault) of Angers. That agreement depends upon a financial arrangement between the two prelates. He asks (Denavit) to ask (Odin) to take care of this matter so that their three seminarians can take their steps in time to rejoin (Odin).

A.L.S. (French) 2pp
VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
4


1862 Dec 15

Des Chaux, Sister
Grand Saconnex, (near Geneva, Switzerland)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Ambierle, France)

Having learned that (Odin) is at Ambierle, the little family of Saconnex asks him to accept this small sum to come to Saconnex in order to reply to the pastor who asked (Odin) to spend Christmas there. The mayor, whom (Odin) visited, extends the same invitation. For her, it will be a proof of his paternal affection. The American family, which had been so happy to possess (Odin) for a few moments, sent them a small package and the adjoined letter (no enclosure).

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


(18)62 Dec 15]

Flandrin, Father C.(?)
Lapacandière, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Ambierle, France)

It is the old one of Lapacandière, Jonas of ancient memory, who comes to present his greetings. He hopes to offer them personally tomorrow if he can find a vehicle but if not, he will expect (Odin) for dinner next Thursday, the day he chose to come and see him. The pastor of Ambierle will accompany him. If Bishop (Claude Mary) Dubuis, (C.M.), whom he has already received, could be of the party, he knows all the pleasure it would cause. He has received Bishop (Armand Francois Maurice de) Charbonnel, who promised him several days, several times. He hopes Charbonnel will not fail him.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
3


1862 Dec 15

Kenny, Th(omas), St. Vincent's College
(Cape Girardeau, Missouri)

To Archbishop John (Mary) Odin, (C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Kenny wrote shortly after Odin had been installed in (New Orleans) and requested him to receive him into the diocese. He once again beseeches him, if he has not already done so to affiliate him to the diocese. He hopes to learn by the return of their Visitor G(general), Father Stephen V. Ryan, C.M., that his request has been granted. His health is good and he is pursuing his studies with as much assiduity as possible. He need not tell Odin that he is happy, as he is aware he knows if it were otherwise that the Lazarists would remove the cause of his troubles.

VI-2-f A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
3


(18)62 Dec 15

Sherbette, V.D.
Paris, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Ambierle, France)

Madame Sherbette has learned that (Odin) is going to travel through Paris. If he recalls a family who bears a great friendship for him, he should write them and they will go to see him. They had this pleasure several years ago.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
1


1862 Dec 15

Young, O.P., (Father) N(icholas) R.
Zanesville, Ohio

to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell
Cincinnati, Ohio

Young has just returned from Washington where his mother died. He gave her the last rites. She was buried at Mount Olivet in the habit of the Dominicans because she was a member of the Third Order. Young asks Purcell to pray for her. He is sorry he could not accept Purcell's invitation to meet him in Brown County. A document from the Master General was awaiting Young and it appointed him Provincial of the Province. He tells Purcell that he will make no changes in the priests of Purcell's diocese without first consulting him. He asks Purcell to have his brother, Father Edward notice the appointment in the Telegraph.

II-5-b A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Dec 16

DeNeve, Father J(ohn), V(icar) G(eneral), American College
Louvain, Belgium

to Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.) of New Orleans
(Lyons, France)

DeNeve received Odin's letter and thanks God for blessing his efforts. Sixty workers is a good augury. DeNeve will not fail to meet the desires of the American prelates in the education of their workers. For the moment he can admit six easily, and eight, with difficulty, if that number suits Odin. The seminary continues to prosper; since Odin's visit he has admitted four new pupils. (John B.) Bogaerts of Malines communicated to him his plan and he would have come to Louvain if the shortness of time which he had to remain in Belgium had not determined him to flit about no longer.

VI-2-f A-L-S (French) 2pp. 12mo.
3


1862 Dec 16

Pendleton, Geo(rge) H.
Washington, (D.C.)

To (James Alphonsus McMaster)
(New York, New York)

In regard to the subject of their conversation on Sunday morning, the organization of the next administration, he does not feel authorized to say any more. The lack of faith, desire for more power than they will ever have, has disordered the schemers of the Democratic party. No steps have been taken with regard to the future, and there has been less movement than usual. The Gentleman of whom they spoke is influenced by an intense, but a high and lofty ambition to wield power of affairs and of his life for the purpose of doing the most good to his fellows. He has the qualities of faith and patience and rarely seeks position until the time has come. He would not be willing to say what he will do 18 months from now; he merely gives his characteristics and Pendleton's own opinions. He is a candidate for the speakership of the next House (of Representatives). His opponent from the North West will not carry the Ohio delegation, the majority of which Pendleton is sure of. His election would mean something. McMaster was complimentary in his early letters last winter and Pendleton hopes that his own ability has increased with time and asks McMaster's good wishes and aid in this matter. His active aid would be of great service in the delegation from Ohio. He asks a reply.

I-1-m A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
1


1862 Dec 16

Walworth, Father Clarence A.
(New York, New York)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Fr. Walworth wants a printed copy of his article that is to appear in the January number for a particular purpose. He recently returned from a visit to Halifax. The Archbishop (Thomas L. Connelly) feels Brownson is slipping from the Faith but Father Walworth assured him that Brownson was as warm-hearted and thorough a Catholic as any in the United States. Father Woods, of the Halifax Cathedral, did not like Brownson's views on the Italian Question but he misses the Review. Secessionist sentiment is very strong in Halifax; Father Walworth gives a personal incident to prove this fact, by stating that at one of the early masses, one of the ladies took occasion to rise and tell the congregation to go home and say to their friends that four live Yankees had come to town, could be seen at the Cathedral, and intended to take Halifax.

I-4-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
2


1862 Dec 17

Boutillier de St. André, E.
Jallais, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Boutillier asks (Odin) to take two letters to New Orleans and to forward them, one to Charles de Monsabert, proprietor at Planché Street in New Orleans, and the other to Henry Gascon employed at the land office in Donaldsonville.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
3


1862 Dec 17

(Monnet, C.S.J.), Mother St. Claude (Louise), Superioress General of the Sisters of St. Joseph of
Bourg, (France)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
St. Germain l'Espinasse, France)

The Sisters of St. Joseph thank him for accepting their request and they have confidence that nothing will prevent the trip which they regard as necessary in the interests of their Sisters. There is one question on which they wish to be perfectly clear; namely, the noviciate to be established at New Orleans. If he could gather some information on the manner in which novitiates in the missions are established, such as those of the Ursulines and the Sisters of St. Vincent de Paul of which he spoke, it would be very useful.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
2


1862 Dec 18

Ceuppens, Francis (X.), Subdeacon, Grand Seminary of
Malines, (Belgium)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Ceuppens asks (Odin) the number and kind of books which it would be most useful to bring to America as the books are cheaper in Belgium. Such is also the advice of the canon, Father De Pauw. He presents his and (John B.) Bogaerts' best wishes. He is busy settling his affairs and hopes to be ready to leave in the first days of January.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
3


1862 Dec 18

Garnier, F., Grand Seminary of
Rennes, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

After having written that (Odin) could count on him, Garnier regrets to notify him that he cannot leave at this time. The superior of the seminary has just advised him, without giving the reason, that he would not permit him to accompany (Odin).

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
1


1862 Dec 18

Gavard, Victor
Annecy, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.) of New Orleans
Lyons, (France), forwarded to Ambierle, near Roanne, (France)

Gavard has just surmounted all the obstacles which could have prevented him from following (Odin). His parents have just given their consent. He begs (Odin ) to count him among those who will follow him. Monday he is going to say farewell to his relatives, and he begs (Odin) to reply as soon as possible, addressing his letter to Ville-en-Sallaz, district of Bonneville. His departure having already imposed a heavy sacrifice on his parents, he hesitates to ask them for the money he will need to go to Paris. He asks (Odin) to come to his aid.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
1


1862 Dec 18

Rochejaquelin, D., Countess de la Ussé, by Chinon,
Indre et Loire, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.) of New Orleans
Ambierle, (France)

Rochejaquelin experienced great joy upon receiving his reply. At last she has found his tracks. She wonders how it is possible that no one at Nancy had given him her address. Father Nuillen(?) The v(ic)ar-general, knows her from correspondence with the Sisters of St. Joseph. The canon, Father Neftin(?), has written to her without cessation about the publication of the life of Father (?) Rey. She deplores Odin's change, how sad to abandon Texas, created by his hands. She admires his zeal and constant devotion and thanks God for having blessed his efforts by enabling him to find 50 priests and 10 religious. She hopes he is acclimated and does not have to fear yellow fever. Mr. Drèce(?) Who is rigging the sails for Odin's departure, speaks well of him. Odin did not tell her how long he has been in France. No doubt he passed near Ussé returning from Nantes. She wonders if he has forgotten her and the parish of St. Tomas Aquinas where he baptized his nephew Bertrand. She wrote to him at Galveston but never received a reply. She does not plan to go to Paris before February 15. However, she does not like to resign herself to his leaving without having seen him. She hopes he will delay his departure. He could interest many persons at Paris in his great need. He could even preach a sermon at St. Mathilda's and one at St. Thomas and collect a little money. A few from St. Germain are returning to Paris at the end of January. He could be introduced to their friends, to the ladies of the Society of Tabernacles, to Mrs. de Jonville who has worked with a society of ladies for the foreign missions her whole life. She wonders if he knows Miss de Mauroy, also a very zealous person. She sends these few words so that a friend can acquaint him with Mrs. Dalon, who is very devoted to the foreign missions. Rochejaquelin's friend, Mrs. de Fevre, will be devoted to him. She wonders if he could come to stay with them for 2 or 3 days. If not, perhaps the Bishop of Tours would let him preach a sermon in the cathedral for his poor diocese. She would try to go. She would like to talk to him about the situation in America and the interests of religion there, and about Texas, evangelized by him, and that nice valley of St. Augustine where his good Irishmen are. She has not forgotten all that he told her. She marvels at the many churches and convents he has erected.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 8pp. 12mo.
10


1862 Dec 19

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick), Camp near
Falmouth, (Virginia)

To (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Ned tells her that he was very pleased to receive such a long letter from her since she is the only real correspondent he has. His Father, (Orestes A. Brownson) has never written him since he has been in the field and his mother only a few occasional lines. He says General Hunt kept him busy all the time the battle was going on and consequently he had no chance for rebes or plunder. Henry (Brownson's) servant got a carpet, a trunk, and other things. Everybody who spent any time in the city got something. He was there on business and as a result was left with not a moment to spare. He borrowed a quartermaster's horse the day of the battle and rode him hard all that day. Ned left the horse tied up near the Phillip's House but somehow he wandered off. And thus he lost a horse at the Battle of Fredericksburg. Ned tells Sal that he was several times in the vicinity of falling shells. The city was a wreck as everyone plundered thoughtlessly. Soldiers sat out in the streets on the finest sofas and piano stools all deep in the mud. They drank their coffee from the best of china. They arrayed themselves in every style of hat from enormous stovepipes to general's cornered ones. He admits his mistake with regard to the "Desdemona" she wrote of. He could not establish any resemblance and lighted on Dela K. as the only mentioned feminine. However, this Crane is not his Miss Crane. He requests that she speak not of Dela's Carte de Viste. Howell searched him in Washington and his Cartes de Vistes were lost. He begs Sal to write often. Bill (Brownson) is unfortunate. He asks for news of Seward or Fremont. Ned sends his love to his mother and tells her that Uncle John (Healy) wishes to be remembered to the family.

I-5-i A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
4


1862 Dec 19

Mary F(rancis), and J(ules) Bonhommet
Le Mans, France

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

The reply that (Odin) made to the superior and to them made them think that the lack of resources is the only reason that prevents him from accepting them. If that is so, they hope to leave with them because both possess some resources and they are ready to dispose of them in order to follow him.

A.L.S. (French) 2pp.

On the same paper:

--------
(1862 Dec 19)

Bruneau, Father Martin
Le Mans, France

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

The desire of these young men to answer (Odin's) call has grown stronger from day to day. Once again he recommends their request. He asks (Odin) to ask Our Lord to increase the peace which his visit produced in a particular seminarian, until then, too frivolous.

A.L.S. (French) 2pp.
VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
3


1862 Dec 19

Young, O.P., (Father ) Nicholas R.
Zanesville, Ohio

to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell
Cincinnati, Ohio

Young received Purcell's letter which filled him with a hope that he may live up to the confidence Purcell places in him. He tells Purcell that his mother's maiden name was Barbara and that she was 69 years old. If the obituary appears in the Mirror he will send Purcell a copy. Young will attend to the parochial business with Father (Caspar H.) Borgess soon.

II-5-b A.L.S. 1pg. 12mo.
1


1862 Dec 20

Schieffelin, Bradhurst
New York (City), (New York)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

A meting will be held to draw up plans to secure Congressional approval of the Emancipation Proclamation, or some other act of Emancipation as a war measure in support of Mr. Lincoln. The sponsors are very anxious to have Brownson present; a notice of the meeting is enclosed. Robert Dale Owen has drawn up an Act to be submitted to Congress.

P.S. Sent by special messenger because so many considered it so important to have Brownson attend the meeting.

I-4-b A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
3


1862 Dec 20

Speth, Father G.
Metting, (France)

To Archbishop (John Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

(Odin's) letter furnished Speth new proof that he is truly "the good bishop" as they say in Texas. It reawakened in his heart the desire to be under his crozier. (Odin's) reason for not coming to Nancy is not difficult to divine; the good Bishop (Alexander Basil) Menjaud is no longer there and everything is changed. Formerly they allowed some to leave for the missions and some for the monasteries; today everything is changed. Six months ago he asked to leave. His request was supported by very influential persons but was refused. He has made new requests but thus far Bishop (George Darby) has not changed his mind. If later he is given his release and if the doors of the seminary of foreign missions remain closed to him, then he will knock at (Odin's) door. One of his close friends, a pastor who has always wanted to consecrate himself to the mission but was not able to leave because of the opposition of his parents, finally asked permission to leave. He was refused, but they added that they would see later. He is an excellent priest. Speth just sent him (Odin's) letter in order to fortify his resolution and to direct him towards New Orleans. Speth wrote him from Texas to get him to come there, and he said later he would have come if he had received the letters, but his parents had intercepted them. At New Orleans Mass stipends are $1, in France 1 franc, and still the pastors in (France) often lack them. If (Odin) receives more than he can take care of, Speth will take care of them or have them taken care of, leaving in (Odin's) hands to be used for good works the part in excess of 1 franc. He knows that by canon law stipends should be given in their entirety to the one who says the Mass but canon law does not prohibit the one who has the right to them from relinquishing them in full or in part for good works.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
3


1862 Dec 21

Bouchet, Jules de Cruseilles, G(ran)d S(eminary) of
Annecy, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Bouchet asks (Odin) to excuse his delay in writing. His mother having fallen gravely ill, he thought it wise to wait until she was a little better before asking her consent. He has just received it from his mother and Father. Having also the consent of his director and of the superior, he is ready to leave. There is still one thing which keeps him from leaving; he owes 200 francs for the purchase of books. He hopes (Odin) will advance this amount until he can return it. As he has many books and several which he wants to keep very much, he asks whether he should take all he has.
(Notation by Odin): He will have to reread it and write again.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 8vo.
1


1862 Dec 21

Chevalier, J(acques), In philosophy at Grand Seminary of
Rennes, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Chevalier asks again the time when (Odin) plans to leave. He has obtained the permission of his parents and has said his farewells. Now he is at (Odin's) disposal.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
1


(18)62 Dec 21

Lejoly, C.M., (J. Fr.), Grand Seminary of
Vannes, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.) of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

In a week Lejoly hopes to have triumphed over all the obstacles to his departure. He will immediately inform (Odin) and he will be ready to follow him. If (Odin) has to sail beforehand he should indicate to whom he should address himself in order to be able to sail without delay.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
1


(1862 Dec 22)

Bonhommet, Jules, (Grand) Seminary of
Le Mans, (France)

To [Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Since Bonhommet's most tender years he has desired to consecrate his life to the salvation of souls. This longing to be a missionary came to him in reading the Annals of the Propagation of the Faith. (Odin's) visit to the seminary hastened the decisive moment. To speak thus is perhaps unseemly for a second year seminarian, but he ardently desires his own perfection and the salvation of souls.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


(1862 Dec 22)

Folliot, F(ran)cis, Student of Theology, Grand Seminary of Le Mans
Sarthe, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

For a long time Folliot has desired to be a missionary. He listened to (Odin) whose words made a strong impression on him. He has reflected seriously and consulted his director who advised him to write to (Odin). He hopes (Odin) will receive him.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
1


(1862 Dec 22)

Mary F(rancis), In first year of Theology at the Seminary of
Le Mans, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Mary hopes (Odin) will pardon him if he again calls attention to his request. Since (Odin) came to the Seminary of Le Mans, Mary has not ceased praying for the realization of his desire to follow him to the missions. He will prove his gratitude by the most complete devotion and zeal.

A.L.S. (French) 2pp.

On the same paper:

Bruneau, Father Martin
(Le Mans, France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Before writing again, Mary asked his advice and he encouraged him to do so because he wishes much to see Mary's request granted.

A.L.S. (French) 2pp.
VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
2


1862 Dec. 22
Réveret, Deacon of the Grand Seminary of Mont-Ferrand,
near Clermont, France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Réveret writes so as not to neglect the promise he made two weeks ago. After mature reflection, his director replied that he would consent to his departure, but only on the condition that the perils to chastity will not be greater than (at the seminary) because he feared for him in view of the working of his imagination. Réveret makes himself fully known to (Odin) so that if he follows him, (Odin) can place him so that he will not lose himself. He has not completely obtained the consent of his parents but he does not despair of doing so.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Dec 22

Ruellan, Ul.(?), Grand Seminary of
Rennes, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Some time ago Ruellan wrote to reveal his resolution to accompany (Odin) to his diocese, but unforseen circumstances do not permit him to execute it at this time. If (Odin) will permit him to rejoin him later he believes the delay will not be too long. His colleagues, who can leave immediately, wish to know if the departure will certainly not be delayed beyond the month of January or at least much beyond.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Dec 23

(Baillargeon), Bishop C(harles) F(rancis)
Quebec, (Quebec)

To Bishop Lefebvre )Peter Paul Lefevere)
Detroit, (Michigan)

Father (J.) Daudet has appealed to the Archbishop about the sentence passed against him by Bishop (Pierre Adolph Pinsonneault) of Sandwich. Daudet has asked Baillargeon to transmit his plea to the Holy Father. As administrator of the province, he cannot refuse to do this. He asks Lefevere, who knows Daudet, to tell what he knows of him, so that the court at Rome may judge. Several priests have assured him that Daudet was of irreproachable reputation but have not heard of him for several years.

III-2-j A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
3


1862 Dec 23

Brownson, O(restes) A.
Elizabeth, (New Jersey)

To (Henry) F. (Brownson)
( , )

Brownson thanks (Henry) for the birthday present he sent him through his brother Ned and quotes the postmaster Maj(or) Leslie in regard to the government's lack of funds. General Burnside's failure has deeply grieved and chagrined Brownson but he retains his confidence in him and the whole army. B(urnside's) recent letter to Halleck puts a better face on the gloomy situation and assumes the whole responsibility. (Burnside's) proferred resignation is straightforward and manly but Brownson fears it will not be accepted, but if he thinks Abe Franklin should be his successor. Brownson discusses the fictitious reputation of both Sigel and McDowell and blames Lincoln for his cooperation with McClellan on the Peninsula issue. Brownson suggests that Banks replace Stanton, whom he has given up. He discusses his recent Review in which he condemns the Administration and the nigger policy of President (Lincoln). Brownson is not an abolitionist, though strongly opposed to slavery, and urges abolition only as a means of prosecuting the war. Brownson declares that there are no military reasons for the President's blunder and usurpation and cannot be justified by military necessity. This "compensated emancipation" if adopted would free no slaves but would put millions into the hands of President (Lincoln's) creatures. Holding Lincoln responsible for all the miscarriages and claiming that Seward follows the President rather than vice versa, Brownson has called upon Lincoln to resign. Brownson urges (Henry) to write concerning his whereabouts and activities in addition to his future plans and tells him that the turn of events have left him with a little influence on the Administration, Governor Andrew being a possible exception. Brownson refuses to ask the President for anything and of Stanton he is distrustful. He acknowledges (Henry's) command of two 26 powder batteries and asks whether he intends remaining on Col(onel) Hay's staff or to take a battery. Brownson urges (Henry) to use his influence with Ned in order to make him study military knowledge because Brownson is assured that Ned will never be a military man, pride and laziness preventing fulfillment of his ambition. Brownson has unsuccessfully contested a seat in Congress and maintains that he consented only to please Sarah and Edward Brownson. He questions the success of his Review for the coming year but finally dispels his private grief with grief for his country. Hearing of disaster for the Army of the Cumberland, under Gen(eral) Rosecrans he is afraid lest the rivers fail to rise and prevent supplies from reaching the army but trusts in God who alone can help them.

III-3-a A.L.S. 2pp 4to.
4


1862 Dec 23

Penndu, J(osep)h, Grand Seminary of
Quimper, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Despite all his entreaties, Penndu has been unable to obtain his parents' immediate consent. They find fault with his resolution to go to work for the salvation of the Americans only because of the little time of trial. Later they will not oppose a persistent will on his part. It is difficult for him to wait two years. He hopes to be able to hasten the moment of his departure and ask how he should rejoin (Odin) as soon as he has the consent of his Father and mother.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
1


1862 Dec 23

Querhoënt, J(osep)h de
Le Havre, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Querhoënt takes advantage of (Odin's) offer to his parents to charge himself with some letters for his brother, A(lbert) de Querhoënt at N(ew) Orleans. He asks him to join the enclosed (no enclosure) letter to the other.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
2


1862 Dec 23

Viau, Joseph, Grand Seminary of
Angers, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Notwithstanding the unfortunate state of (Odin's) diocese and the condition in which Viau's family finds itself, Viau persists in wishing to follow him. If the Bishop of Angers lets him leave on (Odin's) request and if (Odin) agrees, as he had promised, to pay the arrears of his tuition, which amounts to 189 f(rancs), as well as for his trip from Angers to New Orleans, he will be happy to place himself entirely at his disposal. He asks (Odin) to give him all the information possible in regard to his departure.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Dec 23

Wood, James F., Bishop of
Philadel(phia, Pennsylvania)

To Archbishop J(ohn) B(aptist) Purcell of
(Cincinnati, Ohio)

At last they have succeeded in freeing their precious packages from Rome. Such charging and cheating he has rarely witnessed. He imagines Purcell has received his package as they were sent some days since after their arrival in Philadelphia.

II-5-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


1862 Dec 24

Gurley, John A.
Washington, D.C.

To (Orestes) A. Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

E.W. Hoard will pay Brownson two hundred dollars for two lectures in Chicago. Gurley will write Hoard at once so that a time can be set for the delivery of the lectures. Gurley is deeply concerned with the condition of the country; the Senators have made a direct appeal to the President because the friends in Washington were of one mind on the subject.

I-4-b A.L.S. 1p. 8mo.
1


1862 Dec 24

Dallaz, Léonce
St. Claude, Jura, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Dallaz has just received a letter from his cousin Father Tournier, director of the minor seminary of Ferney, announcing (Odin's) arrival in Lyons several days ago. At the time of (Odin's) short stay in the vicinity of Geneva around the middle of last August, he was at Ferney and the pastor recounted his interview with (Odin) and (Odin's) desire to find some young man to take with him. Although he had always found himself inclined towards that vocation, he wanted time to reflect. He asks (Odin) to include him among his young men. He is 20 years old and completed his studies at the college of St. Claude three years ago. Since then, he has learned German, English, and Italian well enough to carry on a commercial correspondence in a commission house at Paris where he remained for a year. Finding himself little inclined towards commerce and having been for some time with his parents, he learned of (Odin's) intention. He asks about the formalities he will have to take care of. As for information about his family, which is honest but whose means will not permit any sacrifice in his favor, (Odin) can write to his cousin Tournier or to the Bishop of St. Claude's grand vicar, Father Girod.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
3


1862 Dec 24

Subileau, Joseph, Grand Seminary of
Angers, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

It was with a very deep rending of the heart that Subileau read (Odin's) letter. He is stopped by the fears which the present state of America inspires in his direction. His director wonders if he can find the training of a seminary at New Orleans. Subileau asks (Odin). He thanks him for his prior replies and hopes that his answer will permit him to put into execution the most ardent desire of his heart. If (Odin) does not believe that he can complete his seminary in America, he asks him to remember him in better times. As for the difficulty from the side of his family, as it is only secondary, he hopes that later he can fulfill his promise to relieve their distress.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Dec 25

Chassé, Louis, Cl(erk) tons(ured), Grand Seminary of
Angers, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Chassé's director having informed him of the good news, he hastens to bear witness of his joy and gratitude. He hopes that soon (Odin) can inform him of the success of the steps taken in regard to the Bishop of Angers in order to obtain his exeat. The letter (Odin) wrote to (Joseph) Subileau did not at all frighten Chassé and he will be happy to have to support some difficulties, some overwork, and some privations for the love of the Saviour.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
2


1862 Dec 25

(Dubuis, C.M.), Claude Mary, Bishop of Galveston
(Coutouvre, near Montagny, France)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.)
Lyons, (France)

He sends Odin everything he has received from Faass and Marziou. He leaves the reply to Odin not knowing what day they can meet at Lyons. For 11 hours he has seen only drowsiness and hard work. They have had 1200 communicants among 2000 souls. He sends his respects to the Superior and to Father Denavit and he thanks them for the good news they sent him. On Tuesday he will be at Belmont at Incarnate Word.

A.L.S. (French) 1pp.

The above letter is written on:

--------
1862 Dec 24

Marziou, V(ictor)
Paris, (France)

To Bishop (Claude Mary Dubuis, C.M.
Coutouvre, France)

What pleasure it will be for him to see his agency at LeHavre send the 50 missionaries destined for the dioceses of New Orleans and Galveston aboard the Ste. Genevieve. It will be a new blessing for their work and probably the start of a second period of great prosperity. He asks (Dubuis) to let him know where they might have an important conference. If it could be at Lyons very shortly, he would be delighted.

A.L.S. (French) 2pp.

Enclosure:

--------
1862 Dec 23

Faass, J.S.(?)
Paris, (France)

To Bishop (Claude Mary) Dubuis, (C.M.) of Galveston
Coutouvre, bear Montagny, (France)

On his return, Faass found Dubuis' letter of the 19th in regard to the passage of 50 missionaries to New Orleans. Dubuis is aware that regular commerce with New Orleans has almost completely stopped because of events in the United States. During (1862) only one ship has been sent from Le Havre to New Orleans. He hopes to be able to place a ship at his disposal in 3 or 4 days. If they have nothing to put on board but the missionaries, the cost of armaments will exact a price of 50 to 100 francs per head above that indicated by Dubuis' letter, under ordinary circumstances.

A.L.S. (French) 3pp.
VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) pp.. 4to.
3


1862 Dec 25

Hecker, (Father) Isaac T.

To (Orestes A. Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Hecker asks Brownson to write Stanton (Secretary of War) in behalf of his friend, Dr. Gouley, a splendid Catholic and a very competent physician. He will be personally grateful for any favor Brownson can do for the Doctor.

I-4-b A.L.S. 3pp.
2


1862 Dec 25

Loughlin, J(ohn), Bishop of
Brooklyn, (New York)

To Bishop (Francis P.) McFarland of Hartford
(Providence, Rhode Island)

The enclosed papers (no enclosure) from Bishop (John Timon) of Buffalo he forwards to him for his advice. From what he observes he thinks the Institution deserves encouragement. McFarland's books are with the binder.

I-1-b A.L.S. 1p. 16mo.
2


1869 Dec 25

Samson, P., C(lerk) t(onsured), Grand Seminary of
Rennes, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of
Lyons, France)

At (Odin's) stop at the seminary, Samson gave his name on the conditions of seriously examining the question with his director and that his parents consented. His parents resisted for a long time but now their consent is explicit. There is another difficulty; he is as good as a French soldier because of the low number assigned him by lot. He leaves the solution of this obstacle, with which Bishop (William Lawrence Louis Angebault) of Angers does not wish to be concerned, to (Odin).

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
2


1862 Dec 25

Veyrat, Cyprien, Deacon, Grand Seminary of
Annecy, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

In the names of his colleagues, (Théophile) Blanc-Garin, (Jules de Cruseilles) Bouchet, ( ) Jacquier, ( ) Navoire, (Victor) Gavard, (Augustine) Vulliet, (Basile) Gay, and (Claude) Favre, who have all written to (Odin) to reveal their firm resolution to leave with him for America, he asks (Odin) to give them some information about their departure. They wish to spend a few days with their relatives. They all have important family matters to settle. The idea of departure preoccupies them so much that they can no longer work seriously. He even fears that some might leave the seminary without the superior's permission. They can do nothing because the superior always holds them back.

P.S. Jacquier is not yet completely assured of leaving because he is waiting for the consent of an uncle who is a pastor.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
9


1862 Dec 26

Brownson, O(restes) A.
Elizabeth, (New Jersey)

To Charles Sumner
(Washington, D.C.)

Brownson asks has the movement against Seward failed, if so, is not Secretary Chase, responsible for the failure? Brownson has come to believe that the United States is to have neither military nor administrative success under the Presidency of (Abraham) Lincoln. Brownson does not believe in Lincoln at all, and to make headway against him and the rebellion together, is more than the United States can do. He is thick-headed, ignorant, tricky, obstinate. Even the good measures that he is willing to adopt lose all their value by his adopting them out of season and in an unstatesmanlike manner. Brownson would like to see Lincoln resign. The war is not conducted as a war, but subsidiary to his politics and to the cupidity of railroad men, shipping masters and contractors. By the last session of Congress slavery is forbidden in United States territories; the seceded states now are territories of the United States. If anti-slavery parties would spend their energies urging the President to treat the seceded states as territories belonging to the United States, instead of urging him to render his proclamation effective, they would more effectively gain their end. With this view in mind, Brownson has written to Sumner's colleague, urging not only the confirmation of the appointment of General Hunt as Brigadier, but also his elevation to Major-General. Brownson also mentioned the wish that he holds with many of his friends, that General Charles P. Stone should be restored to an active command, because of his loyalty and ability.

I-4-h A.L.S. (Photostat, Harvard Library) 4pp. 12mo.
2


1862 Dec 26

Cocheril, Father J.M.. St. Jacut-de-la-mer, by Ploubalay
Cotes du Nord, France

to Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.) of New Orleans
Lyons, (France)

Although provided with a vicarship to his taste, Cocheril has felt inclined to place himself at (Odin's) disposal since hearing of him and his flock's need. He wants information about the difficulties of the ministry in New Orleans and the resources available to the priest; whether there are schools and who directs them; whether there are altercations between the ministers of different religions; the distances between colleagues; the pecuniary resources and burdens of each priest; the number of poor; who will bear the cost of the trip and installation; whether one might bring a mother or other person of confidence to care for the household; and who would pay her fare. If (Odin) believes he might be useful after four years of teaching and eight years as vicar, and at 39 years of age, these are the questions he would like answered.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
1


(18)62 Dec 26

Gélard, P.M., Cl(erk) tonsured at Seminary of St. Brieuc,
Cotes-du-Nord, France

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin) Audin (C.M.) of New Orleans
(Lyons, France)

If Gélard's director had not placed an obstacle to the most cherished of his desires, he would be (Odin's) at this moment. If they do not wish to let too great a number leave at the moment, (Odin) should believe that his desire will increase. From the side of his family the difficulties are non-existent. He has three sisters, religious; a brother, a missionary; and he also enjoys his freedom. He is in his second year of theology, capable of being a sub-deacon at Trinity, and has only two years at the seminary before being a priest. He likes to think (Odin) will find him an opportunity to rejoin him as soon as possible. He asks (Odin) to show him the way to go to Louvain to complete his theology. However, he would prefer to go to America immediately.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Dec 26

Louis, (S.C.), Sister, G(ran)d Sacconnex,
(Near Geneva, Switzerland)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

In the name of the little family of Sacconnex she expresses their chagrin at the thought that he is going to leave Europe without their having the pleasure of seeing him again.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Dec 26

Martinière, Father
Ambierle, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Martinière hastens to inform (Odin) of the success of his request to His eminence. He will have therefore the happiness of offering his children to (Odin) for Confirmation. He does not believe that the number will exceed 200. (Odin) appeared to wish that it take place on Sunday, January 11. He should take precautions against the cold humidity during his trip as it is especially dangerous for neuralgia.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Dec 26

Meline, Major J(ames) A.
Madison, Wisconsin

to O(restes) A. Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Meline encloses remittances for another year's subscription to the Review. He wishes it sent to Cincinnati, Ohio. He recently sent a pamphlet describing General Pope's Virginia campaign, which he trusts will prove interesting and informative. Pope proved his superiority as a leader and commander. He showed he had good control of his troops. The facts contained therein are reliable.

I-4-b A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
1


1862 Dec 26

Moreau, (C.S.C.), Father (Basil Anthony), Superior General, Congregation of the Holy Cross
Le Mans, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Father Florent, (C.S.C.) left Bordeaux on the 14th for New Orleans. In case of necessity, if (Odin's) group takes the same path, he can address himself to Gustave Abadie. Having given Florent only 650 f(rancs), Abadie advanced him 391 f(rancs), 40 c(ents). If (Odin) takes that route, Moreau asks him to reimburse Abadie and to instruct Father (Patrick F.) Sheil, (C.S.C.) to return it to him. Father (Th.) Alleau appears decided to follow (Odin) and Bishop (Charles John) Fillion told Moreau that 4 seminarians of Le Mans appear resolved to do so also. If (Odin) cannot take all the ecclesiastics who offer themselves and if some of them are thinking of the religious life, Moreau could take 2 or 3 while awaiting their departure rather than to expose them to losing their vocation in parish work.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
7


1862 Dec 27

Faass, J.S(?)
Paris, (France)

To Bishop (Claude Mary) Dubuis, (C.M.) of Galveston
Coutouvre, (France)

He confirms his letter of the 23rd. In the interval he gathered information in regard to freight for New Orleans. There was nothing. The best combination would be to touch at Cadiz to take on a cargo of salt. It is on the route and he calculates the trip would be prolonged only for a week. He wishes to know if this would be suitable. In these circumstances the company could accept the price of 400 fr(ancs) proposed. The trip would be made by the "Ste. Genevieve" under Captain Picard. Dubuis should indicate when he wishes to leave.

A.L.S. (French) 2pp.

On the same paper:

(Dubuis, C.M.), C(laude) M(ary), Bishop of G(alveston)
(Coutouvre, France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

On the point of leaving for Montagny and from there for Belmont, he forwards this new plan. He replies to (Victor) Marziou that (Odin) would set the time of departure.

A.L.S. (French) On the margin
VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
3


1862 Dec 27

Favre, Claude, Grand Seminary of
Annecy, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Favre cannot rest before being assured that (Odin) accepts him and will take him to America immediately. All his relatives and professors have consented. He only needs a letter from (Odin) and to say his farewells to his relatives by visiting near them with (Cyprien) Veyrat, his compatriot.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
2


(1862 Dec 28)

Blanc- Garin, Théophile. (Grand Seminary of
Annecy, France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

As he announced by his letter of the 8th, Blanc-Garin is ready to follow (Odin) and the sooner the better. Having several family matters to arrange, he wishes to spend some time with his relatives, as (Odin) knows, he will probably never see his mother again.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Dec 28

Bourasset, W(illiam), Deacon, Grand Seminary of Mont-Ferrand
(Clermont, France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Bourasset has thought seriously about the great matter of which they spoke at (Odin's) stop at the seminary. However his parents suffered considerable losses in a flood at the beginning of December, and he does not have the courage to add to their desolation. Thus, it will hardly be possible for him to accompany (Odin) to his diocese shortly. Later, he hopes to have more courage.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Dec 26

Brownson O(restes) A.
Elizabeth, N(ew) J(ersey)

To Charles Sumner
(Washington, D.C.)

Dr. Gouley, assisted consulting surgeon of the Lincoln hospital in Washington called on Brownson and asked him for a letter to Staunton urging Gouley's promotion to Medical Inspector. Brownson refused because he has a bone to pick with Staunton. Brownson asks Sumner to aid Gouley if the request for promotion comes his way.

I-4-h A.L.S. (Photostat, Harvard Library) 1p. 12mo.
1


1862 Dec 28

Lesne, Marie
Lyons, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

When she saw him, he made her hope for his protection for one of her brothers living at New Orleans. (Odin) asked her to bring him his address upon his return to Lyons. She wishes to know if he is going to leave for America soon, and she asks him to indicate a day and hour when she can speak to him and give him a letter which she hopes he will take care of.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Dec 29

Dallaz, Léonce, St. Claude
(Jura, France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Dallaz thanks (Odin) for his proposal to give him entrée to the seminary of Louvain, but he is forced to renounce so ardently desired a career, seeing that his parents would consent to his departure only if he would find himself immediately under (Odin's) protection. He regrets that (Odin) did not gather some information on him and his family for then he might have still the hope of embarking with him.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Dec 29

Faivre, Fred(erick), Cl(erk) M(inor) at the Grand Seminary of
Rennes, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

He blesses (Odin) for accepting his offer of himself. The superior charged him to tell (Odin) that, if some of the seminarians who had hoped to call him their Father are stopped by unforseen obstacles, still a good number will be happy to follow him.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
1


(1862 Dec 29)

Geoffrey, Caroline, (Grand) Sac(c)onnex, (near
Geneva, Switzerland)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

The children of Sac(c)onnex wish to give him a small remembrance of their work as a symbol of their gratitude for all his good words to them during his short moments in their midst. He told them that he had some young orphan sisters, the same age as they, under the care of St. Vincent. They have made a collection of pictures which they send to them.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 8vo.
1


1862 Dec 29

Jacquier, (Grand Seminary of)
Annecy, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Jacquier wishes nothing more than to be among (Odin's) workers and he has done all that depended upon him. However, all has been in vain because he has found an obstacle before which he must give way. If (Odin) will receive him later, his entire happiness would consist in rejoining his companions.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1862 Dec 29

Lamy, John B., Bishop of Santa Fe
Santa Fe, N(ew) M(exico)

to Archbishop John B(aptist) Purcell of
(Cincinnati, Ohio)

He saw in the Catholic Telegraph that Purcell had gone to Rome last spring. On account of the troubles in Missouri they are receiving very few papers. There is a rumor that there is a large force of Texans coming again to the territory. He hopes they will not come. Lamy intends to go to Europe in 1864 to get some subjects, more Christian brothers and Sisters for a hospital. So far they have only two schools and they are in Santa Fe. About 350 children attend. He ordained a priest on the 18th. Last October four of the Mexican sisters took their perpetual vows. There is weekly mail from Denver and he often hears from Father (Joseph P.) Machebeuf who is as stirring as ever building churches. He has only one assistant priest with him but Lamy cannot spare him more. In Central City, (Colorado) at the last election there were over 1,000 Catholic voters.

II-5-b A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
4


1862 Dec 29

Querhoënt, Count H. de, Chateau de Pyrie near Dinan
Cotes du Nord, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

When Querhoënt visited Sacred Heart of Rennes, (Odin) proposed to Querhoënt's daughter to take charge of a letter for his son, Albert de Querhoënt, who is living at New Orleans. He asks him to forward the enclosed (no enclosure) envelope to him. Although he has received no letters from him for a long time, he knows by indirect means that he is in good health. However, he wonders if his son is thus reassured about his family. His son is attached to the H. Warnery house of Swiss origin. The disruption of commerce has discouraged him and he would be sufficiently disposed to return to France before the solution of the bloody conflict. Querhoënt asks (Odin) to enlighten his son about the probably outcome of the war. His son is 24 years old and made first appearance in commercial affairs in the most advantageous manner. The war has necessarily injured his position as well as that of many others. Except for the war his other two sons would be about to join their elder brother. They are studying commerce at Le Havre. Upon his arrival in New Orleans, his son had a letter from the Bishop of St. Brieuc sent to Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc. His family owes its nobility to service which one of its members rendered in the 7th century to St. Pol Aurelian, Bishop of St. Pol (Brittany). If his family has numerous members in the army and at court, it has also furnished the Church with worthy priests and a bishop at Avranches in the last century.

P.S. He wonders when (Odin) will leave for New Orleans. If he takes a steamer from Le Havre, his two sons would be honored to pay him their respects.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
2


1862 Dec 29

Rouand, Father M(a)th(ew), Director at the Grand Seminary of Mont-Ferrand
Clermont, France

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Rouand writes in regard to Mr. R Réveret, a deacon at the seminary, who offered to go to New Orleans. On the one hand there is reason to think that he has been inspired by God; on the other hand Rouand fears he would be exposed to greater dangers in regard to chastity in a mission country. He has need to surround himself with special precautions. However, if he is faithful to put into practice the resolutions he made before becoming sub-deacon and if he perseveres in the disposition he has maintained during the 4 years that Rouand has directed him, he has reason to hope that he will escape these dangers and become a good priest. Rouand did not wish to consent to his departure before Réveret made his situation known to (Odin). (Odin's) reply to Réveret seemed to advise him to renounce his plan, at least for the moment. Réveret has asked Rouand to write to (Odin) about his condition. If (Odin) thinks he would be wrong to go Rouand will advise him not to think about it any longer.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
2


1862 Dec 31

Glajeux, Berard des
Paris, (France)

To Bishop Peter Paul Lefevere
Detroit, Michigan

The 1862 allotment of the Association of the Propagation for Detroit Diocese is 1,100 francs. According to custom, the last fifth of this sum is withheld until the close of the fiscal year. They regret having for so long been deprived by Lefevere of information about the situation of his diocese, its needs and improvements. Information is necessary to determine the amount of help to the missions. Lefevere's prolonged silence would indicate that his needs are diminishing. Meanwhile they do not forget the ties that attach them to the Detroit Diocese and especially to the (American) College at Louvain.

L.S. (French) 2pp.

On the same paper:

Certes, (Adolphe)
(Paris, France)

To Bishop Peter Paul Lefevere
Detroit, Michigan

Listed allocations to Detroit and Cincinnati.

P.S. Itemized account of balance sheet for 1861.

P.S. He gave first notice of the allocation for 1861 in his letter of May 31. If Lefevere has authorized DeNeve to receive some of it he can do so only from the allocation for 1862.

A.L.S. (French) 2pp.

III-2-j A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
5


1862 Dec 31

Lacouture, E., Passy
Paris, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M., of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Lacouture received today a letter from his sister, Mrs. Moulin which announces that (Odin) is arriving. Mrs. Frobert has delivered to (Odin) the small pamphlet which Lacouture published on the American war and to which (Odin) gave his high approval. He is happy that (Odin) will visit their modest dwelling at Passy. His wife, who has been ill for a long time, rejoices at this project.

VI-2-f A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
3


1862 Dec 31

Raymond, Father C(asimer), Chateau Du Petit Graniogue near L'Embouchure
Toulouse, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Only lately did Raymond learn that (Odin) was in France. He had said goodbye to Texas, his illness made him say even forever, but his heart remains there. In seeing (Odin) once more he would imagine that he saw Texas to which he had given himself with such great heart and which he had so badly served. The particular kindness which (Odin) always showed him, the ingratitude with which he replied, and the afflictions which God has sent (Odin) in these last years make it his duty to write. He begs pardon for doing it so late since more than two years have passed since he returned to France. He was so sick at his arrival that he did not have the strength, then confounding (Odin) with the predecessor, the Capuchins gave him much distressing news that he was obliged to give up the ideas. They were mistaken, but when he wished to write it was too late, New Orleans had been blockaded. He will not venture to congratulate (Odin) on his new dignity. Louisiana needed him. He was not at all surprised at the election of Bishop (Claude Mary) Dubuis, (C.M.). It is also a very happy burden, but with his prodigious activity, his inflexible will, and his enterprising character, he will overcome many of the difficulties. He knows Texas well and he knows all the troubles of a priest. Perhaps this language will surprise (Odin) since he cannot have forgotten the unfortunate difficulties that he and Dubuis had. He was too young then and perhaps a little too influential but now he can only deplore his errors and ask pardon. He is writing to Dubuis to congratulate him and to express his regrets, and, if later it pleases God to permit him to return to those dear missions where he would like to die, it would be a very sweet consolation to have Dubuis for his pastor and Father. His afflictions have opened his eyes. He fears that he carries the seeds of an early death in his heart, but all that has made him examine himself and do penance which he might not have done. However, he is beginning to regain some strength and it is said that he is recovering. They are very anxious about their cousins in S(an) Antonio but he cannot secure any information. Mrs. Abat, the mother, is most desolate; for two years she has heard absolutely nothing of either them or her other son, Paul (Abat). He wonders if (Odin) could tell them about them, and also if he knows anything about the excellent Toutant family, of Father (Michael?) Sheehan and Anthony.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) pp.. 12mo.
7


1862 Dec 31

Spalding, M(artin) J., Bishop of Louisville
Louisville, (Kentucky)

To Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell)
Cincinnati, (Ohio)

Although Spalding does not think he owes Purcell a letter he writes to wish him season's greetings. His brother and the clergy of the Cathedral wish him the same. He hopes the New Year will bring many blessings, especially peace. Archbishop (Francis P.) Kenrick of Baltimore expects an early peace. War and the rumors of war are so unreliable. Spalding regretfully withdrew Mr. Harele from the Seminary because the physician pronounced his eyes as being permanently diseased. Spalding sends his regards to Purcell's brother, the clergy, and his Auxiliary. He is sorry to hear of Father (William J.) Barry's illness, and asks Purcell to remember him to Barry and that he will pray for him.

II-5-b A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
3