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Calendar: 1863

(1863)

Brownson, W(illia)m, I.
(San Francisco, California)

To (Orestes A. Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

William asks his Father to perform this last act of kindness. William met Mrs. White today, she is the former Fannie Rodgers; she is living in San Francisco, her husband failed some years ago. William has seen Mr. Goodrich and his daughter, Sallie (Goodrich). He can say nothing in favor of either of them. The man seems to have lost his energy and mind, and he is very poor. Sallie is going to the d(evi)l fast, and in spite of every remonstrance has lost her friends and position in society. William hopes that his brothers survive the multitude of dangers that surround them. He often feels anxious for his parents. He believes that the hazards should be removed from the war; the North should double its forces and expenses if necessary to insure greater safety and success. The war will never end until there is a complete uprooting of slavery. (The first seven pages of this letter are missing.)

I-4-g A.L.S. (Photostat, Odiorne collection) 2pp. 8vo.
2


(1863)

Granry, F(rancis Peter)
(Angers, France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

After mature consideration he sees no other course than to enter the Oblates of Mary (Immaculate). He regrets that (Odin) did not abide by his second letter; then he would not have to lament in the necessity in which he finds himself. However the ways of Providence are admirable; perhaps the Lord wished in this way to place him on the right path.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
2


1863 ( ) 22

(Raymont), Mary of Jesus, R.G.S., Sister
N(ew) O(rleans, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Unable to persevere any longer in her present position and state of mind, Sister is determined to quit the house (of the Sisters of Our Lady of Charity of the Good Shepherd) to return to the Motherhouse as she is at liberty to do so; only she should have an obedience which she asks (Odin) to send her or she will have to leave without it. All she requires id yo have her passage to New York secured which Father (Henry) Riordan can do without incurring expense. Arrived there, she can write Mother General of her return. She can have any money necessary from her family to defray her expenses. Although fully determined to put this design into execution, she submits it to (Odin's) prudence and judgment.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
3


(1863)

Roberts, John A.
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Although a stranger to Odin, Roberts approaches him with a complaint. Considering himself the guardian of William G. Hale, Jr., whose Father was last located in Calcutta, E(ast) Indies, he represents that for some three years the boy has been a pupil of St. John's School. He is between 10 and 11 years of age and Odin may judge of his proficiency when it is observed he was approximating to the upper classes of his studies. He has been brought up in the tenets of the Catholic Church. He has deeply ingratiated himself into the favor of his teachers, the Christian Brothers. During the recent vacation Father (Jeremiah Moynihan) Monoghan called upon Roberts for the object of withdrawing Hale from the school alleging impurity of blood and that complaints have been made to him for tolerating such an evil. From the best information he has, Hale has an infinitesimal admixture of Indian blood. The Brothers could not have been consulted upon the exclusion, for on the first day of school, Hale's mother was waited on by a deputation of boys to ascertain the cause of his non-appearance, and after the reason was assigned it seems that a controversy arose between (Moynihan) and the Brothers in which the latter were overruled. (Moynihan) has known the boy from childhood and upon Roberts' inquiry could allege nothing adverse to him. Roberts wonders if it is consistent with Catholic institutions to exclude a harmless and unoffending being. The same objection may apply to the sanctuary where he has been serving as a chorister. He asks Odin to reflect and to determine if any expostulation is necessary.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
5


1863 Jan

(Gillespie, C.S.C.), Sister Angela and others, St. Mary's,
(Notre Dame, Indiana)

to Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell of
Cincinnati, (Ohio)

Cardinal (Alexander) Barnabo wrote Bishop (John H.) Luers that the Holy See demanded a separation of the temporals of the Congregation of Holy Cross. The request was made under the impression that Father (Edward) Sorin, (C.S.C.) opposed such a separation. The Sisters deny emphatically that Sorin placed obstacles in the way. Sorin's administration is the only one in the entire Congregation of Holy Cross that ever gave the Sisters anything like a proportional share of the temporals. There was an amount of common debt that had been contracted in Sorin's name and it was deemed prudent to leave his administration the control of the bulk of the common property. It was subjects from France who complained to the Superior General that Sorin deprived them of their just rights. The Sisters testify that they gained more under Sorin's direction that they could have if left to their own resources. Sorin brought them to America to do the domestic work of the college, but from the first he desired them to develop their sphere. In the first years, they received no subjects except poor girls of the working class. Now, however the community has a different position. It is at the Mother House in France that the sisters have been deprived of their share of the temporals, being given only the right of possession of a house attached to the College of Holy Cross. They, in America, earnestly desire that Sorin be confirmed as their Ecclesiastical Superior. The Cardinal's letter further states that in the future the Sisters will be under the direction of the Ordinaries. They petition the Holy See through Purcell that all the branches be under the direction of St. Mary's as their motherhouse. If their was no connecting link among the various houses, the society would soon die. The vast majority of the Sisters wish to remain under the one government. There is a certain amount of common debts which cannot be left to the management of half-formed subjects in separate houses. Unless some principal house was recognized, the position of their sisters who are engaged in military hospitals would be very unpleasant. The Archbishop of Baltimore, (Francis Patrick Kenrick) and Bishop Luers agree that the Sisters must be under one government. This would end the unhappy state of affairs.

II-5-b A.L.S. 15pp. 12mo.
7


1863 Jan

Sorin, C.S.C., Father Edward
(Notre Dame, Indiana)

To Archbishop John Baptist Purcell
Cincinnati, Ohio

Sorin asks Purcell to send back the ordinance which Mother Angela (Gillespie) left with him. Sorin says he will consult Purcell again very seriously.

II-5-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
2


1863 Jan 1

Blanchard, Mrs. née Benezech
Strasbourg, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Blanchard wonders if (Odin) has forgotten that in 1852 he came to talk with them about their son in Texas. The son is still there and since the end of July, 1861 they have not had news of him. He wrote that he had just been named a major and aide de camp of the Governor of the State. (Odin) will perhaps remember having seen her son at San Antonio. He is known in America under the name of X(avier) B(lanchard) Debray. In June, 1862 she lost her sister, and in November her husband was taken. She wrote three times to her son about the sad news but does not know if he received the letters. She wonders if (Odin) could indicate a sure way to forward a letter to him.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Jan 1

Bouchet, Jules (de Cruseilles)
Annecy, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Reading (Odin's) letter caused him great worry and sorrow. His vocation is decided. He does not wish to go to Louvain, and if (Odin) does not direct him immediately to America, he prefers the Indies and will go immediately with the Franciscans. If the small sum he asked is preventing (Odin) from including him among his collaborators, it will not be an obstacle. He asks (Odin) to reply immediately because if he leaves it is necessary to see at least his parents. If in four or five days he does not receive an answer, he will no longer count on America. He has already completed the greater part of his theology and being in the fourth year, he will soon be ready to work in the Lord's vineyard.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
1


1863 Jan 1

Favre, Claude, G(ran)d Seminary of
Annecy, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

He has just received (Odin's) letter of December 30 which is a source of anxiety for him. He thought himself assured of going to New Orleans. The same reasons that he revealed in his second letter of December 6 still exist and will not permit him to accept (Odin's) offer and go to Louvain. He cannot scorn the advice of his parents who will only give him their consent to go to America. He consulted his professors who told him that in going quickly to America he would have many more advantages than his companions. He knows that (Odin) lacks resources and he would do his best to pay his own expenses as far as Le Havre. If he had the money, he would offer to pay for the whole trip. He was born to be a missionary and sooner or later, he hopes that God will grant him that favor.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 8vo.
1


1863 Jan 1

Hendricken, Father Thomas F.
Waterbury, Conn(ecticut)

To Bishop (Francis P.) McFarland (of Hartford
Providence, Rhode Island)

The opening of Hendricken's organ will take place on Sunday, January 10 and he wishes McFarland to be there to preach. The elite of the city will attend. The music and singing will be extra.

I-1-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


1863 Jan 2

Babad, C.M., Father J(o)s(eph)
Les Chartreux, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Babad went to the Grand Seminary yesterday to convey his greetings to (Odin) but did not meet him. The Superior General of St. Joseph asked him to give (Odin) a letter from her niece, a nun and mistress at the novitiate, for her brother, Father Claudius Vialleton, S.J. at New Orleans. It informs him of the death of his Father. She hoped to see (Odin) but, disappointed in that, she begged Babad to present her respects to (Odin). Babad is sending 33 copies of the life of Mother Seton in French. (Odin) is to accept a dozen, give an equal number to Babad's nephew, and the rest to Father (Stephen) Rousselon. Babad will give a dozen to Bishop (Claude M.) Dubuis, (C.M.) of Galveston when he returns. They tell him that (Odin) plans to leave next Wednesday for Paris. In that case Babad, leaving on Monday for Argentière and returning late Wednesday evening, will be unable to see him. He again recommends his poor brother (Henri Babad) and he leaves it to (Odin) to do what is suitable at his stop in New York. If (Odin) is still at Lyons next Thursday and Friday, he should let Babad know and he will go and see him, and they could visit the Mother Superior General of the Visitation Order who should have had (Odin's) manuscript on St. Francis de Sales copied. If (Odin) has already seen her, she should have transmitted his request for a copy.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
5


1863 Jan 2

Dénecé, John Mary
Prénessaye, Cotes-du-Nord, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

When the Superior of the Grand Seminary of St. Brieuc told them that (Odin) was satisfied with what had been done, it gave them real pleasure. For a long time Dénecé was undecided about going to see his relatives before his departure and he kept silent about a project which could cause them much pain. However they learned of it, and his brother came to the seminary. Dénecé and (Hyacinthe) Le Cozic left on December 31, 1862 to see them all. He has been with his family since. He has a sister, aged 24, a male cousin, and a female cousin, aged 22, who would like to accompany him on the condition that (Odin) would employ them at the seminary. He awaits news of the day of departure. There are 6 from St. Brieuc and 11 from Rennes. Lately he saw a letter from one of these seminarians, Hégésippe Boutier. It is said that there will be 40 on their arrival in America, but this is only the beginning. There are at St. Brieuc a great many others who have decided to leave; one of them gave him a letter to send to (Odin). There are also some Sisters of Providence in his parish who ask )Odin) to request them so that they can leave. They are from the parish of Créhen. The superiores is perfectly willing to found some establishments as that has been her work until now.

N.B. Later, he will repay the money that (Odin) loans for his sister and the other two, or better still they could work at the seminary without pay.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 8vo.
4


1863 Jan 2

Granry, Francis (Peter)
Angers, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Granry regrets not having been at Angers when (Odin) was there. He would have been happy to join the seminarians who answered his call. For three months he has been a tutor at Tigné. Several seminarians, knowing that for 5 years his most ardent wish was to consecrate himself to the missions, thought of writing him but did not do so. He hastens to seek permission to join (Odin) if it is not too late. If the difficulty of meeting the expenses of the trip might prevent acceptance, he would do all he could to secure at least part of the price. He wishes to know what arrangements (Odin) will have made with the Bishop of Angers from whom he has already once obtained permission to go to Missions Etrangers Seminary where he spent several days.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Jan 2

Marziou, V(ictor)
Paris, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Marziou received (Odin's) letter of December 31 and is waiting for some news from Mr. Faass before fixing the time of departure. He hopes to be able to go to Lyons shortly and to confer with (Odin) and Bishop (Claude M.) Dubuis, (C.M.) on a question of the highest interest. It may be possible for (Odin) to lighten the expenses of the voyage of 50 missionaries.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
3


1863 Jan 3

Alleau, Father Th.
St. Brieuc, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

As Alleau wanted to be at St. Brieuc on January 1, he remained at Paris for only a few days. He spoke to Mr. Desglayeux (Berard des Glayeux?) about (Odin's) request to the Propagation of the Faith, and he seemed perfectly well disposed. He also saw the Superior of the Grand Seminary of St. Brieuc who told him many good things about all the subjects he is giving (Odin); all are with their families awaiting (Odin's) signal. Alleau has settled all his affairs. If (Odin) believes he should wait until September, he would do so. However, when and as (Odin) wishes. If (Odin) wishes to leave several subjects in France for some time, Father (Louis Dominique) Champeau, (C.S.C.), superior of the Holy Cross house in Paris, would take several. They could serve as teachers; it would not cost (Odin) anything; Champeau would give them a small salary and send them to (Odin) when he wishes.

(P.S.) He will await (Odin's) reply at St. Brieuc until the 10th and then he will leave for Tours. He forgot to mention that Drouyn de Lhuys, the minister for Foreign Affairs is counting on seeing (Odin) before (the latter's) departure. (Odin's) proceedings will be kept completely secret.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 8vo.
5


1863 Jan 3

Bizien, Aymard
Carhaix, Finistère, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Bizien thanks (Odin) for his letter from Annecy dated November 30 and for having accepted him for his mission. December 3 he received his leave from the Bishop of Quimper, and the next day he left the seminary and went to say his farewells to his relatives and friends. (John Charles) Férec and he have traveled a great deal together. There remains only to await the moment of departure.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 1p. 4to.
2


1863 Jan 3

Dubreul, S.S., Father J(oseph) Paul
Balt(imore, Maryland)

To Bishop (Francis P.) McFarland (of Hartford
Providence, Rhode Island)

Mr. Bartley left the Seminary Wednesday and should be in Providence with a certificate of his reason for leaving. The decision in regard to his vocation decided his leaving. In summary, Dubreul feels that he had inclination that would be dangerous in a priest. As to Mr. Clancey [Clancy], Father (Stanislas) Ferté says that McFarland wrote him about Clancy during Dubreul's absence last summer. The letter seems to have been destroyed. This has disturbed him since he felt that McFarland had another reason for refusing to dispense Clancy from an irregularity. He cannot under the circumstances recommend him to any other bishop and he must ask McFarland to tell him of anything that would be calculated to give any fear to the Archbishop for the future. Clancy brought from his pastor a good certificate about the manner in which he spent his vacation time.

I-1-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


1863 Jan 3

Gurley, John A.
Washington, D.C.

To (Orestes) (A.) Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Mr. Hoard has made arrangements for Brownson to lecture in the Metropolitan Hall in Chicago on January 13 and 14. Brownson should write confirming these arrangements so that there will be no mistake.

I-4-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
2


(1863) Jan 3

McCloskey, Father Geo(rge)
(New York, New York)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

McCloskey encloses two letters from (Caspar J.) Beleké. As the Paulists are coming next week McCloskey did not know when he should see him. Brownson may destroy them when done with them.

A.L.S.

Enclosure:

--------
(18)62 Dec 26

Beleké, C(aspar) J.,University of
Notre Dame, Indiana

to Father George (McCloskey
New York, New York)

He asks pardon for not having sooner replied to McCloskey's favor of October 2. He teaches Latin, Greek, and German and also gives lessons at St Mary's Female Academy. He is delighted with his position. In Father (Edward F.) Sorin, (C.S.C.) he has found a warm friend. Nearly all the professors are laymen. They have about 160 scholars. If it were not for the war they would have more than 200. The University has offered a professorship to Brownson. He would find here a most comfortable home and should the Doctor be taken from his family, his lady and daughter would be taken care of at St. Mary's where several widows of high rank reside. Mother Angela (Gillespie, C.S.C.), the Superior, seems anxious that the Doctor come. While here he might still attend to his Review. McCloskey is to urge Brownson to accept the invitation. Nothing could ever induce Beleké to return to New York. As regards the subject of McCloskey's letter, Beleké feels ashamed that he sent in a bill and treated McCloskey like a stranger. He would consider it a favor is McCloskey would allow him to refund the amount of his check. He asks McCloskey to get him a translation of Livy. He has just received a letter from McCloskey's brother (Bishop) John (McCloskey); Beleké is sorry they have only 70 students. They seem to feel the war more than they do here. Beleké fears that the rebels will establish their independence. Beleké wishes to be remembered to McCloskey's mother, sister, and brothers.

A.L.S.

Enclosure:

--------
(18)62 Dec 28

Beleké, C(aspar) J., University of
Notre Dame, Ind(iana)

To Father George (McCloskey
New York, New York)

In a letter a few days ago, Beleké alluded to a correspondence between this institution and Brownson. Terms have been proposed for a professorship but no answer has been received. Sorin spoke to Beleké and is very uneasy about Brownson, fearing that he may be sick. Sorin, hearing on what intimate terms McCloskey is with Brownson, has asked Beleke to ask him to urge Brownson to give a definite answer.

A.L.S.

I-4-b A.L.S. 8pp. 12mo.
8


1863 Jan 3

Marziou, V(ictor)
Paris, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Marziou sends an extract from a letter received from the agency at Le Havre. He asks (Odin's) address at Lyons and what day he can be certain of meeting him, as well as Bishop (Claude M.) Dubuis, (C.M.), there after having made plans with (Odin), he will write to Le Havre about the date of departure.

(P.S.) Advice received from Le Havre: The Sainte Genevieve, Captain Piccard, can be ready to leave on the 20th.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
4


1863 Jan 3

Subileau, Joseph, Grand Seminary of
Angers, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

(Odin's) letter has calmed all Subileau's anxieties and those of his director. Since he is now assured of completing his seminary with (Odin) he places himself in (Odin's) hands. He would like very much to see his relatives before leaving and therefore asks (Odin) to let him know the day of departure, along with the results of the negotiations with Bishop (William Lawrence Louis Angebault) of Angers.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Jan 3

Wood, James F., Bishop of Philadelphia
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell
Cincinnati, Ohio

Wood acknowledges Purcell's letters and $111.29 to pay the costs of the Roman packages. Bishop Duggan had to pay $60.44costs for a package that came to Wood's address. Wood asks Purcell to send his stray medals by express.

II-5-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


1863 Jan 4

Blanchard, Mrs. née Benezech
Strasbourg, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

This morning Blanchard received a letter from Colonel Duplessix telling her what (Odin) wished to say to her. Gratefully she takes advantage of his goodness to try to forward the sad news to her son (Xavier Blanchard Debray). Several years ago Bishop (Claude M.) Dubuis, (C.M.) undertook to inform her son of the death of his sister and she begged him to try and forward a letter to him.

(P.S.) She asks (Odin) to inform Dubuis that, if he learns any news of her son, he will transmit what he can to her.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
4


1863 Jan 4

(Brownson) W(illia)m (I.)
San Francisco, (California)

To (Sarah Healy Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

William admits that he is a very bad correspondent, but he finds it hard to finish a letter. This is William's birthday, he is 29 years of age. William has dissolved copartnership again. He will never enter into copartnership again. He finds the same trouble always with his partners. William has some important cases which would pay enough when finished to leave him independent. At present he is able to live only. Before another New Year he shall have two of them finished, and at least $10,000 in his pocket. He is patient, for with that sum, he can make as much more each year. William saw a dispatch that his Father, (Orestes A. Brownson), was elected, so he wrote to him in order to get an appointment, which could easily be got, of judge. The salary is $6,000 a year. The Review makes quite a stir in San Francisco; everyone admires his political articles. William is glad that Ned and Henry have so far escaped the Rebel bullets. William wishes that he had a commission in the army now that the Emancipation Proclamation has passed, and fighting is to be carried on more vigorously. Sally Goodrich and her Father have moved to San Francisco. She is giving public lectures on women's duties. It does not suit William's idea of things. Sally can write well, but is a bad lecturer. William is on good terms with Sally and her Father, much to the damage of his cash. They had a rousing earthquake recently; they have them about once every three months.

I-4-g A.L.S. (Photostat, Odiorne collection) 3pp. 8vo.

3


1863 Jan 4

Hirel, Alf(red), G(ran)d Seminary of
Rennes, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Hirel asks (Odin) to tell him definitely whether the conscription will be an obstacle. The superior has raised the question. In a letter of early December, revealed that his parents wish him to go only to Louvain. This is not at all an expression of his sentiments. However, if (Odin) sends him to Louvain, he will go there contentedly.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Jan 4

Lesne, Marie
Lyons, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Lesne was very touched by (Odin's) kindness in coming to see her mother. She asks his benevolent protection for her brother. She asks him to make it easy for him to obtain work so that he can repair the mistake which was only a momentary allurement and which he deplores with all his heart. The memory of their Father is dear to them and, although he left them poor, he left them an intact honor of which they are proud. If her brother delays too long in coming to (Odin's) house, Marie asks him to send him word to come for their letters. She warns him that her brother desires that no one know his true name.

(P.S.) She encloses (no enclosure) her brother's address. His true name is James.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Jan 4

Odin, (C.M.), J(ohn) M(ary), Arch(bishop) of New Orleans
Bourg, (France)

Contract for the establishment of a novitiate of the Congregation of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Bourg at New Orleans; signed by Odin, Sister St. Claude Louise Monnet, (C.J.S.); ( ) Perrier; Sister St. Placide, (C.J.S.); Sister of the Heart of Mary, (C.J.S.); and Sister Marie Félicité, (C.J.S.). A copy of the contract is folded with this.

VI-2-g D.S. and copy (French) 8pp. 4to.
6


1863 Jan 4

Spalding, M(artin) J., Bishop of Louisville
Louisville, Kentucky

to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell
Cincinnati, Ohio

Spalding acknowledges Purcell's letter and thanks him for his kindness to Spalding's cousin the doctor. Basil Duke is not dead but is badly wounded. He rode three miles to have his wound dressed and then twelve miles to Bardstown. Spalding will probably be in Bardstown tomorrow evening. The Irish were terribly cutup at Fredericksburg and at Murphreesboro. Joyce, of the Enquirer, says that the 35th Indians, of which Father (Peter Paul) Cooney is chaplain, lost men heavily. Mr. A. Garesche is in Philadelphia on his way to Tennessee to get his brothers' remains. Spalding sends his regards to Mr. and Mrs. Springer. Spalding is using Archbishop (Francis Patrick) Kenrick's translation of the N. T. as a text book.

P.S. He is thinking of publishing Bishop (John) David's Eight Days' Retreat additions from St. Ignatgius.

II-5-b A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
4


1863 Jan 4

Sumner, Charles
Washington, (D.C.)

To Orestes A. Brownson
(New York, New York)

He would like to talk to Brownson because he cannot write. His faith in the country is not shaken and he believes it will triumph. The Potomac Army is in such a position that nothing awaits it but destruction. They have been sworn to secrecy with regard to the Cabinet, although Sumner has insisted upon its removal. If all were known the positions of several persons would be altered. There will be great difficulties in organizing a strong and true Cabinet. Some who would be selected would object, especially if in the Senate. He prefers Chase as Secretary of State and a New Yorker for the Treasury, let the entire Cabinet be anti-slavery, and the inspiration "omnis in hoc." Butler is chafing at his removal which he blames on European influence. Banks seems to be wavering and some predict his failure. General Hunter knows New Orleans well and takes a gloomy view.

P.S. He asks for the January number of the (Review).

I-4-b A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Jan 5

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
Washington, (D.C.)

To (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Ned says they arrived in Washington, (D.C.) at 6:30 A.M. without any exciting experience. He then went to Alexandria, (Va.) by ferry and found there the store where Brown, the Sutter, holds out. He returned by the same boat getting back in Washington about 9:30. Next he went to Dr. Craig and then to the Provost Marshal's to get his pass. On leaving this building, Ned ran across Jim, his Negro worker, who had been searching for him. Jim's pass was made out and he is to accompany Ned tomorrow morning at 8 A.M. He speaks of meeting Capt. Lidball in the street. He speaks of his difficulty in getting money. Ned believes he will be paid next week and then he can send on his Father's money. He tells Sal that his cravat has served him in good stead and now he is saved from all droughts. Swinton has registered himself here and Ned believes that he will leave with him tomorrow. He still wonders about his box and will not be able to find out because they cannot locate Brown. There is some talk about them going into winter quarters but he hopes it is not true.

I-5-i A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Jan 5

Froger, Father Aug(ustine)
Vihiers, Maine et Loire, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Several days after (Odin's) visit to the Seminary of Angers, Froger went there to take the examinations as a newly ordained priest. There he heard of the reasons for (Odin's) trip, and it reawakened a desire for the ministry in America. His director encouraged him to write. However, his director told him that (Odin's) plan was to leave immediately for America and that he already had 42 names. Froger wishes to know the state of religion in America and if (Odin) still wishes to add to the number of those he is taking. If he saw a chance of accomplishing his plans later, he could prepare himself. What made him decide to go is the abundance of priests in Angers and seeing that elsewhere he would be less exposed to falling into sluggishness and negligence. He is only 25 years old and his health has been good enough. For information about him (Odin) could consult the bursar of the seminary, his director.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Jan 5

Houbart, Father B., Grand Seminary of
Angers, France

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Houbart brought Bishop (William Lawrence Louis Angebault) the letter which (Odin) had enclosed for him. He does not know the contents, but he supposes it satisfied (Angebault) because he made no objection to giving (Louis) Chassé, (Joseph) Subileau, and (Joseph) Viau to (Odin). He hopes (Odin) will be happy with these dear Angevins.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
5


1863 Jan 5

Lamy, John B., Bishop of Santa Fe
Santa Fe, (New Mexico)

to Archbishop John B(aptist) Purcell of
Cincinnati, (Ohio)

He asks Purcell to remit an enclosed draft of $250 to Mr. Nurre. He has just written to the Catholic Telegraph to get some copies for Santa Fe. Last Summer Bishop (Sylvester H.) Rosecrans wrote introducing his cousin. The young man did not get the position he expected but now he has some occupation.

II-5-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
3


(1863) Jan 5

(Letilly, Peter M.F.), Grand Seminary of
Rennes, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

(Letilly) wishes to know if, being a soldier, he can be among the workers that (Odin) is taking in a few days. He cannot leave the seminary to go and see his family until he is morally certain that the difficulty will be eliminated. His superiors have advised him to keep his departure secret even from his colleagues. If the reply is negative he wishes to catch up in the different classes that he has neglected in order to complete his theology.

(P.S.) All his colleagues wish to know what they should bring and whether they will have to pay for the trip from Rennes to Paris. It will be almost impossible for him to pay for it.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Jan 5

Lusson, F., Grand Seminary of
Le Mans, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

From Lusson's childhood the idea of being a missionary has not ceased to pursue him. After (Odin) visited the seminary he consulted his director and is persuaded that to hesitate any longer would be to go counter to the will of God. He is only in his first year of theology. His director told him that it is impossible for (Odin) to actually burden himself with him. If a place should become vacant among the 40chosen he offers himself. If he is forced to remain, he asks (Odin) to remember him upon his arrival at New Orleans, and he hopes that the present year will not run out without his wish being granted.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Jan 5

Seymour, Horatio
Albany, New York

to (James Alphonsus McMaster)
(New York, New York)

He hopes McMaster can come to Albany, for he is anxious to talk with him about public affairs.

I-1-m A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


1863 Jan 6

Brownson, O(restes) A.
Elizabeth, (New Jersey)

To Reverend Edward Sorin
Notre Dame, Indiana

Brownson has delayed answering because he could not determine what answer to give. Professor C. Beleki informed him there was a house which Brownson could use. However, Brownson learned differently from Father Sorin. His wife could not be expected to leave her home where her children would visit her. Brownson is appalled that his services be required daily from six in the morning to ten at night. His health won't permit such action. He still accepts. He will be in Chicago the thirteenth and fourteenth of this month. If someone from Notre Dame would meet him there, he would visit the university on the fifteenth and come to some conclusion. Bishop (James) Duggan in Chicago will know where to locate Brownson.

I-4-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
3


1863 Jan 6

Gay, Basile. (Grand Seminary of)
Annecy, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

On December 11, he wrote to inform Odin that he was ready to follow him to New Orleans; he has waited in vain. As he does not know if his letter came to (Odin's) knowledge, he reiterates his resolutions.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Jan 6

Marziou, V(ictor)
Paris, (France)

To Archbishop John Mary Odin, (C.M.) of New Orleans
(Lyons, France)

They have received the following advice from their agency in Le Havre. The Sainte Genevieve will be ready to leave for New Orleans at the end of the month. The departure will take place the 31st, and there will be time if they arrive at Le Havre on the 28th or 29th. (Odin) should wait for a last formal notice before having his personnel leave.

(P.S.) They would like to have an important conference with (Odin) and Bishop (Claude M.) Dubuis, (C.M.) on the 11th or 12th if they could be assured of meeting them at Lyons.

A.L.S. (French)

On the same paper:

--------
(1863 Jan 8)

Denavit, Father
(Lyons, France)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.) of New Orleans
Ambierle, (France)

This letter arrived immediately after Odin's departure. Denavit read it and sent the contents to Dubuis, telling him that Odin had no notice about having an interview with Marziou.

A.L.S. (French) 2pp.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
4


1863 Jan 6

Trumeau, Father U.
Chateauroux, (Indre, France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

(Odin's) letter of the 3rd touched Trumeau deeply. He looked forward to placing his zeal in the mission(Odin) would have conferred upon him. The dark picture which (Odin) traced of the actual situation in Louisiana would have only increased his impulse if he consulted only his heart. However, his age and his little habits of health make him fear that he would not be sufficiently useful. He believes it wiser to defer his departure, but he is far from renouncing his project.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Jan 6

Viau, Joseph, Grand Seminary of
Angers, (France)

To Archbishop John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France

They learned with pleasure that Bishop (William Lawrence Louis Angebault) of Angers accorded them their exeats without difficulty. The poverty of their families, at least that of (Joseph) Subileau's and Viau's, will not permit them to pay the cost of the trip, and they ask (Odin) to supply their need. He asks (Odin) to remember his small debt of 189 l(ivres?). The await an early reply so as to be able to spend a few days with their families. He writes also for Subileau and Louis Chassé.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
4


1863 Jan 7

(Angebault), Will(iam Lawrence Louis), Bishop
Angers, France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Angebault received (Odin's) letter asking for the subjects who agree to follow him: Joseph Subileau; Joseph Viau; and Louis A. Chassé. (Odin) asks the amounts which the diocese has paid for their ecclesiastical education and he has made know his intention to reimburse these sums. There has been paid for Subileau, 1890 f(rancs); for Viau, 1850 (francs); for Chassé, 2400 (francs), totaling 6140 f(rancs). He hopes they will live up to (Odin's) expectations.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 8vo.
4


1863 Jan 7

Barnabo, Cardinal Al(expander) C.
Rome, (Italy)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin?
Galveston, Texas)

Copy. In compliance with his request forwarded to the Sacred Congregation of the Propaganda respecting the decree of the assembly of the Congregation of the Mission (Vincentians), by which suffrages are denied to Bishops of the said Congregation promoted without the permission of the Superior: Father (Jean-Baptiste) Etienne, (C.M.) by his letter of October 14 has declared that he agreed to the intentions expressed by His Holiness; and Father Guarini, (C.M.), the procurator, by his letter dated December 20, affirms that the said decree was abolished on August 31. Barnabo is sure that (Odin?) will be pleased at the result of an affair which concerns (Odin?) of this Congregation. (This appears to be a copy of a letter sent on to Archbishop Anthony Blanc).

VI-2-g Copy 1p. 12mo.
6


1863 Jan 7

Granry, Francis (Peter)
Tigné, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Granry has just received (Odin's) letter. He will do all he can to obtain the sum he asks. He hopes to be able to accompany him. As he is engaged for a year in a house where he is living as a tutor, if he cannot obtain the consent of the family he will wait until the end of his time in August.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Jan 8

O'Connell, sister Mary Xavier
Cork, (Ireland)

To (Archbishop John Baptist Purcell)
(Cincinnati, Ohio)

She begs (Purcell's) pardon but feels that the purpose of her writing will make her more easily pardoned. They wish to erect a new chapel because the present one is too small and is mouldering. They intended to build one before they commenced "The New Alms House" but they had to think of the poor aged women and get them comfortable first. They are trusting to His Mighty Arm but also hoping for the assistance of friends, including those across the Atlantic. Since (Purcell) is already a subscriber to their Alms House it would be trespassing on kindness to ask for a large donation, but the "Parent House of the Presentation Order" a benefit by the smallest offering, and they will ever remember him in their daily prayers.

P.S. Mr. Kearney is well and happy in his new abode.

II-5-b A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
1


(1863 Jan 8)

Pellissier, Jenny, President of the Children of Mary
(Grand Sacconnex, Switzerland)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

The children of Sacconnex again express their gratitude. They received his letter containing instructions and advice. They ask him to pray for the divine blessing on their work. Not content with having possessed him for a little while, they ask for his blessing.

A.L.S. (French)

On the same paper:

--------
1863 Jan 8

Des Chaux, Sister
(Grand Sacconnex, Switzerland)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Des Chaux cannot resist the desire of their Children of Mary who asked her to send this letter to (Odin). (Odin) is going to see her mother; he will find her very changed since July. She wonders if they must no longer hope that his presence will bless their poor village. It seems that everything good is paralyzed in Switzerland. Often she is nearly discouraged and thinks of writing to (Odin's) far off country. She wonders if he will always thinks of the daughters of his true brother and remembers in the Holy Sacrifice his well-beloved adoptive family.

(P.S.) The pastor asks (Odin's) blessing for him, for all his parish, and especially for two unfortunates who keep the name Catholic only to do more evil. He came this morning to say Mass in their chapel. Since September 9 the reservation of the Sacrament had not been renewed. This is why she wished that (Odin) would come; she hoped he would say something that she could not say to the pastor.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
2


1863 Jan 8

Raymond, Father C(asimer)
Toulouse, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Raymond thanks (Odin) for the details about those dear relatives or friends that he left (in Texas). The whole family will be very thankful, especially Mrs. Abat, the mother, who will finally have some hope and consolation. One of these gentlemen was with them lately, and they will see him tomorrow. He was in a state of exasperation impossible to describe; perhaps (Odin's) letter will calm him. The picture (Odin) gave of that poor country to which he will return soon is very frightful, but God will give him courage. He asks (Odin) to convey his most sympathetic remembrances to the Généris family and to Father (Michael) Sheehan.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
4


1863 Jan 9

(St. Palais), Maurice (de), Bishop of
Vincennes, (Indiana)

To (Archbishop John Baptist Purcell) of
(Cincinnati, Ohio)

An old man named Michael Spiechtig who calls himself a priest is now in Indiana and since he is not known he obtained permission to say Mass on presenting the letters of ordination of Father ( ) Wirtz, a name which he uses where he thinks Wirtz is not known. De St. Palais asks that Purcell put a notice in the Telegraph to stop this scandal. Spiechtig is now in Evansville and had been at the hospital of the Franciscan Sisters in Cincinnati.

II-5-b A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Jan 9

(Seton, Elizabeth)
Cragdon, (New York)

To (Robert Seton
Rome, Italy)

To think that (Robert) should be the only absent one; they think of the joy July will bring. Grace Bayley hopes to secure him for Uplands but he must not stay so long as he did on his last visit. Will(iam Seton 4) goes West with Father George (McCloskey) and a party after Easter when the 4th is mustered out of service. Harry (Seton) is still in his room. Will made a start to go but met Colonel Mc G. in town and waits to return. (Robert's) dividend was $350, but exchange is so high it only brought 51 pounds. Father George gave them the last news of Father William. Robert's last letter to the Freeman was sent to Mc Master.

A.L. Incomplete

--------
(1863 Jan 9)

(Seton, Isa)Bella
Cragdon, (New York)

(Robert Seton) Bob
(Rome, Italy)

Liz requested her to finish her letter as she has to attend to her housekeeping. Liz, Nell (Helen Seton), Bella, and their Father went skating. Grace (Bayley) and Emmy (Emily Seton?) passed all day in town and little Agnes Poole returned to school yesterday. Will started off to return to his regiment about two weeks ago but on arriving in New York his Colonel sent him back saying his wounds were not healed; he intends leaving in two days. Bella saw Mary Jay Edwards in New York. Will and Bella visited Aunt Jay. Ninna (?) was ill. They hope to soon see Harry stand on his legs . Tomorrow Mrs. Kane's little girl is to be baptized at their house.

A.L.S. 2pp.

II-1-a A.L.., A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
11


1863 Jan 10

de Levis
Changy, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Mrs. de Levis and he regret very much not having seen (Odin) during his visit to Ambierle. They hope he will come to lunch next Thursday at Changy. (Odin) should ask the pastor of Ambierle and also his successor in Texas (Bishop Claude Mary Dubuis, C.M.) to accompany him. He begs his pardon for fixing a day but they are leaving on the 15th.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
2


1863 Jan 10

Denis, S.M., Father (Leon F.?), Grand Seminary of
St. Brieuc, (France)

to Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.) of New Orleans
(Lyons, France)

Their missionaries are ready to leave. For several days they have been with their families and await only a word to go to Paris. Denis is going to take their exerts at the bishop's and he will give them to Father (Theodore) Lamy, (S.M.) for (Odin). It is with pleasure that they see some Marists going to work under (Odin's) orders in the new world. He encloses the note (Odin) had requested. Their intention is not to embarrass him. He asks (Odin) to fix the moment of departure by the 15th or 16th so that he can notify their Breton colony.

P.S. Next year they will send him a new colony.

A.L.S. (French)

Enclosure:

--------
1863 Jan 9

(Denis, S.M., Father Leon F.), Grand Seminary of
St. Brieuc, (France)

To (Archbishop John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Owing to the seminary of St. Brieuc: Theodore Lamy, priest, 500 (francs); (Marie Ange?) Le Séchairre, 455; (René) Vallée, 775; (Hyacinthe) Le Cozic, 733; (John Mary) Dénéce, 362; (J.B.) Prand, 604 (for a total of 3,429 francs).

VI-2-g A.L.S., A.D. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
8


1863 Jan 10

Keck, Franz Anton
Le Mans, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary (Odin), C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Although (Odin) did not wish to completely grant the request which Keck made at the time of (Odin's) visit to Holy Cross and later in a letter, he again writes him in regard to his vocation. As he knows from his friend in the American Seminary at Louvain that his superior admits all the subjects whom he judges capable with the intention of sending them to some American bishop who has the greatest need, he wrote to him and sought admission, adding what had happened in regard to the request he made of (Odin). He sent to Louvain his certificates and (Odin's) letter. The superior replied that he would accept him on condition that (Odin) would not be opposed to his going to work in (Odin's) diocese after his studies and that (Odin) would recommend him to enter the American Seminary. He asks (Odin) to write to the superior of the American Seminary to that effect.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
2


(1863 Jan 10)

Lancelot, Ambroise, novitiate of the Eudists at
Roche du Theil, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Having learned that (Odin) had enrolled his colleagues for the foreign missions, Lancelot found the news agreeable. However, there is a cloud; a few faults, a temporary state of thoughtless youth. The thought of the missions has not left him, but it can only be suspect in such a circumstance. Nevertheless, (Odin's) wise zeal will know how to avert every accusation. He has studied philosophy for a year, and theology for two years. He hopes his resolution will be agreeable to ((Odin)).

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Jan 11

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
Camp near Falmouth, (Va.)

To (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Ned doubts that the letter he wrote to Sal from Washington, (D.C.) ever reached her. She was probably in York for some days but that he expects a long and interesting letter from her now. Ned tells of a grand ride up the river with Hassler of the Engineers. He speaks of going to Bell Plain to find the 30th. Only the 31st and part of the 29th were there so consequently he didn't see any of the (New) Jersey boys. The latter group is still at Acquia Creek, 15 miles off by the road. He sent Mrs. Pirce's letter to George in an envelope to the Commander of his Company. He compliments Sal for making him a present of the cravat, which kept the cold and the rain from him on innumerable occasions. He saw Fredericksburg again today (Jan. 11, 1863) and could see Rebel soldiers and females walking about the streets. A young aide named Bissell has been added to General Hunt's staff, making two regular aides, as allowed by law, in addition to Ned who is an extra aide. Ned says he likes Bissell and is amused to be with Bissell and Worth. They have both Richmond and New York papers at their camp. His horse is working admirably well and soon will be the best trotting horse around. He expects to get paid sometime this week. He read in the Tablet that Dr. Forbes is excommunicated and he liked an article in the World of the 8th in the Review of the President.

I-5-i A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Jan 11

Deyno(o)dt, Father Louis
Liverpool, (England)

To Archbishop (John Mary (Odin), C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Deynodt received (Odin's) letter of November 25 telling him to wait some time before embarking. All his affairs will be in order. It will take two or three weeks to arrange everything to the satisfaction of all. He regrets not having been able to leave sooner because the winter causes him to suffer very much. He presently has congestion of the chest and has not left his room for 3 days. There is at Liverpool a priest from (Odin's) diocese, Father (J. Ambroise) Martin. He is a native of Liverpool. He returned for reasons of health and plans to enter the diocese.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 16mo.
2


(18)63 Jan 11

Fillon, Father G.
Brignais, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary (Odin), C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Since (Odin's) visit to Brignais, Fillon went twice to the G(ran)d Seminary to thank (Odin) for all his kindnesses. The first time (Odin) was at Beaujeu or Bourg; the second time he had just left for Ambierle. He would have gone to join him there and assist in the ceremony of that morning, but he could not absent himself on a Sunday, especially since he must go to the country at the end of the month for their family arrangements. He would have written sooner but he was waiting for Dr. Bonnefay's prescriptions. The doctor hoped to see (Odin) again. He sends his respects and begs (Odin) to not neglect his sickness, and to follow the advice he gave him. He believes that by seriously caring for himself (Odin) could rid himself of his neuralgia or, at least prevent the gravest consequences. Otherwise, he fears a paralytic degeneration. Fillon's Aunt Claudine gave him some hope of seeing (Odin) again at Lyons. He would like to learn from (Odin's) mouth that he pardons all his importunities. It seemed that in leaving (Odin) was a little angry with him. (He signs as) "your very repentant nephew."

(P.S.) He has had Bishop (Claude Mary) Dubuis, (C.M.) take that letter for Father (Antoine) Borias which (Odin) had agreed to take. Father Denavit is to enclose in (Odin's) parcels the cincture which he left at Brignais.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
5


1863 Jan 11

Guerin, Anthonioz
Oreier, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Guerin asks (Odin) to convey the enclosed (no enclosure) letter to his brother Father Anthonioz Joseph (Guerin), S.J. at St. Charles College, Grand Cot(e)au. He has not had any news of him for four years and needs a letter in order to settle their family affairs. His cousin, Mr. Mugnier, a seminarian at Annecy, wrote him that he had seen (Odin) at Annecy and that he had given him some news of Guerin's brother. He also said that if he wished to write to his brother (Odin) would have it forwarded to him.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
3


(18)63 Jan 12

Alleau, Father Th.
(St. Brieuc?, France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Alleau told (Odin) in his last letter, as he had told him at Lyons, that he is prepared to leave. If he remains until October, it would be because (Odin) finds it more convenient. As he is pressed for the stations of Lent at Epernay, he has replied that (Odin) permits him to accept. He will be at Paris to receive (Odin's) instruction before the departure. If Bishop (Claude Mary Dubuis, C.M.) of Galveston is near, he asks to be remembered to him.

(P.S.) He will be at Paris on December 18.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
2


1863 Jan 12

Browne, W(illiam) Faulkner
Ft. Monroe, Louisiana

to Orestes A. Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Browne has read in the Review, "Faith and Theology" and "The President's Message," both of which were instructive and encouraging. He believes that the result will be either a secession of the South or a reconstruction under the Confederate government. He has little hope that the emancipated slaves will revolt against the Confederate government because he believes that they lack energy enough for a well systematized rising and because state rebellion is state suicide. Most of the southern whites he has met are ignorant, prejudiced sectionalists. Nearly all the people who could leave have left and all those that remain are poor representatives of the human race. Hence, Browne is back of Brownson when so many Catholics are slandering the letter because they fear him. Browne and others have been doing guard duty and previous to that blockade duty having participated in capturing the sunbeams. He has jotted down a few thoughts on the analogy between Protestantism and the Rebellion and wants Brownson to inspect same.

I-4-b A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
1


1863 Jan 12

Granry, Francis (Peter)
Tigné, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Granry is to draw lots for conscription this year and his superiors fear that he may be prevented by the civil authorities from putting his plans into execution. He wonders if (Odin) would not overcome this obstacle, either by taking him with him, or by writing to the Emperor or to the Minister of War. He will have much difficulty in gathering the sum (Odin) asks. If (Odin) can arrange this matter and accept him with the sum he can obtain, he should tell him the day on which he should be in Paris. He is completely ready. He has not yet asked the Bishop of Angers for permission. His director, the pastor of Tigné, will ask it for him.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Jan 14

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
Camp near Falmouth, VA.

Tp (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Their inactivity is at an end. They are due to battle with the enemy. He has just been writing to Jesse (Healy) and hopes he will not disgrace his appointment. (Continued Jan. 15) Ned doesn't know exactly when the battle is to take place. He tells Sal that he will no doubt know all about it by the time this letter reaches her. Henry (Brownson) received his mother's letter. Sumner and Wilson have suddenly come to have a high regard for (Gen.) Hunt. Ned says his Father's (Orestes A. Brownson, Sr.) reputation has not suffered since October. Gen. Hunt, Major Doull, and Gen. Tyler are warm in his praise and in praise of the political articles that appear in the Review. If their father goes to Washington, (D.C.), he will find his influence never greater than now. Ned wants her to tell him if Jesse (Healy) lets her know where he is ordered. They are afraid Hooker is to have command of their army. Ned threatens to denounce Judge White by name if he speaks against Hunt, Stone, and the Regulars as he did in New York. He wants to know if Sal is going to get commissioned as a Volunteer when Dr. Bergen goes as her orderly. He asks to be remembered to the Kiplings and have his love given to a Mary Pegram. Craig has announced an insurrection in the kitchen. He finds it necessary to write in an office with a crowd talking continuously. Conolly was delighted. Ned assures Sal that there is no trouble between Hunt and him. He will go to see the (New) Jersey boys one of these days. He feels that if Henry (Brownson) goes to Rosey, he shall soon follow without any difficulty. The expect to go into winter quarters if they do not fight soon. He asks her to inquire of Howell concerning the papers for the claim. He wants a copy of Sezabad's book. Ned advises Sal to destroy the letter and tells her that her brown horse is behaving amiably well and that he expects his bay horse to be well soon. The paymaster is due also.

I-5-i A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
3


1863 Jan 14

de Bayo, Widow
Louvain, (Belgium)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

De Bayo writes a few words about (Odin's) friend, the late Louis Verret, which she hopes he can transmit to Verret's mother. She has written to her as well as to Nicolas Verret, but she has not received any reply. Louis was admirable in his illness. He died on July 7, (18)62. De Bayo's daughter, who is now a Sister of St. Vincent, was on her knees at the side of his bed. (Odin) should inform Mrs. Verret that de Bayo has preserved all her son's belongings and that she desires her to indicate a way to forward them. She also has some of his money. (Odin) should ask Mrs. Verret to let her keep a small souvenir. She wonders if in going to the convent of the Sisters of St. Vincent de Paul, he would give her daughter his blessing.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
4


1863 Jan 14

Kenrick, Francis Patrick, Archbishop of
Baltimore, (Maryland)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.)
N(ew) Orleans, (Louisiana)

It is greatly in favor of Father John McCloskey that he should have been recommended for Little Rock by Bishop (William Henry) Elder, who lived with him for many years. He is of excellent manners; but his care of the temporalities of (Mount St. Mary's) College, (Emmitsburg) so engrosses his attention that Kenrick fears he is not as studious and spiritual as a Bishop ought to be. He feels confident he would decline. He could not recommend him. Father John Bannon left St. Louis a year ago and went within the Confederate lines. He could not be promoted under these circumstances. He is otherwise much esteemed. Father P(atrick) J(ohn) Ryan has good talents and, Kenrick believes, enjoys the confidence of his brother, (Archbishop Peter Richard Kenrick). Bishop (John) Timon opposed his promotion but made no grave objection. Father C(harles J.H.) Carter, being a native of Kentucky, would scarcely be objected to as a resident of a free state. However, Kenrick is not anxious for his promotion. He is active, although advanced in age, and is likely to accept. His means are ample. He has good information, although not learned. His manners are gentlemanly and his business tact considerable. He is well tried and found faithful. Father Jos(eph Heidencamp) is judged by Bishop (Richard V. Whelan) of Wheeling, who is now at Baltimore, wholly unfit. This does not imply moral disqualification. (Whelan) thinks favorably of McCloskey.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 2pp. 16mo.
12


1863 Jan 14

(Rappe), A(madeus), Bishop of Cleveland
Cleveland, (Ohio)

To (Archbishop John Baptist Purcell of
Cincinnati, Ohio)

He thanks Purcell for his good wishes for the New Year. Father (L ) Hoffer wrote that he had received his exeat for the diocese of Cincinnati and that he offered himself under certain conditions which were not fulfilled; that he felt free to seek another bishop and was now a subject of the diocese of Cleveland. Rappe is of the same conviction as Hoffer. Hoffer promised to write Purcell telling him of his firm conviction to remain in the Cleveland diocese. Rappe is sorry that this affair had to come up so soon after the affair of Father (Mary Anthony) Meyer.

Note added by Purcell:

Answered by extract from Hoffer's letter. Hoffer's exeat is for Purcell; he made no conditions. He is detained unjustly.

II-5-b A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Jan 15

(Bacon), David W(illiam), Bishop of
Portland, (Maine)]

to Bishop (Francis P.) McFarland of
Hartford (Providence, Rhode Island)

A Father Brown lately from Hartford has applied to Bacon and he understands that he gave McFarland much annoyance. He asks some information about the man. He fears he is intemperate and stubborn.

I-1-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
2


1863 Jan 15

(Garesche), L( ) I( )
Harrisburgh, (Pennsylvania)

To (James Alphonsus McMaster)
(New York, New York)

He is returning with the body of his brother (Julius P. Garesche). He missed the connection between this point and Baltimore and will reach Washington tomorrow morning. The funeral will be Saturday. He shall not dwell upon the loss it was to Garesche and the family, because McMaster knew how his brother was admired and loved. He need not express his bitterness to think of his brother and other noble men being sacrificed because of Monroe and others, the New England Abolitionists. He writes because he disagrees with Julius' complaint to McMaster regarding his views. The writer's own views are entirely different. Jules abhorred this war and the Mexican War, but went ahead and did his duty in both. He had intended to tender his resignation if he had survived this battle, as a result of the President's Proclamation. Of course it would have been refused and Staunton would have dishonorably dismissed him. He means by abhorrence, a war in which no Catholics could engage because of conscience. He asks McMaster not to change his policy, nor let any discussion defeat him. Almost as many people paid homage to his brother as he lay in the Church, as usually files past the Blessed Sacrament at Easter time, according to yesterday's Cincinnati papers. If possible, he will continue on to New York to see McMaster, but he does not think he will be able to do so. He left St. Louis the minute he heard the news, casting aside everything. He would like very much to see McMaster. If McMaster should like to write to him, he may be reached in care of Dr. W(illia)m V. Keatin, S.E. Corner of Tenth and Walnut, Philadelphia, (Pennsylvania).

I-1-m A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
2


1863 Jan 16

Babad, C.M., Father J(o)s(eph)
Les Chartreux, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Forced to let Bishop (Claude M.) Dubuis, (C.M.) leave without saying farewell. Babad is sending him 12 copies of the tran(slation) of the life of Mother Seton with the letter that (Odin) had asked for his brother, Henry (Babad). He has placed on it the address of the boarding house where Henry lives. If (Odin) has trouble finding him there, he could go to Messrs. Guillaume at Fargis, merchants. He hopes this visit will provide Henry a way to a more Christian sentiment. He hopes that the change of General (Benjamin F.) Butler will spare (Odin) the hard trials for which he has prepared and that he will find in his successor, General (Nathaniel P.) Banks, more humanity, moderation, and justice. He thanks (Odin) for his letter and the interest he shows in his good and poor nephew, Charles. He asks (Odin) to thank Father (Stephen) Rousselon for all that he has done and still does for Charles.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
6


(18)63 Jan 16

Colliard, James, G(ran)d Seminary of
Annecy, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Colliard received (Odin's) generous offer consenting to receive him in his seminary at the end of the year and to assure his brother the means to complete his studies. The reasons which prevented his leaving no longer exist and others, more serious, might arise. His parents are beginning to be frightened of dangers and he foresees that they will not consent later. He also fears for his exeat. His brother has just lost his teaching position and his parents cannot provide for his desires much longer. If (Odin) cannot lead them directly to America they wonder if at least in a little while they might be under his protection.

(P.S.) Basile Gay is retained. They wonder if they might replace him.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Jan 16

Oury, H, Seminary of
Le Mans, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Oury begs (Odin) to receive him among his missionaries. He fears he is asking a little late, especially since he cannot pay for the trip. He has little virtue but God has given him enough talent to keep him second in his course. Weak in intelligence, he is strong in temperament. He is 20 years old and has received minor orders. He does not see any impediment from his parents to his departure.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Jan 17

Bacon, David W(illia)m, Bishop of
Portland, (Maine)

To Bishop (Francis P. McFarland of Hartford)
(Providence, Rhode Island)

He encloses for McFarland's perusal a letter from Father (Michael) Car(r)aher(?) now within McFarland's diocese and permitted to do duty. Bacon could not induce him to give a statement of his affairs while at Ellsworth, (Maine) and Bacon withdrew his faculties. He told Bacon that if he allowed him to spend a Sunday at Newburyport he would collect a sufficient sum to pay his debts, his uncle having invited him to go for that object. He went and returned with more than the amount of his indebtedness. He now threatens to sue Bacon for more than $500. Does such a priest deserve to be dealt with kindly, asks Bacon. He was careful not to do this until McFarland had recognized him.

P.S. He asks McFarland to return Car(r)aher(?)'s letter.

I-1-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
3


1863 Jan 17

(Baraga), Frederick, Bishop of Saut Ste. Marie
Saut Ste. Marie, Michigan

to Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefevere
Detroit, (Michigan)

Baraga requests Lefevere to write to Father (Ignatius) Mrak, of Grand Traverse, and persuade him not to leave the Indian missions, Mrak had written to Baraga that next spring he intends to quit America and to go back to Europe. Baraga entreated him immediately not to do that. He proposed that he change missions, and take one of the two L'Arbre-Croche missions, if Mrak preferred them to that of Grand Traverse. Baraga told him that he could not leave the missions with a good conscience as he knows all the languages necessary there. Baraga asks Lefevere to find out the true reason of that strange intention of leaving the country. Baraga also received a note from Father Napoleon Mignoult offering his services. He speaks French and English equally well and promises to bring an Exeat from Bishop J(ohn) M(artin) Henni. But Henni wrote to Baraga that Mignoult had given trouble and scandal both east and west on account of hard drinking and its consequences. Baraga asks Lefevere to let him have one of his priests as he does not know who would be with him in Saut Ste. Marie.

III-2-j A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
6


1863 Jan 18

Limpens, Gustave
Louvain, (Belgium)

To Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere)
(Detroit, Michigan)

Limpens received deaconship last Christmas, and will probably receive the priesthood Feb. 28 or April 4 next. Being under canonical age, he petitions Lefevere for a dispensation in aetate of 2 months, and in interstitiis, on the grounds that he greatly desires to become a priest after 4 years of theology, and also to be better prepared for the missions.

A.L.S. 2pp.

On the same paper:

--------
(1863)

DeNeve, Father John
Louvain, (Belgium)

To Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere)
(Detroit, Michigan)

Limpens, a very good student, a Bachelor of Theology, would be able to take a Licentiate of Theology, if Lefevere thinks proper to prepare some that may become Professors; DeNeve would be willing to pay Limpens' expenses. DeNeve complains of the poor service of the mail: he wrote Lefevere on September 26, sending him 3 Mass Intentions to be said by a Bishop on the request of the petitioners. Did Lefevere receive them and say them?

A.L.S. 1p.

III-2-j A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Jan 19

Allier, Me.
Ambierle, Loire, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Allier sends in duplicate the address of Marie (C.) Portier, a servant at New York, from whom no news has been received since 1856. (Odin) had promised to gather some information. He also sends a letter for the French consul at New York whom he asks to make some inquiries. It will be better received coming from (Odin). Enclosed is a slip of paper with Portier's box number, in care of A. Corroyer.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
3


1863 Jan 19

Barber, Samuel, St. Thomas',
(Charley County, Maryland)

To James A(lphonsus) McMaster
(New York, New York)

About two months ago the Fathers of St. Thomas' sent McMaster $10 as a slight token of their esteem for him as a Catholic editor in the cause of "Religion and Truth." Though they do not desire their names mentioned publicly, they have been expecting some acknowledgment of the receipt of the money. He reassures McMaster of the high esteem they hold for him and hope that the sound principles he upholds will spread throughout the country, in an effort to restore the country to its former quiet and prosperity.

I-1-m A.L.S. 2pp. 16to.
1


1863 Jan 19

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
Camp near Falmouth, (Va.)

To (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

The battle that was expected to break has not yet occurred but Ned reminds her that by the time she receives this letter they may already be waging war. He hopes that they shall cross the Rappahanock (River) soon. He has bought himself a new overcoat and has recently received a letter from Orestes (A. Brownson, Jr.). The latter is well and attending school. Swinton is dining with the rest. Ned speaks of eating with Henry (Brownson). Captain Raymond has just arrived there. He tells her that even though the Negroes know of the Proclamation it makes no great difference with them. Ned dislikes Swinton's letter and says that newspaper correspondents are an abomination. He likewise doubts the report that staff officers are to adopt a jacket of gingerbread work as a uniform. He sends her $20, fifteen of which is to be given to Dr. B. (Orestes A. Brownson, Sr.) And five to be placed on her account. He says he will send the balance in the next letter. He hopes Henry (Brownson) will get a Battery. Hayden wants to exchange and so does Henry and himself too.

I-5-i A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
3


1863 Jan 20

Briand, Apollinaire
Tréméreuc, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Three years ago Briand entered the Grand Seminary of St. Brieuc. He received the ecclesiastical habit and the tonsure there. St. Brieuc has numerous priests and he thought he could be more useful in a country where priests are needed. He has revealed his plan to the Superior who assured him that a letter would be accorded by the Bishop and advised this approach to (Odin).

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Jan 20

Chambost, Father Charles
Firminy, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Father Duplay, superior of the Grand Seminary, writes that (Odin) will not return to Lyons, Chambost asks (Odin) to send him his exeat as he still has no permission to be absent from (New Orleans). He does not ask him either to flatter him or to speak too well of him, only not to calumniate him on the words of others, for he worked with much devotion and he returned so rich that he had to work in order to live. Bishop (Claude M.) Dubuis, (C.M.) will have said many false and malevolent things about him, among other places, at the College of Roannes and at St. Vincent's of Rhin to Father Clavelloux, pastor of Grandis. To avenge himself, Chambost has said of Dubuis all the good things possible because he has been consulted several times on his account and on (Odin's) by subjects of the diocese and especially those who plan to follow (Odin). His ambition is satisfied. He wishes only to serve in forgetfulness of evil men, jealous priests, calumniators.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
4


1863 Jan 20

Denavit, Father
Lyons, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

He wrote to (Odin) five or six days ago at the Hotel Fenelon and the carrier brought others also. From now on he will address them to Mr. Boiteux. Their young men are impatiently awaiting news of the day of departure. Bishop (Claude M.) Dubuis, (C.M.) met with an agent of (Victor) Marziou with whom he was quite dissatisfied. The agent demanded immediate payment of 20,000 f(rancs). Dubuis refused and told him he would pay only at Le Havre after having seen and visited the ship, and he asks (Odin) to pay nothing at Paris.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
4


1863 Jan 20

Joubert, Father Alex(André)
Le Monestier, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Joubert finally replies to (Odin's) letter of December 13, 1862. He regrets to say that he cannot be among (Odin's) companions for experienced people have advised him to wait a little while, and he has made it a very painful duty to follow their advice.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 12mo. 2pp.
1


1863 Jan 20

Lefevere, Peter Paul, Bishop of Detroit
Detroit, Michigan

to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell
Cincinnati, Ohio

Lefevere says he received a ten day draft on Purcell from the Treasurer of the Propagation of the Faith at Paris. It is for one thousand and eight francs. He endorsed it at the Bank of Detroit. Lefevere asks if he should not write to have the faculties, granted by Rome and expiring this year, extended.

II-5-b A.L.S. 1pg. 12mo.
1


1863 Jan 20

Manoritta, (O.P.), Father Gioacchino
Rome, (Italy)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

Since it is already a month ago since he replied to (Odin), Manoritta has decided to ask him to let him know when he would be leaving for New Orleans. During the last of December Manoritta obtained free passage on a boat to Marseilles so as to be ready during January. He would like to know when he could leave for Lyons because if the departure is delayed sufficiently he could go to Turin and obtain the government's pension for suppressed religious which he cannot obtain while in Rome. He will await a reply from (Odin) to decide whether to leave for Marseilles or Turin. He sends the respects of Bishop Marongiu and of his spiritual director, Father Blosio, (S.J.)

P.S. He has just received a letter from Monsignor Carretta who sends his respects.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (Italian) 3pp. 8vo.
1


1863 Jan 20

Meloni, Father Pasquale
Rome, (Italy)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

For a long time Meloni has felt the inspiration to minister to unbelievers. The news that his friend, Father (Gioacchino Manoritta, O.P.) Giovachino Manurrita has attained this desire makes him wish it more and more. With the advice of his confessor, Father Blosio, S.J., he asks (Odin) to grant him the same favor as he gave to (Gioacchino). Blosio can tell (Odin) about Meloni and he can obtain testimonials from the Archbishop of Cagliari that Meloni has been a priest for 17 years, as well as from the report in Rome.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (Italian) 2pp. 12mo.
3


1863 Jan 21

( )
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To (James Alphonsus McMaster)
(New York, New York)

In the Freeman's (Journal) of Dec. 3, McMaster expresses doubts of the arrest of Father (J.J.) Mullon and (Napoleon J.) Perché. It is true of Perché, although both were ordered before the Commanding General (Butler). Mullon was ill and could not appear. Perché was reproached with preaching reason which he denied. Upon being questioned, Perché said he did not wish to go to any of the places referred to by the General, as he was chaplain to a community of nuns. Perché was told to consider himself under arrest and was told not to leave his home or receive visitors. This lasted for five weeks until General Banks rescinded that and many more of Butler's orders. Mullon suffered from gout of the stomach the whole time and was never out of his house and not arrested. The Catholics as such have been well treated, the brothers and sisters being granted passes, food privileges, to a much greater extent than any other denomination. The Sisters of Charity are working in the Marine Hospital, as are the Jesuits, Fathers (H.) Riordan and (Richard) Kane. Butler's motive in arresting Mullon and Perché was probably just to prevent the appearance of partiality toward the Catholics, since all the Protestant ministers had been silenced or suspended, who would not take the oath of allegiance. Both priests had been notorious in politics. One was editor of the Propagation and the other had talked from the pulpit for 5 or 6 Sundays after the arrival of the Federals. He would recommend to the prayers of the congregation the Confederates who had died defending their homes, at the same time abusing the Yankees. Archbishop (John M.) Odin stopped it finally. He was the only one who used the pulpit for such purposes, and the people were pained and mortified to see it brought to such a level. This went on for five months although there were officers and soldiers present. Many officers have refused to enter the palatial residences obtained unjustly, preferring their own quarters. Among them are Col. Cahill, Capt. O'Brien, Dr. Gallagher, Capt. Carroll and others of the 9th Connecticut Volunteers, all from New Haven. Captain ( ) Thompson of the Maine Artillery was court-martialed for refusing to fire on a number of women and children on a marauding expedition on the coast. The Ninth also refused to destroy a church that was in the line of fire. Many such acts of charity and respect for Catholics and their property were shown by the Northern troops, but at the same time, some regiments were engaged in indiscriminate plundering. Butler's fair exchange of the shinplaster currency, his ridding the city of thugs and their accomplices, and other such acts, speak well for him. His tax on the few wealthy to give aid to the poor has resulted in employment for 3000 laborers. The ejectment of hundreds of families from their homes was the cruelest of all his acts, for officers and soldiers in many cases immediately occupied the homes with the lewd characters they could pick up. The former occupants were permitted to take nothing but the clothes they wore. Banks restored the homes to nearly all of the dispossessed, has released many persons from prison, and has gained many friends by his kind civil manner, so different from the coarse harshness of Butler. But the question still remains whether Butler could have done successfully from the first what Banks is now doing.

I-1-m A.L.S. (Incomplete) 4pp. 8vo.
7


1863 Jan 21

Chambost, Father (Charles)
Firminy, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Paris, France)

He wrote yesterday and must bother him again today. Father Garnier, pastor of Chambon, has just notified him that Bishop (Claude Mary) Dubuis, (C.M.) said that Chambost left Louisiana with 140,000 francs belonging to the diocese of New Orleans, that he had run away, and that he was still a fugitive. He needs a contrary testimonial for Garnier; otherwise his reputation is compromised in the diocese. Father Clavelloux has already come there to spread rumors and to destroy him. Chambost is also writing to Father Duplay and to Dubuis. If the latter does not do him justice, he will employ the means to secure it.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
5


1863 Jan 21

Le Rebours, Father A.
Paris, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Paris, France)

Father (Th.) Alleau told him last evening of his embarrassing position. Le Rebours' is even greater. (Odin) wishes Alleau to leave for New Orleans at the beginning of February and to cancel his promise to preach for Lent at Epernay. Le Rebours had been asked by the pastor of Epernay to negotiate this matter with Alleau who promised after having consulted (Odin). It will be impossible to find another now. He asks (Odin) to permit Alleau to delay his departure until after Easter.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Jan 21

Glajeux, B(erard) des
(Paris, France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Paris, France)

Des Glajeux regrets not having been able to meet (Odin) at his hotel and he reminds him of his promise to attend the meeting of their council on the 23rd. It will be a great consolation for them to bear witness to their veneration for his person and their profound interest in his diocese.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
1


1863 Jan 22

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
(Camp near Falmouth, Virginia)

To (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Ned tells her that he received her letter of the 17th. He is sending her $5 which will just pay for what he owes her. Promotions are not properly by brevets. Promotion is properly an appointment to an increased grade, to fill a vacancy. Ned speaks of Emma Bartlett as the feminine who promised to be his orderly. It is hard to trudge about in mud and rain in search of a Rebel to fight against. The Irish are hateful in all public relations but not nearly so much as American peace--Democrats and far less so than the Republican medlers in Washington (D.C.). He objects to their running down the army, talking big about taking Richmond by rushing over a strongly fortified enemy and to having such disreputable fellows as Hooker put in command of a splendid army like this, He tells Sal that the picture he sent her is of an officer by no way handsome but he thought she could make use of it. Ned says that their army is composed of excellent fighting material but that Swinton is nothing more than a bother. He is disgusted with the people of the country in general. Some are fanatical Abolitionists; others cowardly traitors. According to Brownson's Review, there is not virtue enough left to deserve a country. He assures her that he is not blue but instead only sleepy.

I-5-i A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Jan 22

Purcell, Archbishop J(ohn) B(aptist)
Cin(cinnati, Ohio)

To Bishop P(eter) P(aul) Lefevere
Detroit, (Michigan)

Lefevere's check for 1,000 fr(ancs) will be duly honored. Purcell borrowed the money to pay for the passage of three German ecclesiastics to the country. It seems to him that faculties had been given until revocation but he will look at the documents and do as Lefevere suggests. Bishop (John Baptist Malou) of Bruges is still battling with his diocese. What a terrible picture the Paris "Monde" draws of the Freemasons and anti-Catholics in Belgium. As Lefevere must have prayed for his own Cathedral mission, Purcell asks him to pray for theirs which begins the first Sunday of Lent.

III-2-j A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Jan 22

Ruchand, Father V.
Angers, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Paris, France)

Conforming to (Odin's) wishes he will send 185 f(rancs) to Joseph Viau, and 75 f(rancs) to one of the three for the expenses of their trip. The price is only about 20, but he w3ill add 5 francs for meals, the sending of packages, the price of the bus, etc. The superior will write to them to inform them of (Odin's) intentions.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
2


1863 Jan 22

Spalding, M(artin) J., Bishop of Louisville
Louisville, Kentucky

to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell
Cincinnati, Ohio

The Exhibition at St. Thomas' will take place on Monday 29th, preceded by that at Nazareth on the 25th, and followed by that at St. Catherines' (Dominican) on the 30th. Spalding leaves for Bardstown on the evening of Purcell's Feast Day. He asks if the enclosed clipping on beards has escaped Purcell and how it effects Father (Edward) Collins.

P.S. The Bishop of Ghent writes to learn if registers of burials are kept in this country. He wants to obtain the certificate of the death of a Belgian in New Albany with a view to authorize the marriage of the widow. He has written two or three letters nit received no reply.

II-5-b A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Jan 22

Terrier, Claudine
Annecy, France

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans)
Paris, France)

One of her sisters, Eugenie Deletraz, married to Pierre Gonzael, went several years ago to New Orleans where a little later she lost her husband by whom she had a daughter, Marie. Her sister remarried Charles Chapotet, a tin smith. She died a few years later leaving Marie Gonzael, aged 9, an orphan. Terrier has learned that some ladies of New Orleans had offered to receive Marie but, being ignorant of their moral character as well as of their religion, she asks (Odin) to gather some information and to tell her if she can permit her niece to accept their offers. She delegates to (Odin) all her authority over her niece. She also recommends to his good offices the children of Charles Chapotet who are also her nephews. The mother of a large family Terrier wants to do all she can rather than leave her niece in danger of being lost. Signatures certified by Levet, mayor of Annecy and de Locane(?).

P.S. Terrier asks (Odin) to send this letter (no enclosure) to her brother-in-law.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
5


1863 Jan 23

Coughlan, Mich(ae)l
Carlow, Ireland

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Paris, France)

Coughlan supposes (Odin) remembers the Irishman, late of the pontifical army, with whom he spoke in the seminary of Annecy. Coughlan was obliged to leave the Missionaries of St. Francis of Sal(l)es because he was not able to pay the pension and the house was too poor to keep him without it. As it is his firm determination to pursue his studies, he asks (Odin) for admittance into his seminary or to procure him a place in some seminary in France to study for (Odin's) diocese.

P.S. (Odin's) reply should be in care of James Moore, Carlow.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
3


1863 Jan 23

Detroit Free Press
(Detroit, Michigan)

(Orestes A.) Brownson lectured at Young Men's Hall on "The Union and the War." Reviewed the Southern doctrine of secession, stating he thought it a great mistake of the Administration, conceding the doctrine, but denying any State had seceded. The difficulty was that while we were subduing them as rebels we were obliged to extend over them the protection of the doctrine of State sovereignty, denying entirely the theory of Southern politicians. Brownson claimed sovereignty is national. The constitution does not make us a nation, we were one people before and always will be. There has never been a moment in the history of this country when a State was sovereign and independent. The sovereign power is vested in the people of the United States. Brownson claimed that a State has a right to secede. The people of a territory decide whether or not it shall become a State. The general government cannot compel it to become a State. The people of a State then create it; what they create they can uncreate, thus destroying the State, but cannot renounce the sovereignty of the United States. He held that the seceded States are but territories subject to the rule of the general government. Brownson thinks the war was being run incorrectly by the administration; for it is a war of the North against the South, whereas it should be a war of the Union against rebellious subjects. War should be conducted on military principles, not on political or humanitarian principles. War should inflict the greatest possible damage in the least possible time upon the enemy, with the least possible injury to ourselves. Brownson did not consider war the greatest of calamities, for war teaches us many good lessons. War is simply the efforts of the nation to throw off a terrible disease. It is what physicians terms a "heroic remedy." In our case it sprang from political corruption, financial dishonesty, and from the loss of personal integrity. The speaker believed this war would ultimately work out incalculable benefit to the country. Brownson urged his audience not to be disheartened by reverses, not talk of reconstruction or peace, but firm in prosecution of the war to victory.

I-4-h D. Typed Copy 2pp. 4to.
(Burton Historical Collection Detroit Public Library March 11, 1949)

--------
1


1863 Jan 23

Deyno(o)dt, Father L(ouis)
Liverpool, (England)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Paris, France)

Deynodt received (Odin's) letter of January 20 and he sees that his affairs are all arranged. It will be almost impossible for Deynodt to leave on February 11 but he is sure of leaving Liverpool at the end of February. (Odin's) apartments are ready. As to the family of whom (Odin) spoke, they will be well treated at the Commercial Hotel. He does not believe any Catholics who run a respectable hotel can be found at Liverpool. There is a steamer leaving for America on February 11.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 16mo.
1


1863 Jan 23

Henni, John M., Bishop of Milwaukee
Milwaukee, (Wisconsin)

To Archbishop John Baptist Purcell
Cincinnati, Ohio

Henni says that at Purcell's request he would have permitted Father (Michael) Obermuller to come to him to be editor of the Wahrheitsfreund but he was not the man for the position. He was also deterred from the position by a letter from his brother in the Diocese of Cleveland. Henni asks about Father (Edward T.) Collins to whom he wrote some time ago about some matrimonial matters but received no reply.

II-5-b A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
3


1863 Jan 23

Massard, A., St. Vincent's Seminary
Le Mans, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Paris, France)

Massard presents his request for the third time. He obtained unexpected success thanks to the Superior(Father Martin Bruneau). In his letter of January 13 he said he would need 200 francs for the trip; today he lacks only 100. (Bruneau) told him he could ask for the place of (Jules) Bonhom(m)et who is retained by unforseen obstacles. If (Odin) cannot give him 100 francs (Bruneau) assured him that his departure will not be delayed because of that. His parents could not be better disposed and resigned to the sacrifice of the separation. He never knew all the faith of his mother, in particular, until today.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
3


1863 Jan 23

Oury, H., Seminary of
Le Mans, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Paris, France)

Not having received any reply from (Odin), the Superior advised him to write a second time. He begs (Odin) to receive him among his missionaries. He is second in his class for talent and last for virtue, in minor orders, and 21 years of age. If (Odin) will take care of him on leaving Paris or at least from Le Havre, he asks him to let him know quickly as he still has some family matters to settle.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Jan 24

Alleau, Father Th.
Tours, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Paris, France)

Alleau encloses a letter he just received. He is ready to leave and will remain only if (Odin) positively wishes him to. If he wishes him to remain, (Odin) should tell him when to leave; in case he cannot leave him the money for the trip, he should give him the power to get it, be it at the Propagation or elsewhere.

A.L.S. (French) 1p.

Enclosure:

--------
1863 Jan 23

Taillandier, Father H.
Paris, (France)

To Father (Th. Alleau
Paris, France)

Archbishop Odin wrote to Father (A.) Le Rebours that he would not withdraw his word, that he would leave (Alleau) free, and that, if he could not leave immediately, he would try to leave him some money for the trip. Le Rebours does not believe he can intervene in this affair any longer and he asks (Alleau) to decide promptly. If he renounces Espernay, he is to write directly to the pastor as the matter is pressing.

A.L.S. (French) 1p.
VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
4


1863 Jan 24

(Angebault, William Lawrence) Louis, Bishop of
Angers, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Paris, France)

(Angebault) has already given three subjects to (Odin's) diocese. A fourth request has come from (Francis Peter) Granry to whom he gives an exeat. However, he reminds Odin of the material needs of his seminary and his promises to give him an indemnity for the cost of the education gratuitously given to these subjects. He likes to think that (Odin) will help him cover at least a little part of his debts.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 8vo.
2


1863 Jan 24

Detroit Free Press
(Detroit, Michigan)

An editorial on the speech of Orestes A. Brownson at the Young Men's Hall on Thursday evening, on "The Union and the War."

I-4-h D. Typed Copy (Burton Historical Collection, Detroit Public Library March 11, 1949) 2pp. 4to.
1


(18)63 Jan 24

Folliot, F(rancis), St. Vincent's Seminary of
Le Mans, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Paris, France)

He has just returned to the seminary and he was astonished to learn that A. Massard had written to (Odin) that he was taking (Jules) Bonhommet's place. Bonhommet's Father will not consent to his departure. When they received (Odin's) letter accepting (Francis) Mary and Bonhom(m)et, the Superior (Father Martin Bruneau) allowed Folliot to take the place of the latter and Folliot went away to his family. Massard wishes to follow (Odin) very much, but he should not take a place accorded to Folliot 13 years ago. Moreover, Massard has not yet obtained the 200 f(rancs) that he needs before leaving. He leaves his parents in great poverty and owing 400 f(rancs). Folliot's parents have given him a little money and they promise to send him 200 or 300 f(rancs) next year. He has their consent, all his preparations are made, his vestments purchased, and he is ready to leave.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
5


1863 Jan 24

(Gillespie, C.S.C.), Sr. M. Angela and others, St. Mary's
(Notre Dame, Indiana)

to Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell of
(Cincinnati, Ohio)

They have received an intimation from the Superior General (Father Basil Moreau, C.S.C.) that if the Sisters obtain permission from the Holy See to alter the present condition of things, that he will withdraw from Father (Edward) Sorin, (C.S.C.) not only all authority over the Sisters but also over the priests and brothers. This would please Sorin but his priests and brothers would consider his removal unfortunate. It seems also that Father Charles (Moreau, C.S.C.), the late Visitor, has obtained Apostolic letters to return and arrange matters accordingly. The Sisters had relied upon obtaining a Visitor outside the society, perhaps even an American prelate. Purcell himself thought they would not give the letter to an interested person. To remain as they now are would be a check on the development of the society. They ask Purcell to write again to the Holy See in their behalf.

II-5-b A.L.S. 5pp. 12mo.
5


1863 Jan 24

Granry, Francis (Peter)
Angers, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Lyons, France)

He just left Bishop (William Lawrence Louis Angebault) of Angers who gave him the exeat he requested. He hastens to send (Odin) the information he asks for the Minister of War: Francis Peter Granry, born March 20, 1842 at Cheffes, the son of Pierre Granry and Perrette Mercelot. He is going to arrange matters with his colleagues at Angers in order to be punctual in meeting (Odin) at Paris on the 30th.

P.S. He sends this to Lyons not knowing (Odin's) address at Paris.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
3


(18)63 Jan 24

Luers, Bishop J(ohn) H(enry)
Fort Wayne, Indiana

to Bishop P(eter) P(aul) Lefev(e)re
Detroit, Michigan

Six months ago Luers wrote to Rome about the Council of Trent in regard to clandestine marriages. He received the answer that there was no knowledge of an indult granted to the Diocese of Detroit either at the Propaganda or at the Holy Office. The Sacred Cong(regation) of the Holy Office thinks it necessary to require an exact copy of such indult as there is in existence a declaration of the supreme congregation of Feria IV, January 26, 1842 regarding the diocese of Detroit. From the above Luers perceives that instead of diocese he should have said city. He asks Lefevere to give him an account of the state of the question for which Lefevere wrote and Father (Peter) Kindekens went to Rome and a copy of the answer which he brought back.

P.S. He is much obliged for the copy of Lefevere's late Synod.

III-2-j A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
3


1863 Jan 24

Lusson, F.
Le Mans, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Paris, France)

Their superior (Father Martin Bruneau) told them that the departure from Le Havre had been fixed for February 2. F(rancis) Mary and Lusson will leave January 29 for Paris where they will stay at the hotel Fénnélon as recommended by (Odin). He wonders what they should bring with them. His resources are non-existent. His mother, widowed for 8 years with young children, has had to contract obligations totaling 1200 f(rancs). She finds it impossible to repay this very soon, and also she counted on Lusson to pay it. His departure disturbs her for she fears that the creditors will torment her. He asks (Odin) to send as a loan, about 600 f(rancs) at the end of 1863 or the beginning of 1864. The promise alone will reassure her and he can leave more content.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
3


1863 Jan 24

Massard, A., Grand Seminary of
Le Mans, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M., of New Orleans,
Paris, France)

It seems that all Massard's hopes are to be disappointed. (Jules) Bonhom(m)et's place is promised to both (Francis Folliot) and to Massard; Folliot pretends to have a prior right to it. He asks (Odin) to take him. His parents have already made the sacrifice with a good heart.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
3


1863 Jan 24

Phélip, Mrs. Pierre-Gilbert-Marie, née Coulet
Lyons, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.) of New Orleans, Hotel Fénélon
Paris, France

Announcement of the death of Mr. Phélip on January 24, 1863, in his 74th year. (The names of many of his relatives are given).

VI-2-g Printed Notice (French) 2pp. 4to.
1


1863 Jan 24

Rigotier, S.M., Father Superior of N(otre) D(ame) de la Nélière
St. Symphorien-le-Chateau, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Paris, France)

(Odin) having vowed lifelong friendship, Rigotier wished to see him during his visit among them. He went to Lyons several times but (Odin) was always absent. He had hopes of meeting him in the mountains of Beaujolais at the beginning of December, as several priests expected (Odin) there with Bishop (Claude Mary) Dubuis, (C.M.). Day before yesterday he wrote to Father Denavit who told him that (Odin) was at Paris and that Dubuis was going to join him there next Monday. The package which Dubuis is bringing contains 300 little offices and 200 prayers for confessors to be divided between (Odin) and Dubuis. It is a blow to them that (Odin) is taking their Father (F.) Bellanger, (S.M.) To New Orleans. He ask (Odin) to embrace him for him if Bellanger is with him. He has not had any news from (Odin) since the few words he sent him at Vauban in regard to a young novice brother of one of (Odin's) missionaries.

A.L.S. (French) 2pp.

On the same paper:

--------
1863 Jan 25

(Dubuis, C.M.), C(laude) M(ary), Bishop of Galveston
Lyons, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin
Paris, France)

He arrived from Ambierle yesterday evening. As always he was very well received by the Sisters. He found the whole family in excellent health but still sad. He tried to dissipate it by letting slip the word of return as he had heard it at Roanne: from (Odin's) two letters he understood his departure was settled and he wrote to the chateau of Lespinasse to make it known to the whole family, and also the success of the Confederates at Galveston and Vicksburg and the advantage of traveling with a friendly family; it will be most satisfactory. They will leave Lyons Wednesday and will be at Paris on Thursday. Miss Dweyr prefers to leave from Voilier. Dubuis will pay 3000 f(rancs), as Odin desires, to the convent of Beaujeu.

A.L.S. (French)
VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 8vo.
5


1863 Jan 24

Rotchford, P(hilip)
Dublin, (Ireland)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M. of New Orleans
Paris, France)

Rotchford received (Odin's) letter of the 21st to Father (Malachy) O'Callaghan, (C.M.). He will see Father (Thomas) McNamara, (C.M.), and go to All Hallows (College) and settle the account. He is not aware how much was in O'Callaghan's hands but he believes it was 600 pounds and out of it about 70 pounds was paid. He will leave for London Tuesday or Wednesday and a letter will meet him care of care of the Sisters of Charity. They are all pretty well, but the war is unfortunate for them. He paid out before leaving all due to (Odin) to the Christian Brothers to a point and left several papers with Father (Stephen) Rousselon to cover all claims against himself personally when they can be collected. He has sent O'Callaghan word that he would attend to (Odin's) requests. The last news appears to be more favorable, but how it will end is hard to say. It is reported that France is about to interfere.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 1P. 4TO.
6


1863 Jan 24

Spalding, M(artin) J., Bishop of Louisville
Louisville, (Kentucky)

To Archbishop John Baptist Purcell
Cincinnati, Ohio

A Mrs. Hawkins, whose husband, Colonel Hawkins of the Confederate Army is wounded, wishes to go to him but could not procure a pass available with General W.S. Rosecrans. The Honorable John J. Crittenden advises her to procure a letter from Purcell or the Coadjutor or both to Rosecrans. Her husband is at Chattanooga and is a negligent Catholic. Mrs. Prentice from Louisville was refused admission to the General's presence although she had letters from high quarters. Henni received from Rome this morning the regulations of the Brotherhood of St. Peter.

II-5-b A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
4


1863 Jan 25

Brownson, O(restes) A.
Detroit, (Michigan)

To (Sarah Healy Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

He tells his wife not to be alarmed at the delay in Brownson's return. He accepted a few more lecture appointments and will return the latter part of next week. He asks his wife to send ten or twenty dollars to Brownson's mother. The trip promises to be fair; he trusts to be able to continue the Review. (Photostat, Odiorne collection)

I-4-g A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Jan 25

Denis, (S.M.), Father (Leon F.?), Grand Seminary of
St. Brieuc, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, )C.M.) of New Orleans
(Paris, France)

Their young men will arrive at Paris on the 30th. (Hyacinthe) Le Cozic is bringing the exerts. Bishop (Augustin) David places them entirely under (Odin's) jurisdiction. Father (Theodore) Lamy is a priest; (Marie Ange?) Le Séchairre and (Réné) Vallee, subdeacons; Le Cozic in minor orders; (John Mary) Dénécé; tonsured; and (J.B.) Prand, an aspirant. Le Séchairre, Vallee and Le Cozic are in their third year of theology, Dénécé in his 2nd year, and Prand in his first year. The expenses of their trip to Paris are 195 and there is 160 paid for Dénécé's debts. (Odin) is entirely free to arrange this matter at his convenience. He can send it to (the Marists) at Paris. Lamy is bringing a letter from Bishop David to (Odin). Denis has only one regret, to see (Odin) leave and to remain.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
9


1863 Jan 25

Dowley, (C.M.), Father P(hillip), St. Vincent's College
Dublin, Ireland

to Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M. of New Orleans
Paris, France)

They have been expecting a line from the Irish College, Paris, which is not at all required. (Odin's) last favor has set all things to rights. The (Dominican Sisters) at Cabra have made the choice, and the (Vincentians) have all agreed in choosing the route via Liverpool where they will arrive on the 10th ready to sail on the following day under (Odin's) protection. Father (John?) Lynch has no doubt informed (Odin) that they were disappointed in the case of the priest promised and engaged for St. Patrick's, New Orleans. Father (Malachy) O'Callaghan, (C.M.)'s enclosed note explains all the money concerns. (Phillip) Rotchford is happily in Dublin.

A.L.S. 3pp.

Enclosure:

--------
1863 (Jan 25)

O'Callaghan, C.M., Father M(alachy), St. Vincent's College
Castleknock, Dublin, (Ireland)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin
(Paris, France)

Immediately on receipt of Odin's favor, O'Callaghan dispatched a messenger enclosing it to Rotchford who arrived with his family nearly two months ago. He was thus deprived of the pleasure of carrying out Odin's wishes himself as he had handed over to Rotchford all the money which Odin sent him from New Orleans. He also sent a letter to Father (Thomas) McNamara, (C.M.) telling him and giving him Ro(t)chford's address. He has referred Mr. Bedford to Rotchford in case he would require money for the All Hallows student. He trusts Odin will approve and that his expedition and that of Bishop (Claude) Mary Dubuis, (C.M.) may be most successful, and that Odin's health is improved if not restored.

A.L.S. 3pp.
VI-2-g A.L.S. pp. 12mo.
9


1863 Jan 25

Grosso, Father
(Turin, Italy)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M., of New Orleans
Paris, France)

The crosses turned over to the Sisters last night will all be fixed in time to be given back; Grosso thinks (Odin) will be satisfied. Father Allara, (C.M.), a missionary, asks (Odin) to give the enclosed letter to Father (Basil) Elia who has not had word from his relatives although they have written to him several times.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (Italian) 1p. 12mo.
3


1863 Jan 25

Moser, Anna
Mannheim, (Baden, Germany)

To Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.) of New Orleans
Lyons, (France)

Her brother, P.H. Moser of Galveston, asked her to write. He would like to help them but it is not safe to send (money) because of the war. He suggested that she ask Odin to advance them 100 fr(ancs) which he will repay as soon as Odin returns. They are old and feeble and almost always ill. Her sister Lissette, who was ill when Odin visited them in 1852, is still ill. They have no friends in this world except the Savior, His Mother, and their brother. (The latter) wrote them in October1862. She wrote a similar letter addressed to Odin at Paris on (December 8, 1862). Her brother wrote again that she should write to Odin in Lyons for 100 fr(ancs). Father ( ) Koch sends his regards.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (German) 4pp. 4to.
3


1863 Jan 26

Léger, Prosper, G(ran)d Seminary of
Le Mans, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Paris, France)

The goodness with which (Odin) received several of his co-disciples gives Léger confidence. For a long time he has desired to be a missionary; (Odin's) visit to the seminary strongly impressed him. But since (Odin) is about to depart, he can not leave with him. He asks if in a little while he might rejoin him. He has not yet revealed his desire to anyone. He plans to speak to his director in a few days. If (Odin) could send him the money for the trip, he would leave with pleasure.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Jan 26

Luers, John H., Bishop of Fort Wayne
Fort Wayne, (Indiana)

To Archbishop John Baptist Purcell
Cincinnati, Ohio

Luers thanks Purcell for the offerings received. He is annoyed by Father (Edward) O'F(laherty's) connection with the Phoenix Society but he has promised to have nothing to do with it. Luers is glad Purcell will attack it. His movement is popular with three-fourths of the Irish, and it is aided by the advancement of Colonel Corcoran to one of the prime leaders. Luers is going to forbid O'F(laherty ) to have anything to do with the Society.

II-5-b A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
3


1863 Jan 27

Baudon, Ad.
Paris, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Paris, France)

Since (Odin) has authorized him, Baudon sends (no enclosure) a letter for the President of the St. Vincent de Paul Societies of New Orleans. He adds (no enclosure) two copies of documents relative to the society, one for (Odin) and the other for the societies of New Orleans. He adds also a small package which he asks (Odin) to forward by the boat which will carry his missionaries.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 1p. 4to.
2


1863 Jan 27

Burdet, Ch(arles)
Annecy, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Paris, France)

Father (Clement) Rigollet, formerly assistant at Perlo, Valley of Aosta, with whom he had business relations, left the area and went to New Orleans. Rigollet left with him in January 1858 a debt of 116 fr(ancs), 55 c(ent)s which he had demanded to no avail. He asks (Odin) to urge Rigollet to send him that sum.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
2


1863 Jan 27

Frobert, Mélanie
Arfeuilles, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Paris, France)

Frobert thanks him for the few lines that he sent her. She is sure that he will pray for her, her Father, her mother, and her sister. No one can honor and respect him as much as his little niece.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Jan 27

(Magnin, Claude) Marie, Bishop of
Annecy, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Paris, France)

Magnin sees an appeal from God Himself in the one (Odin) came to make in the poor diocese of Annecy. He has remained unshakeable in his determination to give freedom to all who would devote themselves to his missions. The Superior of his grand seminary asks a permission for seven to leave, after having tested their vocations, he has given them their exerts.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 1p. 8vo.
1


18(63) Jan 27

Martin, Father (J.) A(mbroise)
Liverpool, (England)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Paris, France)

Being apprised of (Odin's) arrival in Paris, Martin communicates what it is his duty to know concerning him. Being extremely broken down by the ravages of the climate of Louisiana, he was told by his doctors to return to his native home, having a most pronounced dyspepsy and hemorr(h)age. He suffers greatly from it still and his Catholic physician tells him he must not think of returning to New Orleans. He asks (Odin) to forward him a kind of exeat or something to that effect so that he may be able to procure some occupation. Father (Patrick) Phelan of St. Patrick's has given him hospitality since he has been in Liverpool, which is since December 12, but he can no longer abuse his kindness. Martin's mother is dead recently and his Father, 77 years of age, is tottering to the grave.

(P.S.) He includes a verbatim copy of the prescription of his doctor, Joseph A. McEvoy, M.D., dated New Orleans, September, 1862, and a verbatim celebret (in Latin) from Father (Stephen) Rousselon dated September 12, 1862, and a copy of a letter of recommendation from Father N(napoleon) J(oseph) Perché, dated September, 1862.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
5


1863 Jan 27

Rotchford, P(hilip)
Dublin, (Ireland)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.) of New Orleans
Paris, (France)

Rotchford wrote on the 25th that he would be in London in a day or two, but, fearing something may delay his leaving, he encloses (no enclosure) a bill of exchange accepted by Ad. Mascuard & Co. of Paris for 11,550 francs. Mrs. Rotchford and some of the children are in Wexford where all his accounts are. He hopes to see (Odin) in London in a few days. He would prefer if Odin would write Father (Malachy) O'Callaghan, (C.M.), stating that this remittance has come to hand, with such instructions as Odin may require Rotchford to attend to. O'Callaghan wishes him to say that Rotchford has received the money O'Callaghan held subject to Odin's order.

(P.S.) He gave Father (Thomas) McNamara, (C.M.) 16 pounds, and at All Hallows for (J.M. Giraud) Girod 10 (pounds), 13 (shillings).

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
4


(1863) Jan 28

Bruneau, Father Martin
(Le Mans, France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
Paris, France)

Their young seminarians who wished to give themselves to (Odin) will leave tomorrow morning, stopping several hours at Chartres to place themselves under the protection of the Blessed Virgin, and will be with (Odin) at about 7 in the evening. The farewell and sacrifice cost him, but their excellent tendencies console him and all that he knows of (Odin) makes him feel that they are far from being last. (H.) Oury has some talent and enough theological instruction. He is truly pious and has great spiritual energy. (A.) Massard is also capable and he appears equally solid and full of faith. Bruneau has already spoken of (Francis) Mary. (F.) Lusson is very pious, full of rectitude and animated by the best intentions. His character, a little immature, begins to acquire greater solidity and Bruneau hopes he will be an excellent priest. (Francis) Folliot is a good seminarian and does not lack intelligence, but he received a letter today in which he is forbidden to leave in the name of his parents. Bruneau does not know if he can again obtain their consent.

V-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
6


1863 Jan 28

Hirel, A(lfred), Grand Seminary of
Rennes, France

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Paris, France)

Hirel regrets very much that he must postpone his departure. Not having received any reply to his request to go to Louvain, he is advised by his director and his superiors not to go further at present. When he has completed his philosophy, if (Odin) will facilitate his entry into Louvain, his plan is to go there. He regrets that (Odin) took so much trouble to prepare for his departure.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Jan 28

Léveque, R.S.C., Madame E(vélina)
(Paris, France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Paris, France)

The Mother General (of the Religious of the Sacred Heart) expected him this morning. Leveque realizes that he has too much to do at the moment of departure, but she asks him to say farewell if he has a moment. She is sending the letters and small objects for her family and also a little note to remind him of his promise.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Jan 28

McNamara, (C.M.), Father Th(oma)s
(Dublin, Ireland)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M. of New Orleans
Paris, France)

McNamara presents the two young men from the diocese of Longford. As to the young man from Meath, he is not so sure and thinks it better to despatch these men at once. He gave them 16 pounds which he received from (Philip) Ro(t)chord. He hopes Odin will find time to come to Ireland before his return.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 2pp. 16mo.
2


1863 Jan 28

Thévenin, V.S.M., Sister M. Aloysia, Monastery of the Visitation (Sisters)
Le Mans, (France)

To Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.) of New Orleans
Le Havre, France)

Sister has learned Odin is still on French soil and that he should be embarking at Le Havre in a little while. She forwards these lines as much to offer her respects as to remind him of her request. She regrets having had so little time to tell Odin about the difficulties of her position in regard to a house of profession. She has often thought of writing in order to justify and to humble herself before Odin and to tell him that the request to return France had been torn from her by Odin's written threat to expel her and that the two fatal lines, made use of for her renunciation of her house of profession, had been extorted from her by the threats made, it was said, by Odin. If someone called at the community where she spent the best years of her life and where she dispensed 27 years of force and energy; there would not be found many who would accuse her of being the cause of the scandal of which someone persuaded Odin that she was the cause. It is evident that someone has worked on the spirit of her superiors from the outside. She does not wish to be separated from her Sisters of the body and of the heart. She wishes them to know the truth. Now, on the eve of infirmities which her advanced age will soon bring, she is sent to look for an asylum wherever charity will give her one. On January 25, (18)62 she asked Odin's permission to see whichever Jesuit he himself chose, and on February 13 her superior gave a permission to go to the convent of Le Mans, together with $235 in Confederate money. This is how her position had changed since the election of the preceding May. If her views have been badly interpreted that does not make her guilty before God, and her conscience consoles her.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
2


(18)63 Jan 29

Alemany, Joseph S., Archbishop of
San Francisco, (California)

To Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

At his return from the visitation of some portion of the diocese, Alemany is requested by a very respectable gentleman of the city to request Odin to have no hesitation in handing a letter and papers sent him some time ago for a Matthew (Waldron) Maume to (the latter) should he call; else to have them sent to him at Galveston.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 1p. 4to.
2


1863 Jan 29

(Brossais-Saint-Marc), G(odefred), Archbishop of
Rennes, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
Paris, France)

Conforming to (Odin's) wishes, (Brossais-Saint-Marc) is sending the exeats for the young clerks of his diocese who have asked authorization to follow (Odin). They will be brought to (Odin) by these excellent children who are well-disposed to work with all the zeal with which they are capable.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 112mo.
1


(18)63 Jan 29

Herbin, Jeanne Marie
Lyons, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M., of New Orleans
Paris, France)

Herbin was very happy Sunday morning to receive (Odin's) letter and that precious relic. She begs (Odin), her good cousin, to think often of her in his prayers. Bishop (Claude Mary) Dubuis, (C.M.) came to her house for a moment on Monday. On Friday he had gone to Ambierle to her cousins, whom (Odin's) departure left in desolation. She often writes to her cousin Josephine. One of (Odin's) letters would be the best consolation. Their three days at Ambierle made her so happy. Her cousins, Philippe and Claudine, to whom she went immediately on (Odin's) commission, send him their respects and affection. Philippe lost his old master; Pierre Gilbert Marie Phélip died on Friday morning. She is sending (Odin) two palls which a poor lady among her workers gave her; he is to keep one and give one to Dubuis. She would like a little note when he arrives to reassure them. If they were to know that he was not imprisoned or harmed, it would give them great pleasure.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
3


1863 JN 29

Hopkins, Widow
Rennes, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Paris, France)

Hopkins thanks him for writing. She asks him to forward the letters she is sending to her brother and to pray for her children so that they will be all good Christians and some holy priests among them.

VI-2-g A.L..S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
1


(18)63 Jan 29

Jamey, Father V(ictor)
Echenez-la-Meline, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Paris, France)

Jamey received (Odin's) letter and he is happy that he was able to find so many ecclesiastics. He wonders what Father (Stephen) Rousselon will do with them. God will provide. He will continue to pray for (Odin), and he regrets not being able to do more and better.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Jan 29

Le Rebours, Father A.
Paris, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Paris, France)

Father (Th,) Alleau writes that (Odin) has found it well for him to remain in order to fulfill his engagement in regard to the pastor of Epernay. Le Rebours thanks him for having saved him from a great embarrassment. He does not think that Alleau's arrival at New Orleans will be delayed very much.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Jan 29

Replumaz, Father, Superior (of the Grand Seminary of)
Annecy, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Paris, France)

Replumaz asks pardon for not having replied sooner, but he wished to be sure about the number who were going to leave and he has been very busy since it was definitely fixed. He has no particular observations to make about any of them. He did not consent to the departure of Basile Gay because his vocation did not appear secure enough.

P.S. He advanced (Cyprien Veyrat) 225 francs for the trip as (Odin) wished.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
3


1863 Jan 29

Tigier, Father J., (Grand Seminary of)
Rennes, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Paris, France)

The superior, as (Odin) desired, had Tigier give 180 fr(ancs) to (Frederick) Faivre for the expenses of the trip to Paris for the six young men that Divine Providence has given (Odin).

(P.S.) The superior wished to write but several circumstances have prevented it. If all those who wished to follow (Odin) have not done so it is because they met insurmountable obstacles and it appears that several will wait until later.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Jan 29

Whelan, R(ichard) V., Bishop of
Wheeling, (West Virginia)

To (James Alphonsus McMaster)
(New York, New York)

Governor Pierpoint of Virginia asked the legislature to pass a law authorizing the arrests of distinguished secessionists and Southern sympathizers to be held as hostages for civilians seized from Western Virginia. The legislature instead called on Lincoln to make such arrests. No one can tell what will happen; some are leaving the state. Whelan does not think he will be arrested, but he sends his second protest, to be published, with the first, in case he is arrested. But it is not necessary to wait results to speak of the seizures of those nonresistants who were pledged protection and security by the government, through its military agent. Their charter election was held last Monday, Dr. Geo(rge) Baird, a professed Unionist W( ) W. Shrives, the abolitionist candidate. The abolition newspaper called those who should vote for Baird traitors and secessionists. They were determined, however, to have a full and free vote, for the purpose of securing such a vote when the State question came up. Whelan was the first one to cast a vote that day. The separation of western Virginia will prove one of the most serious obstacles to an early peace. The mountains of western Virginia would prove a shelter to all the dissatisfied Negroes. Virginia will not agree to the separation, and the Confederacy will back her in this. The United States will gain only two abolitionist senators of the meanest class and traitors against the state, whose aims will be to prevent peace and whose domination at home will be harsh and tyrannical because of the base means by which they gained power. The Northern newspapers can do much to bring about a free vote, denounce intimidation, and request information so that the North may know whether it is to be accomplished by fraud.

A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.

(The Enclosure):

"Protest of Bishop R.V. Whelan" (Against his arrest). Bishop Whelan protests the action of the Northern government in arresting him and detaining him as hostage for the safety of active participants in the Civil War, since his position as Catholic bishop has barred him from bearing arms and his sense of propriety has kept him out of politics all his life. He protests against his detention as unjust, for both the (National Government at Washington) and the State Government at Wheeling have Constitutions admitting the liberties of opinion and speech. His detention violates the established rules of civilized warfare, which forbid molesting (non-combatants). It violates also Gen(eral) McClellan's pledge to the West Virginians, in which he promised protection and security to all who would remain at their homes. Bishop Whelan further protests the exacting of an oath as an arbitrary and despotic act and a violation of Gen(eral) McClellan's pledge, and he protests especially the oath proposed, which involved perjury in its terms, since the "Reorganized Government of Virginia" is revolutionary in character and in no sense represents the "Government of Virginia," and since it does not fairly represent the people in the western part of the state. Bishop Whelan calls upon all who feel as he does to demand that the United States government live up to its pledges of security to (non-combatants). He shall take no oath, and give no pledge except that which he has given already that, while residing under the protection of a government, he will not use his liberty to injure the government illegally. While his imprisonment lasts it will be an enduring protest against the tyranny and perfidy of those who imprisoned him; and will proclaim to all lovers of liberty the (dis)regard of the Washington Administration for rights and truths. Regarding the fact that he is being held as hostage, Bishop Whelan relieves the Richmond authorities of all responsibility toward him, charging them to treat their prisoners with justice and discretion. He himself is a non-combatant and non-resistant, and arraigns himself before the tribunal of the civilized world as well as before the elements of honor and decency in the North, defying the malignity of the Administration at Washington.

I-1-m A.L. 3pp. 8vo.
3


1863 Jan 29

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
(Camp near Falmouth, Va.)

To (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

They have been busy moving camp all day in a rainstorm. Ned tells her he saw the New Jerseyites yesterday. Some of those he saw are Col. Brown, Adjutant Fairly, Julius Fay, George Price, Steve Lutz, George Dayton and Patrick ________. George Price has received his box. The latter has likewise improved miraculously in appearance. Julius Fay looks soldierly even though he has considerable beard and whiskers. Ned expresses his satisfaction at Julius Fay and George Price. George Dayton is the same as ever except for a moderate improvement and the regiment was receiving two month's pay ($25 about) according to Ned. He tells Sal to pass his remarks on to the Prices and that they need have no fears of ever being ashamed of him. He asks Sal to tell him where Mace Marsh is. Ned tells her that McClellan is strong only through the army and the army is Union. He speaks of Porter's court martial as a miserable affair since it convicted a man of cowardice when his bravery is perfectly well known. He feels that if he had remained with Casey he would now be a major. He asks Sal if she was frightened by the Times. Ned tells her that not one man crossed the river nor was there a single shot fired. Hooker and Franklin defeated them because of their willingness to cooperate. He asks her if an answer has come from Rosecrans. Hooker wanted Stone for Chief of Staff. It is understood here that his Father (Orestes A. Brownson, Sr.) demanded and obtained Stone's release. Judge White's stock is far below par. He tells her that they are now at Brook's Station (Va.) about 5 miles from Acquina Creek (Va,) and that Henry (Brownson) is well.

I-5-i A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
3


1863 Jan 30

Dowley, (C.M.), Father P(hilip), St. Vincent's College
Dublin, (Ireland)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M. of New Orleans
Paris, France)

Odin's note of the 27th has closed all the arrangements for the voyage. The (Vincentians) as well as the (Dominican Sisters) rejoice at the prospect of seeing Odin once more. The calling of the steamer Baltimore at Queenstown is more convenient and gratifying to the nuns who will be in full readiness for Odin any day before February 11. Care will be taken to have the places engaged at Liverpool. He asks Odin on his next visit to the Irish College to say to Father (John?) Lynch, (C.M.) that the Irish books asked for by Father McKenna will be sent soon.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
5


1863 Jan 30

Emmanuel, Sister Marie
(Grand Sacconnex, Switzerland)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Paris, France)

Sister is grateful for his goodness in accepting her commissions in regard to her sister and the latter's Superior. His visit to their convent (of the Congregation of N(otre) D(ame), Canonesses of St. Augustine) and to the sister of Mother St. Augustine will leave a sweet and precious memory.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
3


1863 Jan 30

Healy, Father James A.
Boston, (Massachusetts)

To Bishop (Francis P. McFarland) of
Hartford (Providence, Rhode Island)

When Healy proposed to (Patrick) Donahoe to publish a list of their clergy, churches, etc. he asked whether the other dioceses of New England might not be added. If the proposal meets with McFarland's approval Healy will publish the account of McFarland's diocese and that of the other New England dioceses and whatever the bishop wants to add will be printed.

I-1-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
2


1863 Jan 30

Labbé, Father C.M.
Rennes, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Paris, France)

Labbé is happy that an oversight of (Frederick) Faivre furnishes him the occasion to offer his respects and to wish (Odin) and their seminarians who are accompanying him a prompt and happy crossing.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
2


1863 Jan 30

Léveque, R.S.C., Madame E(vélina)
(Paris, France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M., of New Orleans
Paris, France)

Léveque asks him to take care of these few letters (no enclosures) and to mail at New York those for Canada. The small carton contains a little crown for an Infant Jesus in the house of the (Religious of the Sacred Heart) in Canada and several statues.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Jan 30

Rotchford, P(hilip)
London, (England)

To Bishop (Patrick Neeson) Lynch of Charleston)
Paris, (France)

A week ago he wrote from Dublin to Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.) directing his letter to the Hotel de Fénélon, Paris, and stating that he would be in London in a few days. On the Monday following he sent a remittance to Odin for 11,550 francs. He will remain (in London) a few days longer hoping to hear from Odin, but he asks Lynch to send this to him in case he is within his reach. In case Lynch does not have his present address, he should drop Rotchford a line.

P.S. Father (Malachy) O'Callaghan, (C.M.) gave him Odin's address.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 1p. 4to.
3


1863 Jan 31

Kenrick, Francis P., Archbishop of Baltimore
Baltimore, Maryland

to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell
Cincinnati, Ohio

Kenrick received from Mr. Griffith the silver medal with Purcell's note and gave Griffith a copy of the Mechlin edition of his Moral theology to be given to Purcell. He has also sent by Griffith a revised version to be presented to the Catholic Institute of Cincinnati. Griffith is to return from New York after some days. The Relief Society will meet on Monday to name a Treasurer and prepare a spring payment. The war has cut off their resources. Purcell's suffragans, excepting the Bishop of Louisville, seldom contribute. The Bishop of Cleveland sent $25 last August.

II-5-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
3


1863 Jan 31

Marie de la Croix, R.S.C., Sister, Motherhouse (of the Religious of the Sacred Heart
Paris, France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Paris, France)

Their Mother General wonders if it would be possible for (Odin) to deliver to Mother (Mary Aloysia) Hardey, (R.S.C.) this little box containing silver medals worth about 400 francs. If this might be disagreeable to (Odin),he should return it to the bearer. Today they received a letter from Manhattanville asking for two works, one of which is in several volumes; they have separated them and put them in separate packages so that it would be more easy for (Odin) to take them.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 8vo.
3


1863 Jan 31

Spalding, M(artin) J., Bishop of Louisville
Loretto,(Kentucky)

To Archbishop John Baptist Purcell
Cincinnati, Ohio

Spalding acknowledges two letters of Purcell's. He is at Loretto en route to various institutions. He did not mean to force General W.S. Rosecrans' hand to let Mrs. Hawkins see her husband. He only did as she requested by stating the case to Purcell. Spalding's brother has told him the plea was unsuccessful. Spalding comments on the war and says he expects to be in Louisville on the 3rd of February.

II-5-b A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
2