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Calendar: 1863

(1863) (Feb)

Brownson, Orestes A.)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

To Charles Sumner
(Washington, D.C.)

Sumner's letter was received and Brownson believes fully that Congress should have the management of the lapsed states. It is a Constitutional right and cannot be left to the President (Abraham Lincoln). The President is no statesman, no Constitutional lawyer and has no conception of our system of government. The President claimed to be the depository of the whole war power of the government and forgets that the power is vested by the Constitution in Congress. The president is only the executive in military as well as in civil matters. Sumner showed this idea clearly in his article which appeared in the last Atlantic. The military power is subordinated to the civil and only the executive portion is vested in the president. This is the point that Lincoln does not understand. Brownson gives all credit to Lincoln's intentions but claims in time of a crisis that Lincoln will ruin the nation. Hence Congress should control Lincoln. To keep him within the limits of the Constitution should be their duty. Brownson states there are a few whose views of the war power are not vague or confused. The war power is vested in Congress and no president under it can govern a state or territory by himself or others, except under that which is necessary to the military operations authorized by Congress. Mr. Lincoln had authority to appoint General Foster to the Military Department of North Carolina but Brownson Questions the President's power to appoint Stanley governor of the State of North Carolina because a president can only appoint a civil governor under the direction of Congress. The whole matter Brownson claims should be looked into because Republican institutions will be lost. Sumner fully appreciates the problem. Brownson fears more the bungling statesmanship of the president than he does Ferris and his armies. There are few good statesmen but many poor ones. Brownson puts their only hope in Congress. The people want the end of war to come as well as the end of slavery but the people can be led right or wrong. There are plans to reelect Lincoln but Brownson feels that he is not the man the people want. Sumner's choice is (S.P.) Chase, but he stands no chance of being elected. Brownson's choice is (E.M.) Stanton. No general will do although (N.P.) Banks and (Ben) Butler have been named.

I-4-b A.L. Draft 5pp. 12mo.
3


1863 Feb 1

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
(Camp near Falmouth, Va.)

To (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

He speaks of receiving his mother's letter. He is sorry to hear that she is ill and encourages her to get well soon because there is a chance that he might get home rather soon. When General Hunt goes to Washington, Ned is to accompany him. From there, Ned will be allowed to go where he pleases until Hunt's time is up. They left General Hooker's camp the other day. General Hunt, Patrick, the sawbones Department and himself have just returned. They gad to go through bogs and mud-puddles to get to camp. Ned liked it however, because it was in a pretty forest glade. It is necessary to carry the firewood three miles now since they have used all the firewood within an area of three miles in the short space of two months. His books have been most entertaining in this poor weather. It is extremely bad weather in which to ride a horse. They have a French cook to take care of the moss. Bed asks her opinion of the secret Court Martial of Stone. He wonders how many Republicans agree with Greely. Ned feels now that he would just as soon be ruled by slave holders as by Greely's faction. He says he cannot believe that Greely's faction is a large one but if it is, he cannot wonder that the people have been crying for his scalp. He is liable to be home next Friday or Saturday morning.

P.S. Ned asks Sal to tell his mother to have Henry (Brownson) bring him on his smoking cap and opera glasses.

I-5-i A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
1


(1863 Feb 1)

Petard. V.S.M., Sister Marie Séraphine
Paris, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin of New Orleans
Paris, France)

Authorized by their Mother Superior and encouraged by the goodness (Odin) showed her sister when she presented herself to him several days ago, Petard asks him to join this letter (no enclosure) to those which he has agreed to forward to her brother who is presently engaged in the wars of the United States.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 8vo.
1


1862 Feb 2

Sadlier, Mary A.
New York, (New York)

To Bishop (Francis P. McFarland of
Hartford Providence, Rhode Island)

(James) Sadlier has handed her McFarland's letter of January 28 objecting to certain remarks made editorially on Mr. Howard's "Fourteen Months in American Bastilles." She wrote the editorial and her husband thought she should reply. If it were not for his position she might not reply but his objections are conveyed in so kind a manner that she had to offer explanation. Not being an American and a resident of the country for only a couple of years she has profound admiration for the American Republic, and does not like to see it the object of Southern attacks, despite the corruption of the present administration and the anti-Catholic prejudices of northern and eastern fanatics. But she does not feel that the Southerners are one whit better. She believes the people of Maryland have played a shabby part in the contest. She may have worded her phrases a bit too strongly in the Review but the Southerners might not have held so long except for them. She believes the Union is gone past redemption. She will use the facts the Bishop has sent her without using names and places.

I-1-b A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Feb 3

(Rappe), A(madeus), Bishop of Cleveland
Toledo, (Ohio)

To (Archbishop John Baptist Purcell of
Cincinnati, Ohio)

He received Purcell's letter of the 24th, claiming anew Father (L ) Hoffer as his subject. Rappe can only say that he and Hoffer are perfectly convinced that Hoffer was free to come to the diocese of Cleveland. He is forced to oppose Purcell in this matter.

II-5-b A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Feb 3

Rotchford, P(hilip)
London, (England)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M. of New Orleans
Paris, France)

He just got Odin's letters and he regrets not having them sooner as he might have gone to Paris. He will not be ready to leave to be in Dublin by the 9th and to see Odin he will have to go and return. If Odin were to stop (at London) on his way to Dublin, Rotchford could be at the Huston Station and perhaps, if necessary, could go on to Dublin. He is not aware of any debts due by the late Bishop (Andrew) Byrne. Byrne left in his hands a property note which is now in N(ew) O(rleans) with many other papers for other parties. He is inclined to think Odin will be in Dublin by the 5th or 6th.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
2


1863 Feb 4

Caillet, L.
St. Paul, Minnesota

to O(restes) A. Brownson
New York (City), (New York)

A draft is enclosed in payment of three subscriptions to the Review. Father (John) Ireland is an Army Chaplain so no subscription is being sent to him. He wants to be remembered to Brownson's family, more particularly to William J. Brownson. L(awrence) Kehoe asks Brownson to endorse the draft so he can collect it.

I-4-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
4


1863 Feb 4

Sorin, C.S.C., Father E(dward)
Notre Dame, (Indiana)

To Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell) of
Cinc(innati, Ohio)

He submits to Purcell the manuscript of a pamphlet they intend to publish concerning the Missionary Home. Bishop (John H. Luers) seems pleased with it and promises to subscribe to any communication Purcell will give it.

II-5-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
2


1863 Feb 5

Foley, Father Thomas
Baltimore, (Maryland)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Archbishop (Francis Patrick Kenrick) has directed him to communicate to (Odin) the proceedings of a recent meeting of the Relief Society established nine years ago to aid clerical converts. The meeting was held on February 2, 1863. The zeal and generosity of the late Basil R. Spalding, Treasurer, were mentioned with high commendation by (Kenrick). Through his attention, the pension of Dr. (Levi Silliman) Ives was paid during nine years. O. Oliver O'Donnell was named Treasurer and Foley was appointed Corresponding Secretary. It was resolved that renewed efforts be made to continue the Society and that, in consideration of the loss of several generous contributors in the Confederate States, the prelates actually contributing to it be solicited to continue their support and to increase the number of subscribers in their respective dioceses. (Odin) should remit his contributions by the middle of March. At the present they have no means to meet Ives' semi-annual payment due April 1. He encloses a copy of the original constitution.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
6


1863 Feb 5

(Frobert), Mélanie
Arfeuilles, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M. of New Orleans
Dublin, Ireland)

Last Sunday she received the authentication of the relic of the true cross which (Odin) had sent her. She thanks him and asks him to write them upon his return to New Orleans. She and all those who are dear to her believe they will see him again.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Deb 5

Montalembert, count (Charles de)
La Roche on Breny, (France)

To (Orestes A.) Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Montalembert can not read the concluding words of Brownson's January number without holding out his hand to grasp his. Hew loves bold, rough, independent men and regrets to find so few amongst Catholics. Brownson's article on "Faith and Theology" shows him that they have come round to be perfectly agreed even on the Italian or Roman question. They may perhaps be both heretics but they do not intend to be so. Things are going on sadly in both hemispheres. He fears the Union will never be re-established although all his sympathies are with the North. Strange to say, except the small group of liberal Catholics whose mouth-piece is the Correspondent, the bulk of the clergy and Catholics agree with England (whom they have been taught by the Univers to hate) in wishing well to the slave holders. (Napoleon III), having given up the plan of handing over Rome to victor Emmanuel, has regained the confidence of the poor credulous Catholics. Having concentrated all their attention on the Roman question they take no heed of the system by which (France) has been delivered up to renegades.

I-4-b A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
5


1863 Feb 5

O'Donoghue, Mary A.
Hillsboro, Ohio

to O(rests) A. Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

The writer is a student of geology; she keenly enjoyed the article on the "Antiquity of the Earth" in the January number. She is not one of those who go about with a hammer in their hands breaking off bits of rock and call it studying geology. But she is content to abide by the researchers who give sound arguments of their theories which do not conflict with scientific evidence. She wants Brownson to write an article to answer certain questions suggested by the apparent conflict between the Biblical account of creation and the results uncovered by scientific investigators in his future reviews because she has never had a satisfactory explanation of them.

I-4-b A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Feb 5

Pendleton, Geo(rge) H.
Washington, (D.C.)

To (James Alphonsus McMaster)
(New York, New York)

He thanks McMaster for his letter of Feb. 4 which manifests an earnest interest in Pendleton's success. His notions of propriety and dignity do not permit him to engage actively in his own behalf. McMaster has read correctly the two gentlemen in Ohio whose personal relations he well knows as shown by his letter. They are both old Whigs, converts to the Democratic party. Finck is the more radical, being more quick and active of mind, while O'Neil was the partner of H.J. Jewett, a candidate for nomination for Governor of Ohio on the Democratic ticket. He is now connected with the family of Cox' wife who was formerly of Zanesville. There is an attempt being made to use his intimacy with (Clement L.) Vallandigham in a way to injure them both by pretending that they have combined to parcel out good offices. No detriment will come to either from the straight-forward interest they feel and express in each other's success. He will have four members in Ohio delegation, with his chances for Finck, O'Neil, LeBlande, Hutchins, Bliss, and Johnston; nearly all the Pennsylvanians; all but two from Indiana; all from Illinois unless they have a candidate; all the Kentucky men who will go into caucus; and Maryland, New Hampshire, Conn(ecticut), Rhode Island cannot be spoken for. He can say nothing for New Jersey. His opinion concerning all of them is confidential. He is turning his attention to Ohio but not forgetting other places. He cannot cope with the peculiar industry of his competitor who begs and solicits aid even after having been turned down once. No office is worth the humiliation of one refusal to Pendleton. He doesn't think such a plan will be successful against the type of men there are. He asks McMaster to open and keep up his correspondence with the Ohio members, who are men with brains and can be influenced by a man like McMaster. Vallandigham's speech out West is being published in the papers there, and may be published in Pennsylvania and quite a number of New England states. Why is it that New York alone fails to do so? Is there a local influence at work with Democrats in the center and (William H.) Seward and (Thurlow) Weed leading the right wing as Convay described it the other day? He wonders if Yankee influence has found a way to run the Democratic party on a war platform with no higher object than cutting out every peace Democrat, in the meantime, and then having obtained power, going for peace too. The people will not stand for the State being broken by the West even if the politicians will. Those who keep their eyes open will certainly see.

P.S. The copy of the Statesman contains as many false reports as truths about the speakership. Some papers have merely said a kind word for Cox; some have done the same thing for both of them; some have come outright for Pendleton; and the names of his newspapers are suppressed. He has no interest in any newspaper. The article is all bosh "nobody hurt" by it,

I-1-m A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Feb 6

Thisse, Father J(ohn) N.
Piqua, (Ohio)

To Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell)
of (Cincinnati, Ohio)

He sends Purcell the deed of the Troy Church property. He established in his congregation the Confraternity for the Conversion of America and it now numbers over 120 members. He asks permission to give Benediction twice a month as a favor to the confraternity.

P.S. The Episcopal Church in Greenville is offered for sale. It is quite a new and handsome brick building and can be bought for $3000. This is a golden opportunity for the Catholics of Greenville to realize their desire to have a church. If they will subscribe $1500, Thisse will buy the church. Much mischief has been done in Union City, (Ohio) by three priests who successively attended there from Indiana, Greenville, and the German settlement. Two or three years of toil would revive the dormant elements of Catholic life there.

II-5-b A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Feb 7

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
Camp near Falmouth, (Va.)

To (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Ned tells Sal that he and (Gen.) Hunt were to leave this morning but the latter received a copy of General Halleck's order, stating that officers cannot remain twenty-four hours in Washington without special permission from the War Department. He reassures her however that their trip will not be postponed for too long a time. He hopes she is getting well. It was primarily because of her illness that he wanted to come home. It is rumored that (Gen.) Fremont is to have a command once more. He has written to Capt. Howard to see if there is some truth in the rumor. If he should get with Gen. Fremont again he feels he would be advanced in rank. He hopes to out-play Frank White. He likewise feels that if Gen. Hunt gets promoted there will be no difficulty in his getting his "double-breasted." Ned expects to hear from Sal soon. He heard from Jesse (Healy) a few days ago and it seems that he is now Quartermaster. He says he hears that the sleighing is excellent up North. Ned sees an opportunity to get a commission with the passage of the Negro Regiments Bill. White officers serving in these Regiments are to get double pay. He asks Sal to write him should anything turn up about (Gen.) Fremont. He also wishes Hunt to be made a Major general. He speaks of his need of clothing. He asks if Dr. Brownson (Orestes, Sr.) has returned from the West and if so what news he brings. He speaks of visiting the Jerseyites again last Tuesday. They are all well and Price, Stansburg, and Lutz and some others requested him to remember them to his parents. He brought Fay with him to headquarters.

I-5-i A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Feb 8

Bertail, Father J.M.
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.) of
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

For a month Bertail has been (at New Orleans) to recover his health and to await (Odin's) return in order to ask permission to go to France for the reestablishment of his health. Feeling a little better he gas decided to return to (Paincourtville) to assist Father (L. Augustine) Maréchaux who has taken care of his parish during his illness and absence. For the five years he has served St. Elizabeth's he has had the fever for several months each year. He came (to New Orleans) and called Dr. (Charles Faget?) Flaget who told him he had swamp fever and advised him on three different visits that a change of climate was necessary. He leaves it to (Odin) to judge his motives for asking permission to go to France for a few months.

VI-2-g A.L.S.(French) 2pp. 4to.
4


1863 Feb 8

Lesne, Marie
Lyons, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Upon learning of his departure from France, she prayed that God would watch over him and all those who are going to participate in his work. She rejoices in thinking of (Odin's) promise to see her poor brother (James Lesne) and to take an interest in him. Her mother received a few lines from (James). They had confided their interests to his care but he wrote that unless they could send him 1000 francs for the necessary steps in the matter of succession, he could not continue to be their representative and that he would be obliged to confer their power of attorney on a third party because without money and having no credit, he could not do anything. They cannot come to his aid, being very much in need themselves. She asks (Odin) if he could help him secure the necessary credit or, if not, if he could indicate someone who would act for their best interests.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Feb 9

Hendricken, Father Thomas F.
Waterbury, Conn(ecticut)

To Bishop (Francis P. McFarland of Hartford
Providence, Rhode Island)

Enclosed McFarland will find 2 copies of his report and a draft for $275.55, the cathedraticum for this year. He has not recovered from the effects of his retreat in Providence, his health is as of old.

I-1-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


1863 Feb 9

(McCloskey), John, Bishop of
Albany, New York

to Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

This will be presented by Father Gerrit Sheehan, a most worthy and exemplary priest of (McCloskey's) diocese, who is advised by his physician to take a sea voyage and spend some time in a warmer climate. He has chosen to pay a visit to New Orleans. (McCloskey) asks for him the privilege of saying Mass and testifies to his free(dom) from any suspension or censure.

P.S. Sheehan is accompanied by his brother (Father Maurice Sheehan) whom McCloskey also takes pleasure in introducing. He is pastor of St. John's Church, Salina, and has leave of absence on his brother's account for a few weeks.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
3


1863 Feb 10

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
Falmouth, Va.

To (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
Elizabeth, (New Jersey)

Ned wonders why Sal has not written to him or at least someone. The last time he heard from home it was reported that she was sick. Now he is concerned about her welfare. Gen. Hunt has just applied for 10 days leave of absence. It has to go to Washington (D.C.) for approval. If it is granted he will be on to see her. He inquires if she still thinks of going out West for her health. He hopes she will be enabled to get along well enough at home not to require it. He urges her to keep writing him just as though he weren't coming home soon. He speaks of being sick himself and that he has eaten very little of late but that now he is quite improved. He sends his love to his mother.

I-5-i A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Feb 10

Chambige, Father F(rancis)
Bardstown, K(untuck)y

to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell
Cincinnati, Ohio

Chambige sends the account of Purcell's seminarians. He hopes next year the war will not prevent his sending more to St. Thomas. He has put the account to Bishop Spalding's debit and Purcell's credit and would like his bishop's account be adjusted at st. Mary's Seminary. Chambige managed to get $20 from Mr. Felix and put to Purcell's credit. They have had to feed many stragglers of the war but otherwise have not been annoyed. The student's studies go on uninterrupted.

II-5-b A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
2


1863 Feb 10

Fitzgerald, Father Edward
Col(umbus, Ohio)

to Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Fitzgerald got Mr. T.J. Cahill paroled for Columbus about three weeks ago and has been unconditionally released and gone home. Fitzgerald just returned from a visit to Lieutenant Doyle. He is glad to learn that the Restrictions of the Paschal Communion time was by mistake. He would like to have some way of knowing what are the Archbishop's orders and what are not. He was called to Cincinnati last year in Holy Week by an official order and then on arriving in Cincinnati found that it was not Purcell's order. Fitzgerald intended writing Purcell about Delaware asking him to appoint a successor to (Father John A. Jacquet), but he says he has just written himself. The camps and missions are growing.

II-5-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
3


1863 Feb 10

Fitzgerald, Father Joseph
Columbus, (Ohio)

to Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell of
Cincinnati, Ohio

Fitzgerald turned the two volumes of Marshall's Missions over to his brother, Father Edward, the day after Christmas and has been trying to get him to send them on to Purcell ever since. The book has done some good work out on the mission. He has secured four purchasers of it when it comes from Gadher's Press. Last Saturday he went to Licking County Station, Beechwood. He has called to go to Delaware on a sick call by sleigh and since he was gone, Father Edward took the call, which was a false alarm. This has happened twice on Saturday nights. Fitzgerald suggests Father Charles Hone be sent to Delaware. Since there are few Germans there few Germans there, his want of the language will not be serious. Father Hemsteger and Father Edward Fitzgerald are both well, though the latter was ill all last week.

II-5-b A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
4


1863 Feb 10

Kehoe, L(awrence)
New York (City), (New York)

To (Orestes A. Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Kehoe has about $100.00 belonging to Brownson. He asks if Brownson wants him to pay (Clarence A.) Alvord or to remit it direct to him?

P.S. Kehoe's address is given so as to facilitate Brownson in locating him.

I-4-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


1863 Feb 10

Young, O.P., Father Nicholas R.
Zanesville, Ohio

to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell
Cincinnati, Ohio

Young thanks Purcell for his kind expressions through Father Wilson. He has not been well for some weeks. He has planned some changes of Dominicans in Ohio and hopes Purcell will agree. He will not be able to attend to his Provincialship and the duties of this parish. He proposes to make Father (Joseph) Dunn, O.P. pastor of St. Thomas'. Father Wilson will be his assistant. He would like to appoint Dunn the ordinary confessor of the Sisters of St. Columbia's and Father (George) Wilson, (O.P.) the extraordinary. In Somerset, Young wishes Father (Joseph A.) Kelly, (O.P.) to go to Memphis, Tennessee with Father (Stephen) Byrne, O.P. of St. Joseph's. Father D.A. O'Brien, of Somerset takes Byrne's place at St. Joseph's. Father (Joseph) Jarboe is for Somerset as pastor and ordinary confessor of St. Mary's and Father (Michael) Lilly, O.P. is the extraordinary. Young hopes these plans will please Purcell.

II-5-b A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
10


1863 Feb 11

Healy, Geo(rge) P.
Chicago, Illinois

to (Orestes A. Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Healy discovered a mistake in painting a portrait of Brownson in that the head was too large. He has repainted it and hopes Brownson will be pleased with it. He sent it yesterday by express. The shipping receipt is enclosed. The Bishop, (James Duggan) saw it and is pleased. Healy hopes Brownson arrived home safely.

I-4-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Feb 11

Kehoe, (Lawrence)
(New York City, New York)

To O(rests) A. Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Kehoe has been requested to secure a commission in the Regular Army for Captain McGee of the Irish Brigade. McGee is a sound Irishman and a good republican. He can get the recommendations of several generals but they are of little use. He wants some outside pressure. If Brownson is not coming to see Kehoe before his trip to Washington, he wants an answer. He asks what answer should he send to Richardson, whose letter he encloses. Kehoe will answer as directed. Richardson evades the plain question. Kehoe suggests trying him with one number. The freight to be paid by Richardson.

I-4-b A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Feb 16

Spalding, Bishop M(artin) J(ohn)
Louisville, (Kentucky)

To Father (Peter) Hennaert
(Detroit, Michigan)

Spalding sends an enclosed petition to the Sovereign Pontiff (Pius IX) which he asks Hennaert to submit to Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere) for his signature above his own because of Lefevere's seniority and dignity. Spalding requests Hennaert to direct the document to Bishop (John) Timon who is to procure some other signatures and to forward it to Rome. Spalding has not received a reply from his congratulatory letter to Lefevere at New Year's.

III-2-j a.l.s. 1p. 12mo.
3


1863 Feb 17

Dunne, Father John, President of (St. Patrick's) College
Carlow, Ireland

to Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.) of New Orleans
Lyons, (France)

Upon hearing of the death of Bishop (Andrew) Byrne of Little Rock, he wrote to Odin that Byrne had four ecclesiastical students in the college, all reading theology. Three will not be ready for ordination before Pentecost of 1864, but (D.J.) Cogan, now a deacon, would be ordained at the approaching Pentecost and sent to Arkansas had God spared Byrne. He has endeavored by communicating with Helena to discover in whom the administration of the diocese rests without success. He asks Odin's advice or direction.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
3


1863 Feb 17

Young, O.P., Father N(icholas) R.
Zanesville, Ohio

to Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell) of
(Cincinnati, Ohio)

Purcell's approval of Young's judgment in relation to his brethren was very consoling to Young. He cannot resist Purcell's desire that he should address the St. Patrick's Benevolent Society. Business is crowding upon him.

II-5-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


1863 Feb 18

White, Rhoda E., (Mrs. James)
(New York City, New York)

To (Orestes A.) Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Mrs. White asks Brownson's help in securing an appointment for a certain Captain Russel Dummer, who has had fifteen years in the Regular Army. If Brownson prefers, he may write a letter to Senator Lane who has the most influence with Staunton, which can be presented to the young man. Her husband is opposing policies of the Administration and can't consistently ask for any favors.

I-4-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Feb 19

(Baraga), Frederick, Bishop of Saut Ste. Marie
Saut Ste. Marie, Michigan

to Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefevere
Detroit, (Michigan)

Baraga asks Lefevere to let him have some of his Sisters of Charity for a large hospital at Portage Lake (Houghton, Michigan). The patients are not very numerous so that 3 or 4 Sisters would be sufficient. Baraga would like to have them in this spring, and wants an answer immediately.

III-2-j A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
3


1863 Feb 19

Healy, Jesse
Cleveland, Ohio

to (Orestes A. Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Healy is attached to the quartermaster-general's staff. He has been examining horses obtained from certain contracts. The contractors are using every means to get him to pass their horses; because of his refusal to give them a blind approval, they have combined to induce the Senate to reject his nomination. Brownson is asked to help in getting it confirmed.

I-4-b A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
1


1863 Feb 19

Hecker, Father I(saac) T.
New York, (New York)

To Bishop F(rancis) P. McFarland of Hartford
(Providence, Rhode Island)

Hecker regrets that McFarland's request has been made so recently since the list of missions already accepted runs far into the spring. He will place the application on the list for next season. His apology for not answering earlier is that he has just returned from the west where he gave two courses of lectures to Protestants. His audience was large. Recent events have made a silent but great change in the minds of their people in regard to the holy faith.

I-1-b A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
1


(1863?) Feb 20

McCloskey, Father Geo(rge)
(New York, New York)

To (Orestes A.) Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

McCloskey takes a German periodical, "Literarischer Handweiser" and finds a paragraph about Dr. (Jacob) Froschammer, stating that according to the "Allgemeine Zeitung" the Roman Congregation of the Index published a decree of December 20 by which his "Einleitung in der Philosophie," his "Freedom of Science," and his periodical, "The Athenaeum" are prohibited. McCloskey is not surprised for if Rome could stand Froschammer's expose of the Index the victory would be won and they might hang up their arms. It puts a question on any continuation in the Review of anything from that source.

I-4-b A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
4


1863 Feb 21

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
Headquarters Second Army Corp

To (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Ned encloses a copy of a letter to Mrs. White. He found no occasion to speak of Frank. He had a pleasant interview with General Fremont and likes him better than ever now. Fremont is to ask for his old staff but does not expect to have all the hangers-on. Ned was not disturbed in Washington and North came with him today. Hunt stormed and fumed yesterday before Worth and Ned arrived. He wrote to Orestes (A. Brownson, Jr.). If Mrs. White should require an explanation, Ned says to tell her that there are some things General Hunt gave him to understand which were not to be repeated. Ned met Col. Jones yesterday and he, in turn, introduced him to Miss Jones. The latter is very pretty. He took a sleeping car the night before last and met Capt. Donovan. Ned accompanied Capt. Donovan to the Senate and the House. Fremont feels confident of a command although it is not definitely settled which one he will receive. Ned is sorry that his Father (Orestes A. Brownson, Sr.) did not come on to visit him. He tells Sal that he is sorry she is not well. Hays and Henry (Brownson) have gone to their infantry brigades. He sends his love to all.

P.S. Brownson's ovation came from the Germans. Ned likes Fremont's stern character and friendliness. They enjoyed a pleasant conversation with Ned speaking on whatever subject he chose.
(Dated 1862, but apparently should be 1863).

I-5-i A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Feb 21

McCloskey, Father William
Rome, (Italy)

To Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell of
Cincinnati, Ohio

McCloskey acknowledges receipt of 50 pounds (234.63 scudi) on December 30th. He gave ten scudi to (Daniel O'Regan) at Purcell's request. Richter is showing fine qualities and O'Regan will be ordained in a few months. McCloskey sends congratulations to Father J.W. Dutton on his elevation to the priesthood. He sends regards to Father Barry. Madame Bontonslin asks about Purcell. McCloskey asks how Father (Francis) Pabisch is getting along. The Pope is well but sadly in need of funds. McCloskey asks if the report is true that Bishop (John) Fitzpatrick is dead. Prince Messino requests Purcell's picture. A convert friend of Madame Bontonslin is also collecting pictures of all the bishops here on June 8 and asks one of Purcell. Father Birmingham has been absent since July and is now in Venice collecting for his bishop. Rome is filled with Englishmen and Americans. McCloskey met old Governor Monhead of Kentucky today and he spoke a good deal of Parkin Scott who was his fellow prisoner in Fort Warren. All is well at the college. McCloskey sends his regards to Purcell, Father Edward Purcell, Father Collins, Father Gilmore and Bishop Rosecrans.

II-5-b A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
4


1863 Feb 21

Walworth, Father C(larence) A.
New York City, New York

to (Orestes A.) Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Father Walworth is at work on the article for the April number; and asks how soon it must be in Brownson's hands? He has sent the manuscript of his book to the printers. When it is printed, he will send Brownson a copy so that he may notice it in the Review. He wanted to consult Brownson on one or two points, but it is now too late. Walworth has heard that Brownson's daughter, Sarah, is ill. He hopes she has now fully recovered.

P.S. Father Hecker has arrived home from his lectures and reports excellent success.

I-4-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
3


1863 Feb 23

Sorin, C.S.C., Father E(dward) F.
Notre Dame, (Indiana)

To Archb(isho)p (John Baptist) Purcell
of Cinc(innati, Ohio)

Sorin thanks (Purcell) for his letter of February 19. Father (Michael) Hallinan is doing well but there is no room for another one. The document which Sorin sent is not to be published but is sent for (Purcell's) consideration and approbation. It will be presented to the other three bishops mentioned in it and then they will try to get the permission of the Reverend Visitor to go on with the building, and at the same time publish it in pamphlet form. With regard to their affairs the less he says about them the better; Rome knows nothing of them. Sorin meditates on the 4th commandment every day .

P.S. The fallen ones must remain in petto with their respective bishops.

II-5-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
3


1863 Feb 25

Müller, Father G(aspar?)
Alleg(h)any, Pennsylvania

to Bishop Peter Paul Lefevere
Detroit, Michigan

Müller has spent 9 years in U.S. Missions, coming from the (Ludwig Missionsverein) of Munich. He left Kansas to go back to Europe, but unpaid loans kept him here. While sick he stayed with his sister, then with Father Superior (Leo Meyer) Mayer of the Society of Mary near Dayton, Ohio and with the Benedictine Fathers in Erie. Having received no answer to his letter to Germany, he gave up the idea of leaving the United States. At Erie he saw Father (A ) Caron whom he had met on a retreat in Nazareth, and Father (J ) Luhr who told Müller that the Detroit Diocese was greatly in need of German priests. He is 38 years old with a good voice. He regrets not following Father (John) Hespelein, C.SS.R. some years ago to Detroit. He had declined an offer from a Benedictine Father in St. Paul because he prefers a more settled country. At present he is staying with the Franciscan Fathers to make a retreat before resuming mission work. Müller encloses a copy of a testimonial from Erie; the testimony from Dayton is in German by Father (Charles) Hahne, pastor of St. Emanuel, which Müller will bring.

A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.

Enclosure:

--------
1863 Feb 11

Engelbrecht, O.S.B., Father Coelest(ine)
Erie, (Pennsylvania)

G. Müller spent about three months with them. The testimony from Dayton is sealed by the Secretary of the Archbishop of Cincinnati.

A.D.S. Copy (Latin) 2pp. 32mo.

III-2-j A.L.S., A.D.S. Copy (Latin)pp.. 12mo. & 32mo.
8


1863 Feb 26

Spalding, M(artin) J., Bishop of
Louisville, (Kentucky)

To Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell) of
(Cincinnati, Ohio)

At the request of Bishop (John) Timon, he wrote the Petition to the Holy Father. He encloses a copy for Purcell to sign. The original has the signature of the Bishop of Erie, and the Archbishops of Baltimore and New York. The Bishops of Cleveland and Covington have sent their adhesion. He expects that of the bishops of Vincennes and Fort Wayne.

II-5-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
2


1863 Feb 27

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
Headquarters Second Army Corp

to (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Knowing that he will not get the usual letter from her, he writes her instead. He sends her Gen. Hooker's autograph and tells her that "Joe" Hooker is doing exceedingly well. The latter is organizing the army and giving it some pretty heavy touches of real discipline. Ned mentions the fact that the Rebel cavalry made a raid on them day before yesterday but so far the Union Army has not gained much success over them. No doubt, she has heard terrible accounts of the affair but he assures her that he is all right. He is anxious for Gen. Fremont to get his command and Ned promises to work hard when he joins him again. The brevet list has gone into the Senate and is in the hands of the Military Committee. He supposes Henry (Brownson) is recommended on it for a Majority, and Ned expects he will get it too if the list is accepted. Henry is now Adjutant to Gen. Hays. Henry cannot legally be detached thus from the artillery to infantry duties but he will be allowed to continue as he is. He started over to see Henry the other day but the roads were in such a condition that he dared not go farther than a mile and a half. Henry is about three miles and a half from him now. Ned is jubilant over the passing of the Conscription Bill. He would now like to be Provost Marshal of the 3rd N.J. Congressional District to put the conscripts through. He tells Sal that all the bachelors in Elizabeth (N.J.) should now get married. The cook told Ned that he did not want to cook for a mess that contained Captain Craig. He wants to go with Ned if the latter changes to another regiment. Ned's colored servant, Jim, is to go with them likewise. He speaks of writing to Bill (Brownson) yesterday. He asks Sal if she has attended to the matter he left with her. He would like her to send three or four postage stamps if she could spare them and he promises to send on the money soon. Ned tells her to show the letter to his mother.

I-5-i A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
2