University of Notre Dame
Archives   


Calendar: 1863

1863 Mar

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
( )

To (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, N.J.)

(A P.S. to another document) He has just received a letter from Uncle John (Healy) offering him $100 if he will get the former made Commissary. John feels confident that Ned can secure this appointment for him. His reason for wanting it is that he is anxious to have his boys with him and to serve the government. Sull (Healy) wishes to become an officer and ride about on a horse. He wishes to have his Father, John (Healy), consult Ned and asks the letter to obtain a position for him. John (Healy) wishes Ned to write either Sull or Edson (Healy) an interesting reply on this matter. Ned replied by telling his Uncle John (Healy) that he expected General Fremont soon to have a command and that if he gets a certain position he should probably be desirous of having Edson with him. He hopes Sal is better by this time and advises her that if she isn't well by now she should certainly have a doctor come in. He mentions his visit to Washington, (D.C.) at which time he went into both Houses of Congress. If she doesn't write soon she should have a secretary correspond for her. He has no good letter-answerers since she became ill except for an occasional letter from Uncle John (Healy).

I-5-i A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Mar 1

Feltin, A.M.
Wolk, Bas Rhin, France

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

His brother, Father Nicholas Feltin, once a missionary at Houston and for three years at Spring Creek, has not given them any news for nearly two years. (Odin) can understand the anxiety of their mother, brothers and sisters. He did not know that Galveston was in Federal hands. Otherwise he would have written at that time to Father (Joseph Anstaett) Anstett. Nor did he know that Bishop (Claude Mary Dubuis, C.M.) of Galveston was in France, having read of his departure only this week. He asks (Odin) for news of his brother.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
4


1863 Mar 2

Kenrick, Francis Patrick, Archbishop of
Baltimore, (Maryland)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.) of
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Since (Odin) asked some names in order to form a list of candidates for the vacant see of L(ittle) Rock, Kenrick proposes Father Charles (J.H.) Carter, formerly vicar-general of Philadelphia. He believes him to be without a flaw, endowed with zeal for religion, and to have administrative talent. He is sufficiently trained. The actual vicar-general of the same diocese, Father William O'Hara, is more learned and more gentle, and Kenrick believes him to be pious. Father P(atrick) J(ohn) Ryan, Secretary of St. Louis, also appears to have suitable qualities. Other prelates who know them better can give (Odin) more complete information. He wishes (Odin) a happy trip and return to his flock.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 1p. 16mo.
5


1863 Mar 3

Soldini, Abbot Joseph, St. Barnabas in
Albano, (Italy)

Testimonial letter for Horatius Cajone.

VI-2-g A.D.S. (Latin) 1p. 8vo,
1


1863 Mar 5

Bradley, C.SS.R., Father J(ames) F.
Prov(idence, Rhode Island)

To Bishop F(rancis) P. McFarland (of Hartford
Providence, Rhode Island)

The bearer of this is willing to go to Boston but Bradley cannot urge her to do so. Alone and without friends she would be too much exposed. She is willing to make the sworn statement but she does not want personally to bring odium on the Congregation. The malice was so light that Bradley doubts that there was solicitation. He does not know the name or place of the person.

I-1-b A.L.S. 2pp. 16mo.
1


1863 Mar 5

Gurley, John A.
Washington, D.C.

To (Orestes A.) Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Gurley has directed Mr. Hoard to pay Brownson at once; Brownson in not to blame for any deficiency. Gurley will see that the money is sent at once.

I-4-b A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
2


1863 Mar 8

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
Headquarters Second Army Corps

to (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

He received his mother's letter of March 1 today. He was glad to see Sal's writing again because it was the first letter he had received from home since his last visit. His mother informs him that there is a long letter on its way from Sal. The Russian Captain is talking at a fearful rate in his lingo so that Ned finds it difficult to assimilate his thoughts. General Hunt occasionally gets blue. He is not yet confirmed here and as a result may go out West. Ned hopes he will go to the West, but he would hardly get there before he should have to return to Fremont. Henry (Brownson) is with Ned and likes very much the idea of being Major. Ned felt that the Review was about due to be published. His mother tells him there is an article on Conway appearing in this issue. General Hunt is singing the tenth stanza of Malbrouck. He saw Captain Randol and spoke to him about Mrs. Fremont. He asks Sal if she is to be at Mrs. White's house so he can write to her there. He seeks Sal's opinion on an article on McClellan from Wilke's "Spirit of the Times." He is pleased to hear that both his Father and his sister are feeling better. Orestes writes that Margaret cannot spare Mary. He suggests that he should find employment in the East and have Margaret with Johnney live near home. Mary could go to Grandma's. John acknowledged the receipt of the money. Joe Hooker had a review last Wednesday.

I-5-i A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Mar 9

Lebel, Father I(sidore) A(nthony)
Kal(amazoo), Mich(igan)

to Bishop P(eter) P(aul) Lefev(e)re
(Detroit, Michigan)

They plan to present to the legislature and senate the enclosed petition of the leading citizens and their member Mr. Humphry in order to counteract that of five Protestant colleges. Lebel could not consult Lefevere; Judge (Hezekiah) Wells, leaving for Lansing, wished to put it in the hands of his best friends and assure it of his influence. On his return Wells assured Lebel that the opinion of the Senate and Assembly was that if a distribution of "Swamp Lands" is made for the object of education the Catholics of Michigan would surely have their just proportion. The Michigan Christian Herald, a Baptist paper published in Kalamazoo took umbrage at this and Lebel answered. Lebel rejoices at the appointment of Father (Francis) Gouesse to Ann Arbor. Lebel sees by the papers that Detroit is all on fire.

A.L.S. (French) 2pp. Folio

Enclosure:

--------
1863 Mar 18

(Two hundred names)
Kalamazoo, Michigan

to The Senate and House of Representatives of the State of Michigan
(Lansing, Michigan)

Learning of the application by certain denominations for a portion of the "Swamp Lands" to be appropriated to the support of educational institutions the undersigned citizens of Kalamazoo petition that a proper share be given Bishop Peter Paul Lefevere of Detroit, and to his successors in office, in trust for the Roman Catholic Church of Michigan. In general Catholics have limited means to educate their offspring to fit them for useful citizenship. They propose a plan of education that will combine mechanical, agricultural and horticultural labor with the mental exercises of the school room, so that the mind may be disciplined and trained in connection with the proper physical development of the body. A list of Catholic Colleges and Schools in the United States is given. Signed by 200 names (not given in this copy).

D. Copy 2pp. Folio
III-2-j A.L.S. (French), D. Copy 4pp. Folio
4


1863 Mar 9

Pearce, Sister M. Eulalia
Wheeling, (Virginia)

To (Archbishop John Baptist Purcell) of
(Cincinnati, Ohio)

The remembrances of Purcell's kindness emboldens her to ask him to take some chances in a raffle. The object is to help a poor widow with a large family. Without the least bit of cheating, sister feels confident that Purcell will win a prize.

II-5-b A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Mar 11

Hewit, C.S. (Mrs.)
Bridgeport, (Connecticut)

To (Orestes A. Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

The visit of Mrs. Hewit to Brownson's home, as always, renewed her Catholic strength and courage. While there she failed to ask Brownson's opinion in regard to a proper burial place for her Paul. She preferred burial in the family burial place if it were not contrary to Catholic principles. The child was buried in a Protestant cemetery and since then Mrs. Hewit has conferred with Bishop (Francis P.) McFarland about the matter which visit made her believe it were contrary to good Catholic principles and has partly selected the spot for her family in one that is Catholic. Her husband did not agree and gave as his reason the "our family should be next or near to our kin." She believed the matter could be settled by referring to Brownson. Such a question should be answered because they are living in an un-Catholic neighborhood. Her second source of discomfort is under (Father John Larkin's) direction she received Holy Communion twice a week, as near as she could. The previous Sunday the pastor (Father Thomas Synnott) did not wish them to go to the sacraments during Lent except on Annunciation and Holy Thursday as he wished to hear confession only on Saturdays for their Easter Communion. This made her feel like a Protestant and to rebel because Communion gave to her that strength which she was accustomed to have and now she is denied it. She feels she has a right to go as often as she wishes. She questions the right of Father to say such. She wants Brownson to advise her on this question. A letter was written to Sarah informing her that Dr. Brown was too ill to go to New York.

I-4-b A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
5


1863 Mar 12

Alleau, Father Th.
Epernay, (France)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Alleau does not doubt that (Odin) will have arrived long since at New Orleans and Alleau's Lent at Epernay will be long terminated when this letter arrives. It would be more agreeable and more economical for him to leave after Easter because it is a considerable time until October. The Lenten exercises go well, the attendance is ver numerous, but the people are bad and indifferent. Until his departure he will return to St. Brieuc where he will be amid his own and able to be useful to them.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
1


1863 Mar 13

Jones, Geo(rge) W.
Dubuque, Iowa

to Ja(me)s A(lphonsus) McMaster
New York, (New York)

After reading the 46th and 47th numbers of the Freeman's Journal, loaned to him by Patrick Quigley, he has decided, with four other democrats to subscribe to the weekly. The others are General William w. Smith, John Hoey, John Fortune, and John Thompson. He has long intended reading the Journal but has been prevented doing so from monetary losses suffered during his imprisonment at Fort La Fayette, at which time abolitionists and anti-Catholics tried to ruin him financially, politically, and socially. (William H.) Seward knew that Jones was a strong Union man from his correspondence with the State Department and that even in his letters to Jeff(erso)n Davis he opposed secession and told Davis that if he would stay in the Union that Jones and other Northern democrats would fight to protect the people of the South in their rights. But Seward told a Major General in the U.S. Army, soon after Jones' imprisonment, that it was necessary to punish him as an example to his two sons who had gone South to join Davis, although only one had gone and he without the knowledge of Jones, his wife, or other children. Jones has authorized S.L.M. Barton and E.R. Meade as his attorneys to bring suit against Seward for false arrest, but no suit has yet been started. He told Barton and Meade to seek advice, but has not learned whether they have spoken to anyone yet. He wrote to John Van Buren, but that Man's late war speeches, with those of Brady, have sickened Jones of them. He was told that suit could be started by attaching Seward's property. Does McMaster intend to bring suit for his own imprisonment? He writes to McMaster because of their old acquaintance through several meetings in New York and Washington, and having suffered like McMaster, Dr. Guinn, Staunton, Faulkner, Lanona and others have done from the acts of the tyrants in Washington he feels an attachment to anyone who has been similarly situated. If it wasn't for the timidity or corruption, ignorance, or all three of such men as (Stephen) Douglas, Andy Johnson, Meigher, Corcoran, Lincoln would never have been able to raise his 75,000 volunteers to invade sovereign states. Douglas alone could have smothered such an attempt and Lincoln's other efforts at the establishment of a stratocracy at Washington to which the late conscription act is the final stroke. The people may bow their heads in submission now, but not much longer. McMaster's efforts to oppose their schemes will be crowned with success and his work will be praised in future generations, if not now. He said McMaster's advice as to his suit and if he knows Barton and Meade, he may talk to them and to D.A. Mahony of Dubuque, who is now in New York.

P.S. He repeats the names of the other subscribers to the Journal.

I-1-m A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
3


1863 Mar 13

Van Gennip, Father J(ohn)
Dexter, (Michigan)

to Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere)
(Detroit, Michigan)

Van Gennip has received Lefevere's letter of March 10. He gladly complies with Lefevere's wish. Regarding Northfield, (Michigan) Father (Edward) Van Paemel thought it too much for him as he has too much beside it. It is impossible for either of them to attend it rightly as it is the largest congregation from Detroit to Jackson. Van Paemel's missions are all on the railroad except Northfield, are used to being attended only now and then and he has no conveyance. Van Gennip's missions take him from Dexter to Sylvan to Grass Lake, to Waterloo, Unadilla, Pinkney, Hamburg, and some lesser stations. He performs this circle about once a month. Dexter would feel mortified to be attended but every other Sunday. Van Gennip thinks his expenses of horse and buggy outweigh Van Paemel's. If Lefevere wishes him to take Northfield he is ready. If he receives no answer he will deem that Van Paemel is at Northfield as before.

II-2-j A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
4


1863 Mar 15

Timon, John, Bishop of Buffalo
Buffalo, (New York)

To Archbishop John Baptist Purcell
Cincinnati, (Ohio)

Father (Thomas J.J.) Coppinger wrote to Timon and asked him for a mission in his diocese as he is about to leave St. John's Hospital and refers Timon to Purcell. Timon asks Purcell for information concerning Coppinger.

II-5-b A.L.S. 1pg. 16to.
2


1863 Mar 16

DeNeve, Father John
Louvain, (Belgium)

To Bishop (Francis P.) McFarland of Hartford
(Providence, Rhode Island)

He acknowledges the letter of McFarland of December 18 and the draft and the same amount from Certes in Paris. This year he has 37 students. He has been saving a room for the man mentioned in McFarland's letter but he has received no application yet and has presumed he will not come this year. He asks that McFarland tell him what kind of subjects and how many the diocese will need in the next two or three years and how many pensions McFarland will agree to pay. He has a very good priest Father (A.) De Regge. McFarland should consult Father (Florimond) De Bruycker - although not strong in body. He has a deacon who will probably choose Nesqualy. He is happy to receive the good news of De Bruycker. If he is sometimes sad, he will be cheered by a kind word from his superior.

I-1-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
3


1863 Mar 16

Loughlin, J(ohn), Bishop of
Brooklyn, (New York)

To Bishop F(rancis) P. McFarland of Hartford
(Providence, Rhode Island)

He sends him a paper which he can examine and he thinks proper sign. Other Bishops who have signed are those of Cleveland, Fort Wayne, Milwaukee, Pittsburg, and Vincennes. The Archbishop of Cincinnati refused. The Archbishop of New York has not been asked yet. He sends the bill for Mr. Bradburn for binding the books itemized at $27.34.

I-1-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
1


1865 Mar 16

Pearce, Sister M. Eulalia
Wheeling, (Virginia)

To (Archbishop John Baptist Purcell) of
(Cincinnati, Ohio)

Purcell's letter enclosing the price of 40 chances has just been received and has furnished her with another proof that bishops are the best people on earth for giving neat and sharp little hits. She will certainly secure a drawing number for him. It was a shock to learn of the illness of Father (William) Barry. They are truly afflicted at the prospect of such a loss.

II-5-b A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Mar 17

(Odin), J(ohn) M., Archbishop of New Orleans
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell of
Cincinnati, Ohio)

He just arrived after an absence of nine months. While in Rome he received the news of the death of Bishop (Andrew) Byrne (of Little Rock, Arkansas). The Cardinal Prefect of the Propaganda advised him to postpone the selection of names for his successor until his return to America. Archbishop (Francis P. Kenrick) recommends Father (William) O'Hara and Father (C.J.H.) Carter, both of Philadelphia. Archbishop (John) Hughes seems to be of the same opinion. He has written to the bishops of the province but he is doubtful whether the letters will ever reach them. Odin asks Purcell's opinion and would be please dif he suggests a third name. Poor Louisiana is entirely ruined. Most of the plantations along the river are abandoned. Rich families are almost reduced to beg.

II-5-b A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
6


1863 Mar 19

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
( )

To (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Ned received Sal's letter addressed from Mrs. White's home. He hopes she is mistaken about Fremont's not getting a command. The times of the 17th says he has just been having a prolonged interview with the President (Lincoln). This would indicate some sort of arrangement. Ned has written to Jesse (Healy) to write to Garfield and requested that he (Ned) be added to his staff. Garfield is Rosecran's Chief of Staff. Ned had a jolly time on St. Patrick's Day. General Hooker and his entire staff went over to the Irish brigade. A steeplechase was held and the riders wore fancy colored costumes. General (Thomas) Meagher was the most colorfully dressed man on the grounds. A great deal of green was used in his costume. General Meagher had a half-barrel of whiskey punch spiced at his headquarters. Ned drank only with two friends, Greeks, whom he desired to put in a talkative mood. He asked his Greek friend if General Corcoran was to command them in the future and he replied in the negative and pointed to General Meagher as the man to head them. Ned doubts very much if such will be the case. The 69th Regiment has 97 men for duty and many other regiments are in a similar condition. Mrs. Salm was the prettiest and best mannered of the several ladies who were on the grounds for the celebration. Henry, Ned presumes, has gone home. Ned is acting Ass't Adj. Gen. today for General Hunt. Craig, the regular Adjutant General, went to Washington yesterday morning for four days. Ned expresses the wish that he would be permanent boss around there. His temporary servant cannot come up to Jim. He sends Sal Captain De Russey's autograph. He is in the 4th Artillery, has been Captain for 15 years having won it at Chapultepee in the Mexican War. Ned has paid all the money he owes Uncle John (Healy). He wants Sal to send him one of his Carte de Vistes because he has promised to show it to his friends here. He has heard from Jesse (Healy) and he is confirmed and well. Ned sends his love to his mother and all the rest of the family.

I-5-i A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Mar 19

Slidell, Mathilde
(Paris, France)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

She has a favor to ask. No doubt she has told him how (John) Slidell wished to enter their son Alfred into Vaugirard but their number of pupils was completed when they made their application and Father ( ) Olivain had already refused 200 pupils. Alfred is studying at the Lycée Bonaparte in Paris. He is first in his mathematics and chemistry classes. In order to enter the competition to which all the great Lycées of Paris send their first pupils, it is necessary to prove that he was not 16 years old by January 1, 1863. He was baptized by the pastor of the cathedral, Father (Constantine Maenhaut) Manhaut. She asks Odin if he could send them a copy of the baptismal certificate. They have long hoped to see him again at Paris. Her daughter, (Marie) Rosine, is making a retreat at Sacré Coeur. Mathilde could not accompany her sister because she fell from a horse. (The name Slidell is crossed out the only three times it appears).

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
4


1863 Mar 20

Hendricken, Father Thomas F.
Waterbury, Conn(ecticut)

To Bishop (Francis P.) McFarland of
Hartford Providence, Rhode Island

The schoolhouse will be ready for occupancy by April. He is sure that the Bishop will be pleased with it, since he has been offered $6,000 for it. The cost, $3,500, he expects to pay this year. From April 1 they will be entitled to $400 to $500 annually for its use. He asks permission to use the Easter collection for meeting the balance of the debt. He could take the collection at some other time if necessary.

I-1-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


1863 Mar 20

Jarboe, O.P., Father Joseph T.
Somerset, Ohio

to (James Alphonsus McMaster), Editor Freeman's Journal
(New York, New York)

Although he and McMaster once misunderstood one another, they now stand as brothers. He has been through many trying times since his last letter. He was in Zanesville, Ohio when the war commenced. He tells of the attempts of the people to have him raise a flag above the church, and of his refusal to do so. Bishop (James Whelan) of Nashville asked for a priest to serve the Catholic soldiers of Tennessee and Jarboe volunteered and was sent to Fort Randolph on August 12, where he stayed until after the Battle of Shiloh. He was well treated by the Confederate soldiers and was given many services by them. On Saturday after the Battle of Shiloh he went, under a flag of truce to the other lines to see if his services were needed. He stayed the first night with Dr. Borcoff of St. Joseph, Mo. On attempting to get back through the picket lines, he was picked up by an Ohio Colonel who attacked the Catholic religion, as well as Archbishop (John B.) Purcell. Jarboe replied to all of his attacks and told the man what awaited him in hell if he did not suffer a change of heart. As punishment for his boldness, the Colonel sent Jarboe to General Nelson who was vicious in his hatred of the Catholics and of Jarboe. Jarboe learned that he was killed a few days later. Next he was sent to General Buell who in turn sent him to Provost Marshall Wood of Wisconsin, who put him in prison from Sunday to Wednesday, where he lived on coffee and curses. On Wednesday he was ordered to report to Halleck's headquarters where he thought he was to be shot. Instead he was delivered over to Major John J. Key who treated him very decently, and gave him permission to go anywhere he wished. The following Saturday he took a boat to Cairo where he saved the life of a sick soldier who had been totally ignored in his suffering by officers and other soldiers. A drunken Federal officer made the soldier unwrap his bandage so that the officer could see whether he was faking his wounds. Although they are praying for peace, their prayers will not be granted while such wickedness reigns in high places. This is not for the press, but for McMaster to use in his personal search for right. He has been in Memphis since August, where he has witnessed other Northern soldiers perform acts of brutality utterly unwarranted. Father Reilly is now in Memphis. Jarboe is sending $5.00 to help the new volume and when it runs out, McMaster is to let him know. McMaster is a man that has a soul, quite refreshing to find one left.

I-1-m A.L.S. 15pp. 12mo.
3


1863 Mar 21

Loughlin, J(ohn), Bishop of
Brooklyn, (New York)

To Bishop F(rancis) P. McFarland of Hartford
(Providence, Rhode Island)

He received McFarland's letter enclosing $6. He expected McFarland to make the balance against him and returns the money.

I-1-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


1863 Mar 22

Hewit, Mrs. C.S.
Bridgeport, (Connecticut)

To (Orestes A. Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Mrs. Hewit writes to correct a statement in her previous letter about Father (Thomas) S(ynnott's) refusing to give Communion during Lent; she has discovered this was not his intention but she can not say what he intended to say. Her husband, (Doctor Henry S. Hewit), is with General Grant, near Vicksburg, as Medical Director. His old military enthusiasm has returned. Both she and her husband send their best regards to all the Brownsons.

I-4-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
3


1863 Mar 24

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
Department of Musters

to (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, N.J.)

Ned has been appointed to a new position and is almost afraid to write home about it for fear it should turn out to be a fable. He is now to be head of a department with three regular officers under his jurisdiction. It is an independent position. He is entitled to two clerks but on account of the desire to keep Headquarters as small as possible, he shall employ only one for the present. He mustered in an officer and though it was the first time, he feels that he swore hin in properly. He has a tent for his office but as yet his desk is not put up. He has a very respectable room on the second floor of an I.F.V.'s house. General Couch is downstairs. His room is about as large as the dining and sitting rooms at home. It reminds him of old times with Fremont before he lived in tents. He has a fire place in his new quarters and has a wood fire burning. Jim, his faithful servant, is an eager worker and will do anything Ned requests. Ned was on the move this morning. He is so much of a gentleman now he is able to leave off his jack-boots and blue breeches for decent ones. The officers are fewer and of a far superior class than any others with which he has come in contact. During a battle, Ned is to serve as Aide-de-Camp to Major General Couch. He shaves regularly once a week but it is no longer fun. Ned asks Sal where will Loverty is? If she has not already sent his picture she is not to bother. If Grey has the plate, he should like a dollar's worth more. His mother tells him that Fremont will have no command and Ned believes he must let him slide and not count on him anymore. He wishes to know if his things reached home safely. At the same time he also sent Mrs. Swinton her husband's bag. Ned asks that General Hunt's letter be very carefully saved. Worth left Hunt at the same time as Ned. His mail is to be directed to him in care of the Commissary of Musters, 2nd Corps d'America via Washington, D.C. He requests that Keogh send his Reviews to this address also.

I-5-i 8pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Mar 24

(St. Palais), Bishop Maurice de
Vincennes, (Indiana)

To Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere)
(Detroit, Michigan)

Father (Francis) Gouesse, (C.S.C.), is at Vincennes to offer his services; he has revealed the reason for leaving Detroit; his objections are insurmountable; if he is not received, he will go East where an offer is open in case he does not return to Detroit. Gouesse has been sent to Indianapolis to await a reply from Lefevere; there he holds an assistant's job. St. Palais will not hold him against Lefevere's wishes in spite of the fact that he never received from him any other paper than the transfer of him to (Father Edward F.) Sorin, (C.S.C.), and that he was ordained by the Bishop of Vincennes under the title of the mission, that Gouesse will not consent to be sent alone in a mission. If Lefevere will not consent that he live in Indiana, he will not return to Detroit but will leave Vincennes.

III-2-j A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
3


1863 Mar 28

Healy, Father James A.
Boston, (Massachusetts)

To Bishop (Francis P.) McFarland of Hartford
(Providence, Rhode Island)

They will have to ask McFarland again to consecrate the holy oils. Healy will send down the vessels with the oil next Wednesday night, but he will not be able to come for them on Thursday. He has procured balsam for McFarland as well as for his diocese and will send it down Wednesday. The one in charge of the ceremony might forget that a little water will make the balsam pour.

I-1-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Mar 28

McCloskey, Father W(illia)m
Rome, (Italy)

To Bishop (Francis P.) McFarland of Hartford
(Providence, Rhode Island)

McCloskey acknowledges McFarland's letter of January 20 and will correct the bill. M. Certes, on February 26, wrote that McFarland's letter had not reached him asking that the letter of McFarland or McCloskey be used. McCloskey asks that McFarland write again to Certes; besides he prefers that the order to transmit the funds come directly from McFarland. They are hard pressed for funds. The South American College has apparently struck a snag since the commission of Cardinals has been appointed to look after its affairs. McCloskey, however, has the fullest confidence in the bishops, and he feels that the (North American College) is destined to do a great good. Mr. Hart has asked permission to write to McFarland for permission to go elsewhere. He is an excellent young man but liable to act from impulse. Mr. Sheridan had a cold but is quite well now. Hughes and Chorlton are quite well. The Pope went to the Minerva as usual on the 25th. Report is current in Rome that Archbishop (John Hughes) of New York is very sick. Bishop (John Bernard) Fitzpatrick is in Brussels. The arrest of Sig. Fausti ceases to make noise and no one thinks the Cardinal Secretary will resign. McCloskey asks for McFarland's photograph for a lady who is a collector. The political news from home seems gloomy enough. He thinks the "old ship must go to pieces under Abraham the first."

I-1-b A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
4


1863 Mar 29

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
(Washington, D.C.)

(Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, N.J.)

Ned received her last letter with Mrs. White's enclosure. Murphy will have his leave, if possible, because Mrs. White wrote to his Colonel. His quarters and pleasant position will be somewhat disrupted when the march begins. One clerk is from the 10th New York, which is Frank White's old regiment. The other clerk is from a Connecticut Regiment. The first boy is in for three years while the latter has only three months more of a nine months duty to fulfill. Both boys are about 17 or 18 and are very industrious men. Ned finds himself very busy because his assistants have not yet been appointed and consequently the whole corps is assigned to his department. Last night they all worked until 9 o'clock. More than a hundred official papers were made out by his clerks and signed by him. He assures Sal he is most competent and proves it by relating to her a story of the first officer whom he mustered. His work involves the matter of months' pay for officers in almost every case. Cases of discharges, except for disability, are referred to Ned. Ned informs her that Bishop Potter's son is there as well as Colonel Walker, who is the son of a Bostonian Walker, who formerly belonged to the congregation of Rev. O(restes) A. Brownson. This afternoon Colonel Walker asked Ned to be his tent comrade on the march. Nothing could have been more agreeable. General Couch, Colonel Morgan, Chief of Staff, Colonel Walker, Lieutenant Potter, and Schutze and Burt, the two other aides, are gentlemen. Fitzhugh ranks very low in Ned's estimation because of his unkempt clothes and sloppy manner. He is in constant expectation of hearing something since he read her letter that General Fremont will resign and his staff will be dismissed. As soon as his mother wrote that Fremont was not to get a command, Ned looked about for a man. He expects he shall soon hear from her at Elizabeth. Henry (Brownson) and he are in the same corps but are more than a mile apart. He hopes to get some paper stamped for his office soon. He sends his love to all.

I-5-i A.L.S. 8pp. 12mo.
3


1863 Mar 29

Stanton, Edwin M.
Washington, D.C.

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Elizabeth, New Jersey

Brownson's note respecting Captain John Whelan's application for Provost Marshal will receive due consideration, but without undertaking to say positively what may be the action of the President it is not likely that he will receive the appointment. He hopes that Brownson is in good health.

I-4-b A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
2


1863 Mar 31

Flanders, Mrs. F( ) D.
Malone, (New York)

To (James Alphonsus) McMaster
(New York, New York)

McMaster's photograph reminded her that her husband remarked a few days ago that he had not yet accumulated the receipt of it, and lest he should defer it any longer, she takes upon herself the liberty of thanking him for so great a favor.

I-1-m A.L.S. 1p. 16to.
1