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Calendar: 1863

(18)63 May

Martin, Father J. A(mbroise)
Liverpool, (England)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Having sent two letters begging his exeat for Australia and fearing they left by the unfortunate "Anglo Saxon," he asks (Odin) to send his exeat to Father Heptonstall, Stanbrook, Worcester. They leave on June 5 for Australia.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 1p. 16mo.
2


1863 May 1

Durier, Father A(nthony), Pastor of the Annunciation
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Durier asks permission to go to see his Father, aged 79, and his mother, 7 years younger. Perhaps next year there would no longer be time. He had asked this favor last year, and in the letter which (Odin) took for them he had announced that he thought (Odin) would accord him the favor. He is painfully affected by circumstances and he asks permission to travel to France. If (Odin) refuses, his refusal will be obeyed because he was ordained for (New Orleans) and he hopes to grow old there. Durier wishes, upon his return, to go back to his church. He wishes the priest who replaces him to keep the lady who serves as his servant. As (Odin) knows, she has a son at the seminary. He seeks permission to buy various things for his church: a picture of the Annunciation for the main altar, a statue of the Virgin of Baptismal fonts, 400 or 500 volumes to make a parish library with the books he already has, and some vestments. He will have everything paid for by the congregation or he will pay himself. Before leaving he will account, according to the regulations, for the money received for this year, and his salary and that of his replacement will be settled pro rata.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
2


1863 May 1

Martin, Father J. A(mbroise)
Liverpool, (England)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He fears the letter sent by the preceding mail might have not attained its destination. He was awaiting (Odin's) arrival, but reading the New York Tablet he saw he was the guest of Archbishop (John) Hughes. Martin's health has improved, but the doctors think the climate of Liverpool too inconstant, so he has chosen Archb(isho)p (John Bede) Polding of Australia. All is arranged if (Odin) will but forward his exeat and ordination papers. He has no tie to bind him to his native country. He buried his Father about a month ago and fifteen days later his brother, 26 y(ea)rs of age, died of fever on ship-board, 8 days sail from New York. His only sister left is very sick. He is now doing duty as a chaplain to an orphanage. He begs pardon for ever having offended (Odin). He asks for his papers as soon as possible for there is a priest going there also and he has put it off for a month so as to be company together.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
3


(1863 May 1)

Français, Father (N.)
Charenton, (Louisiana)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Français begs (Odin) to send a priest to replace him for his infirmities prevent him from fulfilling his ministry. If (Odin) cannot send anyone, he is to tell Français what to do to place the sacred vessels in safekeeping, since he is preparing to leave as soon as possible. He has stayed as long as he can. St. Mary's Parish has been on his hands since last November at the departure of Father (Albino Desgaultière?). On Easter he sold the pews of St. Mary's for $1300, $1000 in notes payable March 1, 1864. He is leaving all his furniture and books to the Archbishop on condition that 150 Masses be said for his intention. If (Odin) sends a priest, he should bring the Holy Oils and wine for Mass.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
3


1863 May 1

Spalding, M(artin) J., Bishop of
Louisville, (Kentucky)

To (Archbishop John Baptist Purcell)
of (Cincinnati, Ohio)

His clergy have been worked very hard the last few weeks with sick calls, etc. He rejoices that Miss Chalfont has trampled on the world. He trusts that the Retreat of Father David will meet a want which has been greatly felt. Spalding has little doubt that Purcell will succeed at Rome in the matter of the seminary. He regrets the loss of Father (William) Barry. Spalding has no one to recommend for Petricula (Little Rock) unless Father (James M.) Lancaster who is an excellent priest but engages too much in worldly business. Father (Charles J.H.) Carter would be acceptable. Father (William) O'Hara would better suit a northern diocese and may be wanted for a more important post. Spalding would be sorry to see Little Rock obliterated.

P.S. He sees nothing anti-Irish in Mr. Webb's articles.

II-5-b A.L.S. 4pp. 16to.
5


1863 May 3

Vignonet, Father E(leazar), St. Michael's (Church
Convent, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Vignonet has gone to the new post that (Odin) assigned him. Of the persons in his service only one consented to follow him, and he cannot find lodging there. The inhabitants of Paincourtville express the desire for the return of their pastor; Father (J.M.) Bertail appeared to count on returning. This state of things and the desire not to be a cause of embarrassment for (Odin) causes him to return to a project which he revealed to (Odin) one evening. His old Father is sick and wishes to see his only son. Vignonet could leave to the Marists all that would be necessary to install themselves, as Bertell's replacement would find all he needed at Paincourt. He therefore asks his leave for several months. Then he will return and place himself at (Odin's) disposition. Hoping that (Odin) will agree, he is going to write to Father (F.) Bellanger, (S.M.) to come to St. Michael's and choose all that would be suitable for him.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
6


1863 May 4

(Brownson, Edward Patrick) Ned
Headquarters in Woods

to (Orestes A. Brownson
Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Henry (Brownson) is reported slightly wounded and attending to Gen. (Alexander?) Hays who is also wounded. Ned tells his Father not to expect any more letters from him as he is uncertain as to whether he will be able to get this off. He sends his love to his mother. (There is also a draft, in pencil, of this letter).

I-5-i A.L.S. (Photostatic copy in Box I-4-b) 2pp.16mo.
3


1863 May 4

Simmons, Edward J.
New York, (New York)

To (James Alphonsus McMaster)
(New York, New York)

Simmons thanks McMaster for inserting his communication and encloses a piece of literature which he hopes worthy of publication. Simmons will be grateful if his selection appears. He wishes that his writing would be of any service to McMaster. Any time he "gets off" a piece which he feels McMaster can use he will send it to him and leave the rest up to McMaster's discretion.

I-1-m A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
1


1863 May 5

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
Camp in Woods

to (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

He acknowledges Sal's letters and is pleased to learn some of the gossip of Elizabeth, (N.J.). He tells Sal not to be concerned about him. The night before the battle he went to sleep in the road, was awakened, went to sleep in his tent, was aroused by the fall of his tent (being struck), and finally went to sleep in chairs, on steps, and on boards about a dozen times. He is quite relaxed and unconcerned now as are the rest of the men. It isn't a gloomy party with staring eyes expecting desolation every moment, but they are as pleasant and cheerful as they always were. They are about a third of a mile from the front and sleep behind a breastwork in order not to be awakened by the shells. Ned was with Gen. Couch all during the battle. He is more brave and fearless than Kearney. He was struck by a shell which tore through his overcoat and made his side raw and at the time was not ten feet away from Ned. Gen. Couch says he never knew the fire from the batteries to be more violent than they were in the last battle. Ned was not hurt and nothing more struck him than the little splinter of a stick. He is aware of all his dangers and is prepared to meet them. He was not under fire at Fredericksburg except for a few straggling shells but here it is different. He admits bending his head etc. at first and regretted that he was forced to go to sleep on the Plains of Chancellorsville after being in his first real battle several hours. Ned was down when Hays' men went into the fight. He comforts Sal by telling her that he may not prove a coward in any fight. He asks her not to be afraid of his "bossing" his assistants since he does it in an officer-like way. Fay is in Sedgwick's Corps. Henry (Brownson) is either in the hospital, or a prisoner or has gone with Hays. It is not likely that he is hurt, however. Sal should remain cool and collected because the army itself doesn't get excited. He desires no better position than he already occupies. Ned would like to have a good Irishmen or Englishman to help him in his work. At present he has an Englishmen, but this is only temporary. He is a soldier and Ned is not permitted to detail any soldier for servant. Ned's Negro servant ran away the day they began their march, taking with him a horse, some money and provisions for five or six days. The march has been a bad one for losing things. Ned sends his love to all.

I-5-i A.L.S. pp. 12mo.
2


1863 May 5

Haskins, Father Geo(rge) F.
Boston, (Massachusetts)

To Bishop (Francis P. McFarland of Hartford
Providence, Rhode Island)

John McGirr thinks he would like the place McFarland proposes for him. If placed with a strict master he will likely do well. If granted indulgence he will take advantage of it. He has a strong will and is at time sullen, but can be managed. He is dull or perhaps slow and like his brothers does not like school and when in school makes sorry progress.

I-1-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
2


1863 May 5

Raymond, Father G(ilbert)
Opelousas, (Louisiana)

to Archbishop John M(ary), (C.M.)
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Raymond learned with pleasure of Odin's return from Europe and that his health was better. He was thrown from his carriage by his horse several weeks ago; he still feels it, but he is better. They were not able to get Holy Oils this year and he cannot send their bottles to Odin very easily. If Odin can find some bottles Raymond will have them passed to the neighboring priests. He could address them care of (Major) General (Nathaniel P.) Banks who will gladly forward them to Raymond. The Federal army entered Opelousas a little more than two weeks ago. They have been completely protected, as well as the Convent. Banks came to see the church, gave him news of Odin, went to the Convent five or six times to see that (the Ursulines) were tranquil. Learning that they were short of provisions, he had some sent, and he agreed to forward this letter to Odin. Raymond will give Odin the news about his brother (Father J. Francois Raymond) when he can speak to him confidentially. Father (Clement) Rigol(l)et cannot remain at Opelousas; Raymond acted for the best in taking an interest in him. He was deceived; there are some things essentially vicious. He sends his respects to Fathers Rousselon, Chalon, Perché, and all the others.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
6


1863 May 5

Robert A.
New York, (New York)

To Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Robert received Odin's letter for Father (Joseph Paul) Debreul, (S.S.), President of St. Mary's Seminary, Baltimore, as well as a letter from Father S(tephen ) Rousselon informing him of Odin's intentions in regard to his son, Paul (Robert). He set out soon after the reception of Odin's instructions. He stopped in New York for several days to rest from the sea voyage; then he will leave for Baltimore by way of Philadelphia. He accepts Odin's advances in the hope of some day being able to prove their gratitude by giving him, in their son, a priest worthy of his kindness. He also hopes to return to his family soon and to reimburse Odin.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
4


1863 May 6

(Brownson, Edward P.) Ned
Headquarters, Second Army Corps

to (Orestes A. Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

It has been hard to get any information about Henry (Brownson). Edward believes him not to be wounded, though a prisoner in the hands of the rebels. He was probably taken prisoner in this way: General (Alexander?) Hays was wounded. Henry went to his aid and was captured. Edward is satisfied with his own conduct. The fire which he had experienced at Fredericksburg had satisfied him that he would stand it. He followed General (Darius N.) Couch through the hottest shelling the latter was ever under, and was not a dozen feet from the General when he was twice wounded and his horse was shot. Yesterday he was fired upon but the aim was poor. The Captain told him they were for his exclusive benefit. Edward does not believe they or the Rebels have ever surpassed their artillery practice in the last battle (Chancellorsville). Their accuracy was excellent. The army passed up many chances to annihilate the enemy. Had (George) Sykes or Couch been supported, or had (John F.) Reynolds or (George Gordon) Meade been piled in where (Oliver Otis?) Howard's scoundrels fled from, the tables would fled from, the tables would have been turned. The retreat was well conducted. Rain poured all through the night. Edward went to sleep with his clothes on and he was aroused two hours later to prepare for the retreat. Henry is likely to be paroled.

I-4-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
9


1863 May 6

Flanagan, (O.P.), Mother M(ary) John, St. Mary's Convent
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Sister M(ary) Ursula O'Reilly, (O.P.), has decided on returning to Cabra; she will be ready for Saturday. Father (Jeremiah) Moynihan will arrange the passage money. She fears Sister M(ary)Genevieve, (O.P.), will not be happy. Still (the latter) prefers waiting until she hears from Mother Prioress (of the Dominican Sisters). Flanagan feels assured that Mother Prioress will make no difficulty and that she would be glad that Sister Genevieve accompanied Sister Ursula. She asks (Odin) to write to that effect.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
5


1863 May 9

(Hughes), John, Archbishop of
New York, (New York)

to Bishop F(rancis) P. McFarland of Hartford
(Providence, Rhode Island)

Among the decrees of the Councils of Baltimore confirmed by the Holy See Hughes wishes to call attention to VIII decree of the II Council on an Ecclesiastical Seminary in each diocese; also to XIV decree of the Plenary Council on the same subject, that the Bishops who do not have a diocesan seminary must write to establish at least one seminary in each Province. Providence has enable them to fulfill this decree in the province. He asks that the Bishops meet at what has been called Troy University on May 12 at 12 o'clock to take counsel together on the subject. The session should not last more than 3 hours and he suggests that each Bishop bring his vicar general or secretary or any other priest of his choice, not to attend the sessions but to give advice to the bishop.

I-1-b L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
1


1863 May 9

Weninger, S.J., Father Francis X.
Louisville, K(untuck)y

to (Orestes A. Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Weninger encloses advance sheet of his book, "Easter in Heaven," to be published by the Sadlier Company. He asks Brownson's critical judgment of the work. For his work a recompense is enclosed. Another new book will be forwarded to Brownson by a Mr. Walsh, "The Sacred Heart Mission Book." The preface will point out the purpose of the book.

I-4-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
1


1863 May 10

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
Headquarters Second Army Corps

to (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Ned is delighted to learn that Sal should have such a pleasant subject to divert her ideas from the rain and the heat as the battles of the army. Judge White is the one who was influential in having the scoundrel put in command of his army and he is in a large measure responsible for the recent disasters they have encountered. McClellan was a sorry enough general but a paragon of perfection compared to Hooker. Burnside lost 15,000 men but he lost them for his country's good; Hooker lost 18,000 thinking to enlarge none but his own glory. The general impression is that hooker is a compound of the blunders of McClellan and Burnside. There are several Major Generals who damn him openly. Many pitied Burnside when he failed but no one pities Hooker. The enemy is too disabled to fight back forcefully now. They have lost, undoubtedly, more than Ned's side. 20,000 more men is destruction for them while to the North it means a manageable force. Ned wonders what Peck is doing and why he is not able to enter Richmond from that side. Every general is pretty thoroughly disgusted. Fremont will have a time commanding 10,000 "niggers" says Ned and it will ruin him every way. Henry (Brownson) is beyond a doubt a prisoner having stayed with Gen. Hays when he was captured. Ned is going to write to him tomorrow and hope for a reply. He assures Sal that she need not be in the least disturbed about Henry's safety. They shall at last be forced to whip the rebels from sheer necessity and incompetency on their part.

I-5-i A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
2


(18)63 May 10

G(audet, O.M.I.), Father A(ugustine)
B(rownsville, Texas)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He is ready to leave for France and hopes to sail around the end of May. He can no longer put off the trip; several times he has received the injunction to come to the Superior General of the (Oblates of Mary Immaculate). Perhaps he can return by way of N(ew) O(rleans) in November. If in August (Odin) could forward him a word on the state of their affairs, it would be a true service.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 1p. 4to.
2


1863 May 11

(Brownson, Edward P.)
Headquarters of Second Army corps

to (Orestes A. Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

When Henry stayed behind to help General Hays, he was captured and was taken as a prisoner. He is well and Edward hopes to get a letter to him soon. Edward detests General Hooker and believes him to be the most incompetent of the incompetent . He is not the only one who would like to see this specimen to moral depravity, selfish egotism, and moral cowardice strung up by the neck. He asks the question cannot Judge White and his friends find some other despicable wretch to put in his stead?

I-4-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
1


1863 May 11

Hibbard, W(illia)m
N(ew) Y(ork), (New York)

To Orestes A. Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

He has just heard from his daughter, wife of General Hays, that Hays was wounded in the late battle, and is a prisoner along with Colonel (Henry) Brownson and two orderlies. She has asked Hibbard to inform Brownson. Mrs. Hays has gone to Fort Monroe, and will try to reach Richmond. She is being escorted. In Hibbard's opinion they will be exchanged soon.

I-4-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
2


1863 May 11

January, M(edora or Cecilia)
Donaldsonville, L(ouisian)a

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.) Odine
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

January supposes he has forgotten her. She was baptized a Catholic in Mobile Convent, made her First Communion in San Antonio Convent and was also confirmed there by (Odin). She went to see him at his house in Galveston. She asks him to let her stay at the Convent of the Ursulines in N(ew) O(leans). In Galveston she told him that she was going to her sister's in Mississippi. She went but her sister broke up housekeeping on account of her husband going to war. Since that time she has been living with a family, but they are going to Havana. Her Father is living at Berwick's Bay, but is unable to support his family any longer. He has drank very hard for the last year or two and is also nearly out of his mind. She feels lonely and unhappy and she knows if she were at the Convent she would feel happy. She will assist in teaching or any other light work. Her name is Medora or Cecilia.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
2


1863 May 12

Hibbard, W(illia)m
(New York City, New York)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Hibbard has received a telegram from Fortress Monroe saying General Hays, Captain (Henry) Brownson, Mr. Eckels and three orderlies have been wounded and are held prisoners at Richmond. He does not believe Capt. Brownson was severely wounded. Should he come home on parole, Hibbard will take care to see that it is not broken. Mrs. Mays, (wife of General Hays) has gone down to see her husband. Kind regards were to be extended to Brownson's daughter, who visited Hibbard yesterday (May 11).

I-4-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
2


1863 May 14

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
Headquarters Second Army Corps

to (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

He has this morning sent his watch to her. He wishes her to take care of it and have it repaired if necessary. He wishes her to take care of it and have it repaired if necessary. He is sending it by a jolly Zonave who was overjoyed at the thought of a ten day furlough. He may lose the watch in his excitement but Ned says he will not worry about it. He wishes to have his drawers sent back by means of the private. He is pleased now that he told Sal as much as he did about the battle. It is all out of his head now and Ned says he shall never have occasion to remember again his heroic achievement near Chancellorsville. Henry (Brownson) would not have been taken prisoner had he not chosen to remain with Gen. Hays. A staff officer staying with his General deserves the highest commendation and Henry has behaved most nobly in this affair. If McClellan or anybody else except that "Reprobate" Hooker were to lead the army they would be in Richmond today. Jackson's corps was so demoralized that a regiment could not be organized in all of it. When the Rebels were on the point of complete annihilation with but a few scattered troops at their disposal Hooker retreated like a miserable coward. Still with all his faults he remains on in command. Mr. Lincoln and Hooker are much alike. The best correspondent is Sypher who writes for the Tribune but Newbould, who also writes for it, is a fanatic. Ned saw some remarkable hits made during the fight. No sight appeared revolting. There are four horses to a caisson. Often the wheel-horse would be struck down and the others would gallop wildly with him and the heavy caisson. Every man helped the man next to him in case he was hurt. Their kindness was so great that they would have assisted him if he had no more than the nose bleed. Howard's men retreated first. It was no use trying to stop them. All night they were being reorganized. Gen. Hancock is a hero. He told his men in the front lines that if they retreated their own men behind them had orders to fire on the cowards. Gen. Couch's aides are fine fellows. Ned tells of two experiences he had while scouting in advance of the army at Chancellorsville, (Va.) and at Fredericksburg. In the latter fight he was left in charge to see that all companies returned safely to the regiment. They were being cut off though he found it necessary to wait until the majority of them were in and ahead and then directed the rest to be left to their fate, and the orderlies to follow. Some of the orderlies behind who pushed the stragglers on were shot at. Ned had his orderly salvage for him a good blanket and a clothes brush. He sends his love to his mother and Father and says he intends to write to them today. He has had a busy Ascension Day examining and approving all the musters of the 1st and 2nd Division, fired off two circulars and meditated order #1 which Ned believes he shall get off tomorrow. Ned is enclosing a specimen copy which he has first spoiled butt tells her not to show it to anyone. He expresses the wish that he could once more revere and respect Joe Hooker. Ned is as sure of success to the cause of the North as he is desirous of it. He sends his love to all and wishes to be remembered to Orestes and Bill. (One part of letter written on back of handwritten circular copy of a mustering commissary).

I-5-i A.L.S. 17pp. 12mo.
2


1863 May 15

DeNeve, Father J(ohn)
Louvain, (Belgium)

To Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere)
(Detroit, Michigan)

DeNeve's mother died some time ago. Last week he was called to the family in order to hear the liquidation of her property. DeNeve's share is constituted on the title of patrimony as a subdeacon, and he asks Lefevere to send proof of his title. He will give the Bishop of Ghent (Louis Joseph Delebecque) the deed before ordination, and will confer with the rector of the Ghent seminary about any change in the deed. (Adolphe) Certes has not as yet paid. He hopes Fathers (Gustave) Limpens, (Louis) Van Den Driessche, and (Louis) Baroux will arrive safely, having departed from Liverpool, May 6. Lefevere may place Van Den Driessche any place, but Limpens should not be alone for some time; he is young and talented, and so will be exposed to temptations. Limpens is to hand over 50 francs in gold which Madame Pierssens of Louvain offers as a memorial.

III-2-j A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
5


1863 May 17

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
Headquarters Second Army Corp

to (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

He is once more involved in the business of mustering officers. He inquires what Julius Foy has to write of. He understands he is adjutant now. Ned is going to Washington on Wednesday, he expects, and thence to Ellicott's Mills for a couple of days. He shall not have time or ability to get home since he is going under orders. He wishes that with $25.00 of his next month's pay she would take care of having a grave stone put up over Charley (Brownson) and George's (Brownson) graves. He will furnish the money if she will find out at Elizabeth, (N.J.) something about the price of a marble slab and other things. If Henry (Brownson) returns Ned intends to put him under contribution. Julius Foy will soon go home but Ned will not take anymore leaves yet awhile. He complains that Mrs. white has never answered his letters about Hugh Kelly. If she had not written also to the Colonel he would take the matter up again. Ned asks if the medical department is exempt from the draft in Pennsylvania and how all their Elizabeth, (N.J.) friends stand the near approach of the enrollment? He asks to be remembered to all his female friends. He wonders how Fremont is getting on and asks to be remembered to Mrs. F(remont) and Miss F(remont). Also to Nellie White. He speaks of Alice Curtis. Ned marvels that firey Sull restrains his furious patriotism. Neither Uncle John (Healy) nor Jesse (Healy) write him. Henry's (Brownson) servant is serving as Ned's cook. He tells Sal to take any of his money at home. He may not go to Washington. Henry (Brownson) gave Ned a package intended for Julius Fay.

I-5-i A.L.S. pp.. 12mo.
2


1863 May 18

Hibbard, William
(New York City, New York)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Hibbard has learned that Captain (Henry) Brownson has been severely wounded but the letter containing this information appears to be self-contradictory. He hopes that Captain Brownson has not been wounded severely. In the body of the letter, Mrs. Hays says General Hays was severely wounded in both legs. He marched 22 miles so his tendons and arteries are safe.

P.S. Hibbard will keep Brownson posted as to any further news.

I-4-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
2


1863 May 19

Hendricken, Father Thomas F.
Waterbury, Conn(ecticut)

To Bishop (Francis P. McFarland of Hartford
Providence, Rhode Island)

He writes for faculties to absolve an excommunicated person for being married before a parson or magistrate. He has announced a collection for Ireland on May 30. He cannot say whether it will be good or bad. Immediately afterwards he will go to Providence, if possible, for a day or two.

I-1-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


(1863) May 20

De Marivault, Z
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

In case (Odin) knows some unfortunates whom it might concern, G(enera)l (William Tecumseh?) Sherman will be replaced in his command this evening and the order of the departure of the enemy will be suspended starting tomorrow.

VI-2-g a.l.s. (French) 1p. 12mo.
2


1863 May 19

Pitholot, Father
Cap Haitien, San Domingo

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Ordained at the Seminary of the Holy Spirit in Paris on May 19, 1856, at the age of 26, Pitholot left for Guadeloupe. After a stay of five years, he went to Haiti on inexact information. He arrived at the end of November 1861; he regrets having come so promptly. He would be thankful if (Odin) would accept him in the diocese. Father Pascal, vicar general in Haiti, belongs to the community which directs the colonial Seminary of the Holy Spirit in Paris. In case he is not suitable (Odin) would only have to tell him. His only desire is to see (Odin) with the shortest delay and to march under his orders. He wrote on December 7 and 9 but received no reply. (Odin) should reply to the address enclosed (no enclosure). That young man will send it to him by one of his relatives who lives in his parish.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
2


1863 May 20

McMahon, Father Peter
New York, New York

to Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

On his arrival in New York in the company of Father (Stephen V.?) Ryan, (C.M.), McMahon learned that his mother is reduced to grave necessity because of the failure of crops. He is her chief support. He has resolved to abandon for the present his design of entering a religious community. Father (John) Hayden, ( C.M.) lent him $200 when leaving New Orleans but McMahon left him his books which cost over $1100. He hopes Odin will send him his exeat.

P.S. His physician in New Orleans told him that he would not live more than 3 or 4 years in that climate.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
3


1863 May 20

Tuckerman, Samuel
Boston, (Massachusetts)

To James A(lphonsus) McMaster, Editor, Freeman's Journal
New York, (New York)

He moved from his office on Keeley Street several years ago and asks that his paper be addressed simply to Boston, where it will be put in his box. He reads all McMaster publishes with pleasure and knows any other success is cheap compared to the advancement of the country in faith and liberty. He envies him the calling of editor, but his own calling as merchant makes him leave the nobler mission of leading the rescuers of the country to those more fortunate in vocation. He differs from McMaster in policy, but not in sentiment. He blames the North, particularly New England for the attacks against slavery in attempts to hide their own defects. Although the secession was provoked many times, that fact does not lessen the crime and blunder of secession. He looks upon fighting between two gentlemen as something honorable that can be done with clear conscience and mutual self esteem. The Northerners platform seemed noble and honorable to him although the distortion of the war into a Quixotic crusade has been vile and infernal. His hope is that by a cleaning out of the defects of the government, room will be left open for either mediations for peace or honorable fighting at least. He differs radically from McMaster in policy, although the (Freeman's) Journal must do immense good every week and he welcomes it. If he should write an occasional line for publication perhaps it might be inserted, but if not, his interest will not be diminished. He receives this morning last week's Journal by mistake and asks that this week's paper be sent to him. He asks McMaster to see why his clerk has allowed so long a time to pass since last billing him for his subscription, as he must owe something and would like to pay it.

P.S. He does not need to say that this note is entirely private and personal.

I-1-m A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
1


1863 May 21

(Elder), William Henry, Bishop of
Natchez, Mississippi

to Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Odin's letter of the 8th has come to hand. His one of March 25 reached (Elder) on April 18. As Odin requested, (Elder) wrote to Bishop (Augustus Martin) of Natchitoches and Bishop (John Quinlan) of Mobile. He has received no answer. Their mails have been frequently interrupted. He should be afraid that either (Father Charles J.H. Carter or Father William O'Hara) of Philadelphia might meet with difficulties growing out of political affairs. If their conduct and disposition are such as not to give ground for this apprehension, he sees no reason for changing the list Odin first presented (for the diocese of Little Rock) and putting (Father Patrick John Ryan) from St. Louis in the third place. (Father Joseph Heidencamp) from Wheeling, he fears, would have an especial difficulty in his nationality. If those from Philadelphia are objectionable - which he supposes Archbishop (Francis Patrick Kenrick) of Baltimore can easily ascertain - he would leave (Ryan) on the list and place those of the Vice President of Mt. St. Mary's at Emmitsburg, Father John McCloskey, and Father John Bannon, pastor of St. John's church, St. Louis. (Elder) met Bannon since he wrote Odin and became a little better acquainted with him. He is student of Maynooth, about 40 years of age, and has been 10 years in this country. He appears to have excellent abilities. He fears it will be hard to induce any suitable person to accept. He wrote before that he wished to visit Odin if Odin could obtain liberty for him to return without taking any oath or obligation further than not to use his visit or his knowledge acquired there to the injury of the Federal arms. If possible he would like to have permission for the Sister Superior of (St. Mary's) Orphan Asylum to go down and bring out provisions, clothing, and medicines for the orphans. They are now 101, of whom 85 are girls. Her name is Sister Mary Thomas McSweegan, S.C.. If Odin cannot obtain permission for (Elder), perhaps he could for Bishop Martin or Bishop Quinlan, as being of foreign birth. Or better still, Odin could come out and let them all meet at Natchez or another suitable place. If nothing of this can be accomplished, he asks Odin to give hin all the interesting information he can, especially concerning the various decisions he obtained in (Rome). He wonders if anything practical has been determined to remedy the evils connected with careless marriages.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
13


May 21 1863

Hoffman, W.,
Washington, D.C.

To Orestes A. Brownson
Elizabeth, New Jersey

Brownson's son, Captain Henry Brownson, has not yet arrived at the Commissary General's Office but he should arrive in a day or two. A boat has been sent, under a flag of truce, to get him.

I-4-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
2


1863 May 21

(Gillespie, C.S.C.), Sister Mary Angela
St. Mary's, Notre Dame, (Indiana)

To Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell
of Cincinnati, (Ohio)

She writes to ask Purcell to visit St. Mary's on his return from Chicago. She has many things to say to Purcell and to thank him for so much. Their affairs seem to be in a fair way of being happily adjusted. She will say nothing of the details of her visit to France as she flatters herself that Purcell will visit them.

II-5-b A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
2


1863 May 22

Bellanger, S.M., Father (F.), St. Michael's
(Convent, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Now that they (Marists) have arrived at the end of their journey Bellanger sends him their sincere thanks. Thanks to (Odin's) recommendation they received the most benevolent reception from Madame (A.) Shannon, (R.S.C.). She offered him money for their purchases with Father (Eleazar Vignonet) Vignonnet. It appears that the change is accepted easily enough although Vignonet is regretted. Bellanger would like to have met (Odin's) wishes in regard to the college, but as Vignonet is still at St. Michael's, Bellanger believes it better not to go there. Madam Shannon received them for meals at the Convent of the (Religious of the Sacred Heart).

(P.S.) Madame Shannon seems uncertain about salaries. He suggests that (Odin) say a word to her about it without her suspecting that Bellanger spoke of it.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
6


1863 May 22

Gys, P.J.
Malines, Belgium

to Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Gys asks for some information about Francis (X.) Ceuppens and John (B.) Bogaerts, formerly subdeacons at the Grand Seminary of Malines who left from Le Havre with Bishop (Claude Mary) Dubuis, (C.M.) of Texas and 52 missionaries and 8 religious on February 4, 1863 on the Ste. Genevieve, destined for Louisiana and Texas. Ceuppens, whose deputy guardian Gys was, promised to write immediately after his arrival, but he has received no news from him. In June 1862 he gave Ceuppens a voucher worth 4000 francs so that he could received Holy Orders; assuming that he is in America as a missionary, he no longer needs it and Gys wishes to recover it. Ceuppens said he would forward it as soon as he had his exeat from the Archbishop of Malines, (Cardinal Engelbert Sterckx). (Sterckx) told Ceuppens that it depended on his Archbishop and Ceuppens told Gys that it depended on Odin, who had told him to return it as soon as he arrived at New Orleans. He asks Odin to see that he receives it.

P.S. He requests Odin to forward the enclosed (no enclosure) letter to Ceuppens.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
6


1863 May 22

Kehoe, L(awrence)
(New York City, New York)

To Orestes A. Brownson
Elizabeth, New Jersey

Kehoe has heard several complaints from English and Irish subscribers who have been unable to obtain The Review and seem to think it dead. He suggests that Brownson publish a notice in some widely-read paper, like The Nation, explaining that he has stopped sending The Review to the British Isles because his former agents there have refused to pay for copies sent them. That would be a fitting revenge on them for their shameful treatment of Brownson Bishop James F. Wood's paper is not going so good. It has published a review of decidedly anti-Catholic books. Kehoe asks why Brownson doesn't comment on this.

P.S. The book could be forwarded to Brownson if necessary.

I-4-b A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
2


1863 May 22

Raymond, Father G(ilbert)
Opelousas, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Raymond wrote several weeks ago and (Major) General (Nathaniel P.) Banks charged himself with forwarding his letter. They no longer have soldiers at Opelousas. In regard to Father (Clement) Rig(ollet), Raymond has only himself to blame; he was too good at first and then too indulgent. Rig(ollet) was out of work when he came there and he had pity on him. (Rigollet) acts towards him with an arrogant and insulting tone that no pastor would suffer. (Rigollet) made indecent propositions to their Negress which she rejected. She left and Raymond took another servant, but (Rigollet) did the same thing. He tells these things because he thinks that (Rigollet) is going to ask to be made a pastor. It would be easy for (Odin) to tell him that he can dispense with his services. Father (Isadore Francis) Turgis recommended him for a post in Natchitoches but Raymond did not believe he could leave during Odin's absence. Bishop (Augustus Martin) ought to know about (Rigollet), and Turgis, who does not know him well, would do well to no longer bother about him. As for his brother, (Father J. Francois Raymond, Odin) will recall that they agreed that he should take care of their school for boys and avoid parish work as much as possible. (J. Francois) is sending a letter; Raymond advises the bearer to destroy it if it is exposed to being read by others. He must stop now because of the weakness of his eyesight. He is still not very well from his fall, although better.

P.S. The parish has been very well. The convent and the academy were overflowing with children until the arrival of the Federal army.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
7


1863 May 22

Shannon, (R.S.C.), Madame A., St. Michael's
(Convent, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Shannon is happy to assist the (Marists) whom (Odin) sent. They pray that (Odin) will be rewarded for the inestimable favor bestowed on the parish and their community by their arrival. Major-General (Nathaniel P.) Banks sent a letter of protection to (the Religious of the Sacred Heart) at Grand Coteau; he also sent a letter from Madame (Amelie?) Jouve, (R.S.C.). All are well. Their Provost-Marshal continues to do honor to his religion and country.

(P.S.) Some pupils at G(rand) Coteau had left - 70 only remained there on April 20.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
7


1863 May 23

St. Pierre, (R.U.), Mother
Opelousas, (Louisiana)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Mother St. Pierre is happy to find an occasion to present their respects. They thank God that he found so many zealous missionaries. During (Odin's) absence she was in France looking for some subjects. When she left Opelousas she was authorized by Father (Gilbert) Raymond, their superior, and in passing through New Orleans Father (Stephen) Rousselon approved her reasons for going to Europe. She had nearly $2000 but it was not enough because $1400 to $1500 was in Confederate notes. She also had a draft for $300 but she believes it was stolen. In France she found five subjects, but they had no money. She asked assistance from the Propagation of the Faith, but they told her she would have to present a request from (Odin). Blanc Lacombe, a banker of Clermont, loaned her 5000 francs for 3 months, for which two Ursulines of (Clermont) were guarantors. Since her return last December, it has been impossible to procure that sum. She wrote to Rousselon once, but she received no reply. She would be very obliged for all the means (Odin's) charity might suggest; when communications are more sure it will be easy for her to send him that sum. When the Federals arrived they had 95 pupils, and they had refused 15 or 20 because of the premises. Now they have 22. Otherwise, they have not suffered from the presence of the Federals. (Major) General (Nathaniel P.) Banks sent some necessary provisions and even came to see them 4 or 5 times to inquire if his soldiers had molested them. At the beginning of April, Raymond received the vows of two novices whom they had brought from (the Ursulines of) Bro(wn) Co(unty) and their 5 French postulants took the white veil.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
8


1863 May 24

Dubreul, S.S., Father J(osep)h Paul
(Baltimore, Maryland)

To Bishop (Francis P.) McFarland (of Hartford
Providence, Rhode Island)

He is late in sending his report on McFarland's seminarians because of his many occupations. Malloy has been called to the priesthood, McCartey and Smith to subdeaconship, Gaffney to minor orders, and O'Keefe and Walsh to tonsure. Mally has confirmed their expectations and will be a devoted clergyman, McCartey and Smith continue to improve. He says the same of the three others. He informed McFarland last year that Father J. Smith has his exeat and will send it to McFarland. O'Keefe has written to Ireland for his Baptismal letters, but is doubtful at times if he will have them. Having McFarland's general faculties for promoting his diocesans he must call his attention to that of ordaining ad titulum missionis. These faculties of some bishops have expired, but he asks McFarland to let him know for certain about the subdeacons. He regrets that he could not be more explicit about Bartley but could do so only by word of mouth.

P.S. McKernan left soon after receiving McFarland's consent to give him permission to travel at least as far as New Jersey. They had given nothing to Clancy who did not return to Boston but is serving in a military hospital on the Chesapeake. He has applied McFarland's intention for him to McKernan.

I-1-b A.L.S. 4pp.
1


1863 May 24

Hutchinson (?), C( ) W.
Utica, N(ew) Y(ork)

To Ja(me)s A(lphonsus) McMaster
(New York, New York)

Mr. Schuabb did not give him McMaster's letter until after the meeting and he did not read it until the next day. The meeting was not too successful, since many were deterred from attending because of threats of disturbance by soldiers which were circulated by the malignant. Schuabb's speech was not as good as he is capable of since the managers had promised the hall to the soldiers for barracks at ten o'clock. The arrangements were apparently made without concerted action and the affair was only a bait to trap the opposition while the true party remained concealed. One of the pricncipals told him that they should all stand boldly on the illegality of the arbitrary arrests alone. The opposition feared Schuabb might tell the truth and compromise their position. A few of them stood out boldly against a union policy and they were almost ostracized from society until they polled 1,000 votes in the county, and that number has now increased to a majority. There is only one platform on which they will long stand, for they are sick of the ordinary run of political promises. He owes McMaster and Schuabb apologies for innocently placing him in such a position. He hopes Schuabb will return some time under a new dynasty. He encloses a trifle more for Schuabb and should have done much better if he had understood his position although Beardsly and he makes this a parish matter.

I-1-m A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
1


1863 May 25

(Elder), William Henry, Bishop of
Natchez, (Mississippi)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Elder) profits by an opportunity to repeat what he wrote lately. He has written a second time to Bishop (Auguste Martin) of Natchitoches and Bishop (John Quinlan) of Mobile. He agrees to (Odin's) first list (for Little Rock). If (Father Charles H.J. Carter and Father William O'Hara) of Philadelphia should be out of harmony on account of politics, he suggests Father John McCloskey of Emmitsburg and Father John Bannon of St. Louis. The German subject from Wheeling (Father Joseph Heidencamp) would have difficulties on account of his nationality. He anticipates that no one will accept willingly. If Odin can get permission for (Elder) he will go to N(ew) Orleans. If not for him, perhaps he can get it for one of the others as being of foreign birth. Best of all will be for Odin to come out and let them hold an assemblage at Natchez.

VI-2-g A.L.S 3pp. 12mo.
9


1863 May 25

Hayden, C.M., Father J(ohn
New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

The receipts of St. Joseph's Church for 1862 subject to cathedratical tax amount to $4,337 of which $2,720 was in Confederate money, leaving $1,617 in current funds. The cathedraticum on Confederate money is $136, and on current funds, $80.85 on Confederate money is $136, and on current funds, $80.85. Paid to St. Vincent's College in April 1861, on (Odin's) account, $160, and on Father (Stephen) Rousselon's account, $82, for a total of $129. $113 was retained from the Easter collection of that year, leaving a balance due of $129. Deducting the $80.85 of cathedraticum leaves a balance of $48.15. The $136 in Confederate money he will hand over soon. He asks (Odin) to send an extraordinary confessor to the (Dominican Sisters) next Friday evening; it is more than a year since they had one and he cannot hear them this week.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
5


1863 May 25

Jacquet, Father J.H.
Bellaire, (Ohio)

To Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

The congregation of Bellaire has increased to nearly five-hundred but the number of communicants is low. He will answer the questions of Father (Caspar) Borgess in a few days. The school in Beaver is doing well. A lady from Wheeling is teaching. Father (Dominic) Kluber is going to Cincinnati, shortly and he will bring Purcell $50 from Messrs. Door of Miltonsburg, according to Purcell's own statement.

II-5-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
2


1863 May 25

Speer, A.R., Hardenburgh, Warren and Patterson, E.N.
New Brunswick, N(ew) Y(ork)

To Ja(me)s Alphonsus McMaster
(New York, New York)

A mass meeting of the Democrats and Union men of New Brunswick is to be held on Tuesday, June 2, 1863 at which time they wish to express their testimony in regard to the arrest of (Clement) Vallandigham and others. The committee wishes McMaster to be there and they humbly trust that he will make an effort to be there. He can return the next morning. Speer wishes an early reply on this matter.

I-1-m A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
1


1863 May 26

Ferrus, Théod(ora)
Nantes, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

At the time of (Odin's) passage at Nantes, Ferrus was unable to present her respects, being with her dying niece. Mr. Martet and Mr. Ferrus sent her all (Odin's) good words and his promise to see her uncle, Blineau. Since (Odin's) departure they have received indirect news that her uncle is dying. She begs (Odin) not to abandon him; he has spent his life doing good for his family and others. Her mother is very sad. For the past two years Blineau had given her and her children the money to live, but her mother always hoped that it was a loan. Ferrus' niece of 19 and nephew of 18 were left without any fortune after the death of their parent. Her uncle gave them the money to live. All this is not as serious as the position of her uncle whose misfortune will be without a remedy if he dies without confession. She asks (Odin) to take him under his protection.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 8vo.
3


1863 May 28

Michel, Francisque
Paris, (France)

To Robert (Seton
Rome, Italy)

He had been in Paris only two days when he received Robert's last letter and the little box. His gratitude will not soon be forgotten. He sent them to his wife and now that she has returned them, Michel will answer. He intends to leave for London next Saturday; this heart is torn with the thought that he will never again find there his friend W. Turnbull. He will talk with the many converts whom he knows and a Spanish monk whom he visits. In July Michel will leave for Edinburgh and Glasgow and hopes to talk about Robert with the gentlemen Robert has named. He will also collect all he can find about the Setons with a view to enriching his book if it is ever reprinted.

II-1-a A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
2


1863 May 28

Robert, A.
New York, (New York)

To Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Odin's paternal intentions for his son (Paul Robert) have not been executed as Robert had hoped when leaving Havana. He left for Baltimore where he had an interview with Father (Joseph Paul Dubreul, S.S.) Dubreuil. (Dubreul) decided that Paul should go to St. Charles and when classes resume, that he should take his place at St. Mary's and once again put on the ecclesiastical habit. Paul declared that he did not wish to obligate himself to the Church by entering the seminary because he did not feel that his vocation was sufficient developed. Robert consulted a Redemptorist Father who advised him not to force Paul but to place him in a Jesuit college. (Dubreul) advised placing Paul with the Jesuits at Fordham. Robert returned to New York where he is awaiting news about his family. If they are still at N(ew) O(rleans) and have nothing to fear from the authorities, he will see the Superior at Fordham to try to arrange to leave Paul there. He will then return to his family. Since Odin's wishes cannot be accomplished for the moment, Robert does not believe he should use the $200 that Father (Stephen) Rousselon sent in his name. If he returns to N(ew) Orleans immediately, he will bring it with him. If his family has been obliged to leave the city for the interior, he will remain at New York and send it.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 8vo.
4


1883 May 28

Stanton, Edwin M.
Washington, D.C.

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Elizabeth, New Jersey

Stanton has granted Brownson's son a furlough. No condition of any kind was directed. The order giving him a leave of absence will be repeated and a copy of it forwarded to him. It will be renewed if it is necessary for the recovery of the young man because the leave is for thirty days, only at the expiration of which time he ought to report the condition of his health.

I-4-b A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
1


1863 May 30

Léveque, R.S.C., Madame E(vélina)
(Paris, France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Léveque thanks him for the news about her family. She is happy to know that Zoraide (Léveque) is safe; she needs rest. She hopes that (Odin's) silence about her nephews who were in the army does not signify anything bad. She also thanks him for the news about the houses of the Religious of the Sacred Heart. The Mother General is very thankful. They are happy that he did not charge himself with packages that might have caused him inconvenience.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
3


1863 May 30

McCloskey, Father W(illia)m
Rome, (Italy)

To Bishop (Francis P.) McFarland of Hartford
(Providence, Rhode Island)

McCloskey acknowledges McFarland's letter of May 8 and gave the enclosed note to Hart who thinks McCloskey is guided by feeling rather than sound judgment. His health is not good and he is inclined to despondence. McCloskey intended to recommend him for subdeaconship in spring or summer but will await the settlement of the question. McCloskey has a draft from Certes of Paris containing 4900 francs, $908.28 on McFarland's account. They have not seen the worst. The trial of Fausti engages people's minds. The revelations of the last few months show a sad state of affairs in Rome. O'Neill was ordained priest before Easter, three others today. McCloskey will send by one of them a medal he received for McFarland from the state Department; it is connected with canonization. The Pope's health is improved, but they learn not to lay stress on popular ovations. Hughes, Cholton, and Sheridan are very well. Hart will write if he has anything to say.

I-1-b A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
1


1863 May 30

McCloskey, Father William
Rome, (Italy)

To Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

McCloskey acknowledges Purcell's letter by Fathers Kuhr, Desalers, and Elkmann, and thanks him for the photographs. Madame Bontonslinn appreciates his letter and photograph. Prince Messimo has a picture of Purcell, Bishop Bayley, Bishop Wood, and Dr. Lynch and Dr. Domenera's. Now they wish a picture of Father Pabisch. (Father Daniel) O'Regan was ordained today with Hennessey and Zingsheim. O'Neill was ordained before Easter. Purcell may expect O'Regan as soon as his funds arrive. McCloskey sends his regards to Dutton. He received medals for the American bishops present at the canonization and he will send Purcell's and Bishop Rappe's by O'Regan. Fausti's trial has closed but no one knows the result. The rumored change of Secretary of State is not believed here but there is a lot of talk about Cardinal de Luca formerly Nuncio at Vienna, Fathers Kuhr, Desalers, and Elkmann leave for Germany on Wednesday. McCloskey asks how Father Barry's health is. The rumor is current that Fausti is condemned but cleared of conspiracy against the government. Madame La Roche sent O'Regan a chalice for an ordination present. He sings his first high Mass tomorrow. McCloskey sends his respects to Father Pabisch, and others. There was a rumor that Bishop (John) Quinlan was arrested overnight.

II-5-b A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
3


1863 May 31

Certes, (Adolphe)
Paris, (France)

To Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefevere
Detroit, (Michigan)

The Association of the Propagation has been able to pay the 1862 allocation without suffering any diminution, namely 11,000 francs; also to Father (Aloysius) Lambert of the Detroit Diocese 1,000 francs; at Lefevere's request they have deducted 1,900 francs for Father (John DeNeve).

III-2-j A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
4


(1863?) May 31

McCloskey, Father Geo(rge)
(New York, New York)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

McCloskey was sorry to learn that Frank (Henry Brownson?) was wounded and is now in the Central Park Hospital. He takes it that Brownson will be in this week and they will go to see him together.

I-4-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
2