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Calendar: 1863

1863 Jun 1

B(rownson), E(dward) P(atrick)
Headquarters Second Army Corps.

To (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Ned says the business of his office has been all straightened out. Things are better than ever now. He ran the blockade at Washington and arrived at the wharf for the boat to Fredericksburg. According to the law, Ned says, Adjutants are in the regular service distinctly and this does not make them depend on any general's being in service. These men are as permanent as the Adjutant Major General's and Brigadier General's in the regular army such as McClellan, Fremont, Halleck, etc. Ned sends his love to all. Henry (Brownson's) things are partly sent and the rest are to be sent later.

I-5-i A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
2


1863 (Jun 1)

Good Shepherd, House of the
New Orleans, Louisiana

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

A summary of the accounts for the first four years of its existence from February 1859 to February 1863 showed receipts of $21,185.95, expenditures of $23,410.95. Due for the square, $5,536, leaving an indebtedness of $7,761. Remarks: February 6, 1859, the day on which the House was opened, there was not one dollar for its support. Furniture, clothing, provisions, etc. were purchased on credit. During the first year $1,603 were paid for a square of ground. The second year $1,696 were paid on the same square. The third year, on account of the partial destruction of the house and furniture by fire, at least $1,500 were paid to repair the losses, independent of what was received from the insurance company. The fourth year, to the high price of provisions, etc., the scarcity of work, and falling off of subscriptions can be attributed to deficiency to pay current expenses. (Notation by Odin: received) June 1, 1863.

VI-2-g A.D. 2pp. Folio
1


1863 Jun 2

Fitzgerald, Father Joseph
Columbus, (Ohio)

To Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell)
of Cincinnati, (Ohio)

He sends $143, the amount of the collection in St. Patrick's, for the seminary. His brother (Father Edward Fitzgerald) is quite unwell; he has a fever of some kind which the doctor thinks may be typhoid. He has not yet made the seminary collection in Delaware. He is attending to stations whose calls are more urgent.

II-5-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Jun 2

Loughlin, J(ohn), Bishop of
Brooklyn (New York)

To Bishop (Francis P.) McFarland of Hartford
(Providence, Rhode Island)

On receiving McFarland's letter he did not find any renewal of his faculty to ordain titulo missionis. He went to New York and Father (Thomas) Preston found none in his papers and Father (Francis) McNierny found no trace in his papers. Yesterday he saw Father (William) Starrs and he said he would call the attention of Archbishop (John Hughes) to it. If he finds anything he will let McFarland know. Loughlin thought that the renewal had been sought and granted. Bishop (John)Timon was there yesterday and said he had the faculty. Loughlin asks McFarland if he has the faculty for dispensing from abstinence from flesh meat on Saturday. In a letter of the Cardinal, of which he has a copy, mention is made of the faculty but Loughlin cannot find it. The faculties are received and will be printed by Father McNierny.

I-1-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Jun 3

Bellanger, SM., Father (F.), St. Michael's
(Convent, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Bellanger asks permission to celebrate the marriage of two related persons, children of cousins.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
1


1863 Jun 3

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
Headquarters Second Army Corps

to (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Ned is writing to Sal on the first anniversary of his entry into service. According to the law, the Aides are to be in the regular service. Ned says it does not make him dependent on Gen. Fremont's continuing in service. He has had his clerk Douglas ready at the Letter Book now for three days and he has got only about one-half copied. Lieut. Frank French returned last night and reported to Ned today for duty. He is far from well and Ned fears that he will be obliged to retire from active service. If Frank (French) had not come back Ned had promised the place to Dick Kipling provided the letter could obtain a commission. As it is, Dick must be left to be drafted unless French has to leave the field of operations. His horses are in good condition. He wishes Sal were here to take a ride with him because he hates going out alone. He is going to turn in Henry's horse tomorrow he thinks. He sent him his things today. He asks Sal how Henry (Brownson) is now and wishes to be remembered to him. Ned requests that she send the enclosed letter to Dick Kipling and remember him to the female portion of his family when she meets them. He sends his love to his mother and Father. He received his appointment a year ago the sixth and began training the eleventh.

I-5-i A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Jun 3

Cialdea, Father Peter Aloysius
Prenes, (Italy)

Dimissorial letters for Horatius Cajone admitting him to receive clerical tonsure.

VI-2-g A.D.S. (Latin) 1p. 8vo.
1


1863 Jun 3

Fitzgerald, Father Edward
Columbus, (Ohio)

To Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Fitzgerald encloses $5.00 for the returned bill, and $20.00 for the annual subscriptions to the seminary. He has two young boys being prepared for the seminary and if Purcell will take one, Fitzgerald will pay $50.00 a year and the other boys parents can do the same. Fitzgerald has been sick but is recovering now and would like to take a vacation now that an appointment has been made for Delaware.

II-5-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Jun 3

Martin, Father (J.) A(mbroise)
Liverpool, (England)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Since Martin wrote requesting his papers for Australia, he has been taken so ill as to cause his removal from the workhouse for which he was chaplain. His doctor has forbidden his voyage. He will stay in Liverpool if (Odin) will forward his papers to that effect. He encloses (no enclosure) the Vicar General's writing, hoping (Odin) will return it.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


1863 Jun 4

McCabe, John J.
(Emmitsburg, Maryland)

To Bishop (Francis P.) McFarland (of Hartford
Providence, Rhode Island)

McCabe received yesterday a letter from Father (P.) Delany to whom he had written about his studies at the seminary. Delany at McCabe's suggestion obtained McFarland's advice which he now has before him. He does not know why he did not write to the Bishop first. Examinations are now on. McFarland advised him to finish his studies at the seminary and remain there for the vacation. He had decided not to go away because of the war times. He has now changed his plans because his mother has been sick and wishes him home. His brother who has been in the army will go home on furlough and he may never have a chance to see him again. Finally the draft will be made in the state soon and he is not exempted. Father (John) McCaffrey, the President, obtained an exemption for all of them as teachers but cannot do so now. Mt. St. Mary's is called the hot-bed of secession and the state is wholly under Federal power. That is why he wants to visit his home in Pawtucket this summer. He wants to stay there. He hopes to talk with the Bishop soon.

P.S. He is very much hurries.

I-1-b A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
3


1863 Jun 5

Loughlin, John, Bishop of
Brooklyn, (New York)

To Bishop F(rancis) P. McFarland of Hartford
(Providence, Rhode Island)

Loughlin has just received from Father (Francis) McNeirny the renewal of the faculty to ordain titulo missionis as well as the permission to baptize adults with the short form. The audience in which this was granted was December 13, 1856 and the privilege continued five years and consequently expired last December. Application for renewal will be made.

I-1-b A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
1


1863 Jun 7

Kelley, W(illia)m D.
Philadelphia, (Pennsylvania)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

It has been long since either has written or seen each other and Kelley believes the fault to be his because Brownson had visited him when Kelley was pressed by the demands of duty. Since the adjournment of Congress he has been most actively engaged in the political campaign. He has ceased to sign for decisive victories in the field. An early settlement, if (William H.) Seward were at the helm, would settle the underlying question forever or give their posterity a greater struggle. He is trying to show the people that the contest is between two orders of civilization and that any peace which does not secure freedom will be a treacherous, though it may be a protracted, armistice. The Peacemen are urging the Southern leaders to encourage the election to congress of members enough to give them the organization of the House and, in the event of the loss of Port Hudson and Vicksburg, to ask an armistice during which they may elect Senators and members from all the States. In this way they can control the House and prevent appropriations for the interests of Northern capitalists and give the South the guarantee they need. Only the insane pride of the Southern leaders can save them now. It is time that public sentiment advances despite the feeble counsels and still more feeble action of the administration. He believes Seward's position is that the Emancipation Proclamation acted upon individual slaves and did not abrogate state laws. Kelley expressed some of Brownson's views at their Union League House with a result that he reports. He hopes Brownson will induce some friend in New York, Boston, Baltimore, etc. to act upon it. A number of them expressed regret that they had not read any of Brownson's articles and proposed a general subscription to Brownson's Review. Kelley believes it will reach 50. Thomas Webster Jr. is in charge and will forward Brownson his list. The army is almost entirely cured of (George B.) McClellanism and Kelley would like to know if the administration could be purified also. Brownson would be the best agent if he had a fit audience. They held no lectures in Philadelphia last season but Kelley believes it could be arranged for the coming winter.

I-4-b A.L.S. 7pp. 12mo.
6


1863 Jun 7

Seymour, Horatio
Albany, (New York)

To (James Alphonsus McMaster)
(New York, New York)

He will be glad to see McMaster any time this week before Saturday.

P.S. It would be convenient to see him Wednesday evening.

I-1-m A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


1863 Jun 8

McCaffrey, Father John
(Emmitsburg, Maryland)

To Bishop F(rancis) P. McFarland of Hartford
(Providence, Rhode Island)

McCaffrey is looking everywhere for help. After appealing to Archbishop Kenrick, Hughes, and Purcell he now turns to McCloskey, Loughlin, etc. His problem is that Maurice C. Byrne, a boy of fifteen, was dragged from the college by soldiers because of a letter he wrote to his Father, Judge Daniel Byrne of Milliken's Bend, Louisiana. McFarland knows Judge Byrne, one of their graduates who was a prefect and is one of their most respectable and estimable men, lawyer, judge, and planter. Maurice, with two other sons and two daughters have been cut off for two years from their surviving parent. Maurice had tried to correspond with his Father and boasted that he was a good Confederate in some childish language. Judge Byrne had been relieved of all his property by General Grant's soldiers and his home used as headquarters. General Blair gave him a pass and he had been visiting at Mt. St. Mary's a few days when the little boy was arrested. He was taken to Baltimore and despite the legal assistance of respectable Union men, he was required to take a long oath of loyalty to the Union and hostility to the Confederate cause. The boy was too conscientious to do that, and was ordered to prison through Archbishop (Francis Patrick Kenrick). McCaffrey is appealing for help and hopes that McFarland can do something for him. Some think that he and Judge Byrne are exposing themselves to arrest because of their interference and may cause damage to the college. He hopes that McFarland can bring some influence to bear. He asks him to stir up Archbishop (John) Hughes to whom he has appealed not, he trusts, in vain. McCaffrey asks McFarland to come to their commencement on the 24th.

I-1-b A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
5


1863 Jun 8

McCaffrey, Father John, Mt. St. Mary's College,
(Emmitsburg, Maryland)

to Archbishop J(ohn) B(aptist) Purcell of
Cincinnati, Ohio

McCaffrey says that Maurice C. Byrne, son of Judge Daniel Byrne of Milliken's Bend, Louisiana, and who was Prefect of Mt. St. Mary's under Purcell's presidency, is a state prisoner in Baltimore. He is accused of trying to communicate with his Father but his letters were intercepted. General Grant's army wrecked and destroyed all of Judge Byrne's property in Louisiana. General Blair gave him a pass to come here. Judge Byrne accompanied Maurice to Baltimore with a deputy named French. When Maurice refused to take an oath against the Confederacy, he was ordered to be transported beyond the lines. McCaffrey hopes Purcell will do all he can for the boy. He has also asked Archbishop (Francis P. Kenrick) to forward a letter to the President of the U.S. Lincoln asking him to release Byrnes' son.

II-5-b A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
2


1863 Jun 8

McNeirny, Father F(rancid)
New York, (New York)

To Bishop (Francis P.) McFarland of Hartford
(Providence, Rhode Island)

McNeirny sent in another envelope, by order of Archbishop (John J. Hughes), various documents, six in number, from Rome. The Archbishop asks that if McFarland has any suggestions in connection with these documents he will be happy to hear from McFarland at an early day. McNeirny asks McFarland to acknowledge receipt.

I-1-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Jun 8

Meyer, Maria Ant(hony)
Piqua, (Ohio)

To Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell)
of (Cincinnati, Ohio)

Meyer sends with this letter the title to a plot for a church, and $46.50 for the support of seminarians to which he adds $10. As to the proposed church 35 citizens have promised $3,000 and have collected stones for the foundation. He hopes to collect from $6,000 to $7,000 from the congregation of St. Boniface, some from the congregation of St. Mary's and also from Protestants. All are willing to pay promptly except about 23 persons who seek to prevent the erection of the church. They have circulated a petition on which they have names of women whose husbands are in camp, Protestants, Catholics who have not made their Easter duty, and some youths. In order to build the church Meyer must have express authorization in English which he can hang up in the church to silence the people. The notice in the papers of (Purcell's) visit to Piqua has been interpreted by the people as an expression of opinion by the bishop against the proposed church. His adversaries maintain that if the church is moved they can take back their land on which the church now stands. This is contrary to the nature of the gift, since that required merely that a chapel remain and that would still be true if he erected a house for the sisters there using the church as a chapel for them. This can be done to avoid dispute.

II-5-b a.l.s. (Latin) 3pp. 8vo.
1


1863 Jun 9

Brownson, Ned, Capt. E(dward) P(atrick)
Headquarters Second Army Corps

to H(enry) F. Brownson
( )

Ned says he can't make Everly do for the cooking arrangements. They are asking for him in his company. Ned wants to know whether to send him back or keep him solely for Frank. Ned promises to have Frank's horses attended in the event the latter should choose to have him sent back to his company. He can turn in Frank's horse whenever the latter wishes. He should like to receipt to Frank his saddle and fixings but if the latter sends receipts for forage or authorizes Ned to make them, Boots will always remain booted until your return.

(Among letters of Capt. Ed. Brownson to his sister, Sarah Nicolina Brownson).

I-5-i A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Jun 10

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
Headquarters Second Army Corps

to (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

It will be a year tomorrow since Ned left home for the army. He started to write to her the 6th but suppressed the letter. He encloses receipts for Henry (Brownson's) things. The boxes were directed to their Father. He thinks Sal will enjoy Emerson Etheridge's article which he is enclosing. He was over the river last Sunday. The Rebels have a good many guns trained on the North. Stoneman is reported to have resigned the Cavalry command. Ned doesn't expect (Gen.) Couch back. The latter set out this morning to the Secretary of War according to his order. The feeling in regard to (Gen.) Hooker remains unchanged unless more intense. He inquires as to how Henry (Brownson) is getting on and says he hopes he is getting well fast. He is sending the picture of Capt. Potter and a poor one of Gen. Couch. He trusts Sal will take care of them for him. It took one of his clerks all last week to copy his Letter Book. He anticipates letters from home in the event she hasn't become ill again. Ned inquires of the news of New York and if Sal "did up" Mrs. White. He sends his love to his mother (Sarah Healy Brownson) and reminds them that he is well and doing tolerable.

I-5-i A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Jun 11

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
Headquarters Second Army Corps

to (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Ned expresses his delight at her letter. He accuses Sal of having him booked for matrimony. Her reflections, he is sure, arise from that ill-fated marriage of Virginia's. He does not think Virginia loves Bleeker. He reassures her sister that he is not a letter writer. Sal perhaps expects him to ask some female character to be Mrs. E(dward) P. B(rownson) through a letter. As yet he has not told anyone "he was willin" and does not feel that he shall so make a fool of himself until he is of age. This would be a thing which Jim Ryan might do but not Ned. He wrote to young Dick Kipling that if he got him in the army he should have made him a man and an officer. He asked Dela to make him a clover leaf but she is too sophisticated and cityfied for that. He also requested Sal to tell Miss Hotchkiss that any favors she might send him would be very lovingly received. Up to this time Ned has served under twelve generals whom he names. He encloses forage requisitions for Henry (Brownson). He has nothing else of Henry's and will speak to (Lieut.) French about blank invoices for him. Ned expects to leave Fitzburgh and tomorrow go to Gen. Hancock's headquarters which is half a mile away.

I-5-i A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Jun 12

Follot, Father Francis C.
Plaquemine, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Odin) authorized Follot by letter to accept land for the cemetery, but the notary, G.S. Rousseau, says that he needs a power of attorney; adjoined is the model which Rousseau dictated. Follot asks (Odin) to send it as soon as he can. It will reach him promptly if he confides it to M.R. Haggerty. (Adjoined): A power of attorney to accept a lot of ground from Louis Desobry, Sr. and his wife, Minerva Hopson to be used by the Catholics of Iberville as a burying ground. It is bounded west by a street dividing it from the land of James Carlin, east by a continuation of the line which divides the Catholic and Protestant graveyards, north by the Catholic graveyard, and south by the land of Lovinski Orillion.

VI-2-g a.l.s. 4pp. 8vo.
8


1863 Jun 12

Hewit, H(enry) S.
Bridgeport, (Connecticut)

To (Orestes A.) Brownson
Elizabeth, New Jersey

Hewit has returned by way of Richmond and Libby Prison to recuperate from poor health before returning to active duty, and probably will visit Brownson. He believes Grant will take Vicksburg. He is glad that Henry Brownson escaped death.

I-4-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


1863 Jun 13

Abbadie, S.J., Father J. F(rancis)
Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

A young lady, fearing she could not be married by the priest because she had not made her First Communion, had recourse to a judge. Abbadie wonders what should be required of her before her First communion. Several months ago Father (Victor) Clero(u)in, sending a request for a dispensation to forward to the Archbishop's, wished to know if he could proceed with the marriage before receiving a reply. Abbadie told him he could, basing himself on the difficulty of communications and also on what Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc authorized at Opelousas. He wonders if he decided well. He wonders if a young man, who was baptized a Catholic but never learned or practiced his religion, can be treated as a Catholic when he presents himself to be married to a Protestant. He also wonders if he must refuse to perform the marriage if the license can be obtained neither from the military authority who declares himself incompetent, nor from the civil magistrate whose hands are tied.

VI-2-g a.l.s. (French) 1p. 8vo.
3


1863 Jun 15

Juncker, H(enry) D., Bishop of Alton
Columbia, (Illinois)

To Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell)
of (Cincinnati, Ohio)

He asks what will be done with the priests who fall under the conscription act and if there is any means of exempting them. He intends to take up a collection to buy out any who may be taken. Purcell forgot to send him a copy of the faculties from Rome.

II-5-b A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Jun 15

(Seton, Elizabeth) Elise
Cragdon, (New York)

To (Robert Seton) Bob
(Rome, Italy)

Why has (Robert) not written; can he be sick? Their Father (William Seton 3)is quite anxious about (Robert). Exchange is so high it would be best to borrow and repay when it falls. He has two dividends at the Trust. William Seton 4) left for Huntingdon to visit Charley Prime, but intends to be back in time to write by this mail. Elise would not wonder if Will walked off some morning; he is tired of an inactive life. Elise heard from Kate Chatard that she is engaged to Mr. Ward, the widower of Josey Dugan. Old Madame Chatard is dead. (Continued June 16): Elise and Em(ily Seton) went to town today; they saw Aunt Kate (Sister Catharine Seton) who is quite well. Harry (Seton) has just returned from a fish on the creek; he divided the fish with Mrs. Kemp The papers are full of another rebel raid. They are within 20 miles of Harrisburg. There is another call for 100,000 men. General (John Gray) Foster is very enthusiastic and is raising colored regiments. Ned Austin and wife are to spend 4th of July week with them. Peter Jay who has a regiment of militia has invited the girls to his house for that day. They now have a sailboat in which they can make short excursions. Carly Bailey (Carleton Bayley)? sailed for England and returns in September - a short trip for his health. Elise has promised a large squirrel to Colonel Monroe's sons. Cordial, the gardener, prides himself on having the first and finest peas and strawberries.

II-1-a A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
15


1863 Jun 16

McQuaid, Father B(ernard) J., Seton Hall
(South Orange, New Jersey)

To Bishop (Francis P.) McFarland of Hartford
(Providence Rhode Island)

Their commencement will take place June 24. John D. Kernan of Utica will graduate and it would give great pleasure to his family if Bishop McFarland could be present. The college would also appreciate his company.

I-1-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Jun 17

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
Songster's Station

to (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Ned has learned that the possibility of a Pennsylvania campaign is highly improbable. He had been enjoying delightful anticipation of such a campaign. The marches have been particularly strenuous of late. Three men fell dead the first day, two the second, and a hundred have given out exhausted. The march from Stafford, (Virginia) to Acquia, (Virginia) was awful on the men. He expects she "did" Mrs. White. He supposes Dr. Bergen has been drafted. Ned thinks there are many vacancies for Assistant surgeons of regiments from Pennsylvania which post Dr. Bergen might easily get from Gov. Curtin. Ned is a fixture to his corps because he didn't even go with Gen. Couch on his last trip. Dr. (Orestes A.) B(rownson Sr.) cannot go it too strong on the army question. Sec. Stanton says the troops around Washington and the militia are useless and this is the only army that is reliable. Ned inquires concerning the Army Register and advises her to get it and send it on. He wonders how Gen. Fremont's letter was received and where his "niggers" are? Ned wishes to be remembered to his mother.

P.S. June 18, 1863, Ned is leaving for A. of P. Headquarters on some humbug idea of (Gen.) Hancock. Sends his love to his mother again, promises to write soon and tells Sal that now he is only about two or three miles from Bull Run, (Virginia).

I-5-i A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Jun 18

Legoix, Father (Henry)
Choiseuil, Isle of St. Lucy, West Indies

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

A native of Rheims and having exercised the holy ministry at Paris for 15 years, last year Legoix thought of entering the missions in America. He wrote to Archbishop (Ferdinand) English of Trinidad who made a most generous reply. He left immediately, but on arriving at St. Thomas he learned of English's sudden death. This changed Legoix's situation completely. He went directly to Port-of-Spain where he saw Father Cuenat, administrator of the diocese. Cuenat told him that only his successor could have English's intentions realized. It was about a college that English planned to found. Cuenat was obliged to accept the small parish of Choiseuil. He offers his services to (Odin). He is sending a copy of his letter of recommendation from Paris and of English's letter. For information about him, he would bring a letter from Cuenat. Having made his seminary at St. Sulpice in Paris, under Father Garnier, Father Carbon, and Father Renaudet, he knows some subjects in almost all parts of the world; he wonders if there might be any with (Odin). He owes nothing to the diocese of Trinidad. He knows enough English and has traveled enough in English countries to save himself from difficulties in regard to that language.

A.L.S. 2pp.

On the same paper:

--------
1862 Mar 17

Buquet, Father Louis Charles
Paris, (France)

Copy of a testimonial letter in favor of Legoix.

Copy (Latin)

On the same paper"

--------
1862 May 12

English, Ferdinand, Archbishop of
Port-of-Spain, (Trinidad)

To Father (Henry) Legoix
(Paris, France)

Legoix will be very willingly received. English's correspondent at Paris is Father Rugerson of the clergy of St. Roch. Legoix should talk to him and show him his papers.

Copy (French)

VI-2-g A.L.S. , Copies (French and Latin) 3pp. 4to.
9


1863 Jun 18

Thienpont, Father Em(anua)l
Steubenville, (Ohio)

To (Archbishop John Baptist Purcell)
of (Cincinnati, Ohio)

He sends $71, the collection in St. Peter's Church for the seminary, and $10 for his subscription to the Telegraph.

II-5-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


1863 Jun 19

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
Headquarters Second Army Corps

to (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Ned tells Sal they are just about to move and asks her to send the enclosed to Dick (Kipling) the younger. He makes a request for more stamps and that she read the letter enclosed.

P.S. (Lieut.) French has gone on leave again and if Dick (Kipling) gets a commission he shall have the place. He tells her to have Dick telegraph when he gets a commission.

I-5-i A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Jun 19

Flanders, J.P.
Malone

to J(ames) A(lphonsus) McMaster
(New York, New York)

Flanders cancels his subscription to the ("Freeman's Journal"), and wishes a bill sent to him. He shall remit the amount promptly. He did not preserve a copy of his letter of June 5 to McMaster, and desires the return of this letter or a copy of it. He will pay the expense of copying and postage.

I-1-m A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


(18)63 Jun 19

Hayden, C.M., Father J(ohn), St. Joseph's Church
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

In answer to (Odin's) note of this morning Hayden must state that he several times heard it said that Father (Gabriel) Chalon made the remark in question; but the report did not originate with Hayden nor does he recollect to have repeated it.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
2


1863 Jun 20?)

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
( )

To (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Ned is including the whole family in this bit of correspondence. He wrote from Songsters Station or Centerville enclosing a letter from Dick (Jr.) Kipling. Its substance was that Frank French has gone home on sick leave, intending never to come back but to go on Heintzelman's staff. Consequently, if Dick can get a commission Ned will have him made Assistant C.M. of the Third Division of his Corps if the opportunity should occur. Ned advises Dick to get in some regiment in his Corps. He can get a commission from a governor without being obliged to accept it so that he need not enter the army except in this position. In the event that Dick Kipling, Jr. can't get the place, Ned intends to offer it to Julius Fay, Jr. He thinks this would be a huge joke on the Fay family. Ned asks that Sal write him about Julius' (Fay) return and the other boys. The rebs are scared all around. He wishes she would send him the four-leaf clover because he has no badge to show him as being member of the Corps of Sumner and Couch. Ned has an official communication with (Gen.) Joe Hooker's signature which he plans to send her at the earliest opportunity. He hopes they will have a scrimmage there. He tells Sal that if she did not receive his previous letter to send Richard Kipling, Jr. the points of interest in this letter. Should he be commissioned he is to telegraph Ned immediately and state the Regiment he has been assigned to. He warns him against bringing too much baggage. Ned asks Sal to write as soon as she can and to tell his mother that the accompanying letter is equally for her. Ned inquires as to Henry (Brownson) health and how he feels in anticipation of a Brigadier Generalship. (Letter marked: Extra Private).

I-5-i A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Jun 20

Jacobina, (S.S.N.D.), Mother Mary
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.)
New Orleans, Louisiana

The (School Sisters of Notre Dame) wish to speak to (Odin) about some of their affairs and to ask his advice. They wonder if they might call on him today.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 1p. 4to.
2


1863 Jun 20

McCloskey, Father William
Rome (Italy)

To Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

McCloskey says O'Regan has just been ordained and asks Purcell if (Daniel) O'Regan may stay another year in Europe to confirm his good character. He cites Bishop (William H.) Elder who spent four years in Rome, as an example. McCloskey has made the same request of the Bishop, (James R. Boyley) of Newark in young (Michael A.) Corrigan's case. He could be a companion of O'Regan. McCloskey wishes to place O'Regan, Corrigan, Gardner, and Ward in the same class next year to improve their theology. Madame Bontonslinn thanks Purcell for his letter and sends regards. Richter will be ordained subdeacon in September.

II-5-b A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
4


1863 Jun 20

Sullivan, J.T.
Wheeling, W(est) V(irgini)a

to James A(lphonsus) McMaster
(New York, New York)

Sullivan sends a check, payable to McMaster, for three thousand nine hundred and twenty dollars and eighty-six cents. He wants this amount to be drawn and deposited in the "Irish Emigrant Society Bank." The deposit is to be made payable to the Bishop Richard V. Whelan. He expresses his thanks for the services of McMaster. He wishes to have sent to him, their certificate of deposit.

I-1-m A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
2


1863 Jun 21

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
Headquarters Second Army corps

to (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Ned sends her Gen. Hooker's autograph; also Gen. Couch's. Ned asks Sal to examine a number of papers done up in a large envelope in his box at home and find a small dirty scrap which is Major Hain's receipt for the money for his horse. The bundle of papers is marked Private Documents. Major Hain was dismissed for drunkenness some time since. He has turned over Henry (Brownson's) horse to Mr. Woodruff. There has been a cavalry scrimmage at nearby New Baltimore. He wishes to know how matters at home are progressing. Ned lists the regiments in his Corps.

P.S. There are some vacancies in the medical department of several Pennsylvania regiments which present beautiful "openings" for young Pennsylvania sawbones who are not too green.

Second P.S. He implores Sal to write him some letters since his life is such an upset one now that he doesn't know what to do, think or say. Just when he gets his tent pitched, his desks out and his clerks hard at work he finds it necessary to re-pack again and start out en route.

I-5-i A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
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1863 Jun 21

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
Thoroughfare Cap, (Virginia)

To (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Yesterday they marched over the two battlefields of Bull Run, (Virginia) and forded the streams of Bull run and Cub Run. On the second battlefields of Bull run were the graves of the North's dead in little heaps from which arms, legs, feet and skulls protruded everywhere. He is saving a piece of a rebel shell for Sal as a relic. Yesterday he dined at Groverton, a villa of six or eight houses. They left Centerville yesterday, and arrived at Thoroughfare Gap around midnight. The guns are hanging away over at Aldi which is 15 miles off. Rectortown is only 9 miles the other side of the Gap. It was through that town that Ned marched with McClellan face Southward. Since that time he has made quite a circuit, namely, Rectortown, Warrenton, Catlett's Station, Spotted Tavern, Falmouth, Chancellorsville, Falmouth, Stafford, Acquia, Drumfires, songster's Station, Centerville and so on. McClellan began, Burnside took up and left. Hooker now leads the march. He tells her to show this letter to his mother. He sends his love to all.

I-5-i A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Jun 21

Prevost, Father J.H., Seminary of St. Sulpice
Montreal, (Canada)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

A Maximilien Joseph Daix, formerly of New Orleans, came to live in Montreal several years ago and he is living with a woman whom he cannot marry for want of proof of his freedom. He assures Prevost that his legitimate spouse, Émélie Françoise Le Clerc, died in (New Orleans) in 1853 of yellow fever. He was acquainted with a cantor employed by the Church of the annunciation, served by Father (J.M. Morisot) Morrisseau. Daix lacks the means to earn his livelihood, and what saddens Prevost the most is that he has heard it said that Daix was in contact with certain Protestant ministers. Daix has already been married before one of them although his would-be wife is a Catholic like him. Prevost asks (Odin) to have one of his priests gather some information on the death of Daix's wife.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
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1863 Jun 22

O'Connor, P(atrick) P., St. Vincent's College
Cape Girardeau, M(iss)o(uri)

To Archbishop John (Mary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

O'Connor requests an exeat. He has successfully finished his course of divinity and Father James McGill, (C.M.), the superior, will advance him to holy orders as soon as possible. He resided in N(ew) Orleans from his infancy and was confirmed by Archbishop (Anthony Blanc) as Father J(ames Ignatius Mullon) will testify. He is thirty years of age. In September, 1859 he applied to Odin and was persuaded that he would receive him among his seminarians, but he found after his arrival that he was mistaken. Odin feared his health would not allow him to persevere. McGill, with Father John Hickey, (C.M.), who is now in New Orleans, will testify that he has enjoyed good health for the last five years.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
5


1863 Jun 22

(Lynch), Rose, Sister, St. Mary's Convent
Somerset, (Ohio)

To Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

She thanks Purcell for a book which Father Vincent brought to her. She lost one of her pupils last week, Mary McGirr, who died of diphtheria. The community has increased since Purcell was there. Sister rose and the (Dominican Sisters) of the community wish Purcell good health.

II-5-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
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1863 Jun 22

(Odin), J(ohn) M., Archbishop of
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell)
of Cincinnati, Ohio)

A priest of the diocese of Cincinnati, Father T.J.J. Coppinger, arrived there last week and offered his services to Odin. He came without an exeat. Odin asks for some information about the priest. Odin is afraid to accept him. Odin would like to send some long details concerning the sad situation in Louisiana, but letters are subject to inspection.

II-5-b A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
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1863 Jun 22

Schreiner, Father Lawrence
Grand Rapids, (Michigan)

To Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere)
(Detroit, Michigan)

Having been permitted to stay in his mission, Schreiner will use the permission by writing Lefevere to exonerate himself from charges against him as contained in Lefevere's letter to him. If Lefevere is persuaded of the truth of the charges, then Schreiner can do nothing but accede to Lefevere's indignation. But Lefevere has no witnesses to the truth but has only hearsay, and therefore, he hopes Lefevere will hesitate to decline the charges until Lefevere hears the reply of the delinquent. Schreiner has obeyed commands of Father (Joseph) Kindekens. Even if Schreiner has never received from Lefevere or his Vicar General a copy of the Decrees of the Provincial Council of Baltimore, nor of Cincinnati, yet he knows well the Canon Law and Ecclesiastical custom as regards the use of a strange ritual, or protecting the Blessed Sacrament. Those who have accused him of ignorance paint "lying phantoms." He explains the circumstances of a certain mixed marriage. Schreiner thinks the false charges may be due to lack of fraternal understanding between him and Kindekens, for whom, although he honors him, he could not have the same feeling as he has for Father Vandendrist (Louis Van Den Driessche).

III-2-j A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
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1863 Jun 24

Andres (Father) Fr(ancis) M(aria)
Coshocton, (Ohio)

To Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell)
(Cincinnati, Ohio)

Andres enclosed a letter of Mr. Irvin which tells how they can obtain possession of Mr. McCloskey's house. If it is desired, McCloskey will leave on the following Monday or Tuesday, which would please Andres. Andres has no fear of the proposed deed because both McCloskey's and Johnson's administrators are respectable men. He thinks it best to get McCloskey's deed to Purcell and then get the deed of Mr. Hummit's house to McCloskey to be joined to the first. He asks Purcell to answer immediately and if he approves of that manner of buying the house to send the promised $400. He wonders if by mailing the deed to Purcell's heir and assigns it would belong to them or to the congregation, because he must get the money from the collection. If the house is not bought Andres feels that he must ask for another congregation although he would not care to leave Coshocton. The price of the house is $1,200. If Purcell decides to send Andres away he would like a place in or near the country and gives Newark, (Ohio) as an example if Father (Fred) Bender should leave.

A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.

(Enclosure)

--------
1863 Jun 24

Irvin, John C., Attorney
Coshocton, Ohio

to Archbishop John B(aptist) Purcell
Cincinnati, (Ohio)

Irvin was called in by Charles McCloskey to negotiate the sale of the S of lot No. 101 in Coshocton to Father (Francis) Andres. He was shown a note by Andres from Purcell in reference to the title, which forbade Andres from entering into a contract, and so Irvin makes a statement of the property that Purcell might give Andres further instructions. On August 20, 1851, William R. Johnson entered into a written contract to convey title to this property to McCloskey for $250. McCloskey took possession and made lasting improvements on the property. On December 10, 1860 Johnson, not having completed the contract died leaving a widow and six children, his heirs at law. Thomas S. Humrickhouse Esq. was made administrator. There are no encumbrances on the property except $138 due from McCloskey to the estate on his contract to purchase. Mr. Humrickhouse must file a petition in the Probate Court for leave to complete the contract and the conveying of legal interest of the heirs to McCloskey. McCloskey will pay the administrator the $138 before Humrickhouse files his petition so that the administrator's deed will contain a clear title. If Purcell desires, Mrs. Johnson, the widow, will join the administrator in his deed releasing her dower or will draw up a deed of her own, both have the same legal effect. Irvin informs Purcell that McCloskey can legally make a deed to him before he obtains his own. Irvin, of the firm J. & C. Irvin, Attorneys, is employed by the administrator of the estate, the surviving partners in the banking house and W.R. Johnson, settling the estate. He asks Purcell if he wants the deed to be to him and to his heirs and assigns without expressing the trust on which he holds.

II-5-b A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Jun 24

Angelica, (S.C.), Sister, St. Elizabeth's Asylum
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Sister Angelica understands (Odin) will be in their neighborhood today and she asks him to call at their asylum. She would have called at his house this morning but she cannot do so unless she is accompanied by a Protestant lady, and she does not wish her to hear what she has to say.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 1p. 4to.
1


1863 Jun 24

Koopmans, Father P(eter) C.
Marshall, (Michigan)

To Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere)
(Detroit, Michigan)

Koopmans paid $1,300 for the Battle Creek church property, $1,225 purchase money and $75 to settle a claim on it. $13 was thrown out as counterfeit. He has all the property deeds which he will present to Lefevere. He is at present as hard up as ever, and suggests that he keep $16.75 intended for the Propagation of the Faith and $3 for a mixed marriage dispensation intended for the Seminary.

III-2-j A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Jun 25

Meline, Colonel James F.
Milwaukee, Wisconsin

to Orestes A. Brownson
Elizabeth, New Jersey

Meline asks Brownson to read the enclosed articles and return them. Colonel Meline wishes to have his address changed on the mailing list of The Review. He fears that Rosecran's continued inactivity will fade his laurels.

I-4-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Jun 25

Austin, Eliza P.
Orwell, V(ermon)t

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Austin wonders if (Odin) knows anything of Capt. Samuel N. Cozzens A(ide)-D(e)-C(amp) of General (Nathaniel P.) Banks' command. Is he a Catholic, or has (Odin) any hope that he will ever embrace the Faith? Before Cozzens left New York, they thought perhaps he might. As he is a Vermonter and an acquaintance and they know very few Catholic they would be glad to hear if he has been received into the church. Being, with three sisters, a convert in a Protestant country with rarely the joy of the sacraments, they ask (Odin's) prayers.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
3


1863 Jun 26

Jacobina, (S.S.N.D.), Mother Mary
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Mother Mary Jacobina is sorry she had not the honor of speaking with (Odin) when there on Wednesday. On Monday morning, she called on Colonel Hollabut, Chief Quarter-Master, who gave her a letter for his lady saying Mrs. Hollabut would accompany her to (St. Joseph's Orphan) Asylum and examine it. Mrs. Hollabut did, and acknowledged their great need. Before leaving she begged for a memorandum of those articles of clothing they deemed most necessary, adding she would present it to her husband. She assured them the reason they had made no personal applications, that there are but two departments Colonel (Amos?) Beckwith, Chief commissary, who supplies provisions, and her husband who furnishes money or clothing. She bid her to call on them next morning. Mother did so and no sooner was she announced by a Catholic, Mr. Fitzpatrick, to Hollabut than he sent $600 cash. Then she called on Beckwith who said he would send up flour immediately. She was scarcely at home when ten barrels of flour, five of corn meal, five of beef, two of pork, and one of beans were delivered.

P.S. They ask (Odin) not to dismay the first figs of their garden and also this honey.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
5


1863 Jun 27

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
Edward's Ferry, (Virginia)

To (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Ned is enclosing a Confederate States postage stamp and an autograph of Gen. Cooper, the senior military officer of the Southern Concern. He finally received a clover-leaf from someone and he is merely acknowledging the receipt. Ned wants Sal to send on postage stamps. He speaks of writing to her from Thoroughfare Gap, (Virginia) and later destroying the letter. They have been marching quite a bit lately and yesterday morning the Rebels opened a battery near the end of their column but they gave up after wounding nine Northern soldiers. Luckily for Ned, he was three miles behind at the time, with the rear guard. Hancock's messages are generally useless. He is so fussy he is called "Gen. Prim." Ned doesn't like Gen. Hancock at all but did like Gen. couch and now, since the latter has been moved to Pennsylvania, he feels that that state is in good hands. He is elated at the thought of a Pennsylvania campaign. What a change from desolate Falmouth, (Virginia) to Maryland. He wonders if Julius Fay, Jr. is yet made Major-General of the New Jersey State Militia. He advises Henry (Brownson) to take that place since he is already a regular and a volunteer and might add militiamen. (He encloses a) War Department circular (of four pages, 8vo.) from the adjutant's office dated June 30, 1856, signed by S. Cooper adjutant-general on organization on every post return.

I-5-i A.L.S. 2pp. (Enclose 4 printed pages and signed) 12mo.
3


1863 Jun 27

Lüers J(ohn) H., Bishop of Fort Wayne
Fort Wayne, (Indiana)

To Archbishop J(ohn) B(aptist) Purcell
Cincinnati, Ohio

Lüers wrote to Purcell from Union, which is on the border. Three-fourths of the inhabitants live in Indiana and the town will grow in that direction. Some 20 of the 50 families live in Ohio. Judge Smith has donated a lot on the Indiana side and Lüers believes he obtained two more for him. They are waiting on Purcell's consent to start building a church on one of these lots because one is needed and Lüers promises that if ever the population on the Ohio side warrants a church that he will contribute. The only reason Lüers wants the church built on the Indiana side is that it may act as a convenient place from which to serve the 8 or 9 mission stations under his jurisdiction. Even then the priest stationed there would have a hard time. Father (J.) McMahon who goes to Union from Anderson (Indiana) cannot attend all the stations, so Lüers decides to station a second priest along the line at Union as soon as the church is built so as to serve all the places. He informs Purcell that he and his clergy will always have full jurisdiction wherever they care to exercise it. The church will be started as soon as they hear from Purcell.

II-5-b A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Jun 29

Léveque, Zoraide
Donaldsonville, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Léveque asks him to address a letter to Madame Evélina Léveque, (R.S.C.) for her. She wonders when they will see him and she asks his prayers.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 1p. 4to.
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1863 Jun 29

Williams, Father Jo(h)n J.
Boston, (Massachusetts)

To Bishop (Francis P. McFarland) of Hartford
Providence, Rhode Island)

Father C(harles) McCallion called on Williams this week to obtain permission to say Mass in the Boston Diocese as he intended to open a school in Warren, Rhode Island and the land is in Massachusetts. He referred Williams to McFarland. Williams asks if McFarland will permit him to officiate in his brother's, Father William McCallion's), church.

I-1-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
3


1863 Jun 30

Babad, C.M., Father J(oseph)
Lyons, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

In bed with a very grave illness for two and a half months and still obliged, although much better, to make use of a strange hand in order to write, Babad has not replied to (Odin's) letter. He regrets that Bishop (Claude Mary) Dubuis, (C.M.) forgot to give (Odin) his letter; it would have spared all the difficulties (Odin) had in looking for his brother (Henry Babad). Since (Odin's) passage at New York, Babad has received one letter from his brother and one from his nephew (Charles). He was especially consoled to see his nephew ready to suffer everything and to sacrifice everything rather than to consent to what his conscience forbids. He asked one of his colleagues to get the information (Odin) requested. All the registers of the charity from 1845 to 1852 have been examined but only one name was found, Thérèse Faldoni, but she was born in 1845. No child named Magdeleine Faldon is carried on the registers. The midwife evidently abandoned the child without leaving any note. One of his colleagues went to the police to find the midwife but they did not know anyone named Haller. However, the police promised to continue their investigation. (Notation apparently in Odin's handwriting): Felden and Heller.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
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1863 Jun 30

Bapst, S.J., Father John
Boston, (Massachusetts)

To Bishop (Francis P. McFarland of Hartford)
(Providence, Rhode Island)

Eleven scholastics will soon be ready for ordination. They have received minor orders and it is desirable that they be promoted to the other orders in the same week. McFarland is asked to give the ordinations on July 16, 17, 18. He understands that the Bishops of the country have the necessary permissions. He asks the favor because of McFarland's great charity.

P.S. If the time is not convenient he suggest July 23, 24, 25.

I-1-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Jun 30

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
Union Town, Maryland

to (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Ned doubts whether this letter will reach her. He wrote to his mother from Frederick (Maryland) and to Sal though he may not have mailed the letter. Yesterday they marched 32 miles and now both of Ned's horses have sore backs. Last night Ned had to ride to Gen. Meade's six miles away and back. It was supposed the road might be slightly "Rebellious." Coming back at 12:30 a.m. he met a sutler lieutenant on his return. The sutler turned out to be an arrant coward. Ned was afraid of missing his road back. He had gone over the road at a gallop and at night only. Also it was a road with very few houses near it and every body in them was asleep. Szabod is acting Commissary of Musters of the 3rd Corps.

P.S. He remarks that there is a singular coincidence in the name of Union Town, and asks to be remembered to any friends over toward U.T., New Jersey. Ned wishes Henry (Brownson) to send on five blank forage returns filled with his autograph.

I-5-i A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
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1863 Jun 30

(Kenrick), Peter Richard, Archbishop of
St. Louis, (Missouri)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Odin's) letter of the 6th was delivered today. (Kenrick) does not think it advisable to make any nomination for the see of Little Rock. Whoever is appointed ought to be there, or free to go there without exposing himself to any inconvenience condition such as would render his ministry liable to distrust on the part of his diocesans. Hence no clergyman should be chosen from any of the northern or border states. The best to be done is to appoint an administrator should the late Bishop (Andrew Byrne) have failed to do so. For reasons that will suggest themselves he cannot say anything as to the person named in (Odin's) letter for whom personally he entertains a high opinion. Bishop (James Whelan) of Nashville has resigned, and Father J(oseph) A. Kelly, O.P. has been appointed by (Kenrick) in virtue of special faculties from Rome, administrator of that diocese.

VI-2-hg A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
6