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Calendar: 1863

1863 Aug 1

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
Morrisville,(Virginia)

To (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

They are encamped at Morrisville (Virginia), which he describes. Things are progressing tolerably well. Eckel's appetite continues good and the General remains lazy as ever. Ned is knee-deep in papers and longing for Col. Walker's return. Mustering officers has become a bothersome business. Frank French is doing well but Ned expects him every day to be relieved. He would like to travel home again one of these days but there is no chance of it, especially if such papers as the N.Y. Times succeed in driving the army ahead blindly. The Times groaning over Gen. Meade's "stupendous blunder" in not getting his army destroyed may perhaps secure them another Bull Run and a Washington campaign. They now have Meade, however, not Pope to take care of Bull Runs. They camped in front of a deserted house while they were near Warrenton Junction (Virginia). The blackberries are splendid and plentiful there at Morrisville (Virginia). Because of this condition the staff officers straggle behind especially the doctors. Ned sends Sal a picture of Lieut. Wetmore, which flatters him, though he is a fine fellow, and deserves the flattery. If Henry (Brownson) is in the market Ned might ship him on by express some choice bit of Secesh that would suit him and get him the Tiffany ring. He has seen some girl with pretty eyes up in the London (Virginia) valley. They are nice but not any nicer than Sal's eyes. They belong to a Miss Pleasant Osborne. He is surprised to hear that Lucy Bartlett has gone the way of all flesh. Ned inquires how Mrs. Bleeper gets on. Ned tells Sal to inform Henry that he has found the market up in London county to be quite overstocked. In some places there were dozens of ladies where there was neither Grey back nor Greenback.

I-5-i A.L.S. pp.. 12mo.
1


1863 Aug 1

Odin, (C.M.) J(ohn) M(ary), Archbishop of
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Capt. W. Killborn Provost Marshall, Parish of Orleans
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

(A copy). Odin received Killborn's communication dated July 30 with the copies of the proclamation of the president (Abraham Lincoln) for a national thanksgiving. After mature reflection he must respectfully decline to invite the priests to read it from the pulpit. It is contrary to the custom of the Church. As the proclamation has been made known through the public prints, the churches will be open to the public and divine services performed in them on the day appointed, namely August 6.

VI-2-g A. Copy S. 2pp. 4to.
2


1863 Aug 1

Parisot, O.M.I., Father P(eter) F.
Brownsville, (Texas)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Some time ago someone told Parisot that (Odin) would probably be exiled from N(ew) O(rleans). Parisot would rejoice to see him come to Brownsville where they are already preparing to give him hospitality. (The Oblates of Mary Immaculate) received their new bishop, (Bishop Claude Mary Dubuis, C.M.) who stayed 3 weeks. The parishioners all heard him in their native languages, English, Spanish, German and French. All said that here was the second apostle predestined for Texas. The priests who accompanied him left for S(a)n Ant(oni)o on the cattle carts. They have certainly received their first warnings as they have had the time to know the monotony and the dryness of the Sahara of Texas. One of the Sisters of the Incarnate Word, Sister Euphémie, (V.I.), who came with Dubuis, is at death's door with a chest ailment. She has talent and piety. Only in English can Parisot tell everything about Brownsville. "It is the miniature representation of all Texas, but the characteristic feature of our city is cotton trade." All the hotels and private houses, even their old church, are filled. Brownsville is truly the compendium of Texas and Mexico. There is a continual going and coming of merchants and entire families. Generals (Miguel) Miramon, (Felix) Zuloaga and ( ) Cobos are lost in the crowd. Matamoros is on the same footing. The overflow of the two cities is thrown to the mouth of the river on the Mexican side and is forming a city there which will soon be as considerable as Brownsville. All this makes their mission very active. Bishop (Joannes Francisco de Paula) Verea (of Linares) is at Agualeguas, about 50 miles away, and at the first alarm plans to come to them. His secretary, Father Ant(oni)o Vega, received a shot in the left arm by accident. It was amputated near the shoulder. The last news is that it is hopeless. This is certainly a great loss for Verea. Bishop (Franciscus) Ramirez, new bishop of Tamaulipas is at Puebla. At the mouth of the river there is an Irishman, John Galligher, who has written three letters to his family at New Orleans without any reply. He is worried and intends to have his family come. His wife is Brigit Henry. If (Odin) could advance her $100, Parisot will send it to him. He asks (Odin) to send him 12 English prayer books, 25 English catechisms, and the 5 or 6 last issues of the Propagateur. He wrote to Father (Napoleon Joseph) Perché, but he asks (Odin) to reiterate his request and send it to Matamoros to Father John (Mary) Gayé, (O.M.I.).

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
17


1863 Aug 2

Hendricken, Father Thomas F.
Waterbury, Conn(ecticut)

To Bishop (Francis P.) McFarland (of Hartford)
(Providence, Rhode Island)

Hendricken has had so little satisfaction with the clergy sent to him before that we would regret now losing either of the present assistants, Father (John) O'Farrell or Father (James F.) C(ampbell).They acted on no suggestion of ill-advising friends and were content to attend their duties. But if the Bishop decides otherwise he would not designate which one he wants to retain.

I-1-b A.L.S. 1p. 9vo.
3


1863 Aug 2

Sheldon, J(o)s(eph) Cha(rle)s
( , Texas)

To Archbishop Joh(n) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, Lou(isian)a

A passing friend allows Sheldon time to ask Odin to take the first opportunity to send their daughter to them. Expense will not be considered. C. Blardoni (?) of N(ew) O(rleans) ought to have rec(eive)d advice from J(oh)n Frizzi (?) which placed funds at Sheldon's disposal.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 3pp. 16mo.
3


1863 Aug 3

(Alemany), Joseph S., Archbishop of
San Francisco, (California)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.)
N(ew) Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Alemany) asks Odin to find whether Frank Johnson, resident of New Orleans, native of County Mayo, Ireland, is living or dead. He was married to Abigail ( ) Foley) and is about 50. He was employed as a fireman on a boat from New Orleans to Cincinnati and had a cousin Bridget living in New Orleans. Information may be received from Peter Moran or from Michael Nolan, boat man. (Alemany) is very (sorry) to hear of the loss of Archbishop (Francis Patrick Kenrick) of Baltimore. (Notation apparently by Odin): Michael Nolan had seen Frank Jonson in 1853. He was very dis(s)ipated; he heard of his death. (Odin) knows her sister, Elizabeth Foley. She is an honest and industrious woman. Abe Foley or Johnston married Joseph MacClennon in Whitehall Protestant church. When Abe left N(ew) O(rleans) she had a little girl about 2 years.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
8


1863 Aug 3

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
(Morrisville, Virginia)

To (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

The mail came this evening and Ned is mad because he received no letter from Sal. He is writing out of spite. There is no danger of this Corps being broken up. Hays still holds on to it. Ned asks when they are going to draft in Elizabeth (New Jersey). He sees where Lewis Monteagle has exempted himself from the first draft. He asks if the happy Miss Wendt is in possession of Monteagle. He wants to know about the wedding. He wonders if Sammis will try a similar means of exemption. Ned asks if Jim Ryan is alive. He reckons he will make Howell subside if ever he gets a hold of him. Ned wishes Henry (Brownson) were there as Adjutant General. He sent Frank French an order relieving him last night. He is waiting for a smart man to appoint as his successor. Ned has got his commissaries hard at work. Reports must be made of everybody mustered, of number of men and of vacancies. These reports disclose several officers who in reality have never been properly mustered. The weather is terribly hot. He warns Sal not to mind the papers which talk of advancing now. (Gen.) Hays says there is no fear of Bragg reinforcing Lee. Ned thinks the Northern ladies ought to come down and give them ice water to drink if they expect them to carry on the war. The southerners are lean enough to stand the heat but the Northerners are not. It seems a long time to Ned since he was home. Their forty days campaign was a severe one. He asks Sal to tell Henry (Brownson) that he wishes he would get Provost Marshall Nugent to find out that he has some business connected with the muster out of somebody or other. If Henry would only find this out, express it in a letter, reaching here about the 15th inst. Ned would certainly get himself ordered on for a few days. Undoubtedly Henry could explain the expediency of having the mustering officer present and if Provost Marshall Nugent doesn't see immediately the necessity of sending a communication to straighten the matter out he had better be relieved of his position.

I-5-i A.L.S. 8pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Aug 3

Schreiner, Father Lawrence
Ferrysburg, (Michigan)

to Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere)
(Detroit, Michigan)

Is the commandment of the Church not to marry without a priest to be kept under very great difficulties? He asks for authority in such a case in the northernmost parts of his mission where he calculates to go after a few weeks. He also asks for permission for Mary Haughy and James O'Hanlon who wish to be married although the death of Mary's former husband has not been ascertained. Schreiner also asks some help from the collections made for the Propagation of the Faith so that they could finish the church in Ferrysburg. From Lefevere's last letter he saw that Lefevere supposed him to be a liar for complaining about not being supported as he had paid $300 for land. Wright subscribed $85, Berlin $142, Muskegon nothing, Grand Haven not more than $50. Only Wright has paid. The $30 left with Lefevere for a horse is to be left until he can find a way of getting a horse.

III-2-j A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Aug 4

Jordan, J.C.
South Port, (Indiana)

To Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Jordan wonders if Odin has seen or heard of Father (Louis C.M.) Chambodut, Lucy, McGreel, or any of the Messrs. S(p)ann(?), and if they are well and what they are doing. Jordan is desirous of going home in November to try and collect money enough to defray expenses. He wonders if Odin would advise him to do so, or if it would be possible to sett his claims in New Orleans for greenbacks. His claim on McG. Is 5600 and on Spann's estate 2700. Jordan has been blind over a year. He has had both eyes operated on and one is partially restored. Mrs. Jordan joins in regards.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
4


1863 Aug 4

McGill, C.M., Father James, St. Vincent's College
Cape Girardeau, M(iss)o)uri)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

The bearers are Odin's seminarians, Thomas Kenny and Victor (A. D'Hémécourt). The military authorities have commenced enrolling at (St. Vincent's) for the draft. As both are liable, they deem it best to send them to Odin. After a short preparation Odin can ordain Kenny priest. He has made very good studies and his moral conduct has been always excellent. McGill gives the same satisfactory account of (D'Hennecourt), but he is not so far advanced in his studies. The trip down the river is very expensive and not without dangers. All are very well there.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
4


1863 Aug 5

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
(Morrisville, Virginia)

To (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

He scolds Sal for not writing more often. Ned usually wears a coat until evening but then takes it off. Collars are for dandies or folks courageous enough to wear them. Gen. Hays, of course, is above such inferior things. He wonders why Sal doesn't send him the Review. Ned appointed his Third Division Mustering Officer yesterday. He is a smart, energetic gentleman about 30 years of age from Delaware. He was about to leave for the drafted men but Eckels and French both recommended him and Ned nabbed him just an hour before the time of his starting. Ned has to muster him in tomorrow and he thinks he will go ahead of any Jersey boys. There is one advantage in having all Volunteers under him because none of them can poke into his business. Ned is working the ropes to have nobody recognized as an officer until mustered into service as such. Ned is hard on the feminines of his country. They come to him for guards often. However, he turns them away coldly and doesn't listen to their tales of woe. On one occasion, as they were leaving after pleading in vain, Dr. Dougherty came up to them and talked for awhile. By and by Ned came up with Lieut. Haspell. The Doctor left and walked over to an old lady and gradually approached a younger lady on the other side of the street. He then had a quiet talk with her winding up by squeezing her hand several times. Silly old Doctor! How Hays laughed. He hopes Sal and all will desire to be remembered to Hays as Mrs. Hays remembers him. He has just drawn his pay for May $84.15. It is small apparently but half pay cut him down $21 and he does not charge for a servant. The Government now owes him $215.00. He has drawn $120.00 and not yet spent it. Sal should not hesitate to draw on his account when she needs it. Henry (Brownson's) mess bill is about $23.00 for last month. He tells Sal that it isn't necessary to inform Henry of his financial status. He is sleepy and is going to bed. The evenings there are glorious.

I-5-i A.L.S. pp.. 12mo.
2


1863 Aug 5

Certes, (Adolphe), Treasurer, the Propagation of the Faith
Paris, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

In his letter of June 15 Certes informed Odin that he could draw on him for 16,000 fr(ancs) for the account of Bishop (Augustus Martin) of Natchitoches who had indicated this means. Since then, (Martin) charged Certes to pay about 4000 fr(ancs) in France. If Odin's draft for 16,000 is already drawn, Certes will honor it, but, if there is still time, he asks him to draw it for only 12,000 fr(ancs).

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Aug 5

Pimbel, Father
Altenstadt, Bas Rhin, France

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana

Father Francis Anthony Carius of (Odin's) diocese was born in Pimbel's parish. For more than three years he has not given any sign of life to his family. His old parents beg (Odin) to let them know what became of their son.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 1p. 8vo.
2


1863 Aug 6

Jane de Chantal, (V.S.M.), Sister
Mobile, (Alabama)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Their school being their only support and all their resources being exhausted, the Visitation Sisters are obliged, with the permission of Bishop (John Quinlan), to send Sisters Mary Genevieve (V.S.M.) and Mary Stanislaus, (V.S.M.) to New Orleans for reasons which they will reveal to (Odin). They recommend them to his charity for they will need direction on their dangerous mission.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
5


1863 Aug 6

Lefevere, Bishop Peter Paul (Seal)
Detroit, (Michigan)

To Sister Leucretia
Detroit, (Michigan)

About 1858 Lefevere gave permission for Sister Leucretia of St. Vincent's Orphan Asylum to use 30acres of cleared ground, a part of the church farm, which lies north of Fort Gratiott Road, for support of the girls' asylum, and which later Lefevere intends for a boys' asylum. The expressed understanding was that no timber should be removed and the wood watched for trespassers. Lefevere complains that valuable timber has been removed while he was yearly paying from $45-$68 State and County taxes. Lefevere states certain conditions if Sister wishes to continue using the acres:

--------
1) That she have a watcher against depredation of the timber. In case of such depredation, she is to inform him;

2) As long as she uses the cleared acres, she shall pay all taxes ordinary and extraordinary that may be levied on that part of the farm;

3) At her expense she shall keep said ground in a state of good cultivation and fenced in;

4) After 6 months notice, she shall yield and deliver up said premises in good condition. (Lefevere's seal is on this letter).

III-2-j A.L.S. Copy 3pp. Folio
2


1863 Aug 6

McCloskey, Father W(illia)m
Rome, (Italy)

To Archbishop J(ohn) B(aptist) Purcell
of Cincinnati, O(hio)

(Daniel) O'Regan took his degrees on the 4th and made a good impression. Purcell may expect O'Regan in Cincinnati about the end of October. The death of the Archbishop (Francis Patrick Kenrick) of Baltimore has taken all by surprise. Some speak of Bishop (Patrick N.) Lynch of Charleston as his successor; others of Bishop (John) McGill (of Richmond). The Holy Father has accepted the resignation of the Bishop of Nashville (James Whelan, O.P.). Directions have been sent to St. Louis to look after the diocese. It is probable that Cardinal Antonelli will not remain long in his present position. Madame Scully has returned to the Novigiato but she is not looking well. Don Bernado is enjoying the cool breezes of Albano Lake. Mr. George W. Philips called at the college. Richter will go on his retreat for the subdeaconship. Monsignor Talbot is looking for a successor to the rector of the English College who just died. Talbot must retire to France for his health. Old Father Birmingham is a sort of stationary Vicar General of Paris. Summer always brings back the image of Father (Francis) Pabisch who used to come down for a week to talk philosophy with Mr. Ubaldi. This war has no charm for an Italian spirit. McCloskey is glad that (Father F.X.) Dutton is so well located. Father (Edward) Martinovic of Indiana visited them recently and amused them with funny stories about the western missions.

II-5-b A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
8


1863 Aug 8

Abbadie, S.J., Father J. F(rancis)
Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.)
N(ew) Orleans, (Louisiana)

Abbadie requests light in regard to marriages. Can he assist at the marriage of Protestants with Catholics without informing himself as to what sect they belong to. Often he is notified in the evening that someone wishes to marry the next day. This is especially the case with soldiers and other strangers. If the two parties belong to a state where a license is not required, he wonders if he can marry them without a license. August 15 is the First Communion day at St. Joseph's. Abbadie would like it to be followed immediately by Confirmation, but he does not think that it will agree with Odin's plans for the pastoral visit. He will set November 1 for the second Communion. He hopes that Father (Anthony) Jourdant, (S.J.) will have pity on him and send someone next week.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
3


1863 Aug 8

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
(Morrisville, Virginia)

To (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Ned has been worried. There are so many papers and so many folks that will not understand that he wishes Col. Walker were back. Their new Commissary of Musters and two others have given Ned considerable trouble in making out reports. He has noticed the name of Benjamin Weeks in the 28 Massachusetts Regiment. A "nigger" was found with an order from him calling for two canteens of whiskey. The Negro suffered so much that Ned withdrew the charges just before the court was to meet. Ned has just heard from Orestes (A. Brownson, Jr.). The former wants to know whom is getting drafted in Elizabeth, (New Jersey). If Henry (Brownson) wants receipts for ordinance stores, he will have to sign some more blanks. He wishes Henry would come and take the corps Adjutant Generalry. There are a great number of bugs flying around his head bothering him. He wonders what Mercer Marsh has to say to his sister. She speaks considerably of him in her last letter. The evenings are very cool and delightful. He asks Sal to save a copy of Mary Ann Elwood for him as a present. He asks her to tell his mother that he is healthy and well. He wonders what has become of Hotchkiss and wants to know something of Monteagle's affair. He wants to be remembered to Virginia Crane and Mary Regram. He speaks of Julius Fay and Tom Moore. He has not time to write two folds now but urges her to write now. He wonders if Sal hears of Patterson and if Smith is not drafted. Orestes (A. Brownson, Jr.) addressed Ned as Aide to General Hays.

I-5-i A.L.S. 8pp. 12mo.
3


1863 Aug 9

McCloskey, John, Bishop of
Albany, (New York)

To Bishop (Francis P.) McFarland (of Hartford)
(Providence, Rhode Island)

In compliance with the urgent wishes of Archbishop (John J. Hughes) he is about to go to Europe. His purpose is to se with Bishop (John B.) Fitzpatrick if they can get a religious community to take charge of their seminary. The prospects are sufficiently encouraging. He would like to consult with McFarland. He sails on August 19 by the Arabia from Boston. He will leave Albany on Monday and arrive in Boston that evening, August 17, and seeing McFarland there would be useful to the cause.

I-1-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
3


1863 Aug 9

(McCloskey), John, Bishop of Albany
Albany, (New York)

To Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell
of (Cincinnati, Ohio)

Concerning Father (G ) Meithenger's real character, he knows but little. While he was in the diocese there was conflicting opinions about him. About two years ago he applied for permission to go as chaplain to a Catholic regiment from Troy. McCloskey readily gave his consent. After resigning his chaplaincy, Meithenger wrote for an exeat that he might go west. This also was granted.

II-5-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
2


(18)63 Aug 9

Tobias, Isaac F.
Hamilton, Ohio

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Tobias learned that a Mary Theresa Ingraham is in the charity hospital in New Orleans. She is his daughter and left home about three years ago. If she is there, he wishes (Odin) to give him a full history of her character, and how she is getting along. Her mother died when she was about nine months old. She ran off and married against his wishes but if she wishes to return and is willing to be governed by a parent's rules, he will enable her to come. He understands she is under the care of Sister Rose Genevieve (S.C.).

VI-2-g A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
3


1863 Aug 11

Giraud, Father J.M.
Madisonville, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Everything is going well. Giraud's health is very good. This is the fourth time that he has toured the parish. He visited the families on the Bita, and the upper and lower Tangipaho(a), as well as Chapopeela. He had numerous Communions. He remained at Chapopeela for three days. Men and women fulfilled their obligations. Someone came from Cote Francaise to ask him to go say Mass there. He baptized 20, blessed 2 marriages and administered to 2 sick persons. They urged him to return there before leaving. He has still one neighborhood about 15 miles above Covington on the Bookfalaya. On his return if he finds an opportunity he plans to go to New Orleans. Bishop (Claude Mary) Dubuis, (C.M.) must be expecting him. Long ago he asked about communications between New Orleans and Matamoros but the reply was that they did not know. As he was told that there was no sickness in (New Orleans), he sees nothing to prevent his going there. It is said that Mr. Blanc's schooners come often to Bonfouca. Giraud will be there from the beginning of September. They consent to let him leave only if (Odin) sends another priest. A family of Tangipaho(a) became Methodist because, they said, the Catholic priest did not come there often enough. One of Odin's pupils must be especially destined for St. Tammany. From the 18th to the 27th he will be at Mandeville, from the 27th to September 9 at Bonfouca.

A.L.S. (French) 2pp.

Enclosure:

--------
(1863 Aug 11)

Giraud, Father J.M.
(Madisonville, Louisiana)

To (Archbishop John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Conforming to article 24 of his powers he declares having received the mutual consent of J.W. Herman, Catholic, and Louise J. Huard, Catholic, all the conditions required having been fulfilled in the presence of Messrs. Renaud-Petibien, Widower Beauduc, Louis E. Moussier, A.G. Vincent and E.G. Douviller of Madisonville. At Chapopeela he married Philogoue Baham and Marie Ruth Williams, both Catholics, having dispensed them from publication of the banns. He also ratified and blessed the marriage of William John Tailor and Mary Engleman, both Catholics of Covington. He dispensed from the publication of the banns in view of the necessity of their leaving for the interior.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 5pp. 4to.
16


1863 Aug 11

O'Connor, Father C.P.
Rome, (Italy)

To Archbishop John Baptist Purcell
Cincinnati, Ohio

O'Connor acknowledges Purcell's letter of June 8. He was glad to hear that Father (Francis X.) Dutton's health is improved and hopes that Father Daniel O'Regan can join him before long. Mr. Richter with two companions are at the mission house of the Lazarist Father making a retreat for subdeaconship which they are to receive the 17. The political question has been kept silent for some time now but occasionally a storehouse is burned, and the marble busts on the Pincio have been marred by revolutionists. Monsignor Kirby, Dr. Smith, Dr. Uboldi, Dr. O'Regan, Don Diuseppe, Mr. Richter, Dr. S. Chatard and the students thank Purcell for his remembrance.

II-5-b A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Aug 12

Fuselier, G. L(aclerc), St. Mary's Parish
(Charenton, Louisiana)

to Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.)
N(ew) O(rleans), Louisiana)

At the time of Fuselier's visit to New Orleans, Odin had decided that Father (N.) Francais could retire and he had designated his replacement. Circumstances have prevented this until now. Home after a long absence, he is mortified to have to tell Odin that the state of things in regard to the church is most deplorable. He is more sorry to have to report that it is due to the imprudence and errors of Francais because it was Francais who helped him to return to the practice of his religion which he had long neglected. Francais obtained, with Fuselier's recommendation, a pass which Fuselier does not believe he should deliver to him before consulting Odin. He asks Odin for a word of reproach to those Ladies who have not sent Fuselier any news of their health until now. He recommends them to Odin's protection.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
3


1863 Aug 12

Lüers J(ohn) H., Bishop of Fort Wayne
Fort Wayne, (Indiana)

To Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio)

When Purcell comes to Greenville, he should go over to Union City, (Ohio) to examine the situation for himself. Lüers thinks it can be arranged to avoid the building of two churches at present. Both churches would have to be of sufficient size to accommodate all the Catholics in and around Union City. Lüers suggests that each priest attend to his own side as far as baptisms, sick calls, etc. are concerned, say Mass an equal number of Sundays and divide the income; but have joint jurisdiction for the confessions. Father (Edward) O'Flaherty died at Crawfordsville. Lüers is much obliged to Purcell for permitting the Franciscan Sisters of the Poor to come to his diocese. According to "Gotham" who writes in the Telegraph, priests were to blame for the later riots in New York. To blame or praise priests in this matter is equally pernicious. If Catholic papers will confine themselves to religion, the Church will steer through the crisis about as safely as it can. Lüers is told that about half of the Irish in New York do not attend to them. It is an injustice to blame the few priests. It is best to let the slavery question alone. Most look upon the agitations of the slavery question as the authors of all the present troubles; they are too excited to make distinction.

(Note: there is a clipping attached from the New York World praising the Roman Catholic clergy for checking the riots in New York).

II-5-b A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
5


1863 Aug 12

Sadlier, J(ames)
New York (City), (New York)

To (Orestes A. Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Sadlier's nephew is a wild boy who refuses to attend school or work. He asks if Brownson could get him an appointment as Master's Mate from the Secretary of the Navy, because living amongst the common sailors would be almost certain ruin for him. He would prefer serving on the "Savannah" under the command of Captain Barret, a Catholic, but if that is not possible, any other ship would do.

I-4-b A.L.S. 2pp. 1mo.
2


1863 Aug 12

Tarlattina, (C.P.), Father J(ohn) Dominic
Birmingham, Penn(sylvani)a

to Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio)

He had to go to West Hoboken immediately after his arrival from Cincinnati, and could not write Purcell. They visited the place in Chillicothe and after mature consideration they decided the place is not suitable to their purposes according to the Rule of their order (Passionists). He must decline the foundation but thanks Purcell for the generous offer.

II-5-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Aug 12

Young, O.P., Father N(icholas) R.
Washington, D.C.

To Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio)

He has just returned from Europe where he had an interview with the General of the (Dominicans). He has learned that little charity was shown him while he was away. It seems that some of his brethren have not been contented with filing accusations against him before the tribunal of the Order, but have spread malicious rumors. Young has returned to seek reconciliation. He admits some degree of intemperance, but not drunkenness and is innocent of the second charge.

II-5-b A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Aug 13

Boglioli, C.M., Father C(harles)
Donaldson, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Boglioli received (Odin's) letter of the 10th telling him to discontinue visiting Mrs. Winchester's. He began this mission by Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc's order and discontinues it by (Odin's). As to the mission of New River, he will do all he can to engage them to build a church or a chapel.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
5


(1863) Aug 13

(Brownson, Edward P.) Ned
City Point, V(irgini)a

to (Sarah Healy Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Edward is sorry to hear of the death of William (I. Brownson), poor fellow, his has been a hard and stormy life and may God be merciful to him now. That he had time to prepare is a great blessing for him. Edward came to City Point last night, and expects to go to Washington this afternoon.

P.S. Edward has had no time to examine the needless yet; he has no doubt they will be all right.

I-4-g A.L.S. (Photostat, Odiorne Collection) 2pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Aug 13

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
(Morrisville, Virginia)

To (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Ned acknowledges her letter. The mail either brought nothing or some letters from the everlasting-mustered-out Micks. During all the hot weather Ned was more busily at work than even two years ago when he was writing the Review. He expects Gen. Warren there any moment to take command. Whether he shall remain Adjutant General or not he cannot guess; but, much as he has complained about the work, it is a position which he will not give up if he can help it. Still (Gen) Warren is not (Gen.) Hays. Warren can hop about like Old Sancho, and will keep everybody on the trot. Where Hays will go Ned cannot say. Ned has been the cause of several persons going down a grade or two due to failure to be properly mustered. He is only enforcing old orders of the War Department. Some Commissaries in other Corps will not muster unless they have their clerks with them. He has great allies and agents in the Paymasters who will do whatever he wishes. Three paymasters have been in Ned's office and they have seen just enough to be satisfied. They all say his musters are straight, the dates clear and everything handy. He fears that Sal and Dela ( ) are becoming very thick acquaintances. He sometimes feels as though he would like to make no. 3 in their party and correspond with Dela ( ) as there are no feminine there. One old lady and a younger good-looking one came to him once looking for a guard and mistook him for the General.

I-5-i AL. 4pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Aug 13

Duffo, S.J., Father J(ames) J., College of the Immaculate Conception
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Duffo is sorry to bother (Odin), especially foreseeing that it will be useless, but the bearers have so insisted that he can not refuse. One of their friends is to be shot tomorrow; they believe that a few lines written by (Odin) to the Provost Marshal could stop the execution. Duffo told them that the military law would not be enforced, but he could not satisfy them without sending this note.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Aug 13

McCallion, Father Charles
Camillus, (New York)

To Bishop (Francis P. McFarland of Hartford)
(Providence, Rhode Island)

His brother, (Father William McCallion), is unwell and he is detained longer than he expected, longer than his calculations on founding a school. If McFarland has any further correspondence with Father J(ohn) J. Williams he would like to know the results. If he cannot say Mass daily either at Swanzey or Warren he could scarcely hope to succeed. He encloses a letter from Williams and merely adds that it is not in the diocese of Boston. His choice place is Massachusetts because his brother Neal's farm is there. He thinks that McFarland can get him what he wants.

A.L.S. 3pp. 16mo.

Enclosure:

--------
1863 Jul 31

Williams, Father Jo(h)n J.
Boston, (Massachusetts)

To Father C(harles) McCallion
Warren, R(hode) I(sland)

Williams feels obliged to refuse McCallion permission to say Mass in the diocese of Boston.

A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
I-1-b A.L.S. 4pp. 16mo. & 12mo.
3


1863 Aug 13

Schreiner, Father Lawrence
Grand Haven, (Michigan)

To Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere)
(Detroit, Michigan)

Schreiner received Lefevere's letter of instructions about the things Schreiner had asked and in which he is told that he has no right to complain against the people for non-support, nor to distinguish between salary and alms-deeds. Lefevere justifies the people's non-support since they know Schreiner has money. As long as he has done his duty, he does not care if Lefevere supposes him a liar. Casuals are not salary. Though he is not treated like another priest of the diocese, he still intends to remain in it. He pleads consideration of his inability to talk English well. Tomorrow he has to go to Manistee which will cost $30.

(P.S.) Father (Joseph) Kindekens baptizes children from Schreiner's mission which is against Lefevere's instructions; moreover, Kindekens never gives Schreiner the casual.

III-2-j A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Aug 14

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
(Morrisville, Virginia)

To (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Col. Devereux has just come from Massachusetts with four hundred of the rowdiest of the rowdy and has just left Ned. Warren comes tomorrow, Ned doesn't know what he'll do if Sal goes way off to Massachusetts, especially as she writes so seldom now. He hopes Henry (Brownson) will never again leave his things in his hands. Let Henry charge his receipts for the saddle to Ordinance property. Szabod is too far off for messages.

I-5-i A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
2


1863 Aug 14

Deynoodt, Father Louis, St Patrick's Church
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Deynoodt did not see Father (Henry) Riordan yesterday. This morning he asked him whether he was still taking his holidays. His answer was that he intended to keep on for the present but that very likely he would call on Odin today. Deynoodt thought it prudent to let Odin know all about the affair. All is well (at St. Patrick's).

VI-2-g A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
2


1863 Aug 14

MacHale, Archbishop John
Tuam, (Ireland)

To Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefev(e)re
(Detroit, Michigan)

While MacHale conveys his best thanks to Father (Martin) Fox and his flock for their remittance of 54.7 pounds, he makes grateful acknowledgment to Lefevere who gave impulse to the charity of the hierarchy and the people of America who relieved their suffering flocks.

III-2-j A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
2


1863 Aug 14

Ste. Marie, (R.U.), Mother
San Antonio, (Texas)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Through Bishop (Claude Mary) Dubuis Mother learned that (Odin) had been back in his diocese since March. It is very difficult not having communication with New Orleans. They were very happy to see Dubuis in good health; he arrived on May 28. He leaves tomorrow for Laredo. He told her that (Odin) had sent him the debt he had with the (Ursulines). On Dubuis' return they will settle it. She asks (Odin) to write by way of Father (John Mary) Gayé, (O.M.I.), of Matamoros how they stand in regard to the interest. (Odin's) letter of November 9 told her that there was at that time $253.75 interest which would produce nothing more, but that the $4500 would continue to draw interest. She becomes sicker and sicker. She is incapable of continuing any longer the burden of superior which has become so difficult since the war. She has had to have all the provisions brought from Mexico; Sister Ste. Madeleine, (R.U.) is not capable of taking so many anxieties. Suspecting that she will be reelected for three years, she has obtained permission to refuse. It is necessary for her to prepare for death which is very near. She has had for a year Sister Ste. Chantal, (R.U.), who is so happy that she asks nothing more. She wishes to be accepted, but Dubuis is opposed because they decided at a chapter that Sister St. Joseph, (R.U.) never would be. The latter has recaptured her ascendancy over (Dubuis). Ste. Marie foresaw this, knowing her character. Sister Ste. Félicité, (R.U.) is incapable, nevertheless Ste. Marie fears she will be chosen superior. (Odin) knows all the others. It was necessary to settle the question with the house at Liberty. They have Father (Louis C.M.) Chambodut's sister, (Sister Marie Thérèse Chambodut, R.U.) whom Ste. Marie placed in the novitiate which she is making with all the simplicity of a child. She cannot write to the superior at this time, but she asks (Odin) to give her news of them. All are well except Sister Ste. Ursule, (R.U.) and Ste Marie. She asks him to ask the Superior if she would oppose the acceptance of Sister Ste. Chantal. Her conduct has been irreproachable for a year.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
11


(18)63 Aug(?) 15

Burns (?), Martin
Fort Hamilton, New York

to ( ) Woods
Fort Lafayette

Woods is asked to inform (James Alphonsus) McMaster that enclosed is a permit to see his wife and children. (No enclosure present).

I-1-m A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
2


(1863) Aug 15

Martin, Father J. A(mbroise)
Liverpool, (England)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

The check he received by (Odin's) unwillingness to give him a testimonial, and the mental suffering he has gone through, made him resolve to join a religious community. He asks (Odin) not to prevent him for he hopes it will be the means of his salvation.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 1p. 16mo.
1


1863 Aug 16

Bender, C.G.
Grand Rapids, (Michigan)

to Bishop P(eter) P(aul) Lefevere
Detroit, (Michigan)

On July 8 last year, his 13 year old boy was drowned in the Canal and on the following day was buried with the rites of the Church by Father (Ferdinand) Allgeier. The school children were not at the Mass and the coffin was put on the floor. Bender asked that in view of the unusual accident a funeral sermon be given but he was informed that that was abolished here. He wished then to have another Mass said for his son's soul but Allgeier told him that all the days were taken. He found it necessary to go to the Irish church where his request was readily granted. He waited until yesterday to repeat his request to Allgeier and was told that the Masses were spoken for for a month. Bender has his records from Buffalo, Toronto and Detroit testifying to his religious character. He asks Lefevere to grant his approval of his joining the above mentioned church and sending his children to the school.

III-2-j A.L.S. (German) pp.. 16mo.
3


1863 Aug 16

McCloskey, Father William
Tivoli, (Italy)

To Archbishop John Baptist Purcell
Cincinnati, Ohio

McCloskey acknowledges Purcell's letter of July 17th in which he gives Father (Daniel) O'Regan permission to remain. McCloskey, O'Regan, and three other students of the College are in Tivoli on their way back from the miraculous Madonna of Vicovaro about nine miles beyond Tivoli on the road to Subiaco. The picture is beautiful and is supposed to be a copy of one by Guido (Reni) (?). Many have been cured and about 15,000 people have visited it in one day. Richter was ordained subdeacon yesterday. He and four others are to make a pilgrimage to Vicovaro today and they will all dine together at the "Sybilla." McCloskey believes the succession to the See of Baltimore lies between Bishop (Martin J.) Spalding and Father (Thomas) Foley. Father (H.B.) Coskery and Bishop Elder are unlikely to get it. McCloskey is afraid the war will cause political interference. The Church and the New York riots will not help the matter. He says he has not been able to send Purcell's to Madame Bontonslinn. He sends his regards to Father Edward Purcell, and to Fathers Collins, Gilmore, and Fitzgerald, and Father Pabisch.

P.S. O'Regan took his degree on the 4th. McCloskey will tell Richter the news this afternoon. O'Regan has decided to accept Purcell's advantageous offer.

II-5-b A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
6


1863 Aug 17

DeNeve, Father J(ohn)
Louvain, (Belgium)

To Bishop (Francis P.) McFarland (of Hartford)
Providence, (Rhode Island)

DeNeve acknowledges McFarland's letter of July 23. He immediately sent word to Mulholland and Cooney on what terms they are received. From their letter he fears that they are not far advanced, but they will try. They will expect in due time the young student, Byrne. He hopes the Bishop will impress on him that he is to acquire not only knowledge but the piety of the ecclesiastical spirit, and that he should take the occasion to learn German and French. DeNeve has been in Gand and spoke of McFarland's arrangement to the old professors of Fathers (Florimond) De Bruycker and (A.) De Regge. All thought they would not work well together, and that these men would work better separately. A younger priest would be better with De Bruycker. Father De Regge does not make up his mind quickly. De Neve will ask the Bishop of Ghent and leave the decision to him. If he will not come he will send him a priest that will be satisfactory to McFarland and De Bruycker. Tomorrow he will go to the great Catholic meeting at Mechlin and will give a report on the American College (at Louvain). He will endeavor to obtain a considerable addition before two years.

I-1-b A.L.S. 3pp.
4


1863 Aug 17

(Kenrick), Peter Richard, Archbishop of
St. Louis, (Missouri)

To Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.)
N(ew) Orleans, (Louisiana)

Today in (Kenrick's) return from Baltimore, where he attended the months' mind of Archbishop (Francis Patrick Kenrick), he received Odin's letter. The sudden deaths of Odin's predecessor, of the saintly Bishop Neuman(n) of Philadelphia, and of his (Kenrick's) brother warn them all of the necessity of being always prepared. Father H(enry) B. Coskery is administrator of the vacant see and is well calculated to provide for the wants of the Church. Owing to the impossibility of communicating with the Bishops of Richmond, Charleston, and Savannah, some time may pass before a new Archbishop is appointed.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
4


(18)63 Aug 18

(Alemany), Joseph S., Archbishop of
San Francisco, (California)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.)
N(ew) Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Alemany) apologizes for having neglected to answer on the question of the fitness of Fathers (Charles J.H.) Carter and (William) O'Hara of Philadelphia for the see of Little rock. He has a confused idea that he occasionally heard them spoken of as very good clergymen, but he could not venture an opinion of is own. He recommends for Galveston or Little Rock, Bishop (Thaddeus) Amat, (C.M.) of Monterey. He is a good working Bishop, but he has met with considerable trouble. Several priests have left him, perhaps because of not having support. Many of the people will always be against him for some troubles with old missionaries.

P.S. It is a pity to lose the great light of Baltimore (Archbishop Francis Patrick Kenrick). He hopes he is much exalted, for he seemed a most humble man.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
7


1863 Aug 18

(Flanagan, O.P.), Sister Mary John, St. Mary's Convent
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

(The Dominican Sisters) are making preparations to receive a limited number of pupils as boarders and ask (Odin's) blessing and the privilege of placing the Academy under his patronage.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
2


1863 Aug 19

Burlando, C.M., Father F(rancis)
Emmitsburg, (Maryland)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

The enclosed letter of Sister M(ary) Clara, (S.C.) of Donaldson will explain the motive of Burlando writing. Her statements lead him to conclude that the position of the Sisters of Charity in that town is no longer tenable. It seems that they can have neither school nor asylum and the people that used to be charitable to the orphans are in need of assistance themselves. If obliged to leave, times may soon get better when they may return. Burlando likes the place, the Sisters have labored hard to make it what it lately was.

A.L.S. 2pp.

Enclosure:

--------
1863 Jul 15

Clara, (S.C.), Sister M(ary), St. Michael's
(Convent, Louisiana)

To Father (Francis Burlando, C.M.
Emmitsburg, Maryland)

For several days Sister could not bring herself to write, such is the chaos. She begged Father (M.) Rubi, C.M., who was on his way down to N(ew) Orleans after the battle of Donaldson, to write (Burlando) and tell him all he knew. Rubi must have told him how crowded their house was for several days and nights with men, women and children, black and white; they had been burning Donaldson while he was there. There is no more Donaldson. The few houses left are those on the church grounds, theirs and the church. On the evening of June 30 they were told to leave their house and it would be burned in an hour and a half. It was a Federal officer who told them. Two small carts took the trunks to their ordinary refuge, Mrs. Winchester. That night the Confederates erected batteries on the coast to shoot all the transports and gunboats, and Mrs. Winchester's house was shelled. They all left for the Brulés in the Bayou and wanted to take them, but she thought it would be better for them to go to the convent. So far their house was not burned, so the Sisters have returned. Sister Clara has been very with chills and fever. Mrs. Winchester's house is a complete ruin. Poor lady, so pious, so good to the poor! There was another battle near Donaldson on the Bayou about two miles from their house. One beautiful house belonging to Mr. Gannié was burned to the ground. Old Mrs. Buquoi was burned to the ground. Old Mrs. Buquoi was on Mr. Mire's plantation in a small school house lent her. One of the shells passed between her mattresses while she (was) in bed dying. She is about Santi Zozo's age. The latter went to the Bayou. Three weeks ago a Federal soldier killed three of their cattle. It will require years and years to rebuild. The (Religious of the Sacred Heart) are again their refuge with the same kindness and charity. Madame (A.) Shannon, (R.S.C.) desires to be remembered to (Burlando). If rumor and reports are true, they may see (Burlando) soon, for then he could come via St. Louis without fear of privateers. (Burlando) should come. God will not permit anything to happen to him, no more than to Father (Stephen V.) Ryan, (C.M.). She is glad he did not come with Ryan because they need him now more.

A.L.S. 4pp.
VI-2-g A.L.S. pp.. 4to.
14


(18)63 Aug 19

Decker, Father Michael Joseph
Brooklyn, N(ew) York

to Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

A Catholic servant girl, Mary (?) Cunningham, had a brother, John Cunningham, living in the South, in Texas. She is anxious to hear about her brother. She used to send her letters in care of a Father Shenadore (?); and she thinks this priest must be known to Odin. They would thankfully receive any news.

P.S. Perhaps she means to say Father (James) Giraudon instead of Shenadore.

Vi-2-g A.L.S. 3pp. 16mo.
5


1863 Aug 19

Foltier, Father E.J.
Vermillonville, (Louisiana)

to Archbishop John Mary Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Receipts from January (18)63 to June (18)63,including the sale of pews, amounted to $5949.50. The cathedraticum is $300 and the priest's share is $400. He sends Odin $2431.33. Thinking that the cotton might be seized or burnt, it seemed more equitable to sell it so as to send Odin that which belongs to the Church. He asks Odin to give Father (Stephen) Rousselon $72 for the Propagation of the Faith.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 8vo.
3


1863 Aug 20

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
(Morrisville, Virginia)

To (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Now that Col. Walker has returned Ned is plain Commissary of Musters once more. French will sign receipt for Henry (Brownson's) horse. He is glad Henry has undertaken to have Charley (Brownson) and George (Brownson's) graves marked. He has had his horses photographed. He lost all the Carte des Vistes he ever took from home. His last pocketbook-full he left at Gettysburg. He asks Sal to give his respects to Mr. Sumner and tell Mr. Wilson he remembers him every time they take out his monthly tax as per his Bill in Congress. He supposes she will get Alice Curtis' picture for him now. He wonders how long Sal is to be away in Massachusetts. He has done some visiting lately at the house of a young lady who came to him with her aunt seeking a guard. It is only three miles off on the road to Bealbon. She likes his pictures and said they were good likenesses. Frederick, Ned's servant, could not resist the desire to be taken horseback riding on "Tommy." Ned let him go and "Tommy" got taken beautifully. Ned hopes to be able to read a Marian Elwood. He claims the writing is odd, not because he is drunk, but because his gold pen is sent to Washington (D.C.) and has not yet been mended. He asks to be remembered to Mr. and Mrs. Curtis and Miss Curtis.

I-5-i A.L.S. 8pp. 12mo.
2


(18)63 Aug 20

(St.) Vincent, (R.U.), Sister
Opelousas, (Louisiana)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Sister asks permission to return to St. Martin's, Ohio from whence she came recently on a fo(u)ndation (of Ursulines) to Opelousas. She lacks love and esteem for her superiores (Mother St. Pierre Harrison, R.U.) which renders earth a hell for her. Secondly, she lacks success in the management of the children. She finds them extremely rude, accompanied by an absolute want of respect for religious.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
4


1863 Aug 20

Veyrat, Father C(yprien)
Paincourtville, (Louisiana)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Claude Favre, seeing that his health is not improving, decided on the doctor's advice to return to his parents. He left for New Orleans intending to leave for France at the first opportunity. He requires a life of diet; it is hardly possible to obtain that at Bouligny. The priests at Bouligny advised Veyrat the last time he was in the city, to take (Augustin Vulliet) Vuillet and propose him to the trustees as singer, organist, and later, instructor. But they are in such distress that they cannot guarantee a future for him. (Vulliet) left with Favre. Veyrat asks (Odin) to take care of 43 masses for the dead, Favre will give him the stipends.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
4


1863 Aug 21

Young, (O.P.), Father N(icholas) R.
Washington, (D.C.)

To Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell)
of (Cincinnati, Ohio)

He has just read Purcell's letter to Father Quinn concerning him. He bows to Purcell's sentence. He hopes things in his regard will soon wear a brighter aspect.

II-5-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


18663 Aug 22

Francais, Father (Nicholas)
Charenton, (Louisiana)

to Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Francais takes advantage of Mr. Darolles to beg Odin not to let him suffer any longer in St. Mary's Parish. Two weeks ago, G. L(aclerc) Fuselier, Jules Mobly, F. Etienne, and H. Hinkley(?) wished to make him leave. General (Richard Taylor) Thylor accorded him a pass for the Confederate lines. However it fell into the hands of Fuselier who refuses to give it to him. When Francais sees Odin he will reveal their ill-founded motives for making him leave. Odin's last letter made him hope he would send a replacement as soon as he obtained a pass. Odin has only to get in touch with Darolles who is to return to Vermillon with a schooner loaded with provisions. He could come aboard without a pass. If Francais had not made known the state of his health, Odin could later have believed that he wished to remain despite being deprived of faculties necessary for the good administration of this parish.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp.12mo.
8


(1863 Aug 23)

Bret, Father
Traize(?), by Yenne, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

During (Odin's) last trip to Savoy he manifested to Father (E.) Guillet, archpriest of Aix-les-Bains, his desire for subjects. For some time Bret has been busy training well-disposed young men for the foreign missions. They all belong to poor families and it costs a great deal. He has just bought a house and land at the side of his church. If (Odin) could procure some assistance for him, he would train a greater number of pupils and send them to him when they have examined their vocations thoroughly. Guillet adds a recommendation.

A.L.S. (French)

On the same paper:

--------
1863 Aug 23

Guillet, Father E., Grand Seminary of
Chambéry, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Bret), being at the ecclesiastical retreat with Guillet, asks him to write a few words for (Odin). (Bret) is an excellent priest. Guillet knew him at the minor seminary where he was (Bret's) professor. He consecrates as much time as the administration of parish leaves him to train young men for the foreign missions. He sees that they make all their grammar classes and then places them in one of the minor seminaries of the diocese. Guillet fears that the war in America has deprived (Odin) of the greatest part of his resources. Many times, in reading the newspapers, they think of (Odin) who visited them for a little while at Aix-les-Bains.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
2


1863 Aug 23

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
(Morrisville, Virginia)

To (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Ned asks Sal to tell Henry (Brownson) that Lieut. Derrickson has received the invoices for his saddle and bridle. Ned has sent (Lieut.) French blanks for receipts and has also sent Henry blanks for invoices for the horse. Ned has one pair of spurs belonging to Henry in his possession now everything else is gone. Henry's tent at Chancellorsville (Virginia) was abandoned. Szabod has been relieved from the mustering business and Ned doesn't know what has become of him. Wetmore was only a Lieutenant, not a Colonel, and has just resigned on a surgeon's certificate. Eckels meant one of his pictures for Sal. He wonders how long she plans to stay away from home and tells her that he doesn't expect to hear from her while she is away. It is hot. He asks her to let him know about Boston and wonders if she is going over to Chelsea (Massachusetts) again. He asks about Henry. General Caldwell will be back in a day or two; if he comes poor (Gen.) Hays will be out of a job. Hays says he will not refuse to go to a brigade in another Corps but will not take one in this Corps. Ned thinks he will go to see that young lady. She is good-natured, though not particularly handsome and is about 23 years old. He tells Sal to remember him to Mr. Curtis and to tell Mrs. Smith that he is coming over to see her.

I-5-i A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Aug 23

(Elder), William Henry, Bishop of
Natchez, (Mississippi)

to Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

By an oversight (Elder) has had for more than two years a seminarian studying for Natchez who is really a subject of New Orleans. It is P(atrick) P. O'Connor, brother to Father (N.I.) O'Connor, C.M. (Elder) had the idea that his parents had resided in Missouri and that he had the consent of his bishop to come South for his health. He is now ready for ordination and (Elder) finds that though he was born in Ireland, he lived in New Orleans from the age of two years until he went to college. At one time he had attacks of falling sickness but they ceased all at once. His superior, Father Ja(me)s McGill, C.M., gives him excellent testimonials. If (Elder) could ordain him. He would send him to assist the priest at Vicksburg, who has an immense charge in his own congregation and the numerous soldiers encamped around the town. (Elder) has lost four priests since April 1862. He has only fourteen left.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 1p. 4to.
6


1863 Aug 23

Murphy, Martin
Milford, (New York)

To J(ames) A(lphonsus) McMaster
(New York, New York)

He is glad to see that McMaster's writings are more daring and fearless and they make him resolve to place his principles above life itself. He is in good health, a perfect soldier for Old Abe. His brother Chip (White) came to work with him at Milford, so he asks that McMaster change their address to here. He cannot say whether their little club will continue through the year. He has McMaster's receipt now and will send it to A( ) Fitzgerald today, asking him to do all he can to renew it. It expires Sept.13, and McMaster's traveling agent should call on Fitzgerald when he is in Auburn. He knows McMaster suffered pecuniary leases by Lincoln's infernal edict. It is an onslaught on the Irishmen and Democrats to pay $300 for blood. It is useless to pay greenbacks to the government, who can make millions out of a wagon load of rags. He will neither go nor pay the $300 if possible. He would like to go into some seminary or college for a few years and obtain an education. Others have done this on the same or less capital that he is able to spend. He asks McMaster's advice and assistance in this matter. He could go to Canada and be safe, but will not have enough money after exchanging it for Canadian money. He knows McMaster will assist him and hopes to be able to repay him in some way before hedges.

P.S. He may direct his reply to Michael White, Milford, N(ew) Y(ork).

I-1-m A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
1


(1863 Aug 23)

Quinlan, John, Bishop of
Mobile, (Alabama)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, Louisiana

Father (Anselm Usannaz, S.J.?) Ozanna will hand this to Odin. The blockade cutting Quinlan off, he has sent (Usannaz) with two Visitation Sisters, to confer with Odin. On Quinlan's appointment the episcopal faculties were conveyed in a few lines, viz: "The faculties of your predecessor, Bishop (Michael) Portier, are continued in you, whether ordinary or extraordinary." He wonders whether Portier's faculties were continued to him for the unexpired term only, or for the usual period of ten years, as Portier's term expired January 1, 1863. In regard to the baptism of adults, he believes the time allowed for the use of the formula for infants has elapsed and he wonders if Odin has obtained an extension. He is ignorant of what may have transpired in Rome for the last three years affecting their province; he asks Odin to send this and any other instructions by (Usannaz).

VI-2-g A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
4


1863 Aug 23

William John H.
Sandusky, O(hio)

to J(ames) Alphonsus McMaster
(New York, New York)

William is writing McMaster with regard to a man named Perrin from Alabama whom he heard speak in N(ew) Y(ork) this last spring. William thinks this man can do them much good there in Ohio and that he can be had. He suggests that McMaster propose Perrin for the Central Community of Ohio. They intend to postpone the draft there in Ohio, taking the stand that the war is about over and that they shall want no more men. They hope this will save their crop of wool. Such a system would make capital for the people in New York but hurt the South. William has been writing speeches for a friend of his but for this particular occasion he feels inadequately informed on history. Consequently he asks McMaster to write his friend a short half-hour speech. William feels that McMaster can do it for him better than any other man. There are no democratic lawyers or speakers there on the reserve. They have few men of money or influence but what they have are willing to do anything for the cause. He hopes that this matter will be kept confidential and that McMaster will not think him unreasonable in his demands.

I-1-m A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
2


1863 Aug 24

Fitzgerald, Father Edward
Columbus, (Ohio)

To (Archbishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio)

He took the liberty of detaining Father (Henry) Fehlings as he was passing through on his way to the retreat as he had so many sick-calls and funerals to attend to. The Delaware congregations were so pleased with a sermon preached by Fehlings that they proposed that he become their pastor. Fitzgerald thinks he is just the man for the place. Fehlings assented in case Purcell is willing. In the course of a few years Fehlings can make Delaware a flourishing congregation. The leading men of the congregation, both English and German, requested Fitzgerald to lay the matter before Purcell. Father (John B.) Hemsteger has perhaps explained why Fitzgerald is not at the retreat. The labor of three congregations would be too much for Hemsteger.

II-5-b A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
3


1863 Aug 24

Fitzpatrick, John B., Bishop of Boston
Brussels, (Belgium)

To Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell
of Cincinnati, (Ohio)

He has requested Charles and George Bodiman to call on Purcell. They are now returning to Cincinnati their home. Both attended the college of St. Xavier. Fitzpatrick is a victim of paralysis but is now nearly recovered and expects to return in a few months.

II-5-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


1863 Aug 25

Ranson, J( ) M.

To (James Alphonsus McMaster)
(New York, New York)

If McMaster thinks the above would subserve the public interests, he may if he wishes, give it a place in his columns.

I-1-m A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


1863 Aug 26

Bellanger, S.M., Father (F.)
(Convent, Louisiana)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Nothing of importance has happened except the appearance and disappearance of the Confederates of whom Bellanger spoke in his last letter. The whole parish is in a state of panic caused by an exorbitant tax by the enrollment of all men above 20 years of age, without excepting foreigners. The rumor is that it is for the conscription. If so it will be a pleasant fact for (the Marists), as they took their names like the others. The parishioners begged him to have a procession for peace. It took place on the Feast of the Assumption. Even the Protestants mixed in the ranks. It appears that the reopening of the college is still favored by the interested parties. It would perhaps be good to know (Odin's) plans from (Odin) himself. He asks (Odin) to recommend what his conduct should be relative to existing marriages among the Negroes. He wonders what he should do when they have contracted two or three unions without particular stipulations.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
5


(1863 Aug 26)

Jouve, R.S.C., Madame Al (Amélie?)
Grand Coteau, Louisiana

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Jouve is thankful for the lines (Odin) addressed to her although they dashed her hopes of seeing him this year. In June, the letters from France sent to Madame (A.) Shannon, (R.S.C.) arrived. For two years they had been without news of their superiors in Europe and the same difficulty exists with the houses (of the Religious of the Sacred Heart) in America, even that of St. Michael. Since early May the greater part of their pupils have left, and if there were not a corps of the federal army passing through, they would believe themselves in the depths of Thebaid. She still does not know if they will be able to resume classes in October because of the difficulty of getting in supplies.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
4


1863 Aug 26

(Odin), J(ohn) M., Archbishop of New Orleans
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To (Archbishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio)

Mrs. Martin), one of the good Creole ladies of New Orleans has just been informed that her son Emile has been made a prisoner of war and is now confined in Camp Chase near Cincinnati. She begged Odin to address Purcell in behalf of her son who is only 18 years old and not much inured to hardships. She feels anxious that he should be reminded of his religious duties. Odin asks Purcell to recommend the boy to the special care of the priest who resides near Camp Chase. Archbishop (Peter Richard Kenrick) of St. Louis advised Odin to postpone the selection of names for the see of Little Rock until after the war. It has been impossible for Odin to correspond with the bishops of the province. Now that Natchez is occupied by Federal troops he will be able to write to Bishop Elder. He has no communication with the portion of the diocese which is beyond the banks of the Mississippi. Misery is increasing.

--------
1863 Sep 23

(Purcell, J(ohn) B(aptist)
To Father ( )

Father ( ) will oblige Purcell by trying to find the young man mentioned in Odin's letter and doing him a kindness.

II-5-b A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
5


1863 Aug 26

Stone, Brigadier General Ch(arle)s P., Headquarters, Department of the Gulf
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.)
N(ew) O(rleans, Louisiana)

Two ladies representing themselves as Sisters of Visitation from Mobile applied for transit to Mobile for themselves and a supply of clothing, food, and medicines. The General Commanding is quite ready to sign the permits, but should first be assured the ladies are as represented. He wonders if (Odin) can give any information.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Aug 28

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
(Morrisville, Virginia)

To (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Ned asks Sal to excuse him for not writing a longer letter. He wishes to be remembered to Fremont. If Fremont gets a command Ned will have a finger in the pie. If Henry (Brownson) keeps wide awake he can jump into the colonelcy of some Massachusetts regiment. Two men have just been shot there for desertion right in front of Ned's headquarters. He will telegraph Halleck at her desire not to have Meade move until he is ready. He asks Sal to remember him to McClellan; also to Ben Butler. Henry is in the market to be married according to Sal. Ned is disturbed because his mother has told him nothing about his sister. He asks to be remembered to the family of Miss Curtis all around and tells Sal to write soon. He has just been having a man fined for counterfitting his name but his sentence is unknown.

P.S. The clover leaf or shamrock for a Corps staff officer must be red, white and blue. He sends his best respects to the one who made him a yellow one. He has just been getting in his reports and finds there are some vacancies in the 12th New Jersey Volunteers which may be filled. He has not yet made his report to the Governor of New Jersey but shall soon. He shall not trouble himself about Master Dick (Kipling) but if he were on he would get his commission.

I-5-i A.L.S. pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Aug 28

Ferrus, Theod(ora)
Nantes, France

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

It was with joy and gratitude that Ferrus received (Odin's) letter. The learned with joy of the happy spiritual disposition of her uncle (Blineau). She always hoped God would accord his grace because of all the good he has done. He has been like their Father. She has promised a certain number of Masses after his death. According to a letter received by her aunt, his health does not appear to improve and he could be taken momentarily.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
2


1863 Aug 28

Thévénin, V.S.M., Sister M. Aloysia
Angers, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Sister writes from Angers where the Superiors of Le Mans have just established a house of (Visitation Sisters). Bishop (Charles John) Fillion of Le Mans loaned her to the Sisters who came there not two months ago, having as head, Mother Anne Marie Bergeron, (V.S.M.), who had just completed her term as superior at Le Mans and to whom Sister Aloysia is indebted for having been received in her distress. They are destined to have neither boarders, nor a school, nor ladies on retreat; they have only to serve God in solitude. Bergeron seems to possess all the confidence of Bishop (William Lawrence Louis) Angebault. Father de las Casas is their confessor and the Jesuits come for Mass until they have a chaplain. She knows nothing of affairs in her dear America and she has not received any information about her Sisters at Mobile. At Le Mans they said that Father Charles (Moreau, C.S.C.) Mourau had said nothing could go in or out there.

(P.S.) Since this letter could not leave on time and since she has learned that one can forward something to Mobile, she encloses a letter for Father (Francis de Salles) Gautrelet, (S.J.) which she asks (Odin) to ask (Father (Gabriel) Chalon to forward. She is afflicted by the death of Archbishop (Francis Patrick) Kenrick as much as the church of America and the Catholics of her adopted country. She will always love the country which witnessed her vows. Her state of uncertainty is not a little cross. She does not know why she is not holy; it seems that God gives her all that she needs to be so.

VI-2--g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
10


1863 Aug 29

Jacobina, (S.S.N.D.), Mother Mary
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Their kitchen range in the Asylum (of the School Sisters of Notre Dame) is worn out. They are obliged to cook large quantities; there is a large stove for sale, originally made to order for a large hospital. The price is $325. They seek permission to go to this store and examine the stove.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
2


1863 Aug 29

Jan, Father A(nge) M(arie Felix)
St. Martinville, (Louisiana)

To Father (Gilbert) Raymond
(Opelousas, Louisiana)

Jan is in a situation as embarrassing as it is difficult. A pastor of his district (Father Charles Brun?, who has always been known to drink very much, delivered himself completely to his passion. Jan has spoken to him and has written to him, but it has been completely useless. Last Sunday it was necessary for some soldiers to intervene; they seized him and made him return to the priest house. Jan wonders what he should do.

P.S. This deplorable scene is an exact repetition of one given by the same author on last November 9.

VI-2-g A.L.S. (French) 1p. 4to.
2


1863 Aug 30

Denny, (Reverend) Harmon C.
Bayswater, London (England) W.

To (Orestes A.) Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Father Denny says that a person need no introduction to a person whose works he has read and copied, and further, he and Brownson have mutual friends in Pittsburgh, especially Bishop (Michael) O'Connor and Father (James) Keogh. He mentions a parish priest who read Brownson steadily and expressed his indebtedness to him. He has sent to Richardson and Company "Dr. Manning and his Temporal Power" and a collection of his sermons, the latter of which Brownson will like better. The publishers promised to send some to Sadlier and Company and maybe Brownson will notice same. In the parcel is enclosed also, a prospectus about the works of St. John of the Christ. Father would like to know if Sadlier would take a certain number of copies for distribution among the clergy. It is presumed that Brownson has seen the new "Dublin," the first number under the new editor, Dr. Ward, an enemy of Brownson's. Dr. Manning wrote "Work and Want of the Catholic Church in England" and Fr. Vaughan "Popular Question in Spain." Father begs pardon for the copy being marked up because it is the only one he has and could not afford another.

I-4-b A.L.S. 4pp. 1mo.
1


1863 Aug 31

Anstaett, Father J(oseph)
Galveston, (Texas)

to Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Anstaett avails himself of the opportunity Mrs. Farabee offers to send a few lines. She lost her husband lately; he had been for many years a minister of the Methodist Church. They heard with pleasure of Odin's return in March. Bishop (Claude Mary Dubuis, C.M.) is everywhere received with great satisfaction. In his letter of August 3 Dubuis writes that he is about to make a long pastoral visit embracing almost all the German missions. At this moment he is at Laredo; it will be November before they have his visit. Father (Sebastian) Augagneur is at Galveston in the last stages of consumption. Father (Louis C.M.) Chambodut is most of the times very well, like Anstaett himself. They have seen some troublous times. The (Christian) Brothers' school was as well kept up as circumstances would permit. The (Ursulines) held school all the time, except during vacations and in January last when they had to nurse the sick and wounded of both contending parties. If Union troops should occupy (Galveston) again, Mother Ste. Séraphine (R.U.) might send some provisions, for Mother St. Pierre, R.U.), "has neither silver nor gold." At Christmas time they were without flour, cornmeal and meat. Mr. Denois came back from New Orleans with some flour, else they would have starved. Besides the Sisters and the orphans, there are about 10 boarders from Galveston and Houston. The day scholars are increasing but there are a great many poor among them. Anstaett has just enough to get along and is grateful for that. St Pierre sends her respects; she is doing very well indeed. Louisa and Clam wish to be remembered. Old (Nathan) Smith is alive yet, though some time ago he was so low that they had given him up. (David) Gilbert died lately of Bayou fever. Anstaett's youngest nephew Emile recovered from his illness entirely; both he and Lawrence are in Hidalgo, doing pretty well. Jean Baptiste came to Galveston sick lately. Mr. Spann invited him also to go up to his place and spend some time. Emile and L(awrence) are working and stock raising. Father (Peter F.) Parisot, (O.M.I.), is at Brownsville. (James P.) Nash's little Johny is very ill. Old Mrs. Dirks still comes to church every morning, and loves to speak gratefully of Odin. Anstaett just return(ed) from a trip to Houston for the benefit of the Germans. The (Franciscan) Fathers are doing very well.

(P.S.) He asks to be remembered to Father (John) Hayden, C.M. and the two superiors of the Ursuline Convent.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
18


1863 Aug 31

Fitzgerald, Father Edward
Columbus, (Ohio)

To Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio)

Purcell promised to send two young lads from Columbus into the seminary on Fitzgerald's recommendation. One of them is now ready to go as soon as he hears where Purcell wishes to send him. The parents of the other wish him to wait another year. He is only twelve but very advanced in his studies. Fitzgerald wishes to substitute another lad who is one of the best in the congregation but not very brilliant.

II-5-b A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
1


1863 Aug 31

House, Geo(rge) H.
Lansing, (Michigan)

to Bishop P(eter) P(aul) Lefevere
(Detroit, Michigan)

House holds a tax title upon St. Ann's Church for 1855. He had called while in Detroit a few days ago at Lefevere's residence to offer to sell the same, but Lefevere was out of the city. House now writes to make the same offer if the Church is desirous of purchasing the same. The price is $1,000.

III-2-j A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
2


1863 Aug 31

Smith, (S.C.), Sister Regina, Charity Hospital
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Since receiving (Odin's) note of the 29th, Smith has made inquiries and find they have no Sister in (New Orleans) by the name of J. Doyle. A Julia (M.) Doyle was placed in her care in 1848 or 1851. Her uncle called for her shortly after her arrival - a John Doyle residing in Grand Coteau - he placed her at the convent of the Ladies of the Sacred Heart and she there took the veil. Her uncle has since died. The president of (St. Charles) College at Grand Coteau, (Father Felix Benausse, S.J.) is now in New Orleans and it may be that he can give some information.

VI-2-g A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
5