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Calendar: 1864

1864 (Feb.)

Alleau, Father Th.
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Several pious parishioners have called him to the church for confessions, and have said that the sacristan refused to call him, spoke insultingly, and said Alleau did not hear confessions. The sacristan was not able to explain himself. Several priests have likewise complained about the man. Without doubt he comes from a home radically lacking in education and good manners. In view of the scandal given to the parishioners and the insult to the priesthood, Alleau asks that (Odin) put an end to this vexation.

VI-2-h A.L.S. (French) 1p. 8vo.
1


(1864) (Feb or Mar)

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
(Strasburg, Virginia)

To (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Ned encloses a message which he wishes her to read and if she thinks fit to seal it and send it enclosed in another envelope to Mrs. Fremont. He writes it mainly on Henry (Brownson's) account but also on his own. He has written Henry telling him General Fremont is reported about to have a new command and advised him to get a Lieutenant Colonelcy with Fremont. If General Fremont gets a command he will probably ask for Ned but the latter would rather have Henry go instead. But if Henry doesn't go, Ned will. Ned can get to be his Adjutant General. Part of Sal's letter about Meade, Kilpatrick and Sedgwick appears in the Washington Chronicle. Pelton was quite tickled over Sal's letter, especially at the ambulance part. Ned sends his love to everybody.

I-5-i A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
2


(1864) (Feb)

Buffard, Father (Stephen)
(Liberty, Texas)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Mother) St. Ambroise, (R.U.) has just left for France to bring back subjects for her house of which Buffard was appointed Superior. She will go to Rome to request the protection of the Pope against the Bishops and the priests of America, and especially for the Lyonnais priests. There remains only Sister St. Bernard, but she will not be able to stay there alone. Buffard hopes that Sister Ambroise will be assigned to the novitiate at Auch for the end of her life. No one is able to see the end of the war. The country suffers; everything is expensive. Nevertheless, he and Father (Peter) Berthet do not suffer. Berthet has the school and Buffard goes around the country. He has seen several persons from Louisiana, among others Mrs. Theriot and Mr. Darspy of the last parish of Father (Albino Desgaultière) Degoltiere. Any mail is to be sent to Father (John Mary) Gayé of Matamoros, who will forward it from Brownsville. Odin is to keep the money for April (letter torn here).

I-2-h A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 8vo.
8


1864 Feb 1

Durst, Father A(ugust)
Detroit, (Michigan)

To Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere)
(Detroit, Michigan)

Durst forgot in his request for a dispensation for Disparitas Cultus to mention that John Dreher, a Lutheran, is baptized. Durst hopes nothing will prevent the granting of the dispensation.

III-2-k A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
2


1864 Feb 2

Friedland, Father Joh(n)
(Detroit, Michigan)

To Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere)
(Detroit, Michigan)

After confessions, Friedland asked for Father (August) Durst and was told he had gone out; after the Masses the next day Friedland learned that Durst had left last night for Chicago. Therefore, Friedland sends back that letter found in Durst's room.

III-2-k A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
2


1864 (Feb 2)

Purcell, John Baptist, Archbishop of
Cincinnati, Ohio

to the Bishops of the Province of
Cincinnati

Since the Provincial councils held in the United States since 1829 have been so fruitful for religion and the propagation of the faith and acting according to the wishes of Pope Pius IX and the decrees of the Council of Trent, Purcell announces that the fourth provincial council will open in Cincinnati on the 4th Sunday after Easter. He warns those who should attend, bishops, religious, superiors, superiors of seminaries with their theologians to prepare for the council. He urges that all join their prayers for the success of the council, the purpose of which he defines in the words of the Pope to the Archbishop of Cologne. Among other things they should consider anything that depends on them for bringing an end to the civil war. All these things he places at the foot of their patron the Immaculate Virgin.

II-5-b D (sealed) 2 copies Latin 2pp. 8vo.
0


1864 Feb 2

Quérat, Father (Joseph)
Refugio, (Texas)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He offers (Odin) his prayers and respect. He would describe all the trials and difficulties caused by the war, but he knows they are even more severe in Louisiana. There is not one left to cultivate the land; the drought is so serious that everything will be ruined in a few weeks; there is no one to gather feed and the animals die by the thousands. Bishop (Claude Mary) Dubuis visited him in October. He accompanied the Bishop to Victoria for the consecration of a church which is the jewel of Texas. Despite wartime conditions there was an enormous gathering. Father (Sebastian) Augagneur died in September. Father (Antoine) Borias has gone to Brownsville to join the Oblates. Father (John) Gonnard is at Corpus-Christi since Borias left. The work is hard, and his health is weak. Joseph Fagan died in Arkansas. Captain James W. Byrne of Lamar has also died.

P.S. Mrs. Gregory of Lamar, sister of Byrne, asks that Odin give the attached letter to her brother, Charles Byrn. Quérat has just learned that Father Borias died on the way to Brownsville. His horse froze to death, and Borias was found unconscious. A Mexican took him to Brownsville.

VI-2-h A.L.S. (French) 3pp.
10


1864 Feb 3

De la Croix, Father (Cyril)
Iberville, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

A member of his parish who was married 12 years ago and abandoned 8 years ago received a letter saying that her husband is dead. She wishes to remarry, but there are doubts as to the validity of the letter. De la Croix asks (Odin) if he has seen or heard of the life or death of Mr. Talbot when he was at Galveston. De la Croix requests advice.

VI-2-h A.L.S. (French) 1p. 4to.
2


1864 Feb 4

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
Strasburg, Virginia

to (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

He received Sal's letter from Bridgeport yesterday and he requests her to write to Captain Szabod. He reminds her to call on Mrs. Fremont again. He hopes she will tell him of something at Miss McCarthy's to take a chance in and he congratulates Sal upon her sewing machine as he expects her to run him off some ties, etc. He speaks of a Miss Sallie de Vore. Only her dad and mother live at Catonsville (Maryland) now, she is in the city. She wrote Ned a tiptop letter and he encloses it for Sal's benefit. He makes her promise not to show any knowledge of this letter. He wants Sal to tell Howell or drop him a note at Ned's request telling him the Devere's wish to be remembered. Ned encloses $50 note with coupons. He needs another $50 right off. He wants the other three 50's changed like this and says she may have the interest if she will only oblige him. His mess bill last month amounted to $60. Captain Searles is going away with his Regiment. This takes away the most pleasant and congenial companion Ned has ever known. Ned wrote his Father urging him to change publishers. He hopes it did not reach him when he was particularly ill and tells Sal she had better read if she can obtain it. He asks Sal to try to get Father (Orestes A. Brownson, Sr.) and General Hancock together. Hancock is now in Pittsburgh but is likely to go to New York shortly. Hancock is Grant's rival according to Ned. Ned has received Henry's invoices and found the old one but inquires to what news there is of Henry (Brownson). If he takes a leave he wishes she could be in Baltimore at the same time and asks her if she could manage it. He sends his love to his mother and dad and inquires as to Bill (Brownson's) address.

I-5-i A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
2


1864 Feb 4

(McCloskey), John, Bishop of
Albany, (New York)

To Bishop (Francis P.) McFarland (of Hartford
Providence, Rhode Island)

McCloskey sends by tomorrow's express the statement of Father (John) Corry's account with the estate of Father Ja(me)s O'Reilly. The vouchers accompany, at least what he could find. He thinks McFarland will understand them better than himself. He does not know how the case stands with reference to the claim in the state of Maine and Mr. Hayes and the lawyer are trying to find out. Both the lawyers there and Hayes may present the bill for services. There is elsewhere a receipt of Reverend Mr. Bray and a certified claim of Bernard Lamb. Father J. Brady wrote to Father Conroy saying that Corry had accepted the claim but had not paid it. He does not find a receipt from Mr. Berge but besides being entered in Corry's account as paid it is also credited on the Day Cash Book. He did not trust the express with the mortgage itself, but it will be brought. When the account is closed McCloskey will cancel McFarland's name on the note and send it to him. He supposes the usual commission for settling the estate will be allowed. The balance held in the bank may be for that. He asks if Corry had any property in Providence. He supposes that the deeds found in the papers are for lands that have been disposed of, some of it to Bishop (Bernard) O'Reilly or to McFarland, but he sends the deeds if McFarland wishes to investigate. He would prefer to go and see McFarland but Lent begins next week and he does not want to be absent from home.

I-1-b A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
3


1864 Fab 6

(Elder), William Henry, Bishop of
Natchez, (Mississippi)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Odin's) letter of January 4 was received; (Elder) has heard that (Odin) is still suffering. He asks if there is not some way of going to (New Orleans) without taking an oath. His objection to the oath is not from hostility, but merely out of desire to be acceptable to his spiritual charges. He and his priests have aided the U.S. Army; he has 2 priests solely to attend to the soldiers and the Negroes who have congregated at Natchez because of the Army. He has never preached a war sermon, though he blessed a flag once. Father (Patrick) O'Connor was ordered to report to the conscript camp at Enterprise because the law exempted only those "licensed to preach" before 1862. O'Connor cannot go out again without danger of being seized for a deserter. He asks if (Odin) has use for O'Connor in New Orleans. He asks (Odin's) advice on a House of Redemptorists to be established at Vicksburg. It would relieve him of many cares, but he feels the priests would be dissatisfied if he gave the richest congregation to religious. It is not improbable that Vicksburg will be the proper place for the Episcopal See. He could offer the Redemptorists Jackson, but doubts that they would accept it.

(P.S.) (Odin) is to tell Father (A.) Duval and Father (J.B.) Heran that he cannot use their services.

VI-2-h A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
5


1864 Feb 6

Larnaudie, S.J., Father F(rederick)
Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

The renovation of the church has started. The funds at hand should suffice to place the church under roof. He has assembled material for the altar and sacristy, but he must stop if the funds do not arrive. He asks for a dispensation for a parishioner, a pious man whose five children are being cared for by his dead wife's sister. Due to economic reasons he would like to marry her.

VI-2-h A.L.S. (French and Latin) 3pp. 12mo.
2


1864 Feb 6

McCloskey, (Father) William
Rome (Papal States)

To Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell
Cincinnati, Ohio

McCloskey hopes that O'Regan has reached Cincinnati and desires to hear from him when he reaches New York as he is anxious about his health. Mr. De Bolle is now a student at the college, and McCloskey has made him subject to the same rules. Since the death of Archbishop (John Hughes of New York), there has been much talk about his successor and Bishop (John McCloskey) of Albany and Bishop (James R. Bayley) of Newark are mentioned as candidates. As far as he knows, Baltimore will remain the same. Rumors single out (Bishop Martin J.) Spalding. He imagines Nashville will have to take its place with the rest of the appointments. He reminds Purcell of his intention two years ago to get rid of the honor of the Mitre. It is the last day of the Carnival. The liberals have issued their condemnation of such unholy proceedings and in that respect are in accord with the pope who is now at the 40 hours devotion. The new Minister, Mr. (Rufus) King, seems to be a very worthy man. The address by some 200 Catholic laymen was very good and they presented some money to Peter's Pence. He has not seen Madame Bontonslinn since Christmas. Richter is well and is studying hard. He tells Purcell the Don Bernard is so busy that they should send him to New York as Archbishop. He asks Purcell to learn what his brother has to say about the possibilities of a financial smash-up after the war. He is expecting some new comers. He sends his regards to Purcell's brother, Father (Edward) Collins, Dr. (Francis) Pabisch and Father (Daniel) O'Regan.

II-5-b A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
5


1864 Feb 7

Egglemers, Father A( )
Covington, K(untuck)y

to Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere)
(Detroit, Michigan)

Egglemers was educated in the seminary of Haaren in Holland where he was born and raised. Five years ago at Bishop (George Aloysius) Carrell's request he came to Covington with a priest whom Lefevere sent to Egglemer's seminary to "collect" priests. For 8 months Bishop Carrell taught him English, when he took charge of the congregation and college, taught theology and scripture to 3 seminarians, to study divinity and to teach the boys. After 3 years Egglemers was moved to Lexington. Father Benkers (Bekkers), secretary to Bishop (Martin John Spalding) of Louisville, applied to Carrell to be received and Carrell placed him in Lexington. Egglemers was moved to the Cathedral. Egglemers is not satisfied and offers himself to Lefevere as he understands there is a great shortage of priests in the Detroit diocese. As he has no debts, Carrell will not object. Egglemers is so disposed at present that he would sooner go back to Europe than to remain here.

III-2-k A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
5


1864 Feb 8

Baroux, Father L(ouis)
Silver Creek, (Michigan)

to Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere)
(Detroit, Michigan)

Lefevere's letter of the 2nd affords Baroux an opportunity of explaining the result of his voyage to Europe and the causes which prevented him from collecting money. Baroux intended to go to Detroit but sick calls prevented. Because Lefevere's charges against him are so serious he will give full satisfaction. Lefevere believes Baroux received large sums of money and other articles besides the 5,000 francs on Lefevere's account. There is a great mistake as he had little left after paying his voyage expenses. Because of the strict request from the Council of the Propagation of the Faith, they would not give him permission to preach in favor of his mission; so he nearly failed in France and Belgium. Baroux visited the members of the Paris Council to complain but in vain. What shall he say to his Indians about the Catholic charity of Europe? Baroux's letter to the President, (Berard) des Glajeux, brought a letter the next day with 5,000 francs for his missions. Baroux is sorry that this sum was not given independently of Lefevere's share and will write Des Glajeux about it. On Baroux's return home it was too late to begin construction of the church at Rush Lake (Michigan)' the 5,000 francs were given to interest for ten months. Baroux did not take up a collection on Pentecost Sunday because no announcement was made at Niles. For eight years he has lived in a hut hardly good enough for a brute, has been exposed to all kinds of privations without any help from outside. Father (Edward) Sorin, (C.S.C.), sent him to the extremities of the world (Pakistan, Asia). The times are good, and his people have subscribed over $400 to build a priests' house; he has only23 Irish families, 9 Indian and 2 Canadian families. Baroux has spent 17 years of hard trials and suffering.

III-2-k A.L.S. 8pp. 12mo.
6


1864 Feb 8

Follot, Father
Besancon, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Follot's brother, Father Francis Follot, was stationed at Plaquemine a few years back. For three years his friends and relatives have written to him but there is no reply. This long silence has led his family to believe that he was one of the victims of the Civil War. Follot asks (Odin) to send some news or consolation to the family.

VI-2-h A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
2


1864 Feb 9

McCaffrey, Father John, Mount St. Mary's
(Emmitsburg, Maryland)

To Bishop (Francis P.) McFarland (of Hartford)
(Providence, Rhode Island)

Acknowledging McFarland's letter of the 4th, he says that much as he would like to oblige him and the boy's reverend uncle he cannot admit the young man to the seminary. They could not admit that they would take or keep one dismissed for such a violation. He returns the letter of Father Dubreul. McCabe was allowed to visit his family on the news of his mother's death. McCaffrey is looking for his return as he is their most promising student. Mr. Rogers is also one of their most promising students. On McCabe's return he will consult his colleagues and if they approve promote them to deaconship. They are and have been very useful as teachers. Many causes have lessened the number of seminarians. The College has 120 pupils and is increasing. He could accept two or three seminarians who could teach while studying to cut their expenses. He will accept anyone that McFarland recommends.

I-1-b A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
1


1864 Feb 10

Durst, Father Aug(ust)
Iowa City, Iowa

to Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere)
(Detroit, Michigan)

Durst asks for approval of his stay in Iowa City because of his health. The Detroit climate is too harsh. He has sacrificed all that is dear to a priest's heart, Father, country, parish. He can present four medical certificates to prove the necessity of a change of air. His address is - Care of Father William Emonds.

III-2-k A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
3


1864 Feb 11

McFarland, F(rancis) P., Bishop of Hartford
Prov(idence, Rhode Island)

To Bishop (John) McCloskey of
Albany, (New York)

McFarland has received the package by express from McCloskey and another by mail from Mr. Hayes. One plot was sold to Bishop (Bernard) O'Reilly in 1851. The other two plots he sold to J. Baggot and Michael Early and McFarland has bought them back for seven times the amount for which Corry sold them. Father (John) Corry had no property in Providence since he sold the lot to Bishop O'Reilly. McCloskey went to Probate Court Tuesday but the Judge postponed the matter until today. The papers were not satisfactory. The voucher from Hennessy was not signed. There was no deduction of Corry's expenses in coming to Providence. The receipt to Father John Brady has a different amount than the account. The administrator, when appointed by the judge, will decide on the voucher for Birge's $104. The judge made one bequest to John O'Reilly but insists that an administrator be appointed before the final settlement. The administrator should be sought by some creditors and McFarland sends a blank for that purpose to McCloskey. McCloskey should name the man he wants appointed in the form and a certificate from the Surrogate under seal saying that McCloskey had been appointed administrator of the estate of Father Corry. When the estate of O'Reilly is settled there will be little difficulty getting the other matter settled. McFarland does not want to have anything to do with the estate of O'Reilly, unless McCloskey can find no one else. The court will allow $5 to Hayes but no claim to Lamb unless it can be shown that Corry promised it. McFarland will keep the papers.

I-1-b A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
3


1864 Feb 13

Stehle, Father E(nglebert)
Cincinnati, (Ohio)

To (Archbishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio)

Not finding Purcell at home yesterday, he writes for Purcell to put an end to the relationship between himself and Father (John W.) Brummer. Stehle suffered for 14 months with Brummer's orders in respect to the cooking. Every day Brummer ate two or three pounds of meat. Stehle cannot live with such a gourmand.

II-5-b A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 16to.
2


1864 Feb 14

(Brownson), Ned (Edward Patrick)
Strasburg, Virginia

to (Sarah Nicolina Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

He received her letter. He was amazed at the serious style of her letter as regards Sally de Vere. Ned is not interested in Sally but he would like to know something about her sisters particularly one who is about his age but whom he has never seen. He should not be surprised if she and her younger sister, Annie, were both at Catonsville (Maryland) although he thinks they have a house of their own in Baltimore. He wonders if Sal has any particular friends in Baltimore that she should like to have him call on when he goes there. He is pleased to hear that she did not worry about him. He was vexed at not getting into the principal fight that he could not endure to write and say he was unhurt. He asks Sal who and what is the Elizabeth Argus and if she will please send him a copy. The New York Herald never could have done such a smashing business as it did in Bridgeport (Connecticut). Sal must have had a magnificent time. He doesn't believe she gave his messages to Father Synot. He tells Sal to be sure to give his message to Howell without exaggeration and he wants to know in detail what he does about it. The Ball takes place on the 22 of February. He hopes Henry (Brownson) will come down and if she will come too she shall be well provided for. Ned is willing to bet 10 to 1 that the unsophisticated Richard Kipling will time his visit just then. He wishes Sal will write his (Kipling's) sister. He tells Sal to telegraph him in full by Friday if she or anyone else is to come. Sunday night would be the best time to start and Ned will get them passes by then if they decide to come. In order to kill as many birds as possible at one time, Henry wishes Sal to give verbal invitations (more or less affecting) to everyone of the Elizabeth young ladies she meets being particularly sweet to Miss Middlebrook and Miss Steiger. Ned doesn't think there is any danger of any of them coming. He has been vaccinated this morning and another man, Walker, nearly fainted upon being treated. Father Ovellet is coming back there. Ned thinks that perhaps the lecture he gave Father Hudson, S.J. when he was at home did something towards it. He wishes his mother would buy him a pair of summer cotton stockings and send them on by mail. He sends his love to all.

I-5-i A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
1


1864 Feb 14

Dubreul, S.S., Father J(osep)h Paul
Balt(imore, Maryland)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

H has received (Odin's) letter of January 30 along with $100 which he has disposed of according to (Odin's) wishes for (Joseph) Gallen. Gallen has asked several times whether he ought not be clothed, etc. at (Odin's) expense. Dubreul thought that was (Odin's) intention and since then Gallen has received a letter from his sister in New Orleans which confirmed this, in effect. All are well despite the war and the financial embarrassment which follows it. They still do not have an Archbishop, and it does not seem that one is coming soon. He asks (Odin) to pass on an enclosed note to Father (Gilbert) Raymond.

VI-2-h A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 32mo.
3


1864 Feb 14

Maréchaux, Father A(ugustine)
Assumption, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Father (Cyprian) Veyrat has asked him to straighten out his accounts with (Odin) regarding the jus cathedraticum. Since his arrival at Paincourt on June 10, 1863 to January 1, 1864, Veyrat's salary and fees have amounted to almost $800. Consequently Maréchaux sends $40. But Father (J.M.) Bertail has had his $5 per $100 paid by his trustees and he pays only on his fees. If Maréchaux understands (Odin's) letter, the pastors, with the trustees, are to pay 5% of their entire receipts, except the Masses. The pastor of Thibodaux thinks the same. If Maréchaux is in error he will talk to (Odin) when he goes to the city on Quasimodo Monday and confer with the trustees at Paincourt.

VI-2-h A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
4


1864 Feb 15

Schreiner, Father Lawrence
Grand Rapids, (Michigan)

to Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefevere
(Detroit, Michigan)

In spite of Lefevere's order, Schreiner feels so outraged that, upon the people's wish, he has to reply to Lefevere against his defenders. Following Lefevere's order Father (Ferdinand) Allgayer had to move to his new missions immediately after Ash Wednesday. He left for Wisconsin for a few days, leaving the house keys and his furniture still in the priest's house with the housekeeper who would not give Schreiner the keys. The committee threatens to go to court to keep Schreiner out. Allgayer deserves to be put in the state prison. If Lefevere has no objection, Schreiner will remove the members of the committee from office.

III-2-k A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
3


1864 Feb 16

Timon, Bishop John
Buffalo, (New York)

To Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefev(e)re
Detroit, (Michigan)

Timon sends Lefevere faculties of Vic(ar) Gen(eral) for his diocese, and requests Lefevere to grant the faculties if he thinks proper. Timon regrets some remarks in the pastoral of the venerable Metropolitan (John Baptist Purcell). He fears all allusions to politics in these dangerous times. The bishop of Louisville (Martin John Spalding) tells Timon that the government has some objections to Spalding's nomination for the see of Baltimore. He can scarcely credit it. Timon asks news of Louvain.

III-2-k A.L.S. 2pp. 16mo.
3


1864 Feb 17

Lefevere, Peter Paul, Bishop of Zela
Detroit, (Michigan)

To Archbishop J(ohn) B(aptist) Purcell
of Cincinnati, (Ohio)

He received the list of questions to be proposed at the council. The last clause of the circular has caused some uneasiness in his mind lest some question in reference to politics may be brought up. Considering the scandals brought by the unfortunate meddling of some clergymen in politics, Lefevere protests against mooting any question of this kind. He proposes that they forbid clergymen to take part in the political affairs of the country. He inquires about certain faculties.

II-5-b A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
1


1864 Feb 17

Ste. Marie, (R.U.), Sister
Beaujeu, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Odin) left many happy memories the previous year when he took time to edify and to bless the Sisters. His interesting stories, his words of edification and encouragement have deeply influenced them. They envy the good fortune of their New Orleans sisters who receive his wise instruction, and who are the object of his parental regard. They assure him of their continual devotion and prayers for his health, for the safety of his episcopal city, and for his continual preservation in the work of his diocese.

VI-2-h A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
1


1864 Feb 18

(Elder) William Henry, Bishop of Natchez
Natchez, Mississippi

to Archbishop John B(aptist) Purcell
Cincinnati, (Ohio)

Elder received Purcell's letter of Jan. 25th. Because of Purcell's mentioning Bennett in his letter, Elder was wondering if he should bring him into the diocese but he now has learned that the Conscript law in the Confederacy exempts only those clergymen "licensed to preach" by 1862 and as Bennett would be liable for conscription anywhere except at Natchez or Vicksburg Elder wants him to stay and be ordained by Purcell until he can find a place for him at either of the above cities. Elder's faculty to ordain for the title of the missions has expired and he applied for its renewal on Jan. 19. His brother, John (Elder) has been treated shamefully even though he took the oath of allegiance. He tried to obtain redress by applying to the highest authorities but they have violated the public faith and that does not say much of a government claiming to be the best the world has ever seen. Because Elder has looked upon Purcell as a Father since he arrived at the Mountain in 1831 he does not like to speak to him about political matters but Purcell believes he is the victim of unfavorable opinions caused by misrepresentations of the two journals and Elder has not seen more than three of them since1861 until lately and was shocked at seeing the Bishops and priests urge prosecution of the war, and Purcell's Pastoral. Elder's opinion is that Purcell dislikes slavery and would like it discontinued but by having printed his approval of Abolition which means in the present day sense a continuance of the war until the South is subjugated, he has caused a grief to the Southerners. Elder has no great confidence in human government and would not urge any one to volunteer risking his life for it. The best government is one such as existed in Catholic times when condemnation by the public and the Pope insured the world against unscrupulous rulers. Elder believes that the Federal Government has stopped the Pope's letter to Archbishops (John Hughes) of New York and (John M. Odin) of New Orleans and feels that such a government will not afford for civil or religious liberty. He fears a sweeping conscription by the Confederacy which will include priests, and hopes Bishop (John McGill) of Richmond (Virginia) will come to an understanding with the authorities. He has taken no part, but his sympathies are with his own flock. He asks for pardon for the long letter describing his position and regardless of the difference in views he continues to esteem Purcell.

II-5-b A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
5


1864 Feb 18

Mauclere, S.M., Father F.X.
Dayton, (Ohio)

To (Archbishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio)

As soon as he received Purcell's letter, he went to see Father (Thomas) Blake of Xenia and to his surprise Blake refused to attend with him once a month the poor German families of Xenia. Blake says there are only four German families and that twice a year is sufficient for them. Mr. Klein told Mauclere that there are at least 38 Catholic families. Blake's opinion is not worthy of a priest; even four families are worth attending to more than twice a year. For that which concerns Boyl, his conduct leaves much to be desired; he has yet to write a letter of thanks to Purcell for his kindness.

II-5-b A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
2


1864 Feb 19

O'Connor, S.J., Father (Bishop) M(ichael)

To Father I(saac) T. Hecker, (C.S.P.)
(New York, New York)

This letter introduces Richard H(enry) Clarke, a brother of a Jesuit who is removing to New York to practice his profession. He has hitherto lived and practiced in Washington. He will be an acquisition to the Catholic body of New York. (In the Clarke Papers).

I-2-n A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
2


1864 Feb 19

Purcell, Archbishop J(ohn) B(aptist)
Cincinnati, (Ohio)

To Bishop P(eter) P(aul) Lefevere
(Detroit, Michigan)

Lefevre's letter of the 19th inst. is the cause of consternation to Bishop (Sylvester Horton) Rosecrans and Purcell. They know of no paragraph or word that could cause fear or uneasiness to Lefevere by any reference to politics, unless it was the closing suggestion in the Letter of Convocation concerning prayer and exhortation for peace which the Holy Father strongly recommends. It was Rosecrans who sent the Letter at his request. The mild and saintly Archbishop of New Orleans (John Mary Odin, C.M.), in his pastoral speaks more strongly when alluding to the war. Purcell assures Lefevere that no question of politics shall disturb the serenity and union of their counsels and affections. Purcell fears it will be difficult, if not inexpedient to obtain a promise from any clergyman to express no political leaning or opinions. A priest at a social function took a glass of wine saying, "Here's to the Union - to put it down." Purcell has never heard of any other "enormous evil or grievous scandal" caused by priests mixing in politics. If to be opposed to slavery is so regarded read the letter of Bishop Dupanloup in this week's Catholic Telegraph or Montalembert's discourse at Malines before Cardinals, etc., and Lefevere will see on whom such a censure would fall! Bishop (Frederic) Baraga cannot escape from the ice for the date of the Council. How about June 5th? Bishop (George A.) Carrell favors it. Letters from Niles (Michigan) complain of neglect.

III-2-k A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
6


1864 Feb 21

Miller, R( ) B.
( , )

To James A(lphonsus) McMaster
(New York, New York)

The Ratification of the Constitution by the State of New York in 1788 indicates the path of duty and honor, as well as of expediency to be pursued by the approaching convention at Albany. He asks McMaster to publish this ratification in his next issue so that the public may appreciate the importance of this remarkable document. He sees no alternative between immediate secession by New York and an armistice accompanied with a proposal to join the contemplated Congress of Europe. McMaster's maxim "we must all compromise" is an improvement upon the maxim of Russia: "open all question." They may consider themselves invited to a set and hospitable treatment in Paris, where French politeness will be happy to return civilities received in New York. He advises the convention to recite the Ratification, point out the violation of rights enumerated therein, and to send a delegation to Europe in favor of an immediate Congress which even England will be glad to accept in preference to impending desolation. He also suggests an Armistice pending the session of the Congress. He would like for the News to publish the Ratification before Tuesday, and asks McMaster to send them this note. Mr. Beendoley is all right.

P.S. McMaster may make what use he pleases of this letter.

I-1-m A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
1


1864 Feb 22

Alleau, Father Th.
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Upon his arrival (Odin) had spoken to him of being spiritual director for the Sisters of St. Joseph. Later, in a conference with (Odin) and the superior of the community, he was asked to say Mass at the convent several times each week; to hear the confessions of the Sisters, the day students from outside the parish, and the boarders and to give First Communion instructions each week to the children. It was understood the day students from St. Anne's continue to study their catechism with their pastor and make their First Communion in that church. But it was easy to see from the first meeting with the pastor of St. Anne's that he was not happy with Odin's arrangement. Father (Hyacinthe) Tumoine presented his grievances to the Archbishopric after which it was decided to follow the steps recommended to the superior by Father (Gabriel) Chalon, the chancellor. This measure humiliated Alleau. The school consists of 10 Sisters and over 100 pupils, among them are boarders and day pupils from several parishes of the city. Some parents put their children in boarding school with the express condition that they are not to go out of the house. How can Tumoine demand that children belonging to other churches come to him for catechism? These are the difficulties that the Superioress well understood and which brought her to ask (Odin) for a priest who would live in the house. Should Alleau continue to fulfill (Odin's) first intention? The decision given the Superior has deeply hurt Alleau and made him have fears.

VI-2-1 A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
4


1864 Feb 22

Blain, Father P(rosper) S.
(St. James, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He is very willing to serve the post to which (Odin) has assigned him provided (Odin) assist him to do so in the best way. It is impossible to serve Vacherie properly while living in St. James. He has found a compromise at the home of Mr. De Soliel 5 miles from Vacherie. He needs only (Odin's) consent, De Soleil brings this letter and can explain.

VI-2-h A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
3


1864 Feb 22

Boutwell, E( ) B.
Philadelphia, Penn(sylvania)

To (James Alphonsus McMaster), Editor Freeman's Journal
(New York, New York)

Since General (Ulysses S.) Grant has been nominated for the Presidency of the United States by the New York Herald, he would like to call the attention of the Catholics of the country to an account by Lt. Colonel Fremantle, Coldstream Guards, Royal Army. It tells of the practice of Federal troops in Jackson, Mississippi in destroying, pillaging and looting private homes and other buildings with no military significance. Also, under the eyes of Grant, a Catholic Church, the priests' house, and other buildings were destroyed. Fremantle is a foreigner, and a Protestant and therefore a disinterested witness. They were informed a few months ago of the destruction of a Catholic Church in Louisiana by Admiral Farragut and of the confinement of a French priest on an island in the Mississippi. Since then they have read of the destruction of a Catholic Church in florida by New England troops under the eyes of General (W.S.) Rosecrans and Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell. Unless slavery and Popery have been decreed to die together, there is no need for such a thing. The Catholic Bishops should follow the lead of the Methodists in taking possession of southern Churches in the wake of the Federal Army, as is being done by the Methodist Bishops Aimes and Scot. How do we know whether or not the remains of the Catholic Church in Jackson will not be changed into a Northern Methodist meeting house before the war is over or that the land upon which the Church stood will not be appropriated for the use of a Negro school house?

I-1-m A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
5


1864 Feb 22

DeNeve, Father J(ohn)
Louvain, (Belgium)

To Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefevere
Detroit, (Michigan)

DeNeve rejoices at the news of Lefevere's letter of December 26, that he is to visit the American College of Louvain. John Reichenbach has arrived in good health, as also (James) Pulcher. DeNeve regrets they have been in an American seminary since it will be harder to impress them with the necessity of turning over a leaf upon entering a seminary. He made "restitution" to Bishop (Frederic) Baraga, and charged the 500 francs for traveling expenses for Father (Francis) Van Der Bom to Lefevere's accounts. DeNeve can wait for the money until Lefevere comes if he does not have the next house for which DeNeve offered 37,000 francs. Lefevere has at the College (John) Busche who will be ready in September, (Henry) Delba(e)re for September, (Henry) Beerhorst and (Bernard J.) Wermers will be ready for next year, and (Francis P.) Flanagan, Pulcher, and Reichenbach who will need 3 years at least. Busche pays for his board. A few days ago DeNeve received Cardinal (Alexander) Barnabo's letter applying for priests for the Antilles Islands. Arch(bishop) Joachim Louis Gonin wishes to be a patron of the American College. DeNeve asks for some good arguments. DeNeve will write Archbishop (Martin John) Spalding about it. The Holy Father has granted some of the indulgences asked for a plenary at the first Communion in the College, and in the Mission.

III-2-k A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
13


1864 Feb 22

Hay, J. Harvey
Philadelphia, (Pennsylvania)

To James (Alphonsus) McMaster
(New York, New York)

He has read McMaster's remarks in the freeman's (Journal) regarding the Fenian Brotherhood. He believes McMaster favors the Catholic side of the question, although the Fenian's believe otherwise. They have been condemned by two Bishops here and by a Council of Bishops in Ireland and by Catholic sentiment in both countries. By persisting in their mad course, they are only imitating the Jacobine Clubs of France. He did not see what they were at until he read the closing remarks in the Journal, which he found to be the key to their whole proceedings. They called attention of the government to the fact that it was the stand taken by Irishmen at home that kept the English government from acknowledging the independence of the South. They knew that was false, as did McMaster, but they had an object in view which did not reach Ireland, but came home to themselves. Their politics are any the government desires; they will support the establishment of despotism here and then go to Ireland to free it from English despotism. How McMaster, knowing the true facts, can have faith in these men is a mystery to all. Hay does not see how a man can be a villain here and a saint in Ireland, or how an Irish abolitionist is any better than any other abolitionist. He notices McMaster's remarks in respect to Bishop (James F.) Wood having his name removed from the Herald or Universe. The Bishop had ordered his name taken from the issue, but this was not done until Wood had threatened the man from the altar. Wood has sold himself over to the abolitionists, and has a picture of Lincoln over his bed, while in every paper he has a picture of a Bishop or priest. He has seen two articles in the Freeman's (Journal) taken from a Dublin paper which no true Irish Catholic can approve. They attack the Catholic church and (Daniel) O'Connell's moral force principles. They are "young Irelandism" revived in a secret form without shame, honor, gratitude. O'Connell's moral force principles raised them from inferiors to equals, placed most of the cities of Ireland in their hands, opened Parliament to them, and brought about respect for the Catholic Church in England, Ireland, and Scotland, which was the dearest object he had in view. The liberty of Ireland will not be achieved by the tools of despotism here. Many have been made to believe that the United States would aid Ireland, but this is false, since this country has never been anything other than English in sentiment and has opposed the liberty of Ireland. The burnings of Church and convent and the refusal of some states to allow an Irishman or a Catholic to become a citizen are proof of that.

P.S. -- He did not write for publication, but McMaster can do so if he likes.

I-1-m A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
3


1864 Feb 22

Hendricken, Father Thomas F.
Waterbury, Conn(ecticut)

To Bishop F(rancis) P. McFarland (of Hartford)
(Providence, Rhode Island)

Henricken sends a draft for $275.15, the cathedraticum on church funds for 1863. They realized about 2600 at the fair. He had felt so asthmatic since then that he is only now making his report, which he will send in a few days.

I-1-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


1864 Feb 22

Marchand, F.
Galveston, (Texas)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He asks if (Odin) has any news of George Démeusy who left Galveston for New Orleans last June. No one has received news from him; his wife is worried and would like to know if he has arrived. The man was a Frenchman and a Galveston fisherman.

VI-2-h A.L.S. (French) 1p. 16mo.
2


1864 Feb 22

Reilly, Father Patrick
Little Rock, Ark(ansas)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Since the occupation of Little rock by Union troops he has received no word from (Odin), and presumes his past letters have miscarried. He lacks the ability and confidence of taking charge of the diocese, and consequently fears that religion is suffering. He hopes that the time for the appointment of a successor to the late Bishop is not far distant, for there is great need due to the misery of the civil war. He would have come to see (Odin) at Christmas, were he able, but promises he will do so as soon as possible.

VI-2-h A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
1


1864 Feb 23

Chambige, Father F(rancis)
St. Thomas Seminary, Bardstown, K(entucky)

To Archbishop J(ohn) B(aptist) Purcell
of Cincinnati, (Ohio)

He thanks Purcell for his remittances. Purcell's students are well and giving satisfaction. He begs Purcell's blessing.

II-5-b A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
1


1864 Feb 24

Bellanger, S.M., Father F.
St. James, (Louisiana)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

In one of the chapels there is a way of the cross with pictures only. He thinks that for a church it is necessary to place a cross with each picture, and requests permission to do this. Father Morel's treatise states that the erection of the station of the cross ought to be constituted by a double process. Bellanger does not know what type of ceremony accompanied the erection of the stations in his parish, and consequently asks if anything more ought to be done. Their Lenten exercises are well attended both at the church and at the chapel. They have begun a meeting exclusively for men; a crowd has been attending who never set foot inside the church.

P.S. Father (J.M.) Gautherin (S.M.) sends greetings to (Odin) and Fathers Rousselon and Chalon.

VI-2-h A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 16mo.
3


1864 Feb 24

(Elder), William Henry, Bishop of
Natchez, (Mississippi)

To Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.)
N(ew) O(rleans, Louisiana)

(Elder) wrote Odin on the 6th. Father (Patrick P.) O'Connor is gone to Vicksburg for the present to assist the priest there. Sister M. Thomas is just going and (Elder) has not time for more.

VI-2-h A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
3


1864 Feb 24

Nash, James P.
Galveston, (Texas)

To Archbishop John (Mary Odin, C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

In addition to a note yet in the hands of Bishop (Claude M. Dubuis) who is endeavoring to get to New Orleans, Nash writes to give an idea of the conditions in (Odin's) once favorite city. Incessant movement of the enemy along the sea coast up to Brownsville keeps them in a state of constant excitement. The enemy appears to be afraid to leave the vicinity of the gunboats. In their rapid march from Point Isabel with a view of taking Galveston by land and water, they were marching on the Peninsula when they learned that General (J. Bankhead) Magruder was near the mouth of the Cany with a strong force. The Brazos, Cany, Bernard and Matagorda country is full of troops. It is supposed that there is a sufficient number of men to repel the invader if he attempts to enter the country. Galveston had visits from General Kerby Smith, sterling Price, and other notables; all expressed their admiration of the work of Colonel Salakowski, the chief engineer, who has now been relieved by General (Paul O.) Hébert. Governor (Francis R.) Lubbock in his first proclamation condemned Galveston to the flames. They were not then consumed but ever since the city is fast disappearing. The Godin premises, stables, shrubbery and all is gone; (Odin's) old house is a military barracks. Nash's houses adjoining are occupied by soldiers. The citizens cannot raise a vegetable, chicken, or cow that are not stolen. Flour is $150 per hundredweight in Houston, but very little reaches Galveston; corn meal is $12.00 per bushel. The college at the Cape owes Nash over $240. If Father (John) Hayden, (C.M.) would send him even $20.00 in specie it would do a great deal of good. He asks (Odin) to send up pound of white and pound of black thread. The bishop will bring it to Nash. Nash is assessing the county for the war tax at $5 per day. Old Mr. Smith is still breathing.

VI-2-h A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
12


1864 Feb 24

Oram, (Father) William Henry
Titusville, Penn.

To (Orestes A. Brownson)
Elizabeth, (N.J.)

Oram states that he is the priest who was formerly stationed in Hudson Bay Territory. The climate there made him come to the oil regions of Pennsylvania where he now is establishing a parish. The parishioners have little money. Oram would have Brownson give a lecture if the latter would agree to it. Oram would like to know the exact time Brownson could deliver the lecture.

I-4-c A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
1


1864 Feb 24

Schreiner, Father Lawrence
Grand Rapids, (Michigan)

To Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere)
(Detroit, Michigan)

The scandals continued by Father (Ferdinand) Allgayer could be stopped if (Lefevere) would show who is master. The one who was always talking against Father (Martin) Marco is acting as Marco did in his opinion. Schreiner is under the impression he will have to help himself.

III-2-k A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
3


1864 Feb 25

Coudert Frères
New York, (New York)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, Louisiana

At the request of Father A. Théves, formerly of New Orleans, they call attention to his claim for moneys taken from his trunk to pay debts due by St. Peter's Church, New Iberia. In 1854 Théves undertook to enlarge the church of which he was at that time pastor; this was to cost $1900. Upon Théves' leaving he placed his trunk in care of Mr. Ratier, now deceased. The trunk contained $2150; $700 belonged to Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc. The sheriff repaid Théves $100; the money taken from the trunk was then applied to repairs on the church. (Some items) were omitted from the inventory made by (Father Rousselon) Rosisselow, vicar general. Those who have had the benefit of Théves' money should return it; he cannot afford to lose it. (The signature on this letter is indecipherable).

VI-2-h L.S. 2pp. 4to.
5


1864 Feb 25

Durst, Father Aug(ust)
Iowa City, (Iowa)

to Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere)
(Detroit, Michigan)

In view of Lefevere's censure and Father (William) Emonds' advice, Durst is leaving Iowa City to make a retreat. But where? Emonds advised him to comply with Lefevere's demands and humbly ask for an exeat for the Dubuque Diocese where there are German priests. Durst thinks the trustees of St. Joseph (Detroit) should reimburse him for the organ. If Lefevere condemns him to inactivity for a few months, Durst cannot pay his small debts. He will make a retreat at the Jesuits in Chicago where he will await Lefevere's reply.

III-2-k A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
4


1864 Feb 26

Faure, Father J.A.
San Antonio, (Texas)

To Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.)
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

It is some time since he received Odin's note of November 6. He was very upset to hear that he was sick. Bishop (Claude Marie) Dubuis ought to be visiting New Orleans soon. He is tremendously energetic; he has already visited all of the diocese and is now searching for new seminarians. Faure asks that Odin remind Dubuis to pay Pauline Morin, mother of their domestic, $200 in Confederate money for services rendered. The last he heard, Dubuis was at Naqodoches (Nacogdoches). Father Julian (Przysiecki) Prezciesky was killed by his horse last November. He has recently heard that Father Peter (Baunach, O.S.B.) is dying, but he hopes the rumor is not true. Sister St. Clare, (R.U.) and Sister St. Ursule, (R.U.) are also dead. Mother St. Marie, (R.U.) almost died but is getting better. Sister St. Chantal is superior of the convent. Sister St. Ambroise, (R.U.) of Liberty has gone to France. Father (John J.) Magee has left Texas. Father (Nicholas) Feltin is now pastor at Austin. The Brothers of (Mary) at the college are all well. Father (Stephen) Buffard is chaplain of the convent. All is tranquil in Texas, but the suffering is great. Provisions are rare and expensive. Father (Sebastian) Augagneur died; it is sad because he is so young and zealous.

VI-2-h A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 8vo.
15


1864 Feb 26

Lefevere, Peter P., Bishop of (Detroit)
Detroit, (Michigan)

To Archbishop J(ohn) B(aptist) Purcell
Cincinnati, Ohio

Lefevere agrees with Purcell and Bishop (George A.) Carroll that the Council should be opened on the 5th of June, the 3rd Sunday after Pentecost, and suggests that all future Councils should begin on the 3rd Sunday after Pentecost. He has inquired into the affair of the priest who made a statement at the house of Mrs. Elbert and he is Father J.A. Rotchford, a Dominican Father of the Convent of St. Joseph's, Perry Co. Ohio and is now Superior at London, Canada. Rotchford, while at a tea at Mrs. Elbert's showed the company how some people in Washington often toast the Union. Lefevere wishes to prevent any future scandals by priest meddling in politics, whether he be from his own diocese or from another. He thanks Purcell for his hospitality during his stay in the Archiepiscopal City and because this time Purcell will be more crowded he has applied to the Jesuit Fathers for their hospitality during the next Council. He sends his regards.

II-5-b A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
3


1864 Feb 26

Timon, (Bishop) John
Buffalo, (New York)

To (Bishop) Peter Paul Lefevere
Detroit, (Michigan)

Timon blesses God for giving to Detroit diocese a prelate so prudent. Lefevere's protest pleased Timon much. Timon sends the formula of the Litany of Jesus with indulgences. Cardinal (Alexander) Barnabo sent them to Timon about a month ago.

III-2-k A.L.S. 1p. 16mo.
2


1864 Feb 27

Buffard, Father E(tienne)
San Antonio, (Texas)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Bishop (Claude Mary) Dubuis is probably in New Orleans as he said he wished to look for subjects of whom he has great need. Buffard started his work at the convent at Liberty; then in the country. He has been here six months. First he took Sister St. Thérèse (R.U.) to San Antonio, then, forced to make observations to Sister St. Ambroise (R.U.), she denied his powers in her community and sent him about his business. Finally she went to France with the daughter of a Protestant doctor. She left from Matamoros October 28. After Confirmation at Liberty on December 13, the Bishop sent Buffard as chaplain to the convent at San Antonio. Sister St. Bernard, (R.U.) is the only one left at Liberty. Mr. Berthier is still at Liberty. Buffard does not need the money due in April at least until a sure way is found to send it. Buffard believes he should have some letters from France at Father Rousselon's. Father Peter Baunach, O.S.B.) of Fredericksburg has been seriously ill for 8 days. Another priest was killed by falling from his horse recently. Sister Ste. Chantal, (R.U.) is the Superior; the former one is ill. Mrs Rogers(?) is ill; they fear for her life. Texas has an abundance of cattle and corn; other things are dear in paper but in silver almost like before the war. All the priests of San Antonio are well. No doubt (Odin) has heard of the death of Father (Sebastian) Augagneur. Father Thomas (Hennessy?) Enessi has been ordained and assigned.

VI-2-h A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
12


1864 Feb 27

Emonds, (Father ) W(illiam)
Iowa City, (Iowa)

To Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere)
(Detroit, Michigan)

Emonds had permission from Bishop (Clement) Smyth to receive Father (August) Durst if he was in good standing. Emonds is startled to learn from Lefevere's letter that Durst was not in good standing. Emonds is now sending back Durst and hopes he will settle down. If Lefevere sends Durst back, Emonds will do everything to make him a useful priest.

III-2-k A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
3


1864 Feb 27

Folse, Sosthène
St. Mary's, Lafourche, (Louisiana)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Folse has heard that Father (Cletus) Urcun has gone to the city, probably to leave them after what has happened to him and because of the accusations that he was intemperate, and consequently unable to perform his duties. This is false. His sermons are filled with instruction not only for the children but also for anyone not too bigoted or evil to comprehend them. Folse asks (Odin) to persuade Urcun to stay among them for the instruction of the children with which he is always occupied. Folse will soon send another letter with signatures of the congregation.

VI-2-h A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
3


1864 Feb 27

Gertrude, Sister M.
(Sisters of Mercy)

To Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio)

Mother Superior and Mother Baptist write that they are likely to get a free pass to Ireland, and if so, they want Purcell's permission to go. They sent a postulant as the first fruit of their travels.

II-5-b A.L.S. 1p. 16to.
1


1864 Feb 27

Moser, P(eter) H.
Galveston, (Texas)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.)
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

It is three years since he saw Odin. His wife sends her respects. He has not heard from his sisters for over three years and appeals to Odin to send 100 francs to his sister Anna Moser, in Mannheim, Baden if he can. He would have sent the money by Bishop (Claude Mary Dubuis) Dubois but he went before Moser knew it. Moser is in the militia; his duty is only 2 or 3 hours a day and then he sells property in Galveston at 5% commission.

VI-2-h A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
3


1864 Feb 27

Noyes, Mary E.
New York (City)

To (Orestes A.) Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Mary Noyes sends some doggerel to Brownson in the hopes that it will please him. The writer thanks Brownson for his effort to save the church from the scandal which lay and cleric politicians have sought to fasten on Her. She wonders what causes people to act in such a manner. She hopes that Brownson will shame "them" into consistency. The writer sends her regards to Mrs. Brownson and Miss Sarah.

I-4-c A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
1


1864 Feb 27

White, James W.
Washington, (D.C.)

To (Orestes A. Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

White infers that the candidate for Presidency is an open question in Brownson's mind referring to the last issue of the Review. White prefers Mr. Chase to Butler or Fremont. The public has identified Lincoln with national unity and liberty. Looking back on the administration for the past three years, he feels that the public has been deceived about Lincoln. For the past weeks Lincoln has been in a serious state of indecision as to whom he will appoint to the Army of the Potomac. White tells of the military situation south of Washington. Would Brownson support Chase? The radicals in the country oppose Lincoln. He believes Lincoln would be defeated at the polls. Next to Chase, the writer chooses Grant. If Brownson favors Chase, would he assert his views in the Review? White assures him the committee would take two thousand copies of the Review alone. He requests an early answer to this letter.

P.S. The committee would take the same number of the July and October issues, if Chase is nominated.

I-4-c A.L.S. 6pp. 12mo.
1


1864 Feb 29

De Chalais, R.S.C.J., Madame C.
Nancy, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

They have a pupil from New Orleans at their boarding school. The mother, Mrs. Mary Regan, sent her 4 or 5 years ago and has paid regularly for her daughter. Since the war Regan does not want to lose almost half in exchange. A missionary now in Cleveland told de Chalais that if Regan gave (Odin) the 3,500 f(rancs) due, (Odin) could send the receipt to Nancy and they will present it to the Propagation of the Faith who will pay them. They will write Mrs. Regan to arrange to see (Odin). Marguerite will soon be returning to her mother and they would like her account settled before she leaves. Mrs. Regan's address is in care of George H. Vinton, New Orleans.

VI-2-h A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 8vo.
3


1864 Feb 29

Navarron, Father Louis
St. Philomena, Clermont County, O(hio)

To Archbishop J(ohn) B(aptist) Purcell
of Cincinnati, O(hio)

Navarron acknowledges Purcell's letter of Feb. 4 with the 22 intentions and $11 in stipends. Purcell should address him at New Boston. He has never said two masses on the same day except at Christmas. Now at Stonelick the people can come at ten o'clock, and he does not deem it prudent to begin to have two masses. The Catholics will be able to make their Easter duty coming to him or to one of the other priests. He intends to teach the children catechism 3 or 4 days a week beginning Easter Tuesday until they are prepared for first communion at the beginning of June.

II-5-b A..L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
1


1864 Feb 29

Sigrist, Father Simon
Indianapolis, Ind(iana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Sigrist's nieces in Strasbourg have asked him for information regarding Mr. Veltin (Father Nicholas Feltin?). Since the start of the war, neither he nor Veltin's parents have received news of him, perhaps because correspondence from Texas is forbidden to the North. (Odin) can probably throw some light on the situation of Sigrist's fellow countryman so that he can inform his relatives in Alsace.

VI-2-h A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
3


1864 Feb 29

Spalding, M(artin) J(ohn), Bishop of
Louisville, (Kentucky)

To Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell)
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Spalding can see no objection to postponing the council until June 5 or the last Sunday in May. He presumes that Bishop (Frederick) Baraga can come by that time. He sends some questions for Purcell as to dances round dances, fancy dances and waltzes, (2) on frequenting moderate dances and theaters in Lent and Advent, (3) the practice of having uniform laws on matrimonial dispensations in the province, (4) whether the taxes for the dispensations be used for the seminaries and be left to the will of the pastor. He is fatigued with his journey. He sends his regards to Mr. and Mrs. Springer.

II-5-b A.L.S. 4pp. 16to.
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