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Calendar: 1865

1865

( )

To (Archbishop John Mary Odin, C.M.?
New Orleans, Louisiana)

A poem to the Pilgrim from Rome.

VI-2-i A.D. 2pp. 16mo.
1


1865

( )

To (Archbishop John Mart Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

First Communicants for the year 1865: Emma Pugh, Louisa Tete, Valerie Villarosa, Rosa Tete, Azelia Maspero, Elise Lebret, Emma Pike, Gertrude Duralde, Amelie Fernandez, Adelaide Lanaux, Georgine Campbell, Mary Carmody, Stella Villeré, Noemie Letellier, Marie Lecourt, Kate Purcell, and Edna Stewart. Those renewing: Corinne Gardère, Kate Belmont, Ida Daunis, Valentine Andry. For the general confession: Mathilde Mioton, Julie Fernandez, Delia Vivès, Cecile Roman, Algaé Bouis, Alice Cenas, Berthe Alpuinte, and Alice Desforges.

VI-2-i List (French) 1p. 4to.
31


(1865-1866?)

(Brownson, Orestes A.
Elizabeth, New Jersey)

To Mr. Editor
(New York, New York)

(Entitled): "State Suicide." It seems to (Brownson) that those who contend that the late Confederate States have ceased to be States in the Union and those who contend that they still are States reach their conclusions from confounding the meaning of the word State under the American system with its general meaning. This is the condemnation of the theory defended in his recent speech in Congress by (Henry Jarvis) Raymond. If Raymond is right that the States all along have been States in the Union, he is wrong in maintaining that Government had a right to make war upon the Confederates and also in defending the measures of reconstruction adopted by (Abraham) Lincoln and (Andrew) Jackson. On the other hand, (Brownson) thinks it is wrong to contend that they are a conquered territory. He insists that the several States that seceded lost all their political rights and immunities as States in the Union. His chief objection to the President's plan is that it is based upon principles which mutually destroy one another and assumes for the Executive a power that he has not under the Constitution. (Brownson) would be more indulgent to the late Confederates. He would have adopted the terms on between General (William T.) Sherman and General (Joseph E. Johnston), but he would not entertain those terms for a moment now.

I-4-c A. Draft (Incomplete) 2pp. 4to.
6


(1865-1866?)

(Brownson, Orestes A.
Elizabeth, New Jersey)

To (Horace Greeley), Editor of The N(ew) Y(ork) Tribune
(New York, New York)

The seceders held that sovereignty rests in the states individually; (Brownson) holds it rests in the States united. They are always exposed to two dangers disintegration and consolidation. The state sovereignty theory was, he had supposed, disposed of by the suppression of the rebellion. The war against it naturally disposed men's minds to the opposite error. He will not say that Congress in any of its (reconstruction) measures has absolutely fallen into this error but it has seemed to favor it. Under (the American) system the powers of government are divided between the general government and the State governments. The distinction is that between general....

I-4-c A. Draft (Incomplete) 1p. 4to.
3


(1865-69?)

(Brownson, Orestes A.
Elizabeth, New Jersey)

To The Editor of the N(ew) Y(ork) Times
(New York, New York)

(Labeled): Reconstruction. (Brownson) supposes nobody expected the work of reconstructing the Union would be finished the moment the fighting was over. He stated to his friends in April 1861 that it would take four years of hard fighting to subdue the Confederate forces, and at least three years more to complete the work of reunion. The whole work might have been done in a year if we had been prepared and had the requisite statesmanship. But as things actually were no one who looked closely could count on bringing the work to a close in less than seven years.

I-4-c A. Draft (Incomplete) 1p. 4to.
2


(1865-67?)

(Brownson, Orestes A.
Elizabeth, New Jersey)

To The Editor of the N(ew) Y(ork) Times
(New York, New York)

(Labeled): Reconstruction. There can be no doubt that the President's policy of reconstruction has miscarried and it now seems not unlikely that the constitutional amendment proposed by Congress will fail to be adopted. The plan of the (New York) Tribune, impartial suffrage and universal amnesty, seems to be quietly rejected and the cry is now raised for manhood suffrage. (Brownson) does not despair of the Constitutional amendment because he does not recognize the ten unreconstructed states as states in the Union. He hopes it will not be abandoned for any other scheme. It seems likely Congress will refuse to recognize the several governments organized under executive advice and direction as legal state governments.

I-4-c A. Draft (Incomplete) 1p. 4to.
3


1865

Finucane, Father John L.
Newport, K(entuck)y

to Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere)
(Detroit, Michigan)

Finucane came one year ago to Bishop (George A.) Carrell in Covington (Kentucky) with leave of absence from Bishop (William Henry Elder) of Natchez (Mississippi). Carrell informs Finucane that being about to ordain 2 seminarians, Finucane will no longer be needed. In a letter Carrell mentions some good qualities of Finucane and observes that he has an indefinite leave of absence. He is 29 years old, of Irish birth, came to the U.S. when 12 years old, and was ordained June 1861 at St. Sulpice, Baltimore. Finucane requests to be accepted temporarily or permanently with Detroit Diocese. Answer in care of Father P(atrick) Guilfoyle.

III-2-k A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
4


(1865)

Gavard, Francois
(Haute-Savoie, France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

For a long time he had lost hope of news from America when at last (Odin) sent it. He and his family rejoiced. It was a great sacrifice to consent to the departure of a son (Father Victor Gavard) in whom were all his hopes. He asks (Odin) to give his son the enclosed letter and ask him to write.

VI-2-i A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 8vo.
2


(1865) ( )

(Longuemare, Emile)
(Mexico City, Mexico)

To (James Alphonsus McMaster)
(New York, New York)

(Pages 1 and 2 missing) ... Page 3: McMaster has his excuses. He is afraid McMaster will fell grieved and disappointed when he hears the tales of those returning to New York, but the sickly reason that has put a stop to emigration will give them time to look about them and plan a course of action for the future. Longuemare will abide by McMaster's decisions. Some of the lands he has procured are good and some are not so good. B.G. Caulfield will come to New York, and McMaster can get his impressions. Longuemare is showing him around Cordova and the lands. Caulfield is going to organize the "American and Mexican Emigrant Company," of which Longuemare will be the agent and representative. They have drawn up an arrangement by which Longuemare agrees to purchase lands for the company. Caulfield has not been successful in his demands on the government for a charter. Robles asked Longuemare regarding the matter, and finally rejected the charter, but said he would give Caulfield a paper containing only the essence of the law. McMaster must not mention this to Caulfield, or tell him that Longuemare was in any way connected. Let Caulfield go back to work the Company, and help him if there is profit in doing so. In San Francisco a company with large capital is forming to raise cotton on the Pacific coast of Mexico. Longuemare advises emigrants to send no commissioners like Caulfield who try to get grants, but men who will pick out the land they want, and will make arrangements for the families they represent. Foreigners are displeased because there is no society in Mexico, so Longuemare advises them to settle close together. Even in the cities it is dull, but they could be beautiful, especially (Mexico City). The American families living in Mexico are dissatisfied and unfriendly. One reason for this feeling is that the cities are overcrowded and no houses can be had, so that they must live in hotels which are anything but comfortable. Longuemare would leave a family at Cordova or Crizaha, for the trip from Vera Cruz to (Mexico) City is very trying and cannot be made for less than $50. The Diligence company has a monopoly on all the hotels, and its prices are exorbitant. Boarding houses are much preferable to hotels, and the board there is superior to that in America. There is a fine opening for American hotel keepers, for all the large cities in Mexico are sadly in need of good hotels, and anyone with capital would find the hotel business a paying investment. But there is no lack of openings for capital, and Longuemare refers McMaster to the paper "El Orizateno" for ( )2, ( ), for a story on it. Among foreigners in Mexico there is some fever for coffee lands; they are interested in the culture of coffee, and come to Longuemare for suitable lands. He hopes to make arrangements with the government to get control of matters in that direction, unless McMaster orders him to devote himself to something else. Companies could be formed in New York to promote coffee-cultivation, and Longuemare plans to have some acres planted in coffee to supply plants to those who are buying coffee lands. Plants sell for $3 or $4 a thousand, and buying them gains a year for the grower. J.N. Tesey (?) wants Longuemare's name connected with his Real Estate Agency, but he has as yet refused, seeing no probability of its success. Longuemare now supplies the Agency's lands, and his future depends on what position he will hold toward the government. He hopes McMaster understands that he will make money if the opportunity presents itself. He means to carry out to the letter the terms of their agreement to encourage emigration, and has acted as he thought best even though it was in a roundabout way. But if any outside business presents itself while he is attending to main questions, shall he take care of it? He begs for an answer to this question, and asserts that he will stay in Mexico until the last act of the play. Just now everything looks bright, so far as the emigration and speculation scheme is concerned, on the part of the government. McMaster should inform him of any companies formed in New York, and assure them that he (Longuemare) will manage them, and can promise to obtain from the government what few others can. But in all this he abides by McMaster advice. As soon as his plan has been decided upon and he is placed in the position he desires he will notify McMaster. If the government adopts his views he can also supply McMaster with government advertising. The political situation is quiet. The troops are leaving every day to finish up the guerilla bands, there is no longer any need for them in this section. It is not true that there has been a break between the Emperor (Maximilian) and the clergy. The Emperor has said that in 18 months his picture and that of Pius IX will be side by side in every house, and Longuemare believes it will be so. Longuemare, however, does not approve of the French who are trying to force the Emperor to a policy benefitting them alone. He is surrounded too much by the French, and the Mexicans are left out of every thing, so that they pronounce him incapable and in power only by the grace of Napoleon (III). The dismissal of the Chief of Cabinet, Eloin, would be hailed, for he is especially odious and holds his position, it is said, through the influence of the Empress (Charlotte) and Leopold of Belgium. The French are now fighting the government on the naturalization question. They do not wish to lose their nationality, and deny the policy of making a Mexican citizen of one who possesses a portion of Mexican soil. The French paper has come out against the Constitution, and there is a general desire for American immigration to counteract the French influence. Holy Week was celebrated in Mexico as Longuemare has never seen it celebrated. He gives an account of the celebration, and decides that the stories told about the corruptness of the clergy must surely be false, for it seems impossible that a people with a bad clergy could be so devout and pious. Emigrants going to Mexico need no passport, and it is a useless expense to get one. When they arrive, they should not stop in the dreary country between Vera Cruz and Potiers, but at Cordova or Orizana instead. Longuemare met a Me. Stewart, a friend of McMaster's, and is sending his greeting with Mr. Keeling, who is a practical man whose opinion is worth knowing. Longuemare will take care of some matters soon.

(P.S.) The man who was supposed to have carried this letter was delayed, and Longuemare will send it by Caulfield. He reports an interesting ceremony that took place on Holy Thursday the washing of the feet of 24 poor by the Emperor and Empress. That day Longuemare met the Emperor and Empress on the street, walking without escort, and obtained a good look at them for the first time.

I-1-m A.L. (Incomplete, unsigned) 10pp.
4


1865 ( ) 29

(Lavastida), Archbishop P(elagius) A(ntonius) of Mexico City
Mexico City, (Mexico)

To (Bishop Thomas Grace)
St. Paul, Minnesota

He received Grace's letter of June 20, 1864, introducing Dr. ( ) Massey. He was pleased with Massey, and would have liked to do something for him, but after his first visit, Massey did not return. He hopes that Massey was able to secure a good position and would like to see him again.

--------
1865 Dec 2

Grace, Bishop Thomas L.
St. Paul, (Minnesota)

To Dr. ( ) Massey
( )

The annexed letter from the Archbishop of Mexico is in reply to one he wrote him through Massey. Grace hopes that Massey's trip to Mexico was agreeable and satisfactory. Massey's friends here and ask about him and would like to see him return to Minnesota. The prospects in St. Paul and Minnesota were never better as now since the closing of the war. All of the railroads are under way again with a certainty of completion. In politics all of the old party lines are fast disappearing. He sends regards to Mrs. Massey.

I-1-m A.L.S. (Part French) 4pp. 12mo.
2


1865

McCaffrey, Father John, Mt St. Mary's College
Emmitsburg, Maryland

A printed announcement of a compendium of the elements of Christian Doctrine written after an experience of more than thirty years and at the suggestion of Archbishop (Francis P, Kenrick). The letter exposes the better features of the compendium. (In the papers of Bishop Francis P. McFarland).

I-1-b Printed circular 1p. 4to.
2


(1865)

Tasset, Father F.
(Houma, Louisiana)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He was happy to receive the letter from (Odin) announcing a priest for the chapel at Terrebonne. The chapel has a cemetery and ground for building a rectory; they are going to begin it immediately. M. Curvy can give the plan and dimensions. It is better at Terrebonne than at P(etit) Caillou. The priest could stay with Tasset a month if he wished. Tasset would like to see two at the ends of the Gulf. The new priest is to bring a chalice. Tasset gave one of his to Father (John Mary Joseph) Dénecé. An assistant at Houma would not be too much as there are 2 large bayous to serve; Bayou du Large and Bayou Black. The Way of the Cross will probably be Tasset's last good work in the parish. He suffers from the cold and would like a warmer climate, perhaps Mexico, at Puebla. He talked to Father (Hyacinth) Gonnellas; he would like the post. Tasset asks (Odin's) consent on his decision.

A.L.S. (French) 6pp.

Enclosure:

--------
(1865)

T(asset), Father F.
(Houma, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

T(asset) asks for a dispensation for first cousins: Serge Chauvin and Theolinde Thibodaux.

A.L.S. (French) 1p.

VI-2-i A.L.S. (French) 7pp. 8vo.
8


(1865 Jan)

Chavas, (S.M.), Father (Claude Marie?)
(Convent, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He takes advantage of the kindness of the assistant at St. James to send his respects.

P.S. He also sends greetings to Fathers Rousselon and Chalon. Is there the custom in (Odin's) diocese, as in most dioceses of France, of gaining a plenary indulgence on feasts even though one confesses only every 2 weeks? If not, he asks (Odin) for the privilege.

(P.S.) Chavas regrets that Father (Leon F.) Denis, (S.M.) is absent. He also could have sent a letter with the collection for the seminary.

VI-2-i A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
2


(1865 Jan)

Denis, S.M., Father (Leon)
(St. Michael's, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

The Society of Mary of St. Michael extend their wishes for a happy New Year. He thanks (Odin) for all his past favors.

VI-2-i A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
2


(1865 Jan ?)

Hérisé, Emmanuel
Roanne, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

At the time of Odin's visit to Ambierle, Hérisé missed being presented to Odin by Mr. Combe of Roanne. He had wanted to ask about his nephew Father Ernest Forge, who since 1849 has lived near Odin's diocese. Born April 5, 1838, Forge left for the United States in October, 1848. After 2 years at Springhill College he was sent to Natchitoches. Two years have gone by without a reply to their letters. A power of attorney, dated January 2, 1863, made before Mr. Cuvilier, notary public of New Orleans, is the only sign of life they have had from their young relative. Hérisé asks Odin to investigate.

VI-2-i A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
4


(1865 Jan.)

Orth, M(atthias), St. Vincent's
Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania

to (Archbishop John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Having finished his preparatory and theological studies, he came to America because there was an abundance of priests in his diocese. His parents tempted him away from theology. He took part of his studies in the seminary and there received four minor orders and tonsure. He has letter dimissorials attesting to them and to his good standing. He is a theological candidate in the diocese of Treves and is twenty-five years old. He speaks German, sufficient French and some English. He asks to be admitted to Odin's diocese. His address is care of Father C. Kauder.

VI-2-i A.L.S. (Latin) 2pp. 8vo.
2


1865 Jan 1

Chapuy, Widow née C. Detour
Ambierle, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Miss Herbin shared with (Odin's) family and Chapuy the letter (Odin) wrote to Father (Peter) Berthe(t). She was glad to hear that (Odin) is better than at the time of departure of Father (Charles) Padey who visited her in November; they talked of friends in America. For two weeks now she has lived across from Mr. Bernaud, who has a store. Here she is a little more independent but she can in an instant go to her poor sister. Her Father, mother and sister are getting along all right. (Odin's) family is well except Aunt Josephine suffers a little. Mrs. Frobert and Miss Mélanie are well. Mrs. Monérie's son has typhoid fever. Mélanie came to help her sister take care of him, but the doctor told her it would be prudent for her to return to Arfeuilles. The pastor, Mr. and Miss Deliguére and Mr. Thevenard and the Sisters all send their respects.

VI-2-i A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
10


1865 Jan 1

De Bolle, Father J( ) H.
Rome, (Papal States)

To Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

De Bolle wishes him a happy New Year. He has received the application of another man, Father Henry Balicki, for the diocese of Cincinnati. He is 25 years of age and a priest for 17 months. He has given him his dimissorials. He is a nobleman who came to Rome to enter a contemplative order but had to leave because of his health. Father De Montel thinks him inconstant, but De Bolle thanks that since he has remained studying in Rome at his own expense, Purcell would write him a word of encouragement. He now desires to stay in Rome for his doctorate and then to teach, probably in Purcell's seminary. De Bolle quotes his dimissorial letter (in Latin) from Bishop Anthony Joseph Manastyrsk of Premysl. Balicki knows French and German as well as Polish. He sends the Annuarium but cannot get any Agnus Dei as Bishop (William) McCloskey requested. Mr. Richter will tell Purcell the same thing. De Bolle admits that he is not satisfied with sub-deacon Edward Constantin. He will withhold any letter of admission until he has heard from Purcell on this. De Bolle hopes he will not be a burden to Purcell. He has presented his respects to Prince of Hohenlohe on his return from Germany and the Prince has promised to do what he can for him. He has recommended him to Prince de Rospigliosi to take care of the education of his three sons, but he has received no answer. Times are very hard everywhere.

P.S. The Annuario Pontificio will be printed January 15 and he will send it immediately.

II-5-c A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
4


1865 Jan 1

Juncker, H(enry) D., Bishop of Alton
Mound City, (Illinois)

To Archbishop John Baptist Purcell
Cincinnati, Ohio

In Purcell's last letter he spoke about some newspapers. Juncker has always endeavored to banish them from the diocese and would have publicly denounced the German paper of Baltimore but Bishop (John M.) Henni thought they had no right to do so since it was not published in their dioceses. He was grieved by the letter from Bishop (James F.) Wood, that the bishops assembled at Philadelphia did not think it proper to make an effort to have priests exempted from the draft. The priests of St. Louis University were exempted by being teachers, not as priests. Juncker has blessed the new academy of the Sisters of Loretto in Cairo, the only such academy in southern Illinois. He is trying to start a hospital and poor house for the sick and refugees in Cairo.

II-5-c A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
5


1865 Jan 1

Good Shepherd, Sisters of the
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

New Year's greetings and best wishes to (Odin) with thanks for his paternal protection and the wish that he visit them sometime in the New Year.

VI-2-i A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
1


1865 (Jan 1?)

Sacred Heart, Student of
St. Michael, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Greetings and best wishes for the new year, and a request for (Odin's) paternal blessing.

VI-2-i A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to
1


1865 Jan 2

Clore, Thieobalt, Joseph Vogl and John Hunsanger
White Rock, Mich(igan)

to Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere)
Detroit, (Michigan)

Father Peter Kluck is going to leave them shortly, whether or not by Lefevere's order. Kluck tells them the reason is that he is not sufficiently supported; Lefevere knows that they supported Kluck when their number was quite small. His niece was married lately. She was pregnant, and Kluck attempted to shield her by no publication of banns. Lefevere will understand why Kluck is leaving and the people do not support him. They trust Lefevere will send them a new priest as their number is increasing every week. There are 16 Irish families and some French. They wish an English-speaking priest. Kluck could not preach or hear confessions in English which is another reason some did not support him. They protest that Kluck is taking church goods with him.

III-2-k A.L.S. 2p. 8vo.
3


1865 Jan 3

Manly M.E.
Newbern, North Carolina

to J(ames) A(lphonsus) McMaster, Esq.
(New York, New York)

The recent upsetting of things in the south has deprived him of a judgeship on the supreme court of the state, scattered the accumulations of his past life, and forced him to begin anew as a practicing attorney. He is associated with John Haughton, an eminent lawyer of established reputation and sends McMaster a card. His misfortunes have arisen from a devotion to cause of the south in the late Civil War. He has been "tabooed" by party now in power and violently thrust out of an office, held by terms of the constitution for "good Behavior," and kept so long in an un-pardoned and exposed condition that property of every description has been wasted and stolen away. This is not offered with a view to invoke sympathy for suffering in that cause, but as the facts of his condition. He asks McMaster to publish the enclosed card.

P.S. He sent his annual subscription to the Journal a few days ago and inquires if subscription has been received.

I-1-m A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
1


186(5) Jan 3

Raymond, Father G(ilbert)
Opelousas, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

[Father (Aristide) Plotin arrived after a long voyage. Father (Gustave) Rouxel was installed at Lafayette and Father (René) Vallée at Villeplate. Father (Jean) Poyet had a serious difficulty with a person; Raymond heard there were gun shots, but that Poyet was in the right and was not hurt. (Father J. Francois Raymond) is as usual. There are 53 students at the academy, 27 of whom are boarders. The number of students at the convent is small. They say the College at Grand Coteau and the Convent at Lafayette also have few students; he does not know about Sacred Heart Convent. The receipts from January 1863 to January 1865 were $13,974.76; dispensations $85.00; collection for the seminary $225.25. Up to July 1, they had to take Confederate notes for fees; since then he has asked for real value but there is no silver here. He still owes (Odin) about $1040; he will send something if he can. Mother St. Pierre Several, R.U. plans to go back to the city to pay the debt they owe in France by sending a dozen bales of cotton to New Orleans if she gets permission from the Confederate authorities. All could be done without her as the sales must be made through an agent, Mr. Noblom. There is a spirit there a bit too anxious. Sister St. Vincent, (R.U.) is very bad; Sister St. Hyacinthe, (R.U.) very well. Raymond sends respects to Father Rousselon and others.

VI-2-i A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 8vo.
10


1865 Jan 3

(Several, R.U.), Sister St. Pierre
Opelousas, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Mrs. Gautheret who is with them at present, wishes to find a position for herself and daughter. They are very capable of teaching their language and also music, drawing, and painting.

VI-2-i A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
2


1865 Jan 3

(Several, R.U.), Sister St. Pierre
Opelousas, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

She takes advantage of Mrs. Roy's trip. Mrs. Roy will tell him that Sister was about to go with her. She has not entirely given up the plan as she has not been able to pay the debts of the Ursulines and the only way is from the cotton taken in payment from their pupils. She cannot sell it here in specie nor even in notes she could exchange for money. So she must resume her trips to New Orleans to sell it and also to get a permit to get it through the lines. The school is small this year. Father (Gilbert) Raymond said he had spoken to (Odin) about their Community.

VI-2-i A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
4


1865 Jan 3

Sheeran, C.SS.R., Father James
Winchester, V(irgini)a

to (James Alphonsus) McMaster
(New York, New York)

He has just time to write a few lines before starting on his journey to Dixie. He was released from Fort McHenry on December 5 and thanks McMaster for the interest; he took in his case. He is sorry McMaster was mistaken in his opinion of General (Philip) Sheridan. He is neither a Christian nor a gentleman. Although the conditions under which Sheeran was released was that he should go home, Sheridan would not have let him go if Sheeran had not threatened to expose him again. Sheridan apologized for the manner in which Sheeran had been treated, saying that Sheridan had been misinformed. He again expresses his gratitude to McMaster.

I-1-m A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
2


1865 Jan 4

Francais, Father (Nicolas)
Monthureux-sur-Saone, (France)

To Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He sends his wishes for a happy new year. At Mass he remembers all his confreres who continue to work in the difficult mission which his infirmities forced him to leave. He will never forget America. In France there is an abundance of material things but if he did not believe in the words of the Divine Master, he would think that religion is at an end. It is forbidden for the Bishops to talk of the Pope's encyclical. Francais received Odin's letter dated June 28. He rejoiced in Odin's better health and in the number of Confirmations. He asks Odin to give him news of his nephew, Father (J.) Outendirc(k), pastor of New Iberia. Francais preached here the octave of (All Soul's) day. He thinks always of his Charenton. He sends greetings to Fathers Rousselon and Chalon and all his confreres. Especially to Father (john F.) Cambiaso, (S.J.) and Doctor (Charles) Faget.

VI-2-i A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
4


1865 Jan 5

McGlynn, Father Edw(ar)d
(New York, New York)

To Bishop (Francis P. McFarland of Hartford)
(Providence, Rhode Island)

McFarland is invited to attend the funeral of Father J(eremiah) W. Cummings, pastor of St. Stephen's Church, on Monday, January 8 at 10 A.M.

I-1b A.L.S. 1p. 16mo.
2


1865 Jan 6

Spalding, M(artin) J., Archbishop of
Baltimore, (Maryland)

To Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Spalding wishes Purcell the season's greetings. He does not expect a speedy reply of the Holy See to the application for the appointment of a new Bishop in Louisville. The Cardinal wrote him on Nov. 9 asking his opinion on some names presented for Albany. He expressed his wishes for Father (John) Conroy. He will write in a few days in regard to that Rescript on Solemn Vows which need explanation and modification so that houses of the Visitation all over the country will have the same vows. He sends his regards to Mr. and Mrs. Springer. He is trying to stir the people up to some progress. One man has supplied two free beds at Mt. Hope, two busses at St. Charles College, and given Spalding $15,000 to enlarge the old "Archbishop's Palace." Three new churches are being built in Washington and he hopes to have two or three begun in Baltimore in the Spring.

II-5-c A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
3


1865 Jan 7

Berthet, Father Peter, On board the Tampico
Off the Coast of Santo Domingo

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He should have written sooner to acknowledge (Odin's) letter with the draft. But as it arrived only a few days before leaving for Texas he though he would write from Cuba. He wrote immediately to Father Denavit, Director of the seminary at Lyons, to tell him of (Odin's) advice about his return to Texas and the different commissions for New Orleans. Denavit also sent Father (Charles) Padey to Father (Henry) Rousselon to see if there were any religious for New Orleans. The answer was negative. Denavit advised Berthet to leave by the Tampico on December 16, 1864. This advice was based on a letter from Bishop (Claude Marie) Dubuis brought by Padey, ordering Berthet to go by way of Mexico to avoid the United States customs on 4,000 francs worth of church furnishings. Berthet is truly sorry that he could not accommodate (Odin). All (Odin's) kindnesses to him compel his gratitude, especially the one of September 7.

VI-2-in A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
5


1865 Jan 8

Hendricken, Father Thomas F.
Waterbury, Conn(ecticut)

To Bishop (Francis P.) McFarland (of Hartford
Providence, Rhode Island)

Enclosed McFarland will find a draft for $300 cathedraticum together with the deed of the house property belonging to the church. The cemetery is now completely out of debt and will be deeded to the Bishop in a few days. He encloses also the report of the last year (no enclosures) which he has read that day to the congregation. McFarland will perceive that they are not going backward. If they had not got the organ, bought the house property, and rebuilt the schoolhouse, they would be nearly out of debt. But they are necessary debts and they are working their way through them.

I-1-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


1865 Jan 7

Fields, J.T.
Boston, (Massachusetts)

To (Orestes) A. Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Fields is obliged to return Brownson's paper for the Atlantic Monthly because he has many articles now on hand. It will take a long time to print the accumulated papers, and hence he has refused much good writing because of lack of space.

I-4-c A.L.S. 1pg. 12mo.
2


1865 Jan 9

Duggan, James, Bishop of Chicago
Chicago, (Illinois)

To Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

This letter will be presented to Purcell by Judge Wilson, who visits Cincinnati as Counsel for some Chicago prisoners now on trial in Cincinnati. Judge Wilson wishes to meet Purcell.

I-5-c A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
1


(1865) Jan 9

(Elder), William Henry, Bishop of Natchez
Vicksburgh, (Mississippi)

To Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

He asks Odin to give Thomas Owens of Natchez letters that will be of service to him. (Elder) has given him a letter in French; Odin will see from it that he need not be afraid to recommend him. He thanks Odin for the Concilium Provine.

VI-2-i A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
2


1865 Jan 10

Durst, Father Auguste
Theresa, Wis(consin)

To Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere)
(Detroit, Michigan)

Durst acknowledges the receipt of Lefevere's letter of Dec. 22, 1864 in which Lefevere assents to his request. Milwaukee's Archbishop (John Martin Henni) has agreed to incorporate Durst into the Milwaukee diocese on condition of an exeat. Durst requests that the necessary documents be forwarded to him.
(Note) Answered January 20, 1865.

III-2-k A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
2


1865 Jan 10

Hickey, (Father) John F.
Baltimore, (Maryland)

To Archbishop (John Baptist Purcell)
(Cincinnati, Ohio)

Hickey again asks Purcell about his subscription. Hickey was very sick this time last year, and does not remember paying for his paper in advance. Hickey sends five dollars in advance for the present year. Because of years of friendship which is close to Hickey's heart, he almost forgot that he is a poor priest writing to a Prince of the Church. Another motive for writing is to know if they ought not to take another into their society of 7 glories, in the place of Father (Honoratus) Xaupi, who is not dead, but freed from Office, Mass, etc. Father Xaupi is hors de combat though he may be able to say his 7 glories. Hick is entirely restored to health and is now Chaplain at the Hospital.

II-5-h A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


1865 Jan 10

Pabisch, Father Fr(ancis) Jos(eph), Mt. St. Mary's
Cincinnati, Ohio

to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell
Cincinnati, Ohio

In compliance with a request of Purcell Pabisch quotes St. Augustine, Contra Julianum lib. c, cap.xi, n.44 and St. Thomas Aquinas in 1ma 2dae, qu.68, art.11mo on the manner of eternal punishment of original sin in non-baptized children.

Pabisch in P.S.
Asks if Purcell can come on next Tuesday or Thursday, Jan. 25 to celebrate the Mass of Thanksgiving for their benefactors. He asks Purcell to let him know so he can tell the people tomorrow.

II-5-c A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
1


1865 Jan 10

Rochu, Cecile Marie
Ambierle, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

(She addresses Odin as) her uncle. They learned with joy of his improved health; his letter gave them much pleasure.

(P.S. In another hand)
The parents of the religious Mouillé are well. They received her letter a few days ago. The pastor of Ambierle sends his respects.

VI-2-i A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
2


1865 Jan 10

Spalding, Father B(enjamin) J.
Louisville, Kentucky

to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell
Cincinnati, Ohio

He received Purcell's favor in regard to the case of Vincent Marmaduke. He thanks Purcell for his charity. Miss Davidson has heard from Marmaduke how kind Purcell was to him. He hopes Marmaduke may get out of this scrape. Rome hastens slowly, but Spalding will be content, let the result be what it may.

II-5-c A.L.S. 2pp. 16to.
3


1865 Jan 10

Veyrat, Father C(yprian)
Paincourtville, (Louisville)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Veyrat took the seminary collection on the Sunday after Christmas and got $53.10. He also sends $40.50 for the jus cathedraticum. He asks (Odin) to have ten requiem Masses said; the offerings are with the money he sends. Father (Augustine) Maréchaux and Father (Jules) Bouchet are in good health.

VI-2-i A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
3


1865 Jan 12

Follot, Father F(rancis) C.
Plaquemine, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin (C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Since October he has not been allowed to go out of Plaquemine. When called to visit the sick, he could not obtain a pass. He applied many times to the Major but in vain. He wrote to General Sherman but received no answer. On December 20, the church was closed by order of the Major. Follot is unconscious of the cause. Long since he took the oath of neutrality. Odin is to examine into this.

VI-2-i A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
1


1865 Jan 13

Gonnard, Father J(ohn)
Corpus Christi, (Texas)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

It has been over a year since he was transferred to Corpus Christi. He has now realized his plan for a school at Washington, (Texas) called Hidalgo School. Some funds left by Father (Antoine) Borias helped him. He completed the house built for Father (John J.) Magee. It will accommodate 12 boarders. He is going to buy a two-story concrete building for $500. This will be the Hidalgo School for Boys. (Odin) no doubt knows Mrs. Bray, mother of Mrs. Peterson. On leaving she left Gonnard ten acres of land verbatim only. Is there some way to writer her to get it in writing? She is either at New Orleans, Cincinnati or Philadelphia. Gonnard hopes soon to start a class in Latin; one of the Spann family is going to start it. Their Bishop was very ill, but has recovered. A letter could be addressed to Matamoros for Gonnard.

VI-2-i A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
8


1865 Jan 13

McIntyre, Father J( )
Windsor, C(anada)

To Bishop P(eter) P(aul) Lefev(e)re
Detroit, (Michigan)

He is from Nova Scotia. Due to had health, McIntyre seeks a more salubrious country, and requests entry into Detroit Diocese. He has his exeat from his last Bishop.

III-2-k A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
1


186(5) Jan 13

Thrasher, R.M.
New York, (New York)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Mrs. Thrasher came North last September with consent of the Sec(retary) of War at Richmond. Poor Doswell (Ménard) has been for 4 years an epileptic. The past summer she was again ordered from her home in Atlanta, Georgia. Dosie has grown quite tall and says he feels better. She writes about the child of Colonel Ménard, Odin's friend, a man who did good all the day long. Mrs. Thrasher saw her daughter Clara (Thrasher) at Mobile. Clara died September 24 in the Catholic faith. Mr. Thrasher went to Texas to send her means. She has not heard a word from him. Her means are limited and her health failing. (T.W.) Pierce has advanced her some money. She is possessed with the belief that her husband is dead. She asks Odin to write to Mr. Leclerc not to let any of her Galveston property be sold. Leclerc was Colonel Ménard's most trusted friend. In the midst of this her skeptical mind begins to give way to the yearnings of years that she may believe and that she may die in the faith of Colonel Ménard and her Clara. Does Odin think some money could be raised through E.J. Hart of New Orleans by mortgaging some of her property in Galveston? Her address is care of J.R. Bostwick, Bridgeport, Connecticut.

VI-2-i A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
8


1865 Jan 14

Mittlebronn, Father (Francis)
Pointe Coupée, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop John Mary Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Mittlebronn sent not long ago a summary of the state of his parish and his two churches. He stated that there was no cemetery at the church at Fausse Rivière and Odin replied that he must try to buy land for one. Last week someone offered him 80 acres. They ask $1800 in gold. The revenue from the cemetery would pay for it in 2 or 3 years.

VI-2-i A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
2


1865 Jan 14

Thrasher, R.M.
New York, (New York)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Since writing a few days ago she received a letter from a house in Havana telling her they heard from her husband November 26, Houston, and that funds are in their hands subject to her order. Odin will therefore not trouble to see (E.J.) Hart. Her only friend has been T.W. Pierce of Boston. Her prayers for him and Mother Thrasher come easily to her. She prays that Doswell (Ménard) may become worthy of his Father. Dosie is now with another doctor; he believes he will cure him; that is a good thing for epilepsy. She finds it hard to bear the loss of her child Clara (Thrasher). If Sister St. Agnes is in New Orleans, Odin is to tell her that her school pet has passed away. She asks Odin to point out a course of reading on the proofs from the Bible of tenets of the Catholic Church. Her address is care of J.R. Bostwick, Bridgeport, Connecticut.

VI-2-i A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
7


1865 Jan 15

(Bayley) J(ames Roosevelt), Bishop of
Newark, (New Jersey)

To Robert (Seton
Rome, Italy)

He received Robert's letter by the last steamer. Their new Archbishop of New York, (John McCloskey) is winning golden opinions from all by his prudent zeal and cautious manners. There has been a continual succession of dinners but he make time to visit the churches, religious houses and institutions. (Bayley) has no doubt that he will accomplish much for religion. In New Jersey most of the Catholics are mechanics and servants. Many of the men have gone to war, and three times as many have gone to Canada, Australia, and California to avoid the draft. (Seton Hall) College and the Motherhouse of the Sisters of Charity are doing very well. They are building a fine church at Camden and another in Newark. He is told that there are rumors of peace, but does not attach much importance to them at present. He called to see Robert's Father and the girls New Year's week and was surprised to see (William Seton 3) looking so well. They said Robert had made up his mind to some home next summer. Willy (William Seton 4) comes out to see (Bayley) now and then, and is in good health and spirits. Robert seems to be laying in such a fund of learning that (Bayley) does not know what they will do with him when he gets there. There is a rumor that they are to be invited to Rome again to assist at another canonization, but (Bayley) thinks it is a false one. It would be impossible for most of them to get away at this time. The letter of (Pope Pius IX) has been much garbled in the English translation. (Bayley) sends regards to Dr. Smith and Father McCloskey.

II-1-a A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
8


1865 Jan 15

Carrell, Bishop Geo(rge) A(loysius)
Covington, K(untuck)y

to Bishop P(eter) P(aul) Lefev(e)re
(Detroit, Michigan)

He thanks Lefevere for his kind attention to his seminarian, and encloses the $10 received from Lefevere. Carrell hears so many fine things about Canada, particularly Quebec and Lower Canada in general, that he desires to visit it. Carrell has given up the idea of ever visiting Europe, since the Holy Father (Pius IX) has dispensed with the obligation of visiting Rome within ten years, but he would like to see a Catholic country. He may try to do so next summer, when he will repeat his visit to Detroit.

III-2-k A.L.S. 1p. 12mo,
1


1865 Jan 15

(Schorlemer), R.G.S., Sister Marie de Ste. Thérèse
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Yesterday they saw the property in Bienville Street. It is very suitable; if it were double the size it would please her extremely. She would be very much inclined to buy it if the price is not too high as they are without resources and still have the debt on this block down here. Yesterday she received a letter from Angers from their Mother (Sisters of the Good Shepherd) who is always anxious about her, knowing her difficult position. Ste. Thérèse asks Odin again to write to Mother. Odin is to let Ste. Thérèse know the price of the property.

VI-2-i A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
2


1865 Jan 16

Timon, John, Bishop of
Buffalo, (New York)

To Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.)
N(ew) O(leans, Louisiana)

Odin's letter announcing the rapid sinking of Father Sisto (da Gagliano, O.S.F.), Timon sent to Father Pamfilo (da Magliano, O.S.F.) at the Franciscan College, Allegany. Returned from a visit through part of the diocese, he finds mention of his death. He was a good and exemplary religious. The Franciscans are grateful for Odin's expressions. Timon offers his prayers for peace. They have 40 hours adoration, most fruitful in conversions. They are now just closing a retreat for men alone; they calculate about 2400 went to Communion.

VI-2-i A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
3


1865 Jan 17

Baasen, John F.
Milwaukee, (Wisconsin)

To Archbishop John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Uncertain whether Father J(ohn) B(aptis)te Baasen, his son in Pollard, Alabama, received the 145 p(iastres) of which he spoke in his letter of October 23, he sends a letter with100 piastres to Odin asking him to send it on to his son and let him know. Baasen has not yet received the notice of the custom duty and details about the books which Bishop Adames of Luxembourg promised to send to Odin.

VI-2-i A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
2


1865 Jan 17

Bessonies, Father Aug(ustus)
Indianapolis, (Indiana)

To Archbishop J(ohn) B(aptist) Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Bessonies acknowledges Purcell's letter in relation to Confederate prisoners. They have all been released by taking the oath of allegiance. Some went home to Louisiana and others for want of means and working. After their arrival at Camp Morton, Bessonies gave them services for a while but was soon refused admittance. Application for admission was made to the Secretary of War, the Honorable (Edwin) Stanton by Bessonies' friend, Father E.R. Kilroy at Washington City, but this was refused. Governor A.P. Morton and Colonel Baker got him in to see the dying but only under guard. Colonel Stevens and Major Gozzam were kind enough to allow him to see four "Northern Bounty Jumpers" who were sentenced to be shot.

II-5-c A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
2


1865 Jan 17

Brownson, Orestes A.

To W(illiam) D. Kelley
Elizabeth, New Jersey

The administration wished the people to believe that the war was to be a short one; it feared that if it told the people the truth, they would not sustain the war. How the nation is going to get out of the financial muddle no one knows. Brownson sees nothing better to be done than to return to specie payments as rapidly as possible. The tariff must be purely revenue, not protective.

I-4-c A.L.S. (Incomplete) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1865 Jan 17

Brownson, O(restes) A.
Elizabeth, N(ew) J(ersey)

To C(harles) Sumner
(Washington, D.C.)

Brownson says his review "died of" (John Charles) Fremont. He states that he voted for Lincoln electors in the recent election. He is writing a work entitled; "the Republic of the United States;" he deals with its Constitution, its tendencies, and its destiny. Brownson further gives the scope of his treatment; he wishes this to be considered as his political testament, and his legacy, as a citizen, to his country. It will be an octavo volume. This work will be followed by one in philosophy, then one on Theology, another on the Church, and another on the Catholic and Protestant controversy. The materials are all collected; the greater part already written. He is glad (Benjamin) Butler is relieved. He believes "this is worth more to us than would have been even the taking of Fort Fisher." He thanks Sumner for his speech on the Reciprocity Treaty a treaty Brownson never liked. National affairs seem brighter. Thomas is not bad. The amendment prohibiting slavery concerns Brownson greatly. He hopes for a competent man to succeed the present Secretary of the Treasury.

I-4-c A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
3


1865 Jan 17

Brownson, O(restes) A.
Elizabeth, N(ew) J(ersey)

To E(lihu) B. Washburn
(Washington, D.C.)

Brownson writes to Washburn in the belief that he is a loyal man and a friend of General (Ulysses S.) Grant. He wishes to congratulate him on the removal of General (Benjamin) Butler. Brownson holds Butler to blame for Grant's impediments to success. He attributes the fiasco at Fort Fisher to Butler's genius. He also believes Butler should be court-martialed for his insult to General Grant during his farewell to his army. Brownson would have Washburn help block the movement to have Butler run for the Presidency in 1868. Brownson was opposed to the nomination and reelection of (Abraham) Lincoln, but he voted for Lincoln. He would rather have Lincoln for a third term than have any civilian, who, at the beginning of the war, was appointed to high military rank. He would like the rank of full general bestowed on Grant and Sherman, and have as many Lieutenant Generals as there are permanent army corps. Brownson believes the United States must have a strong navy. The rank of admiral should be possible for Vice-Admirals. He has full confidence in General Grant as General-in-chief if Grant can be permitted to have his own way in selecting the officers under him. Brownson hopes there is a way of preventing the incorrect allotting of the number of recruits.

I-4-c A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
5


1865 Jan 17

Timon, John Bishop of
Buffalo, (New York)

To Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.)
N(ew) Orleans, (Louisiana)

He has just received Odin's letter. The sad loss had been known to them by telegraph. It is probable that two anonymous letters against Timon may have reached Odin. A few priests thought to intimidate Timon. He did not answer but the Dean of Rochester answered part of the last. Timon found out all, four at most. He pardoned all, but one so unworthily discharged his duty that Timon had to send him. The only punishment Timon gave was to endorse the very slim exeat he brought from his last mission. The Bishop of Boston, to whom he went, wrote begging to know if he could employ him. Timon replied by requesting the Bishop to give him a trial under a good priest. Timon sends the "Cavil of the Dean" of Rochester when the event occurred and who was privy to all. It was published in the "Union and Advertisor of Rochester," November 5, 1864.

VI-2-i A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
1


1865 Jan 18

Anderson, W(illiam) Marshall
(Circleville, Ohio)

To (James Alphonsus McMaster)
(New York, New York)

Anderson thanks McMaster for his letter and asks him to prepare the letters. Anderson hopes to call for them in about three weeks, and will endeavor to do the rest after he has been presented to such gentlemen. He has seen enough of politics. The deliberate surrender of a noble constitutional principle to a miserable pecuniary policy made the hope of his heart sicken and despair. It is time for him to seek another home. The Union is gone forever. So long as Puritan meaners and Yankee love of rule endures, so long will continue the struggle between North and the South. If he remains he would remain without liberty and in this Union, there is no liberty. Ask Stone, Jacobs and Wolford. He is going where God and Liberty rule the land. His poor friend Col. Maderia said to him that if he were twenty years younger, he might stay and fight it out. His resolution is fixed, and nothing but death or imprisonment can prevent or change it. He should enter the new country in high hopes. Those noble Christians and charming gentlemen, Archbishop of Baltimore and the Bishop of Cleveland, could not have written more flattering to and of him, but had he been greatest and best in land, he said. He asks God to bless them.

P.S. He wants to know if McMaster has any knowledge of value of land in best part of Mexico? He says he should be able to raise about $17,000 or $18,000 in gold, perhaps more. He had an enquiry on his best tract of land on the Ohio today, and asks if he should sell now or wait until his tour of observation. His wife would not be willing to go until he has seen with his own eyes. He ought to have this knowledge before he starts. Another postscript of a different handwriting puts the question: "What is the price of it (my river bottom farm) $400 yearly or one half cash, the balance in 1, 2, and 3 years?" The answer of a still different hand: "Now, if for the purpose of getting a gold payment and all dust, I made a sacrifice of much value. Can I outside of France place my funds in safety until invested? Please advise what to do. I have been offered $80 for 256 greenbacks. I ask $50 in gold. The payments I fear will divide us."

I-1-m A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
1


1865 Jan 18

Cunningham, David P.
Savannah, G(corgi)a

to Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

On account of the rapid movements of the army Cunningham did not get Odin's last letter from his brother sent to the care of James Myher, New York. He encloses one which Odin is to try and forward. Cunningham wrote him to try and join him and if he needs any money to do so, Cunningham will refund it to anyone advancing it. He signs as war correspondent of the New York Herald.

VI-2-i A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
2


1865 Jan 19

Andres, Father Fr(ancis)
Canal Dover, Ohio

to (Archbishop John Baptist Purcell)
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Andres asks a dispensation for a secret impediment of consanguinity in the second degree. The couple were married in good faith and their children have been regarded as legitimate. They promise to abide by the usual conditions until the dispensation is granted.

II-5-c A.L.S. (Latin) 1p. 12mo.
1


1865 Jan 19

Hecker, I(saac) T.
(New York City)

To (Sarah M.) Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Hecker informs Miss Brownson that her manuscripts are ready for the printer. She will have to write another preface if one is necessary. Hecker asks where the proofs are to be sent.

I-4-c A.L.S. 1pg. 16mo.
1


1865 Jan 19

Longnemare, Emile
Cordova (Mexico)

to (James Alphonsus) McMaster
(New York, New York)

He is located 100 miles from Mexico City. He writes this report in order to make the steamer leaving January 23. They arrived January 13 and he went immediately to the Governor of Vera Cruz who was quite cordial, but who said the proper person to see was Minister Roblez of the Agricultural Department. He went on a tour of the interior, trying to see as much as possible of matters and things in about Mexico. The Pennsylvanians were given passage on the railroad to Solidad and offered to them and now do not have money left. Longnemare is disappointed in the Pennsylvanians, but those in the party from Illinois and Missouri are braver, better behaved, and more intelligent men and will not leave Vera Cruz until he did. He describes their two day journey from Vera Cruz to Cordova, the last 23 miles on foot. The Comisario of the municipality was powerless to aid them or even to give any information. He has visited many plantations and inspected the lands around here, all of which are for sale, but cannot be bought. He shall give an explanation of this in his next letter. From Cordova on, the land and climate are perfect. Unless he can succeed with the government, the whole thing will have to be abandoned, and American emigration will be at an end. He would not advise anyone to come without a capital of $20,000 for living is so expensive. He gives a list of the 22 arrivals here. All letters sent to him should be sent by Mr. Arroyo or send to Havana. Letters addressed to Mexico just do not arrive. He asks to be remembered to Mrs. McMaster, Mrs. Brown, and Miss Brown.

P.S. He asks that two American one horse ploughs be sent to them in care of Bourcy and Montandon, Vera Cruz.

I-1-m A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
2


1865 Jan 20

Juncker, (Henry D.), Bishop of Alton
Cairo, (Illinois)

To Archbishop J(ohn) B(aptist) Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

He writes for Purcell to procure him some paroles. Juncker knows no one while Purcell knows all the important people. Purcell frightened him. Purcell has asked who is that Sister. Juncker is at Cairo to build a new church. His hospital has poor prospects.

II-5-c A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
1


1865 Jan 20

Magliano, O.S.F., Father Pamfilo da
Allegany, N(ew) Y(ork)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He thanks (Odin) for his kindness shown to their departed Father Sisto (da Gagliano, O.S.F.). They buried him yesterday among his confreres as he had wished. Magliano encloses a note for Father Agostino and asks (Odin) to forward it.

VI-2-i A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
3


1865 Jan 20

Mount Carmel, Sister of
Vermilionville, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Odin) may not recall Sister Marie du Saint Sacrement, (O.Carm.). She will never forget the happy days when she received his blessing. The Community joins her in sending their wishes for a happy New Year. For almost 3 years his steps have been marked by good deeds.

VI-2-i A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
2


1865 Jan 21

Carrell, Geo(rge) A., Bishop of
Covington, K(untuck)y

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Visitation Nuns near Mobile lately wrote to the Sisters at Washington, D.C. describing their situation as deplorable, having been obliged to flee from their convent and take refuge in the Jesuit College of Spring Hill. The Sisters of Washington sent an extract of the letter to a priest at Maysville, K(entuck)y, who wants Sisters, saying that the Sisters of Mobile would be glad of an opportunity of establishing a new house. If these Sisters were sent north or west, (Odin) could inform them of the opening at Maysville.

VI-2-i A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
2


1865 Jan 21

McCloskey, Father William
Rome, (Italy)

To Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

McCloskey acknowledges Purcell's letters of the 15th and 26th of December and the draft for 25.10.9 pounds of which he gave Richter 5.10.9pounds and placed the rest, 25 pounds, to Purcell's credit. As yet he has heard nothing of any appointment to Louisville nor has Bishop (Patrick) Lynch heard. He has not heard of the Worthingtons and Wills but he hopes they will come in for the Easter ceremonies. He hears frequently of Madame Bontonslin's good work. Purcell wrote concerning a Mr. Schlichter of Frejus but is Mr. Constantin who is from Frejus and Schlichter is from Münster. McCloskey told Dr. Balle who is to notify the Vicariate that Constantin might do damage as a priest. McCloskey intends to go to America in the Spring. Cardinal Barnabo agrees with his plan. He hopes Purcell approves. Dr. Lynch is now in Rome and may remain until Easter. Maguire has turned up in New York. Dr. (Levi Silliman) Ives formerly of Milwaukee, is now staying at the Redemptorist Convent near S. Maria Maggion. Last summer he placed himself in the hands of the inquisition and is now trying to erase the scandal. Father John Bannon, formerly of St. Louis, is about to become a Jesuit in Dublin. McCloskey will attend to Purcell's request about the power to ordain "subtitulo missions" and the renewal of the permission to eat meat on Saturday. Dr. Kirby was injured not long ago when his horse ran away. McCloskey will get Don Bernardo's budget for Purcell when he sees him. He sends regards to friends. Richter says he saw De Montel a few days ago.

II-5-c A.L.S. 4pp 12mo.
5


1865 Jan 21

Tiernan, Bernard
Tampico, (Mexico)

To Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

He encloses a draft for 30 pounds sterling which he asks Odin to cash and give his mother, Mrs. Rose Tiernan, the $150 it will make.

VI-2-i A.L.S. 1p. 4to.
2


1865 Jan 22

Peter, Sarah
Cincinnati, (Ohio)

To J(ames) A(lphonsus) McMaster
(New York, New York)

After settling debt to the Freeman she asks McMaster if he has noticed the history of the Church which O'Shea is publishing, from the French. She says it is an admirable work, and greatly wasted for she believes there is no such thing in their language as a Catholic History of the Church. There are two or three volumes, merest skeletons, she says. She has a double reason for calling work to McMaster's attention.

--------
(1) is its general excellency and
(2) the fact that she is translating it.

She translated it on the condition that Archbishop (Martin John) Spalding would not mention her by name. Yet he has and also used the hackneyed phrase "lady convert." The reason, she says is that she wishes to work in peace and having years ago left the world, does not wish to be reminded of her existence. She made a gift to the Archbishop of the translation as an act of thanksgiving for the precious gift of faith. She hopes the Lord will give her help and that the work may be useful in warming faith of so many tepid Catholics who are absolutely ignorant of wondrous history of their church. There are four volumes to the work, 800 pages each. She sends her best regards to Mrs. McMaster and Mrs. Brown.

I-1-m A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
2


1865 Jan 22

St. Vincent, R.U., Sister
(Opelousas, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

A year and a half has gone by since she first wrote (Odin) about leaving Opelo8sas but he has not replied. She sent a second with Mother St. Hyacinthe, (R.U.) last September which St. Hyacinthe gave back on her return. She asked permission to return to her own convent (Ursulines of Brown County) but being forever excluded from it, on account of noncompliance, it only remained to beg (Odin) to enter at New Orleans. Her superiors at St. Martin's, Ohio, will give a satisfactory account of her and her superiors here will be inclined to excuse the past. She has been tempted to leave this convent but wishes to do so in a proper manner. Father (Gilbert) Raymond and Mother say they cannot give her permission to go to see (Odin).

VI-2-i A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
4


1865 Jan 23

Andres, Father Francis
Coshocton, (Ohio)

To Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Andres is satisfied with the way Rosecrans settled between him and his congregation. Rosecrans will give Purcell a report and the cash accounts of the congregation here. Andres asks to go back to his old congregation because of the debts here and because his mother will never become free of fever in Dover.

P.S. If Purcell will let Andres go back he pledges his honor to pay all the debts within one year and will make a donation of the money the congregation owes him.

II-5-c A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
1


1865 Jan 23

Darby, Mary M.
St. Louis, M(issouri)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Since she last saw or heard of (Odin) many sad changes have come about due to the war. Her brother Francis' wife died about 3 years ago. Her only daughter is now living with Darby. Her brother Walter died about a year ago. Mr. Darby and her own family are well; one son is in the army. Mr. Darby has not yet become a Catholic. What has become of (Odin's) servant and her husband, Clem. Mr. Daly, formerly secretary of the Bishop here, has offered to take this letter.

VI-2-i A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
2


1865 Jan 23

(Elder), William Henry, Bishop of Natchez
Vicksburg, Mississippi

to Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Odin's letter of the 11th reached him Saturday. At the present value of currency his diocese would lose $550 to $600 in gold. (Philip) Rotchford has always been a king friend; it would be unworthy to annoy him. If Rotchford feels safe to pay it after the war, (Elder) can wait. If he prefers to settle it now through the Sisters, would they be willing to pay in specie after the war? He begs Odin to arrange it as he judges fairest. If the $3000 were paid now would the deficit be supplied some future time? If Odin receives any for (Elder) he can deposit it with (Thomas?) Layton, as also the $442 which Odin purposes paying himself. (Elder) has been in Vicksburg since Christmas. He is waiting for the arrival of Father Charles Van Quechelberge whom he has appointed pastor; he is the best for the post. They are to have a Catholic Commander at Natchez, General (John) Davidson.

VI-2-i A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
5


1865 Jan 23

Viau, Father J(ose)ph
Lafayette, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Viau will not tell about their trip as he believes Madame (A.) Shannon, (R.S.C.) will tell him. Slowed up by their baggage, it was a long trip. Once inside the Confederate lines, he had to get new passes for which he went to Colonel Ménard and General (Xavier) DeBray. Both had known (Odin) in Missouri and in Texas. Two weeks after leaving New Orleans they arrived at Lafayette. He is delighted to be with Father (Gustave) Rouxel. Rouxel has already baptized two Protestants. Viau goes every week for Mass at Royville, staying at the home of Desiré Roy. At Royville he saw Mr. Woolf, Russian Consul for Texas and Mr. Delaunay who said he knew (Odin) in Texas. They asked Viau to ask (Odin) for the Holy Oils.

A.L.S.

On the same paper:

--------
(1865 Jan 23)

Rouxel, Father G(usta)ve
(Lafayette, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He thanks (Odin) for sending him Viau. Rouxel is sending (Odin) 10 piastres by Father (René) Vallée, the result of the collection for the seminary.

VI-2-i A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
10


1865 Jan 24

Le Saicherre, Father J(ohn) B(aptist) and Father F(rancois) Ceuppens
New River, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Since receiving (Odin's) reply this is the first chance to send the explanations he asked for. The dispensation was for affinity. The marriage took place yesterday and they were obliged to use the dispensation given for disparity of cult as the Protestant party refused baptism because of confession. (Odin) is to send a few lines that they can show the couple. (Odin) spoke of a box of books from Belgium addressed to Ceuppens. Ceuppens has not ordered any but it may have been sent by a friend. They cannot send the money to have it sent but could pay through Mass Intentions. Ceuppens has been sick for a week. This morning the doctor said the fever would be gone today.

VI-2-i A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
2


1865 Jan 24

Murphy, Father P.J.R.
Chicago, Ill(inoic)

to Archbishop J(ohn) Baptist) Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Bishop Duggan gave Murphy Purcell's note with the enclosure from Mr. Cairon prisoner of war at Camp Douglas, with instructions to present Purcell's application to Colonel Sweet, commanding this post. Sweet said he had orders from Washington not to release or exchange prisoners until the President is applied to. Cairon wishes Purcell would send him twenty of thirty dollars for necessities he cannot obtain in prison and the clothing and money can be forwarded to Mr. Cairon, Barrack 18, Camp Douglas. Murphy can carry the money to him if Purcell wishes but he is not allowed to carry clothing to prisoners. Murphy says he had very important missions in Chicago before becoming a Chaplain in the Federal army. He served under Generals W.T. Sherman, N.P. Banks, and A.J. Smith. He was captured by the enemy while on the Red River expedition. General Dick Taylor held him six or seven days as a prisoner and then let him go. He injured his right thumb and had dysentery so bad he had to leave the Army. The Bishop last October appointed him pastor of (St. James) parish and Chaplain of Camp douglas which is a few hundred yards from his church. His brother, Cornelius R. Murphy, was recently killed in the Federal Army at Thibodeaux, Louisiana. Murphy asks Purcell to offer a Mass for his brother and to pray for him. He also asks Purcell to send some Catholic books for the prisoner.

(Note by Purcell: he sent $10 to Murphy for Cairon).

II-5-c A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
3


1865 Jan 24

Wood, James F(rederick), Bishop of
Philadelphia, (Pennsylvania)

To Bishop Francis P. McFarland (of Hartford)
(Providence, Rhode Island)

Father (Ambrose) Manahan knocks on his door from Danbury, Connecticut and Wood infers no good. He has no papers. Wood asks McFarland his opinion of Manahan's future.

I-1-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
2


1865 Jan 25

McCloskey, Father George
(New York, New York)

To Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

McCloskey asks Purcell to help him out of a blunder he made. He went to Washington and presented Purcell's letters. Mr. Chase was very courteous and endorsed Purcell's letter. Mr. Dennison was very sympathetic and gave McCloskey a letter to the President and got him an appointment before others who were waiting. The President said the petition could not be granted. McCloskey told it all to Mr. Selin. McCloskey has not had time to write to Purcell before now and asks him not to mention his delay in his reply because he will have to read the letter to Mr. Selin.

II-5-c A.L.S. 6pp. 12mo.
1


1865 Jan 25

(Seton), Harry
Jacksonville, (Florida)

To (William Seton 3)
(Cragdon, New York)

He has just returned from St. Augustine. They had a trip fraught with accidents. Their vessel struck a bar about 4 P.M. They had about ten ladies with them and managed to land them on a sand island before dark, without swamping any boats except one which capsized in the breakers. They had to build a fire to guide the remaining boats. They remained on the island about 6 hours when their blue lights and guns at last attracted the attention of the people of St. Augustine who reported to the commander and sent 6 or 7 boats in which most of them reached a very good supper by 3 A.M. at the famous Colonel Buffington's. Harry bought the girls some palmetto work in St. Augustine. The officer taking this letter will also give Will(iam Seton 4) the power of attorney. Charley was along. Harry wrote Will and Ned Austin by the last boat. Gen(eral Eliakim Parker) Scammon has recommended Henry for a commission in the Regular Army. Harry is sending a Florida newspaper with the announcement of his promotion put there by Scammon without Harry's knowledge. When does (William 3) think Bob (Robert Seton) will come out? He will try to write.

II-1-a A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
6


1865 Jan 26

Baasen, John F(rancis)
Milwaukee, (Wisconsin)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He has received (Odin's) letter of the 11th with the bill for sending the books to his son, Father J(ean) B(aptis)te (Baasen) at Pollard. He was surprised at the exorbitant charge for the small case, especially as he could have obtained them from Mr. Bentzinger of Cincinnati for 63.30(?). He sends (Odin) the $62. He would also enclose a little gift if he were not too hard up just now. His fortune for the most part consists of assets in Minnesota so loaded with taxes that his income hardly provides for his family six months of the year. He received a letter today from Bishop W(illiam) H(enry) Elder dated the 12th telling of the receipt of a letter of his son's which Baasen had sent on October 24 in a letter written to (Odin). Baasen does not know how this letter reached Elder. If (Odin) has received the $100 sent on the 18th it will be better to pay the transportation charges on the box, as it might find J(ohn) B(aptist) without money. Or if the $100 is already sent on, (Odin) is to let Baasen know the charges or send the box to Elder and let Baasen know.

VI-2-i A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
4


1865 Jan 26

Hecker, I(saac) T.
(New York City)

To (Orestes A. Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Brownson is informed that Appleton retains the rights to publish but not the copyright of the book. If the book sales exceed publication cost, the ten per "dates back to the beginning." Appleton & Co. will keep the plates. Hecker sends two pamphlets by Frothingham. The latter is alleged to be the author of the first article in the "Ex(press?)." Brownson might be glad of this information since Frothingham is the author of "The New Religion of Nature." Hecker comments on "p.3, first column " Brownson will find a defence of this "New Religion" in the Review of "Hedge (?)." Frothingham is seriously challenged for his attack in the Examiner. Hecker has written to Boston to learn whether Fields will publish the pamphlet. He suggests a title for it. He will get the Newtonian paper to determine the authorship of the article. Brownson may assume it. Appleton's terms were better than he supposed.

I-4-c A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
3


1865 Jan 26

Kehoe, L(awrence)
New York (City)

To (Orestes A. Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Kehoe sends Brownson seventy-three dollars and fifty cents. He will see Brownson as soon as he can.

I-4-c A.L.S. 1pg. 12mo.
1


1865 Jan 26

Purcell, Archbishop J(ohn) B(aptist)
Cin(cinnati, Ohio)

To Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefevere
Detroit, (Michigan)

The accompanying document (no enclosure) came without the promised Syllabus. Cardinal (Alexander) Barnabo says permission to eat meat runs to 1868. Purcell notes such a furor among his Germans for marrying in the first degree of affinity in collateral line. He has exhausted 7 of the 10 faculties allowed him. These Germans come out of their hiding places in time of missions. Barnabo sends him a copy of an old list of questions, substantially answered before now about candidates proposed for episcopal sees. The Archbishop of Baltimore, (Martin John Spalding) has sent to the Cardinal the names presented for Albany. Purcell is at a loss to know what to say about the names offered at Detroit. Several bishops would prefer Father William McCloskey Rector of the American College in Rome. If they could get the Provincial of the Jesuits (Ferdinand Cossemans, S.J.) in St. Louis, Purcell would prefer him. Purcell asks Lefevere to advise him what to write to the Cardinal about Father Ben(jamin) (Spalding), (Peter J.) Lavialle, Coosemans, and McCloskey.

III-2-k A.L.S. 3pp. 16mo.
8


1865 Jan 26

Seton, Harry
(Jacksonville, Florida)

To Will(iam Seton 4)
(Cragdon, New York?)

He has another picture, better than the first, and will send it per mail, also one of Charly Deanmead in his uniform. Will is to give one of the pictures to Eddy and the best one to his Father. They have just had a little fight outside their lines. Some 40 of their infantry were out foraging and were attacked by 300 Rebel cavalry. They lost about 30 in killed and captured. They followed the men so closely that the pickets had a chance to fire. Harry went out about 4 miles, saw nothing but picked up some of their own men who had escaped and taken to the swamp. He will send the palmetto work with Captain Wotten or the purser Mr. McManus, until Will calls for them.

P.S. Will is to tell Ned (Austin) he will send him his picture per next mail.

II-1-a A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
5


1865 Jan 27

Lefevere, Bishop Peter Paul
Det(roit, Michigan)

To Father Polydorus L.M. (Henry) Delbaere
(Detroit, Michigan)

Lefevere forbids Delbaere to perform any religious ceremony with the Detroit Diocese, due to his scandalous way of saying Mass and administering the sacraments, under pain of suspension. Until Father (Peter) Hennaert is satisfied that Delbaere has corrected these faults, the prohibition will remain in effect.

III-2-k L. Copy or Draft 2pp. 8vo.
2


1865 Jan 28

Pearce, Sister M. Eulalia
Wheeling, (Virginia)

To Archbishop John Baptist Purcell
Cincinnati, Ohio

Her eyes actually swim when she hears Purcell's name so intensely gratified does she feel as a Catholic and a convert for the noble manner in which Purcell has asserted the doctrines of the Church in defiance of stupidity and calumny. She has been commissioned by the community to write to (Father Edward Purcell), but as she does not know him she has added a note to this letter.

II-5-c A.L.S. 3pp. 16to.
1


1865 Jan 29

(Schorlemer), R.G.S., Sister Marie de Ste. Thérèse
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

It has been 2 weeks since (Odin) promised a reply concerning the price of the property. Tomorrow a woman (is coming?) who intends to approach the governor to obtain boarders for them; it would be useful to know where they count on building.

P.S. Has (Odin) written to Angers; Ste. Thérèse has new reasons for seeing the necessity of the novitiate (of the Sisters of the good Shepherd)here.

VI-2-i A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
2


1865 Jan 30

Hayes, Cornelius, William Shiel, Patrick Winn, and James Murray
Adrian, (Michigan)

to Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere)
(Detroit, Michigan)

The undersigned have been deputed by those who wish to have a school opened in (W.) Dunn's house. Lefevere is asked to notify Dunn, who is unwilling to yield possession, alto Lefevere had asked him, through Mr. Phelan, to do so last fall. They are anxious to open a school for their children.

III-2-k A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
3


1865 Jan 30

Vignonet, Father E(leazar), St. John Baptist
(Bennet Carré, Louisiana)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He hoped that the explanation that he sent to Father (Stephen) Rousselon to give to (Odin) would be received with indulgence as it was sent in good faith. He knew about the circular in regard to the rendering of accounts but if he got one he could not find it and he had to rely on his memory. He was in France when the objection was made and he knew nothing about it before he left. He believes that (Odin) does not require the rendering of accounts from pastors whose churches have trustees; they are only required to pay the jus Cathedraticum. He would have gone to the city as soon as he got Rousselon's letter except for the feast day Thursday. He will go next week; he will bring the sum the sum deducted from his receipts which up to January 1 amount to $698.65.

VI-2-i A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
3


1865 Jan 31

Lüers, Bishop J(ohn) H(enry)
Fort Wayne, (Indiana)

To Bishop P(eter) P(aul) Lefev(e)re
Detroit, (Michigan)

Lüers writes for faculties for Father Henry Koenig, Mishawaka, (Indiana), to hear the confessions of some German Catholics in Niles, (Michigan) as Lüers has given Father J(ohn) Cappon for Belgian Catholics living in Mishawaka. As yet Lüers has heard no news about Louisville. In Germany he learned that Bishop (Frederick) Résé is in an asylum in Hildesheim but entirely out of his mind. Lüers saw Father (John) De Neve in Louvain and spent 2 days with him.

III-2-k A.L.S. 4pp. 32mo.
6