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Calendar: 1865

1865 Dec

Hobart, Henry
Jackson, Mich(igan)

To Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere)
(Detroit, Michigan)

Hobart writes Lefevere to inform him about the school in Jackson. A few men have taken things into their own hands without consulting Father (Cornelius Moutard) or anyone else; they intend to pay the teacher out of the pew rent or Sabbath collections, hardly enough to support the priest and pay for his house. There was once a good teacher, Mrs. Carloss, but a few men put her out of school; now they wish to hire a man at $400 or $500 a year. To have a good school under good management Sisters are needed, and the cost would be only half as much, as well as a priest as head.

III-2-k A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
3


1865 Dec 1

Dauterive, Mrs. Celina
New Iberia, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.) Aubin?
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

She recalls the promise (Odin) made on leaving, to procure an orphan for her. She is sorry to bother him, but her great necessity prompts her to ask again. She trusts to his kindness.

P.S. She will raise the child as her own and have her practice her religion.

VI-2-j A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
1


(1865 Dec 1)

Grevemberg, Euphémie
(Grand Coteau, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

She thanks (Odin) for sending her the beautiful little book. She hopes she will be confirmed by (Odin) this year. Madame (E.) Freret, (R.S.C.) has promised her she would make her First Communion this year.

A.L.S. (French)

On the same paper:

--------
1865 Dec 1

Freret, R.S.C.J, Madame E.
Grand Coteau, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

She asks )Odin's) indulgence for Euphémie's letter. The little girl will treasure her book. Her mother will be touched by this sign of (Odin's) kindness. Freret, as agent for their little family at Coteau, thanks him for all his favors.

A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
2


1865 Dec 1

Hoersch, John F.W.
Wyandotte, (Michigan)

to Bishop P(eter) P(aul Lefevere)
Detroit, (Michigan)

By being in Detroit yesterday, Hoersch missed Lefevere's visit to Wyandotte. He has fallen out with Vater De Prete (Father Charles L. Depreiter). Hoersch lists 24 points in his favor. He has spent much labor, time and money to improve church and school properties. De Prete opposed the school, but with some Irish and German families a teacher was hired and Mr. Gransinger's home rented. De Prete told Mrs. Brodhead of Gross(e) Isle, and Mr. Gransinger and Pat Finn here that he was a bad man and not to have anything to do with him. He has been discharged as Treasurer of the graveyard, and any sale of lots is null and void so that people are withdrawing their purchase of them. Hoersch has a lot in Mount Elliotte. He helped last winter to haul stone from Ecorse to Wyandotte. There was only one sermon preached at the Jubilee last summer. Hoersch was arrested for breaking up an anti-Catholic lecturer from Canada. De Prete has denounced him from the altar, so that he cannot go to church.

III-2-k A.L.S. 5pp. 4to.
3


1865 Dec 1

Raymond, Father G(ilbert)
Opelousas (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Odin) has sent Raymond a very fine young man in Father (J.B.) Preau. Concerning Father (J.N.) Simon, Father (Joseph) Roduit and Father (Felix) Benausse complain that he goes into their own parish where they go regularly themselves. Because of the absence of Father (Francis Raymond) and then of Father (Aristide) Plotin, he has spent some little time with Raymond. But he should remain in his parish; he is in charge of Calcasieu, not Villeplatte. There will be a regular mail between Lac Charles and Opelousas which will permit a prompt answer about marriage dispensations. Two priests are needed at Calcasieu but priests who know Simon say they could not live with him. Preau says that Mr. Paquet, the Canadian living with a mulattress, wants to go to ask (Odin) for permission to marry her. Raymond believes that the law about marriage between whites and blacks has not been repealed by present circumstances. Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc always told Raymond not to bless them. As for Villeplatte, (Odin) has said that Father (René) Vallée could go to Cataigner and old Grand Prairie and divide the fees with Raymond. This is good but for other places, as of Father (A.) Beaugier's time, he should not officiate without letting Raymond know. This is what they did at Grand Coteau. Vallée is going to build a presbytery with the money subscribed for the church. He needs it but should not get his own money involved. He was obliged to interrupt his letter and continues on December 4 from Washington, (Louisiana). He spoke of a case concerning his brother; it happened before(Odin's) visit to Opelousas. It is perhaps why he went to make a retreat with the Trappists. The same thing happened 4 years ago. They are making the Jubilee; this week he is at Washington.

P.S. He will try to get to (New Orleans) soon.

VI-2-j A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
14


1865 Dec 1

Shannon, (R.S.C.), Madame A.
St. Michael's, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

She asks for permission for Father (F.) Bellanger, (S.M.) or Father (Claude Marie) Chavas, (S.M.) to examine the three members of their community (Religious of the Sacred Heart), who are to make their profession on December 8. She arrived home yesterday and found all well except Madame Melancon, (R.S.C.). They have 86 boarders and 34 poor externs. The Archbishop of Rennes, their Mother General and Mother (Adèle) Cahier, (R.S.C.) sent their respects.

VI-2-j A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
6


1865 Dec 2

Berthaud, Father F(rancis)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

To his great disappointment, Berthaud is back in Louisiana. He had hoped to find in Havana the old bishop whom he knew but he has been replaced. This unfortunate trip used up his resources. So he applies again to (Odin). He left Louisiana but now he is back solely on the advice of Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell. If Berthaud must respect (Odin's) rules, he asks to spend the winter with a confrere where he can have some income. If (Odin) refuses him, which he does not think he will do, it would be strange after all Berthaud has done for Louisiana. He feels misunderstood.

P.S. He hopes (Odin) will receive this direct; he can give a reply to Father Rousselon or Father Perché. Berthaud could perhaps go to New York but how could he gain any income where English is spoken. The pastor of St. Vincent de Paul acted treacherously or quite childishly in his regard. (Odin) will not regret it if he takes him back.

VI-2-j A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
2


1865 Dec 2

Dubreul, Father J(osep)h Paul
Baltimore, Maryland

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He sends (Odin) the bill from St. Charles for the expenses of (Joseph) Gallen. There is talk of the National Council in 1866. (Odin) will recall that they gave him hospitality at the Council of 1852; he is to regard the seminary as his base in Baltimore. He recommends their Seminary of St. Sulpice to (Odin's) prayers. For the number and spirit they have little to be desired. They have 64 seminarians; St. Charles (College, Ellicott's Mills, Maryland) has 118 students.

VI-2-j A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
4


1865 Dec 2

(Elder), William Henry, Bishop of
Natchez, (Mississippi)

To Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Odin's letter of November 23 was received. Yesterday he looked over all of Archbishop (Anthony) Blanc's letters and found it, dated March 5, 1858. Blanc says he had received a rescript from Rome dated January 25, 1858 in answer to a petition for the faculties in casu complicis. The mission will continue to the 13th. He has not yet determined when to start for Europe. The rations are stopped and there is not sufficient provision for their orphans. Father (Frederick) Müller spoke to (Elder) of his idea of a Negro asylum. (Elder) did not encourage him much. He is better at temporal management than at spiritual care; he has some peculiar notions. (Elder) sends a copy of the Natchez Courier of today with a letter about the Free Masons. He has some thoughts of writing a fuller one about secret societies.

VI-2-j A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
5


1865 Dec 2

McCloskey, Father W(illia)m
New York, (New York)

To Bishop (Francis P. McFarland of Hartford
Providence, Rhode Island)

McCloskey has received word from the Vice Rector of the Roman College that Mr. Chorlton's health will make it necessary that he return home. Chorlton has written to McCloskey that only the advice of the physician has made him make this step. McCloskey agrees because Chorlton desires to finish in Rome and suggests that McFarland mention this to Chorlton's family. McCloskey thinks he will be able to enter at once into the Troy seminary or any other. McCloskey will see McFarland in a few days and asks that he take no steps about the College until then. He has had a satisfactory visit in the West where they do not fear, as in New York, the "Roman doctors."

P.S. McCloskey includes a letter that Chorlton wrote to his parents which McFarland may read and send on as he thinks proper; also the one he wrote to McFarland. The "young novice" was Chorlton dressed in Monk's clothes.

I-1-b A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
2


1865 Dec 2

Horton, R( ) G., The Day-Book
New York, (New York)

To J(ames) A(lphonsus) McMaster
(New York, New York)

He asks McMaster to send over the announcement for the Old Guard of which they spoke.

I-1-m A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


1865 Dec 2

Cullen, Paul, Archbishop of Dublin
Dublin, (Ireland)

To Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Since Purcell is interested in the Fenians, Cullen is sending him the Freeman's Journal which gives an account of the trial of one of their leaders. The Attorney-General's speech gives a great amount of information about them and shows their hostility to religion. Luby, a fellow of Trinity College was the first tried. He was sentenced to 20 years penal servitude. But the Fenians will not be crushed in Ireland unless supplies be cut off in America. Cullen is afraid that if an outbreak occurs in Ireland, the Orangemen will treat the people like the Blacks were treated in Jamaica. Mr. John O'Mahony, the head of the organization, is safe himself but is sending his dupes to destruction. He follows the example of Mazzini who lives in affluence in London and has conspired for years against Europe's powers, injuring others but not risking himself, Cullen sends his regards to Dr. Rosecrans, his former fellow student, Dr. Murray, has been consecrated Bishop of Maitland in Australia a few days ago.

II-5-c A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
2


1865 Dec 3

Kane, Father R(ichard), St. Mary's College
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Father A(nthony) Verrina, (C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

The contents of Verrina's communication astonished Kane. His punctuality up to the time of his troubles in attending the conference will prove the interest he has always had. If he has not attended this year it was because he was engaged here and his absence would cause inconvenience. He asks Verrina to represent the circumstances to Archbishop (John Mary Odin). As his duties as chaplain did not fill up his time. Kane saw no better occupation for his leisure hours than in donating them to the instruction of youth. (In the papers of Archbishop Odin).

VI-2-i A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
2


1865 Dec 3

Sorin, (C.S.C.), Father E(dward)
Notre Dame, (Indiana)

To (Orestes A.) Brownson
( )

Sorin acknowledges the receipt of Brownson's letter of November 5. He trusts that for as long as they live Brownson will consider their engagement to hold. If resources permit Sorin will try to show better appreciation of Brownson's contributions; for the present he will not find it a loss to labor gratuitously for their Blessed Mother. Mother Angela just handed Sorin Brownson's letter.

A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.

On the same paper is written:

( )

(Gillespie, C.S.C.), Sister (Mary of St.) Angela
(Notre Dame, Indiana)

To (Orestes A.) Brownson
( )

Sister Angela would regret nothing more than to see Brownson's name disappear from the contributors to Our Mother's journal. His great heart and rare intellectual powers can influence others to love Our Mother. (Sorin) proposes to offer $200 for the best prose article on the Blessed Virgin; it will undoubtedly be Brownson's. Why does she not hear from Sarah (Brownson)?

I-4-c A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
2


1865 Dec 4

Brownson, O(restes) A.
Elizabeth, N(ew) J(ersey)

To Charles Sumner
(Washington, D.C.)

Brownson did not write for a long time because after his (John C.) Fremont fiasco he did not have the courage to look at any of his old friends in the face. But Brownson and his son Henry both voted for Lincoln's reelection. Brownson has ordered his publisher, Fr. O'Shea, to send a copy of Brownson's book "The American Republic, its Constitution, Tendencies and Destiny." Brownson thinks that in it he successfully defended Sumner's doctrine that secession is state suicide. They could remain states in the Union only on the principle of state sovereignty and on that principle secession is valid. Brownson hopes that Congress will take the matter of reconstruction into its own hands and not hold itself bound by the extra-Constitutional action of the Executive. The Executive has the right to hold the late rebel territory under military governorship until Congress otherwise provides, but there is no authority for the Executive to appoint civil governors, and to say who may vote in elections. Brownson does not like the pardons granted by the President. Brownson believes that the rebellious territories should be held under military governorship until the people can be trusted to reorganize themselves. Brownson trusts that Sumner is not deceived by the cry that slavery is dead. Ratification of the Amendment is needed. Brownson's Review is dead, he killed it because after the Fremont affair he did not die from the lack of patronage, but because he sacrificed it to his regard for a man who always disappoints the expectations he raises. Brownson is nobody now but he loves his country and is his country's servant. Brownson's friends secured for him a small annuity on which he can live.

I-4-h A.L.S. (Photostat, Harvard Library) 4pp. 12mo.
1


1865 Dec 4

(Duggan), James, Bishop of
Chicago, (Illinois)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Duggan) commends to (Odin) the young man presenting this note, the O'Connor Don of Ireland, a member of the British Parliament. He visits the South for information. As a representative of one of the oldest and most faithful Catholic families in Ireland it would not be proper not to meet (Odin). (On the back, in another hand): Notre Dame du Lac, St. Joseph's Co. In(d?).

VI-2-j A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
2


1865 Dec 4

Larnaudie, S.J., Father F(rederick)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

This week his successor spent two days with him and promised to be here on December 16. He also wanted Larnaudie to tell (Odin) a petition was being prepared in his former parish. Father (Cyril) Delacroix thinks the best time to divide the parish would be during the interregnum at St. Gabriel. Everything here is going well except the orphan asylum. Since (Odin's) visit, Larnaudie has spent several hundred piastres to repair his old buildings and the cemetery.

P.S. W. Repp would like to let (Odin) know that he has been good since (Odin's) departure but he does not dare to expose himself to take the guarantee of so absolute an affirmation.

VI-2-j A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
4


1865 Dec 4

Lüers, J(ohn) H., Bishop of Fort Wayne
Fort Wayne, (Indiana)

To Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell
of Cincin(nati, Ohio)

Father (Henry) Koenig whom Lüers engaged in Paderborn has arrived in New York. His companion, Father (F.H.) Nolte, destined for St. Louis is with him. They would like to remain as near each other as they can. Lüers asks if he can give Piqua to Nolte. If Lüers deems Nolte unfit, he would withhold Purcell's reply. Nolte does not know English.

II-5-c A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
3


1865 Dec 4

Thivain, Jean
Philadelphia, (Pennsylvania)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

A woman coming to America was charged with delivering the enclosed letter to (Odin). Thivain, through a wife, beloved and mourned, was related to (Odin's) family. The lack of work and the fine promises held out made Thivain decide to go to America. But the language is a stumbling block and they are obliged to work in a shop where French is spoken and which exploits the new arrivals. He has learned that workers are sought after in New Orleans and he is tempted to go next spring. There is a rumor that a silk factory may open in New Orleans. The family of Mrs. Dubuis, Coutour, has asked him for her address; he asks (Odin) to send it.

(P.S.) Thivain's address is in care of M(ar)g(ueri)te Henneb(?).

VI-2-j A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
3


1865 Dec 5

Brownson, O(restes) A.
Elizabeth, N(ew) J(ersey)

To W(illia)m D. Kelley
(Washington, D.C.)

Brownson's silence has resulted from having committed a blunder in the late presidential election and not having courage to meet old friends. He asks Kelley to send him the congressional Globe during the session. He has just published a book on The American Republic: Its Constitution, Tendencies and Destiny in which Kelley may find something of interest. It is intended to discuss the principles of Government in general and of the American Constitution in particular, and to define and defend American democracy, or the American order of civilization. Congress did a good day's work yesterday, but he sees from the New York Times that an effort will be made to forestall the action of Congress by Executive action on the theory that the population and territory lately in rebellion all along have been states in the Union with vacant seats which they have had the right to occupy by their representatives and senators when they chose. (William H.) Seward's theory and probably (Andrew) Johnson's. Brownson repudiates it. Brownson would have accepted the programs agreed upon by (William Tecumseh) Sherman and (Joseph E.) Johnston but as that was rejected Congress should provide for their government till they who were electoral people under the law in force at the time of secession can be trusted to reorganize as States. The President's amnesty proclamation, May 29, was the most proscriptive to be found in history and his assumption of power to pardon before trial, conviction and sentence unconstitutional and ridiculous. He has pardoned the worst men and has made the exceptions in his proclamation a farce. Brownson never liked Johnson any more than that narrow-minded Parson (William Gannaway) Brownlow or Seward. Brownson was a (John C.) Calhoun man and never had any respect for Southern Union men. Johnson would have been as good a ceder as any other Southern man if he had believed the rebellion could be successful and he could be one of its leaders. Brownson fears the (Reconstruction) policy represented by the New York Times, Seward's mouthpiece, of which Thurlow Weed is the consulting editor, will prevail. The friends of that policy must be watched if Kelley means to get rid of slavery and the obligation of indemnifying the people of the South for the destruction of private property cause(d) by both Federal and Confederate armies, as well as the public property of the several States. On this theory, can the government insist that the rebel debts be repudiated? The centralization of all power in the hands of the Executive is the only centralization Brownson fears.

I-3-c A.L.S. (Xerox copy, Butler Library of Columbia University and Historical Society of Pennsylvania) 8pp. 8vo.
11


1865 Dec 5

McCloskey, Father William
New York, (New York)

To Archbishop John B(aptist) Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

After arriving safely in New York, McCloskey must leave for Boston tomorrow. Bishop (John B.) F(itzpatrick) asks him to come on to arrange for the collection. McCloskey asks that Purcell do nothing about the Cincinnati collection until he hears from him. He has not yet seen the students who were going to Rome. He would like to have a draft on Paris if Purcell will send him one. He had a bill yesterday for the organ. They had been using a hundred dollar hand organ and it was rented. Georgetown, Brown County could beat that. He hopes Purcell has notified Dutton that he has formally resigned from the dignity of associate justice. He hopes Father (Joseph)Ferneding has recovered from his wounds. He said Mass on St. Cecilia's Day for the Good Shepherdesses at Columbus. He asks for what the Detroit Sister is going to Rome. She called the other day to ask if McCloskey was to sail soon. He sends his regards to Father Edward Purcell, whose kindness he shall never forget, and to Fathers (Caspar) Borgess, and Halley.

II-5-c A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
3


1865 Dec 5

Sorin, C.S.C., (Father) E(dward)
Notre Dame, (Ind.)

To (Orestes A. Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Sorin asks Brownson's opinion on the best subjects or theses in the whole range of the mysteries or events of the life of the Blessed Virgin. What one is best calculated to do some good? Where would Brownson direct it for the greatest advantage of the readers? Sorin welcomes any suggestions by Brownson; he encloses a sheet which is an appendix to the idea in the letter. On the 31st of May, prizes will be awarded; also, a new statue of the Blessed Virgin is to be erected on the dome of the new college. The details of the solemnity will be found in the Notre Dame Almanac.

I-4-c A.L.S. 3pp. 16mo.
2


(1865) Dec 6

Anatolie, (C.S.J.), Sister Marie
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

As (Odin) knows,Mother Eulalie, (C.S.J.) left a debt of $800. They have been asked to pay but they are not obliged as it is said that they were to pay the interest from that day, that is, a year after the purchase. They have only 650 piastres and as they are expecting their Sisters (of St. Joseph) they must have money for their passage. They are thinking of paying 400 piastres on account and giving another note for 400 payable in six months. She will do what (Odin) tells her about Mr. Robert.

VI-2-j A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
4


1865 Dec 6

Aquarone, C.M., Father A.
Donaldsonville, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He has been a little overcome by his rheumatism since he had to go to New River for a sick call and some marriages. He was there November 25 while Father (Charles) Boglioli, (C.M.) was at Iberville. On December 3 he left to stay over night at Crevasse, on the 4th he had to go 8 or 10 miles further down to the old chapel near Father (Jean Baptist Le Saicherre) Desechaire. He asks (Odin) to have Desechaire or some one else go to these parishes. In passing, he saw the material for building a chapel; it would take only the impetus of a resident priest to finish this chapel. The people of New River are more and more convinced of the necessity of a priest. Desechaire is well liked and once he recovers from his illness, he should succeed very well.

P.S. On the 2nd he was already on the ferry for a sick call at New River when he was told that the sick man had died.

VI-2-j A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
4


1865 Dec 6

Chapuy, Widow, née Ct. Detour
Ambierle, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

It seems like ages since she has had news from (Odin). She wishes him a Happy New Year. His family is well except for the little son of Jean Claude (Odin)?) who fell while playing and broke his leg and who is doubly dear because he is the image of Odin. Miss Cesile entered Pradine(?) A few days ago. Mrs. Frobert is getting along all right; all her family are well. Father (Joseph) Martinière left 3 months ago; he was tired out. He was replaced by Father Didier. Mr. Delinière and his daughter are well, as are Mr. Tevenard and his son-in-law. Mrs. Preverot has a nervous disease. Mr. Lagendre and his sisters are well. Chapuy was happy to see the war end, it makes her hope (Odin) will now be able to visit them. Her Father has given her the buildings at Bourg and the garden. She was happy to receive a letter from Mr. Reban and his son Felix (Reban), her godson. Her parents and sister send best regards.

VI-2-j A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
11


1865 Dec 6

Sorin, C.S.C., Father E(dward)
Notre Dame, (Ind.)

To (Orestes A. Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Sorin has received Brownson's fifth article. He would have it printed immediately but suggests that Brownson postpone the publication of it for two months while he obtains the "Roman Imprimatur." Since Brownson stands in the eyes of some as a "dubious writer," Sorin feels that since this is a delicate matter, he would like to send the article to Cardinal Barnabo. He believes he will receive a favorable response from the Cardinal. He awaits Brownson's consent. He asks Brownson to continue his subject for the Ave Maria.

I-4-c A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
2


1865 Dec 6

White, D.P. St. Nicholas Hotel
New York City

to J(ames) A(lphonsus) McMaster
(New York, New York)

White has been in New York several days but being confined to his room must send this by the post office.

I-1-m A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
2


1865 Dec 7

Bancroft, Geo(rge A.)
New York (City), (New York)

To (Orestes A.) Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Brownson's remembrance of Bancroft was but the echo of Bancroft's feeling toward Brownson. The American Republic is so compact with thought that it cannot be read hastily so that Bancroft can endeavor to penetrate Brownson's thought. Bancroft would like to know why Brownson never comes to see him when in New York. Their friend (George) Ripley became married to a young woman who is well cultured. Since their meeting in Boston, Bancroft recalls their experiences. He would like Brownson to remember that he has taken an interest in his advancing reputation.

I-4-g A.L.S. (Photostat, Odiorne Collection) 4pp. 12mo.
2


1865 Dec 7

McCloskey, Father W(illiam)
New York, (New York)

To Bishop (Francis P.) McFarland of Hartford
(Providence, Rhode Island)

McCloskey acknowledges McFarland's letter of Nov. 26 and says that he agrees with his views. The collection for the American College must not interfere with that for the clergy of the diocese. It can wait until spring. He finds that he cannot return as soon as he hoped. He finds great prejudice against "Roman doctors" and he is trying to remove it. The weather is so unfavorable that instead of going north he thinks of going to Baltimore. He will wait a few days. There is no news from Rome except the rumored removal of the French troops.

I-1-b A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
1


1865 Dec 7

Tancioni, Father F(ilippo), Urban College
(Rome, Italy)

To Father Robert (Seton
Rome, Italy)

Tancioni invites (Seton) to sing Mass tomorrow in the College and join him at table. (Seton in 1890 adds on the back of the letter that): The invitation was from the Rector of Propaganda often called Urban College. (Seton) was ordained on Holy Saturday of that year and was then at the Academia Ecclesiastica but had been a student at the Propaganda.

II-1-a A.L.S. (Italian) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1865 Dec 8

Allgayer, Father Ferd(inand)
Muskegon, (Michigan)

to Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere)
(Detroit, Michigan)

The deed of the additional church lot is not recorded in the Register's office. Allgayer, after learning instructions, did not know this because of absence on the mission for 7 weeks. Not being entirely paid for, and having read the bishop's letter, one of the principal men says they will send the deed to the bishop if a regular deed can be got. Allgayer is shamefully abused for informing Lefevere of their past attitude. As long as Allgayer remains, the church will not be finished, and he has not received one cent for 3 months. Since there is no use in remaining, he asks Lefevere to send his leave of absence letter to Grand Rapids where he will hand over the church vessels to Father H(enry) Beerhorst. He encloses the inventory for church and house (no enclosure) and $8 for dispensations in publications.

III-2-k A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
3


1865 Dec 8

Spalding, M(artin) J(ohn), Archbishop of
Baltimore, (Maryland)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

He received (Odin's) letter on his return to Rome, he will give his opinion on the names presented for Little Rock and will urge prompt action. He has received nothing further on the time of their Plenary Council. Father Henry (Riordan?) Reardon applied to Spalding for admission to his diocese. He asks (Odin's) opinion of him, particularly whether his morals are irreproachable. Spalding send regards to (Odin's) vicar general and to Father G. Whelan.

VI-2-j A.L.S. 2pp. 16mo.
3


1865 Dec 8

Timon, John, Bishop of
Buffalo, (New York)

To Bishop P(eter) P(aul) Lefev(e)re
(Detroit, Michigan)

Timon gratefully accepts the nomination of J( ) O'Flynn as attorney and writes today to Honorable R( ) O'Connor of Monroe, (Michigan) also to communicate with O'Flynn. The Fenians are giving much trouble there, as elsewhere, though he has not denounced them but contented himself with instructing the priests to discourage adhesion to them as much as they can. He has denounced the Fenian Sisterhood, with their night meeting. He aks Bishop Lefevere how he treats this "plague," if he has any of it.

III-2-k A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
5


(1865 Dec 9)

Dénecé, Father J(oh)n M(ary) J(oseph)
Petit Caillou, (Louisiana)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He told the parishioners of (Odin's) intention to put an assistant at Houma and leave them without a pastor if they did not wish to build a church. Dénecé does not think they will do anything about it. He thinks the best thing will be for him to live at bayou Terrebonne where he has a lot to put his house. Terrebonne is four times better than Petit Caillou; the people are more human and religious. (Odin) is to ask Father (Hyacinth) Gonellas to let him have Terrebonne; his Bayou Large is worth more than all the other bayous put together. Dénecé will be able to be there in a moment if there is a sick call and he intends to have High Mass every 2 weeks. He hopes the two bayous will make a good congregation which will support him. He finds here the pure air of his Brittany and has made many expenditures both for the church and for himself. If (Odin) wishes to assign him to another congregation Dénecé would like him to wait until after Easter. If some one gives him land, the church will soon be built. If they cannot have a lot in Petit Caillou, they could put a chapel on the edge of the bayou. (Odin) is to send him an ordo by Mr. Viala. He asked Father Rousselon for Masses but he has not answered. Everyone is busy during the week; could they not chant the nocturne before High Mass and the Libera afterwards. This was the custom in his parish and all others in the Diocese of St. Brieuc.

A.L.S. (French) 4pp.

Folded with the above:

--------
(1865 Dec 9)

Dénecé, Father J(oh)n M(ary) J(osep)h
(Petit-Caillou, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Odin) is to send him some intentions by Viala and to ask Rousselon to send him some; also an ordo. He hopes to see (Odin) in January.

N.B. Can he perform a marriage for a young man of his parish who is being married in Gonellas' parish? Since Father (Francis) Tasset who was commissioned to set the limits of Dénecé's parish, gave him the two bayous (Odin) is to tell Gonellas so. Dénecé's congregation begins at Mr. Barrow's house where the two bayous begin. Can Dénecé dispense from one of the banns if the parties are too poor?

A.L.S. (French) 2pp.
VI-2-j A.L.S. (French) 6pp. Folio
9


1865 Dec 10

Brownson, O(restes) A.
Elizabeth, N(ew) J(ersey)

To Father E(dward) Sorin, C.S.C.
(Notre Dame, Indiana)

Brownson has been unwell and the death of his Mother, (Mrs. Relief Brownson) makes it harder for him to plan the coming year. He makes it clear that he is in no way opposed to the Catholic doctrine on veneration of saints and worship of the Virgin Mary, but he believes some Catholic writers have over-emphasized these practices and thus given non-Catholics a wrong concept of the Church. Brownson inquires about the contest to be sponsored by The Ave Maria for the compositions on the Virgin Mary. He hopes to be able to visit Father Edward Sorin some day, but his health will not permit it now.

I-4-c A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
3


1865 Dec 10

De la Croix, Father C(yril)
St. Gabriel, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Mrs. Trust, who is leaving St. Gabriel today to go to her mother, will bring this letter. If Odin can help her in getting some good boarders it will be a good work as they are in great need. The unexpected arrival of Father (Jean Honoré) Dubernard forced him to break his silence about his transfer. The result was tears and sorrow and petitions. To speak frankly, he is very sorry to leave. Baton Rouge is more important but will he be able to fill it? The jubilee finished on November 30. He had less Communions than he had hoped for; there were 270. The cause was probably the bad weather. He will send the offerings with Father (Frederick) Larnaudie, (S.J.). De la Croix expects to go to Baton Rouge the 16th or 18th.

VI-2-j A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
4


1865 Dec 10

Madden, A( )
New York, (New York)

To (James Alphonsus McMaster), Box 2697 P(ost) O(ffice)
New York, (New York)

He feels able to discharge the duties of the situation advertised as vacant. He is a school teacher, 21 years of age. He was last employed by the late W( ) J. Flicks and can give good references. He resides with his parents.

I-1-m A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


1865 Dec 10

Purcell, J(ohn) B(aptist), Archbishop of
Cin(cinnati, Ohio)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.)
N(ew) O(rleans, Louisiana)

Doctor Fortineau and Mr. Foucheux of New (Orleans) have promised to give Odin this letter together with a copy of Purcell's diocesan statutes. Odin has received his letters about the nomination for Little Rock. His only fear is Father (Edward) Fitzgerald's health. In all other respects it is perfect. Odin is to pass this on to Bishop Martin his resignation of his see sent months past to Rome. But Father (Thomas R.?) Butler is thought to be marked for an early grave; he has heart disease. Father Collier and Father David Whalen and their old housekeeper, Mrs. Ann Marr from Washington and Mt. St. Mary's are all gone. The Sisters there are all well. He sends regards to Sister's Reverend nephew and to Bishop Bayley and Dr. Starrs and Father McNeirny.

II-1-a A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
6


1865 Dec 10

(Several, R.U.), Sister St. Pierre
Opelousas, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Mrs. McGinty has donated them a chalice which St. Pierre now sends to (Odin) to be consecrated.

VI-2-j A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
2


1865 Dec 10

Walker, Francis A.
Easthampton, Mass(achusetts)

To (Orestes A.) Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Walker has not looked over his photograph book since the death of Brownson's son (Edward Brownson). The book contains the pictures of many gallant fellows. Walker has been the most intimate with Edward, consequently he asks Brownson for a photo of Edward. The day Edward died, Walker went to a rebel prison. The death of Edward was glorious.

I-4-g A.L.S. (Photostat, Odiorne collection) 4pp. 16mo.
2


1865 Dec 11

McCloskey, Father W(illia)m
New York, (New York)

To Bishop (Francis P.) McFarland of Hartford
(Providence, Rhode Island)

McCloskey regrets that he will not be able to visit McFarland. He was detained a whole week and it is unlikely that any collection will be taken up except the most pressing home claims. He wishes to postpone it until spring. Permission has been given for a (Second) Plenary Council and Archbishop (Martin John Spalding) is most anxious to hold it. McCloskey thinks one could question the expediency of a council so soon after Civil War. Questions will come up and prove that they are not united but that there is a good deal of division. Besides Rome might want to send out someone to be present if not to preside. He need not say how distasteful that would be to the American Archbishops and a good many bishops. Councils are frequently stormy sessions and if held while the Bishops are under trial may produce less good.

I-1-b A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
3


1865 Dec 11

Schutjes, Father H(enry) J.H.
East Saginaw, (Michigan)

to Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere)
(Detroit, Michigan)

He sends $1000.71, as a bill of deposit, also a draft of $115 as part of money Lefevere gave Father (Remigius) Van Der Heyden. The difficulty is settled. Schutjes thinks he can pay $350 for which Lefevere was to give a mortgage. He also has money enough for fences and other improvements. His stay has been too short to get the other $100 which Lefevere advanced. He hopes Lefevere will donate that amount or wait until a priest is stationed at East Saginaw who can collect and pay it to him; it would not do for Van Der Heyden to collect it. Schutjes will return to Bay City next Wednesday as his mission here is finished. A house will be built for a priest as soon as one is sent here.

III-2-k A.L.S. 1p. 4to.
3


1865 Dec 12

Gouvenot (de la Rivière), Father (H.)
New Iberia, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Odin's) invitation should have brought him to see (Odin) the day of his arrival but the need to see about his nephew who accompanied him from Paris forced him to travel on with him to get him settled at New Iberia.

VI-2-j A.L.S. (French) 1p. 8vo.
1


1865 Dec 12

Schutjes, Father H(enry) J.H.
East Saginaw, (Michigan)

to Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere)
(Detroit, Michigan)

He has obtained a quit claim of Mr. Taylor's property. He has secured $75 but expected more, but it is such a mixed-up affair; some subscribers denied any promise, others say they have paid their subscription, but Father (Remigius) Van Der Heyden denies any payment. A $275 mortgage is suggested.

III-2-k A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
3


1865 Dec 12

Smith, Anne M.
Rose Croft, M(arylan)d

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Some months since she received through her sister, Mrs. Hardey, the cheering message that her husband General Persifor S. Smith was a Catholic at the time of his death. She thought it probably that Father (Peter J.) De Smet, (S.J.) had received the General into the Church as she had learned from Captain Drum, the General's aid-de-camp, that De Smet had visited him during his sickness at St. Louis. De Smet informed her that he was unacquainted with the circumstances of the conversion but that he had written Father W(illiam) S. Murphy (S.J.) of New Orleans on the subject. She asks Odin to inform her.

(P.S.) Her address is care of Father (B.) Pacciarini, (S.J.) St. Inigoes.

VI-2-j A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
7


1865 Dec 13

McCloskey, Father W(illia)m
New York, (New York)

To Bishop (Francis P.) McFarland of Hartford
(Providence, Rhode Island)

McFarland's letter of yesterday has arrived. Bishop (John) Fitzpatrick has asked him to go to Boston. He will probably leave this evening for New Haven, taking Providence on his way. He hopes to see him soon.

I-1-b A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
2


1865 Dec 15

Dwenger, (C.PP.S.), Father Joseph
St. Mary's, (Ohio)

To Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Dwenger blessed the church at Celina last Sunday in honor of the Immaculate Virgin. He celebrated solemn high Mass assisted by Father Bernard Austerman, who remained three days longer preaching the Jubilee. Some people returned who had been out of the Church for twelve years. Wapakoneta also should progress. Next Thursday on the feast of St. Thomas, Dwenger shall bless the church at Six Miles in honor of St. Thomas. Lung fever is raging in St. Mary's. Everything is going well especially at Celina. German farmers are building up the population there. All leading men gave $10 on the bell but they made up money for a second bell weighing 800 lbs. Dwenger asks Purcell's permission to bless it. He kept the Chalice Purcell gave him for Kenton because they have one like it. Instead, he sent them a check for $24.11 which is more than the chalice is worth new. He asks Purcell if this was all right. He receives letters of Lamentation from Kenton but he cannot do any more for them. He asks Purcell to send him the statutes of the Diocese.

II-5-c A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
1


1865 Dec 15

Murphy, (S.J.), Father W(illiam) S.
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He has received a letter from Father (Peter J.) De Smet, (S.J.) asking him to state that (Odin) would confer a favor on Mrs. Persifor F. Smith by communicating to her the details of her husband's conversion. The direction is care of Father (B.) Pacciarini, S.J., St. Inigo's.

VI-2-j A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
4


1865 Dec 15

Sorin, (Edward), C.S.C.
Notre Dame, (Indiana)

To (Orestes A. Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Sorin has received Brownson's "two favors" of the 11th and 12th instant. He thanks Brownson. Sorin will send today "to R------ the part" Brownson named. The printers have the other part. Sorin regrets to hear of the death of Brownson's mother. All the "prizes" must be mentioned in the Almanac. The competitors have a choice of subject. Sorin is trying to direct the "best minds" to the Mother of God. He will have time to receive Brownson's suggestions before the Almanac is issued. Everybody seems to want it already.

I-4-c A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
1


1865 Dec 15

Van der Heyden, Father R(emigius)
Saginaw City, (Michigan)

to Bishop P(eter) P(aul) Lefevere
Detroit, Mich(igan)

Van der Heyden is happy to learn that the fair money is in safe hands. The fair was not gotten up solely to furnish the house. He can prove through witnesses that it was intended

--------
1) to pay for the dwelling house,
2) to furnish the same,
3) to change the old church into a schoolhouse.

The church in Saginaw City will be ready on the Sunday before New Year's. Van der Heyden will be happy for Lefevere to come on that day. But if impossible he should not come on Epiphany since not many people would be at Mass. If he comes the Sunday before New Year's, there would be just a day for East Saginaw and a day for Saginaw City.

III-2-k A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
2


1865 Dec 16

Brownson, O(restes) A.
Elizabeth, New Jersey

to Father (Edward) Sorin, C.S.C.
(Notre Dame, Indiana)

Brownson believed that Father (Edward) Sorin intended to submit all the articles to Rome before publishing any. He will wait until he hears from Father Sorin before writing any more.

I-4-c A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


1865 Dec 17

Veyrat, Father C(yprian)
Paincourtville, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Veyrat left in sadness last Wednesday. (Odin) had told him that Father (Claude) Favre would probably replace Father (Jules) Bouchet. Since (Odin) sent Bouchet to him, Veyrat had been happy; they were like brothers. Bouchet is called to work elsewhere; this sacrifice costs Veyrat more than when he left his parents. When (Odin) proposed Favre as an assistant, Veyrat gave an evasive answer because at first he did not understand that (Odin) was talking about Favre. If he had he would have been an ingrate as they are all from Savoy and have promised to help each other. Favre's parents recommended him especially to Veyrat. Since the revenue of the church is in the hands of the trustees and he can give only a small salary to the assistant, he could not give a reply without consulting the trustees. Everyone recognizes the necessity for a second priest to help at Pierre-Part and the chapel at Bruly des Oliviers. Now that Bouchet is to leave Pierre-Part, Veyrat has been committed for two years to pay the salary of a second priest. It would be sad to abandon the people there. Veyrat will take the responsibility of Favre's salary. The people of Paincourt and Pierre-Part will be glad to see Favre come; they already know him. Veyrat asks that (Odin) notify them ahead of time so that Bouchet can settle his affairs.

VI-2-j A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
4


1865 Dec 18

Glynn, Martin
Dunmore, P(ennsylvani)a

to (James Alphonsus) McMaster
(New York, New York)

He sends $15 for subscriptions to the Freeman's Journal for five men whose names he mentions, all of Dunmore. He thinks he can do more yet and asks McMaster to send another paper to the person whose name he may send in.

I-1-m A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
1


1865 Dec 18

Scollard, Father J(ohn)
Jackson, L(ouisian)a

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He inquired at the insane asylum about Edward Kennedy. The superintendent told him that he was out in the woods cutting trees and is much improved. The physician said he would examine him to see whether he is fit to be sent home. Scollard has said Mass on two Sundays in B(ayou) Sara since (Odin's) visit to Jackson. He called on Mrs. Flowers in company with Mrs. Lebret. While living in Philadelphia Mrs. Flowers used to go to Bishop Kenrick but since has gone nowhere. She is Catholic in faith. The Protestants offered her a pew in their church but her answer was that as long as she had not her own Church to go to she would go nowhere. Scollard has moved upstairs over the church. He has fitted up 2 rooms and the third he intends for a school. He has received $11 more for the jubilee; he forgot sending it when Mr. Dominic left. Mrs. McKenna and family join in thanking (Odin) relative to her daughter. Scollard regrets that she could not be received as, could she receive only one year's education, she would be able to obtain a situation as governess. There is said to be a regular post office at Bayou Sara. (Odin's) address at Confirmation here has given great satisfaction, particularly to the Protestants. Mr. Rhea said he never before heard such an explanation of Catholic doctrine.

VI-2-j A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
7


1865 Dec 19

Barnabo, Al(exander), Cardinal Prefect
Rome, (Papal States)

To Archbishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Barnabo acknowledges Purcell's letter in which he gave his judgment of the candidates proposed as coadjutor of Boston. The brief of the Holy Father will announce the one he chooses. In the same letter Purcell proposed two questions. In the first he asks whether the vows of Ursulines, Sisters of the Good Shepherd, and the Mesdames of the Sacred Heart are to be regarded as solemn vows. In the second he asks whether the Ordinary has the power of dispensing from their vows, at least that of obedience. In answer to the first Barnabo refers him to the letter of the Sacred Congregation of Bishops and Regulars to the Archbishop of Baltimore concerning the vows of nuns in the United States. As to the second, Barnabo thinks that without doubt all solemn vows, vows of perpetual chastity and of religion, secretly or privately taken, and all other vows, even temporary, taken in any institution are reserved to the Holy See unless the taking and dispensation of such vows was permitted by the authority of the Superior or the Bishop. In this matter Barnabo quotes the words of Pope Benedict XIV that in the dispensation of these kinds the Bishop should not concern himself. Purcell should add to this the decision of the Sacred Congregation of Bishops and Regulars on the constitutions of nuns taking only simple vows which declares that such vows can be dispensed only by the Holy See.
Signed by H. Capalti as secretary. No. 4

II-4-c L.S. (Latin) 2pp. 8vo.
4


(1865 Dec 19)

Girard, Father G(eorge) V(ictor)
Huron, (Michigan)

To Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere
Detroit, Michigan)

After reflecting on what (Lefevere) said some weeks ago, Girard found the advice, to apply to the diocese of Paris, to be excellent. But to gain the confidence of the Superiors, one must have good references. (Lefevere) said he would give Girard an exeat but he did not say what kind of reference he would give him. Girard does not know if the measures taken against him by some of his parishioners concerning the building of the presbytery have changed (Lefevere)'s feelings toward him. He would like to know whether on leaving his diocese, (Lefevere) would endorse the papers Girard presented on his arrival and whether he could use him as a reference. It pains Girard to take this step but he no longer has hopes of being able to build a church at Swan Creek. However, he still hopes to be able to remain in (Lefevere's) diocese. He has just talked to Peter Jacker who assures him that the people of Rivière aux Ecorces (Ecorse) want to do all they can to obtain and support a priest. There, at least there is a church and house. Girard would be willing to take (Lefevere's) orders for this place. He asks (Lefevere) to allow him to at least go there and spend a week to assure himself of the dispositions of the people and give a report.

III-2-k A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
4


1865 Dec 20

White, Father Ch(arle)s I.
Washington, (District of Columbia)

To Father (John) McCaffrey
(Emmitsburg, Maryland)

At McCaffrey's request, White has examined the improved edition of the catechism which McCaffrey sent. It appears in several respects better adapted to children than any of the previous catechisms, especially by the simplification of the phraseology. White thinks it is susceptible of further improvement, particularly in regard to method or arrangement, and accuracy of statement or explanation. White then gives his suggestions for improving the method of the catechism and its accuracy. White submits these to McCaffrey's superior judgment and with the compliments of the season.

(This is a copy of White's letter to McCaffrey and is found in the papers of Bishop James Roosevelt Bayley).

II-2-n Copy 3pp. Folio
2


1865 Dec 21

Juncker, Henry D., Bishop of
Alton, (Illinois)

To Archbishop (John Baptist) Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Juncker wishes Purcell the season's greetings. He asks what Purcell thinks of Father (Denis) Dunn who is second on the list for Dubuque. Everyone speaks against him and Juncker feels he is not the man for Bishop of Dubuque. Father (John) Hennessey and (A.) Pelamourgues are far superior to him. Juncker asks when Purcell will visit in Alton or Quincy.

II-5-c A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
3


1865 Dec 21

Le Saicherre, Father J(ean) B(aptis)te
New River, (Louisiana)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Contrary to the diocesan regulations, he performed a marriage at a home within the prohibited limits. He tried his best to get them to come to the chapel but seeing them decided to marry before the judge or minister he saw sufficient reason to act. It was not to defy the Church law that they refused to come to the chapel but for fear of being insulted on the way. Everything is arranged for the building of the church. The sale of the land s not yet ratified but he is sure the person selling the land will consent to everything.

VI-2-j A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
3


1865 Dec 21

Provosty, Aug(uste)
Pointe Coupée, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Father (Francis) Mittelbronn has returned and is to leave today to see Odin. He has left behind pleasant memories and deep regret. His return gives them the hope that Odin may consent to give him the parish of Pointe Coupée. He speaks English well enough and he knows the parishioners. Provosty made application to Father (Isidore Francis) Turgis which he did not accept; Mittelbronn's appointment would console them for his refusal.

P.S. Odin is not to tell Mittelbronn of what Provosty has done.

VI-2-j A.L.S. (French) 1p. 4to.
3


1865 Dec 21

(Schorlemer), R.G.S., Sister Marie de St. Thérèse
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

The ladies in charge of the fair have asked her to come and see their tables before the fair opens tonight. She asks (Odin's) permission to go with one or two Sisters and return by Bienville where she has business.

VI-2-j A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1865 Dec 21

Sorin, C.S.C., (Father) E(dward)
Notre Dame, Ind(iana)

To (Orestes A. Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Brownson has misunderstood what Father Sorin wants to do with Brownson's series of articles. He desires Brownson to continue his writings without delay. Sorin will introduce the "American Republic" to the Ave Maria press, and wants Brownson to write a just criticism of the same. There will be no one the wiser because Sorin will copy it and destroy the original. He wants Brownson to do it for him as a personal favor.

I-4-c A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
1


1865 Dec 22

Kindekens, Father P(eter)
Adrian, (Michigan)

To Bishop P(eter) P(aul) Lefevere
(Detroit, Michigan)

He relates an incident in the life of St. Anthony, applicable to his brother (Father Joseph Kindekens) and to Lefevere's treatment of him. He asks that his brother be removed from Grand Rapids and be sent to Monroe where Father (Edward) Joos would treat him agreeably. Since his brother has not written about seeing Lefevere he has written to Father H(enry) Beerhorst but received no answer. He hears that Father Ri(e)vers wrote somebody that his brother was leaving "the (Grand) Rapids."

III-2-k A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
2


1865 Dec 22

Nordmeyer Father J(ohn) G., St. Vincent
Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania

to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell
Cincinnati, Ohio

Humbly prostrate before Purcell he asks the mercy of Purcell. He has made his retreat at the Benedictine monastery and has made his general confession to the abbot. The abbot says that if Purcell will grant him pardon no access to Rome will be necessary. Nordmeyer asks Purcell to grant him pardon, even though he admits his unworthiness, and assures Purcell that if the pardon is granted he will endeavor to repair the damage, and Purcell can impose any penance he wishes.

II-5-c A.L.S. (Latin) 1pg. 8vo.
1


1865 Dec 22

St. Bernard, (O.Carm), Sister
Thibodaux, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Odin's) feast day and the new year give the (Sisters of Mount Carmel) the occasion to send their good wishes and prayers. They have need of his protection. Their Community is not the youngest among the great number in his diocese but it is the poorest and most forsaken. All at the convent, Sisters and pupils ask his prayers and benediction.

VI-2-j A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
2


1865 Dec 22

Scollard, Father J(ohn)
Jackson, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

The Medical Director of the Insane Asylum called on Scollard to say that he was mistaken in his report of the health of Edward Kennedy or rather in the man. He mistook one patient for another. Kennedy is considerably demented but in every other respect is well.

VI-2-j A.L.S. 1p. 4to.
2


1865 Dec 23

Mt. Carmel, Sisters of
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

They send good wishes for (Odin's) feast day.

VI-2-j A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1865 Dec 24

Brownson, O(restes) A.
Eliz(abeth), N(ew) J(ersey)

To W(illia)m D. Kelley
Washington, D.C.

Brownson read a report of Kelley's colloquy with (Henry Jarvis) Raymond and wishes Kelley had asked him what it is that constitutes a state in the union. Kelley would have nailed him. Raymond adopts the theory, long since exploded, that the powers of government are made up of the rights of individuals surrendered to society, and the power of the general government is made up of the rights surrendered by the several states. In striving to avoid the doctrine of the Radicals, Raymond falls into that of the secessionists, as does President (Andrew) Johnson and Billy (William H.) Seward, and hence their popularity with secessionists and Copperheads. The Confederate States are out of the Union as States, but have never as population and territory been alienated from the domain of the United States. Congress has the right to grant them permission to reorganize and apply for admission as states. It has been the absurd theory of the administration that has complicated the question. Yet Brownson is not quite satisfied with the Radicals.(Thaddeus) Stevens is right in regarding the rebels as subjugated people but wrong in claiming for Congress all the rights of a conqueror. It is limited by its own constitution and the territorial law. Congress has under the late amendment the right to pass a bill like that introduced by Senator (Henry) Wilson but no right to enact a law in favor of Negro suffrage. Brownson favors Negro suffrage but wants it constitutionally introduced. But between themselves he has little belief in the perfectibility of the Negro race and has all along regarded Emancipation as the first step toward the extinction of that race in the United States.

I-4-c A. Draft S. 4pp. 4to.
7


1865 Dec 24

Schlatre, M(ichael) Jr.
Iberville, L(ouisiana)

to Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Odin's letter came to hand some days since. This week Schlatre received a letter from his old fellow student of St. Louis University informing him that he had remitted a draft to New Orleans for $300 to be paid to Odin for the benefit of their church. This Father (Joseph G.) Kernion was a student with Schlatre in 1835. He is a Louisianian by birth and together with Father (John S. Verdin) Verdin, now of Kentucky, he became a priest. Some time since, Schlatre appealed to Kernion to do what he could for them. Last Sunday, Father (Francis) Follot said he was going to see Odin in January, by Odin's order. Schlatre hopes something beneficial may result. Odin speaks a good deal about the law suit of their church. Not being able to pay the demands of the builders for want of funds, was the cause. He hopes they may yet succeed in releasing their church from its embarrassing situation.

VI-2-j A.L.S. 1p. Folio\ 5


1865 Dec 25

Thompson, Geo(rge) W.
Wheeling, W(est) V(irgini)a

to (Orestes A. Brownson)
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Twenty-five years ago, Thompson gave Brownson an outline of a work he intended to do in the Philosophy of History. Brownson had praised it then. Due to deterring factors in life, his work was considerably slowed up. This made for a more comprehensive preparation and a better synthesis on life. Thompson feels prepared to offer the world "a system of Fundamental thought based on a new Method with new Processes." The "partial thought" will be published in the course of a month in a small volume as a preliminary book. The publishers have been instructed to send Brownson a first copy. The work is entitled "The Living Forces of the Universe."

I-4-c A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
1


1865 Dec 25

Veyrat, Father C(yprian)
Paincourtville, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

By now (Odin) should have received a letter Veyrat sent recently about Father (Claude) Favre. When (Odin) proposed Favre as his assistant, Veyrat thought he was speaking of another priest; that is why he gave an evasive reply. He thinks this can be excused in a young priest who, seeing the scandals around him, fears to be compromised. How could it be said of Veyrat that he had refused as an assistant a fellow countryman, a friend, to whose parents eh is indebted? (Odin) knows that Veyrat needs a second priest, that he cannot serve the two churches of Pierre-Part and Paincourt. (Odin) is not to worry about Favre's salary; Veyrat will share with him.

P.S. Veyrat asks (Odin) to give Favre the enclosed 5 piastres for Requiem Masses. He also sends the 25 piastres for the jus cathedraticum for 1865.

VI-2-j A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
3


1865 Dec 26

Bertin, Father
Melleray Abbey, (France)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Bertin is a brother of a priest who spent 15 years in the Antilles, America and the Island of Trinidad, the vicar-general of Bishop MacDonal. His bishop is dead and so is he. In sorrow, Bertin gave up teaching and retired to a monastery to study his vocation. His confessor told him that he was wasting his money and 36 years of his life. A young man of Bertin's diocese 9of Rennes came to make a retreat and told Bertin that he wished to become a missionary; this seemed to be his opportunity. He has all his papers in order from Archbishop Godefroy Brossais St. Marc. Bertin has said Mass every day since his ordination. He knows Fathers Bellier, Chassé, and Lecoutel of Rennes who are in the United States. He asks (Odin) to call him.

VI-2-j A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
2


1865 Dec 26

Brownson, O(restes) A.
Elizabeth, N(ew) J(ersey)

To Father (Edward) Sorin
(Notre Dame, Indiana)

Brownson will send the "sixth article" in a day or so, as soon as his cold is better. His criticism on the American Republic is in the preface. He sets forth the salient features of American Democracy, state sovereignty, and the distinction between barbarism and civilization. Father Sorin's opinion of his book is desired. Brownson holds his book in high esteem, claiming that he can write no better than in the book, the American Republic.

I-4-c A.L.S. 4pp. 16mo.
1


1865 Dec 26

O'Reilly, Father Bernard
South Bridgewater, Mass(achusetts)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

He introduces Thomas Henesy Walsh, nephew of Father Richard Henesy. He visits New Orleans with the intention of residing there. He is an apothecary but has strong religious objections to the profession.

VI-2-j A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
3


1865 Dec 26

(Ray, R.U.), Sister St. Séraphine
New Orleans, Louisiana

to Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

In case they do not see Odin on his feast day, she extends their best wishes.

VI-2-j A.L.S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
1


1865 Dec 26

(Schorlemer, R.G.S.), Sister Marie de St. Thérèse
New Orleans, Louisiana

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

In the name of her community (Sisters of the Good Shepherd) she offers (Odin) best wishes for his feast day tomorrow and for the new year. The retreat of Father Alexander (Cvitkovicz, C.SS.R.) did great good. Their fair went badly; Mrs. Capdeville directs things very poorly.

VI-2-j A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
4


1865 Dec 27

Gutton, Father Ph(ilibert)
Pointe Coupée, (Louisiana)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

A severe storm lifted most of the roof of the church at Fausse Rivière. He thought he would be able to repair it but it is impossible. The fields are flooded and the levees unrepaired. He came from Morganza, having said Mass at New Texas. A person has offered to furnish the materials on condition that the labor was paid but he wants Gutton to promise to pay him the balance on the day the pews are rented. As (Odin) told Gutton that he intends to have a charter for this church, Gutton will be unable to respond to that promise. He has had to dismantle the altar. He has received not a cent for the new cemetery since (Odin) and Mr. Bonauchaud(?) who promised 250 piastres for the fence, could not give it, the cemetery remains half enclosed. Burials are made at Pointe Coupée. Gutton (lists money expended for the parish amounting to) $280.95. On June 21 he received $250 from the trustees; $191 for burials, $90 for marriages, $179 for baptisms, $141 for Masses. He went to see the brick chapel begun 14 years ago. It is on the other side of Chenal, 18 miles from here and three miles from Father (Victor) Gavard. Father (Jean Arthur) Poyet is known in Pointe Coupée and from what is said it would be well not to station Poyet here. During the jubilee there were 122 communions. Gutton asks for a dispensation for disparity of cult.

P.S. The jubilee offerings amount to $67.70.

VI-2-j A.L.S. (French) 8pp. 12mo.
7


1865 Dec 27

Hurd, John C.
New York (City)

To (Orestes A.) Brownson
(Elizabeth, New Jersey)

Hurd wishes to express his gratification to Brownson over the latter's generous reference in the Review on the Law of Freedom and Bondage in the United States. Hurd is also pleased over the mention his book received in the Review. He thanks Brownson. Hurd has furnished the Army and Navy Journal with articles on the Reconstruction question and intended another on "State Suicide" with references to Brownson's views. He had planned on sending Brownson a copy of it. The Journal did not have room for it, hence Hurd sent it to the Times. He encloses the article printed in the Times. He hopes to meet Brownson personally some day. Hurd writes Brownson to call on him either at his home or office.

I-4-c A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
1


1865 Dec 27

Marion, Father F.M.
St. James, (Louisiana)

to Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

(A.V.) Romain and (J.) Gentil will have a boarding school near the church, at Theriot's. In view of his request to (Odin) and these men coming to give lessons to pupils Marion could have at his house, and since it is not suitable to compete with the Marists, Marion has decided to leave St. James toward the last of January. He will go to New Iberia and if the place suits him for an institution he will accept it.

VI-2-j A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
6


1865 (Dec 27)

Ryan, C.M., Father S(tephen)
St. Louis, M(issouri)

To Archbishop J(ohn) M(ary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Ryan has received Odin's favor of the 6th. Father (John) Hayden, (C.M.) had written on the subject of Ryan's letter. The only obstacle is the difficulty of providing German priests; they have very few. All he can do is write to the Superior General. Father (Thomas J.) Smith, whom Ryan sends back to New Orleans at least for the time, will give the news.

VI-2-j A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
3


1865 Dec 28

Brownson, O(restes) A.
Elizabeth, N(ew) J(ersey)

To J(on) C. Hurd
New York, (City)

Brownson thanks Hurd for the enclosed article from the times. He feels Hurd gives him too much credit for the comments he has made on Hurd's book. Brownson apologizes for not having reviewed it at length in the Review. His eyes prevented him from reading the work. He was forbidden to read. Brownson praises the scholarship of the work. He is happy that Hurd has adopted that view which is the key to the whole mystery of the American Constitution. The credit of asserting this "view" belongs to Hurd for mentioning Brownson's book in the Times. Brownson claims that most men who refer to his writings do so with a "but." He would like to meet Hurd personally. Brownson's gout and old age keep him a prisoner in his home.

I-4-c A. Draft S. 8pp. 12mo.
1


1865 Dec 28

Furlong, Mary
Canton, (Mississippi)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Furlong is a Catholic and hopes to be the instrument of the conversion of a Protestant family. The eldest daughter wishes to go to the best convent school in New Orleans; she has expressed her desire to join the Church and has met no opposition. The family is reduced by the war and banished from Missouri. The Church improves here and she thinks prejudice gives way.

VI-2-i A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
1


1865 Dec 18

Lefevere, Bishop Peter Paul
Detroit, (Michigan)

To Father J.T. Stephen
Ann Arbor, Mich(igan)

Lefevere lists 7 sources of information from reliable persons, of the widespread scandal caused by Stephen's drinking. Some people in Detroit and Ann Arbor are quite sarcastic in their talk about Stephen's pretended complaint of inflammatory rheumatism. Because of the complaints and scandal, Lefevere withdraws all faculties to perform any sacerdotal functions within the Detroit Diocese. This prohibition is under pain of suspension to be incurred by the very fact of Stephen's disobeying it.

III-2-k A.L.S. Copy 2pp. Folio
1


1865 Dec 28

Sacred Heart (Convent), Pupils of
Grand Coteau, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

They send New Year's wishes to (Odin).

VI-2-j A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 8vo.
1


1865 Dec 28

Sacred Heart, Religious of the
Grand Coteau, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

They send New Year's greetings.

VI-2-j A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
1


1865 Dec 29

(Elder), William Henry, Bishop of
Natchez, (Mississippi)

To Archbishop J(on) M(any) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Odin's letter of the 2nd was received. Last week he gave a draft of $10 to Miss Elve Moore(?), a contribution of the ladies to the fair of the (Sisters) of the Good Shepherd. (Elder) has nearly $800 to pay. To save Odin trouble he has given a draft to (Thomas?) Layton for all that amount and will draw on him for various amounts. It seems that Odin collected more than was owing (Elder) is kept here by the beginning of their school house. He thinks he can find an interval to pay his visit to the Coast. Archbishop Spalding writes that every day he expects a definite answer from Rome about the Plenary Council. Father (Desiderius) De Wulf, who traveled with Odin from Natchez to New Orleans has gone to Baltimore on account of his health. He was one of the very best missionaries in the diocese.

VI-2-j A.L.S. 1pp. 4to.
6


1865 Dec 30

Cuny, Father (F. Christophe)
Charenton, (Louisiana)

to Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Cuny offers (Odin) his wishes for a good year. He has scarcely done anything in his parish except to maintain what good he found there. Times are very hard. He held the Jubilee but with little success especially on the part of the men of whom a great number came regularly at first to the Mass in the three churches where he continues to say it alternately. The collection amounted to only $10. At present he is busy cleaning up and restoring the cemetery at Charenton, and making a subscription to buy a bell for Pattersonville. Odin should tell Father (Napoleon Joseph) Perché that he gladly subscribes to the Propagateur Cath(olique) and perhaps he will be able to get him some other subscriptions later. The Azelle (?) Marthial family, who returned from Paris to reside with their old Father, wants him to say Mass and hold a catechism class in their house once a week. He asks Odin for authorization. The plan to buy a small chapel later.

VI-2-e A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
5


1865 Dec 30

(Mt.) Carmel, Sister of
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

They send New Year's greetings.

VI-2-j A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
1


1865 Dec 30

Outendirck, Father J(oseph)
New Iberia, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop J(on) M(any) Odin, (C.M.)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Ulise Segura and Uranie Bodin wish to marry and ask for a dispensation as sister-in-law and brother-in-law. There is a child whom Uranie has brought up. Outendirck has done all he can to persuade them not to marry but he is afraid if they do not get the dispensation they will be married by the judge. When does Odin think he can send Outendirck a replacement.

VI-2-j A.L.S. (French) 1p. 4to.
3


1865 Dec 30

Pabisch, Father F(rancis) Joseph, Mt. St. Mary's
Cincinnati, Ohio

to Archbishop John Baptist Purcell
Cincinnati, Ohio

As Purcell wished, Pabisch looked through the works of St. Jerome and found in the first volume the life of St. Paul the Hermit, which Erasmus declared a genuine work of the Saint. According to the story when St. Anthony found the hermit dead in a kneeling posture at a distance of three days from the monastery he did not know how to bury the saint. Pabisch quotes the works (in Latin) of St. Jerome about the appearance of two lions who grieving at the loss of St. Paul dug a hole in which Anthony buried the hermit.

II-5-c A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
1


1865 Dec 31

Bellanger, S.M., Father f.
St. James, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

The (Marists) send their greetings to (Odin).

P.S. They have given their students four days of vacation. Young Rapier has benefitted by it. Belanger sends regards to Father Rousselon.

VI-2-j A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo.
3


1865 Dec 31

Notre Dame, sisters of
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

They send New Year greetings.

VI-2-j A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
1


1865 Dec 31

Rodriguez, M.S.C., Sister M(arie) de St. Alphonse
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Archbishop (John Mary) Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana

The Sisters of Holy Cross send New Year greetings.

VI-2-j A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
1


1865 Dec 31

St. Cyr, P(auline) de
Galveston, (Texas)

To Archbishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.
New Orleans, Louisiana)

She thanks (Odin) for all his kindness. Yesterday they had good news of their children who are very well and who did not forget their dear Bishop of Galveston whom they regard as a Father. (Hyacinthe) St. Cyr has been ill all week; his excessive fatigue has put him in bed. (Odin) is not to worry if Mr. St. Cyr's friends have not given him the photographs, she will send him others. Bishop (Claude Mary) Dubuis told her that he had hopes of seeing (Odin) knowing that Mr. St. Cyr is here and knowing (Odin's) paternal love for him. She wishes (Odin) a happy new year in which they hope to see him again.

A.L.S.

--------
(1865 Dec 31)

St. Cyr, (Hyacinthe) de
(Galveston, Texas)

To Bishop (John Mary Odin
New Orleans, Louisiana)

St. Cyr wishes (Odin) a happy new year and asks him to be his spokesman to Father Chalon, (Odin's) vicar-general, and all the clergy St. Cyr knows. They have had good news of their children. They often see Bishop Dubuis and speak of (Odin). St. Cyr spoke to Father (Louis) Chambodut about a Conference of St. Vincent de Paul but they are all so busy here working they often forget the most precious things. St. Cyr told Dubuis that he was his debtor for $700, gift of Mrs. de St. Cyr to help in the founding of the hospital and that he held this sum at Dubuis' disposition. St. Cyr has not seen Ernest (St. Cyr?) again; he has all of St. Cyr's most important papers, all the notes for more than $100,000, all his stocks, more than $150,000. St. Cyr hopes to send (Odin) what he owes him in the first week of February. Ernest has made them lose great sums and keeps St. Cyr and Mr. Wegman anxiously awaiting their papers and books to settle their affairs. What is disastrous is that he has taken to drinking. Galveston will be a capital and Texas an empire.

A.L.S.
VI-2-j A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 16mo.
6