University of Notre Dame
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Charles Frederick Weiher Papers

1938-1999.

Origination : Weiher, Charles Frederick
Extent : 10 linear feet
Repository : University of Notre Dame Archives
Address : Notre Dame, Indiana 46556
English.

Administrative Information

Contractual restrictions may apply

Source

Laurie J. Echterling, Arts and Letters Space Management and Interior Design, University of Notre Dame.

Preferred Citation

Charles Frederick Weiher Papers (CFW), University of Notre Dame Archives (UNDA), Notre Dame, IN 46556

Scope and Content

Papers (1938-1999) consisting of clipping files, teaching files, notebooks, class records, handouts, homemade text books, sketch books, philosophical notes, and manuscripts of writings; holy cards and memorial cards; books and pamphlets on apologetics vs. atheism, on science, and on change; and digital documents representing his research and teaching.

Background

A priest of the Congregation of Holy Cross, Charles F. Weiher earned a Bachelor of Science degree in physics from Notre Dame in 1944. He served in the army, studied at the Massachusetts institute of Technology, and entered Holy Cross Seminary at Notre Dame in 1946. After his four years studying theology at Holy Cross College, he was ordained in 1953. He earned a Master of Arts degree from Notre Dame in 1955 with a thesis on Motion and the Categories according to the Principles of St. Thomas Aquinas and a 1960 Ph.D. from Notre Dame with a thesis on Foundations of an Abstractionist Theory of Natural Number. He joined the faculty of the University of Notre Dame in 1956 and, except for a year at the University of Portland (1961-1962), served there as a professor and residence-hall rector for the rest of his career. He published articles in the New Catholic Encyclopedia, The New Scholasticism, International Philosophical Quarterly, and Philosophia Mathematica.

Index

Weiher, Charles Frederick
University of Notre Dame. Department of Philosophy.
Motion and the Categories according to the Principles of St. Thomas Aquinas
Foundations of an Abstractionist Theory of Natural Number


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