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Brother Aidan's Extracts


STATISTICS

Receptions: 1841-1848

 1841: Took the Habit  1 1842:  "    "    "   11 1843:  "    "    "    4 1844:  "    "    "    9 1845:  "    "    "    8 1846:  "    "    "    4 1847:  "    "    "    3 1848:  "    "    "    3                    _____ 

                     43

(1841-2) During the school year 1841-2 Congregation added 9 Brothers in the United States to Sorin's group, making 16 Brothers.

In America four establishments: 1) Brother's Novitiate at St. Peter's, Oct. 13, 1841; 2) The school there October 27, 1841; 3) School at Vincennes, Dec. 16, 1841; 4) Kennedy's Chez M. Kennedy, Daviess Co. two leagues from St. Peter's. Kennedy's closed July 31, 1842.

(1842-3) Seven new subjects in the United States: 1 missionary, 5 Brothers, 1 Sister. During 1842-3....31 subjects in the United States; 3 (1 missionary, 2 Brothers) left. At the end of 1842-3 there were 28 in the United States: 4 missionaries, 19 Brothers, 5 Sisters; one Professed -- Brother Joseph.

     1841      10 Professed            1841      34 Professed Salvatorists   9 Novices           Josephites   96 Novices               19 Total                         142 Total 

    1851      25 Professed            1851      80 Professed Salvatorists  28 Novices           Josephites  136 Novices               53 Total                         252 Total 

(1841-43) With Father Sorin to Vincennes, went:

In Nov. 1842, with Father Sorin to Notre Dame went:

In Feb. 1843, From Vincennes to Notre Dame went:

(St. Peter's, 1842) "We have this morning eight postulants for the reception of the Habit. I believe that Brothers could never have had in France the chances of success they find here. There is no doubt but that the Brothers are destined to do incalculable good in this country." Sorin's letter to Moreau, Aug. 21, 1842.

(1842-43)

 7 new subjects           Madison school opened on 1 missionary             Oct. 1, 1843; Ft. Wayne 5 Brothers               Dec. 1, 1843; for one 1 Sister                 Brother at first, then                          another for German. 

Total in 1842-43: 31     Left   "   "   3 - 1 missionary, 2 Brothers     Net           28 - 4 missionaries, 19 Brothers, 5 Sisters,                               Brother Joseph -- professed. 

Students in 1843: quelques boarders                       7-8 orphans. 

At the end of 1843: Association had 218 in all, 28 in United States (4 ecclesiastics, 19 Brothers, 5 Sisters)

In 1843-4 -- 4 Brothers left.

At the end of 1844: 30 in United States: 4 ecclesiastics, 17 Brothers, 9 Sisters, 4 Novice Brothers. Annals General S. C. Ms. 1844

At the end of 1843-44; Association had 236 members: 4 priests in the U.S., 9 Sisters in the U.S. including 4 novice Sisters, and 17 Bros. in the U.S.

During 1844 - 526 new members in the U.S.: 2 ecclesiastics, 12 Brothers, 14 Sisters, including 1 novice.

Now there are 54 Associates in the U.S.: 7 ecclesiastics, 32 Brothers, 15 Sisters, including 1 novice; Left Association -- 4 Brothers, 1 Sister. Brothers' School at Pokagon closed July 31, 1845. Hence ten establishments in the U.S.

(Aug. 28, 1843) "Only a few boarders and 7 or 8 orphans," Sorin.

(1844) Priests -- 3, Brothers -- 32. Metropolitan Catholic Almanac, Baltimore.

(1844) "In May, 1844, there were at Notre Dame du Lac: 3 priests, 1 seminarian, 25 Brothers and postulants, 3 Sisters and 5 postulants. "Besides the primary school at Notre Dame, the Bros. had four other schools." Vincennes, Madison, Ft. Wayne, Pokagon, Michigan."

(1844; from the 'Free Press', South Bend) "University of Notre Dame du Lac under the direction of the priests of Holy Cross with the Brothers of St. Joseph.

"The teaching consists of English, Arithmetic, Spelling, Reading, Writing, Geography, History, Accounting, Math, Astronomy.

"Board and tuition (ordinary) one hundred dollars a year.

"There is in addition an Apprentice School conducted by the Brothers for farms and trades. The Brothers conduct four schools and collaborate in teaching at the University, allowing the priests to go to the Missions in the Diocese of Vincennes and Detroit."

1850: 7 priests, 11 seminarians, 35 Brothers.

(1844-45); Provincial Archives) "Members of Council of Prefect of Discipline: Mr. F. Gouesse, President; Bro. Gatian, Secretary; Bros. Augustine, Vincent, Paul (died 1845) and Mr. Riley. Bro. Francis de Sales, Mr. Moses L'Etourneau.

"Met weekly, Employed in keeping good order and cleanliness in the college and in overlooking (supervising) the boarders."

Boundaries: "of the Boarders' yard of recreation." "There shall be two reviews, one on Wednesday, the other on Sunday."

-- Minutes.

(1844-45) "Brothers of St. Joseph conducting Orphan Asylum and Manual Labor School have an extensive farm connected with the University.

"35 Brothers of St. Joseph in Diocese of Vincennes. 13 Professed. Schools at Vincennes, Madison and Fort Wayne. About 10-70 pupils in each."

-- Catholic Almanac, ; pp. 1544-5. 1847

(1850-51) two priests, 3 teaching Brothers, 8 Coadjutor Brothers, 6 Sisters.

(1869) 32 professors: 3 teaching Brothers, 8 Coadjutor Brothers, 6 Sisters.

(1844-5) At the end of 1844-5 7 ecclesiastics, 28 Brothers, 13 Sisters. In 1845-6 entered: 17 -- 1 Ecclesiastic, 6 Brothers, 10 Sisters. Left 8 -- 2 ecclesiastics, 5 Brothers, 1 Sister. End of 1845- 46: 58 in U.S.-- 9 ecclesiastics, 29 Brothers, 20 Sisters. Ten establishments in the U.S. at the end of 1845-6. (annals. Gen.)

(Sorin's Provincial Archives; 1845) schools: Notre Dame, Pokagon, Ft. Wayne, Vincennes, Madison. Students: 315. Ft. Wayne founded in 1844: taught by Brother John: 84 students, 54 boys, 30 girls, 4 Protestants.

At the end of 1845-6, 58 in the U.S. -- 9 ecclesiastics, 29 Brothers, 20 Sisters.

1846-7: 12 entered: 4 ecclesiastics, 4 Brothers, 4 Sisters. Total 12 priests, 34 Brothers, 25 Sisters. Left: 4 priests, 2 Brothers, 2 Sisters.

End of 1846-7: 60: 9 priests, 29 Brothers, 22 Sisters. Increase of 4: 1 ecclesiastics, 1 Brother, 2 Sisters; professed, 4. New establishments: Indianapolis, Brothers Novitiate and Washington, Daviess County, opened March 15, 1847.

"8 clergymen, 32 Brothers, 5 postulants in the institution. Number of boarders, 40." Catholic Almanac, 1846, pp. 121 ff.

(1846) "Brother Mary Joseph at Madison: Brother Francis at Vincennes; Brother Benedict at St. Mary's; three professors at the college: Bros. Gatian, Francis de Sales, and Bernard.

"First grade taught by Bro. Francis de Sales. 12 pupils. Studies: alphabet, spelling, reading, catechism and penmanship.

"Second grade teacher, Bro. Gatian. 6 pupils, Studies: geography, history, grammatical analysis, arithmetic, penmanship, etc."

-- General Archives. . Founding Fathers 1846

1846: 8 priests, 32 Brothers, 5 postulants, Boarders -- 40.

Professions -- 1846-56. re: 43 from August 30, 1846 to Feb. 3, 1856.

(Brothers' Houses; May 27, 1846: Provincial Archives.) The Brothers have three houses: Bro. Francis at Vincennes, resides with the Bishop, has 75 students of whom one fourth are Protestants. 2) At St. Mary's, Kentucky; 80 students, mostly Catholic. 3) at Madison, 300 miles from Notre Dame. Brother Mary Joseph has a number of pupils of whom one third are Protestant.

-- Provincial Archives 1846

(Notre Dame, May 27, 1846) Members: 68; Priests 8; Seminarians 4; Brothers 32; 5 professed: (Vincent, Lawrence, Justin, Mary Joseph) the others are novices: Thomas, Francis, Peter, William, Basil, Patrick, Ignatius, Mary Joseph, Anthony, Stephen, Augustus, Gatian, Francis de Sales, John, Dominic, Benedict, Emmanuel, Bernard, Louis, Matthias, Charles, Borromeo, Michael, Jerome, John Baptist, etc.

Brothers had three institutions: Bro. Mary Joseph at Madison, Bro. Francis at Vincennes, Bro. Benoit at St. Mary's, Kentucky. Three Professors of the college: Gatian, Francis de Sales, Bernard.

Elementary Classes: Francis de Sales and Bernard; secondary classes: Bro. Gatian.

Disciplinarians: Bros. Gatian and Francis de Sales.

(1846) "Personnel of the College is twelve."

Novitiate of the Brothers under Bro. Vincent. 9 Brothers or postulants.

At Madison, 87 leagues from Notre Dame, students one third Protestant. salary 250 francs ($83) for ten months plus transportation. A free school, founded in 1841. Salary paid by the pastor.

St. Mary's is a fine place in a forest. An Irish colony.

Demands for Brothers from South Bend, Ft. Wayne, Lafayette, Washington, Evansville, St. Louis, New Orleans, Philadelphia, etc. General Archives, Founders 7.

(November 1848) Priests -- 7, Brothers professed -- 13; Novices -- 22.

(1847: Professed Brothers -- 13; Novices -- 24 (Bros.)

-- Catholic Almanac, p.115.1847

(1847) "There are in the diocese 36 Brothers of St. Joseph, 13 of whom are professed. They have schools at Vincennes, Madison and Ft. Wayne, in each of which there are from 60-70 pupils." Catholic Almanac, p.115. 1847

(1847-48) Entered in the year: (3 Brothers, 7 Sisters) -- 10. Left in the year: 5 -- 2 ecclesiastics, 2 Brothers, 1 Sister. At the end of the year: 62: 5 priests, 30 Brothers, 27 Sisters.

Nine establishments remained: St. Mary's College, founded Sept. 12, 1847; established Sisters there, Sept. 14. Schools at Vincennes, Washington, Madison, closed July 31, 1848, St.. Mary's Kentucky, July 15.

(Drouelle visit: 1848 at Notre Dame)

 Total inventory                      292,970  francs. l'immouble                           198,913    " Land                                  50,000    " Buildings, (University and Novitate)  50,     francs Debt (Nov. 1)                         42,286  Francs 

At Notre Dame: 124 -- 8 priests, 28 Brothers, 12 Sisters, 6 seminarians, 18 orphans, 3 hired men, 3 "infirmed", and 5 outside boarders: 83 124-83 (students ???)

End of 1847-8 -- 62: 5 ecclesiastics, 30 Brothers, 27 Sisters.

Entered 1848-49: 23 -- 11 ecclesiastics, 5 Brothers, 7 Sisters. Left Congregation in 1848-49: 7 -- 2 ecclesiastics, 1 Brother, 4 Sisters.

Remained at end of 1848-49: 78 -- 15 ecclesiastics, 33 Brothers, 32 Sisters.

(Father Drouelle Visit 1848) "Notre Dame had 40 students, including 6 seminarians. Five were Protestants. Al were 'supremely independent', proud, cold but studious. In general, well disciplined, very much better than in any other American foundation. Three lay professors. One professor of Greek. Two of Latin, of whom one was a layman, 1 of French, 1 of German, 1 of Arithmetic, 1 of music. (Layman), 1 for penmanship and drawing, besides the President, Director of Studies, and Prefect of Discipline. Board averages 214 francs a year ($40.) (Average ??? of student board, '525 francs per year.' or $101.33) Often paid in 'nature'".

1849-50:Entered in the U.S.: 9 -- 3 ecclesiastics, 2 Brothers, 4 Sisters. Left in the U.S.: 7 -- 1 ecclesiastics, 5 Brothers, 1 Sister. at the end of 1849-50: 86 -- 17 ecclesiastics, 30 Brothers, 35 Sisters. New establishments: St. Johns, German colony, Lake County -- Brothers and Sisters.

End of 1850-51: 15 ecclesiastics, 41 Brothers, 40 Sisters, 8 postulants.

(1850) "The Brothers of Holy Cross have a Manual Labor School at Notre Dame du Lac, near South Bend, and a male orphan asylum at New Orleans. They number 35, including novices." Catholic Almanac. p. 228, 1850.

"In 1850-51: 56 students -- ditto, Catholic Almanac.

(1850: Teachers) "Seven teachers. Rev. E. Sorin, President, Professor of Moral and Religious Instruction. Bro. Gatian, Professor of Bookkeeping and Arithmetic. Bro. Thomas, Professor of Arithmetic and the Preparatory Course of English. Brothers Victor and Anselm, Prefects of Discipline. 50 students."

-- Scholastic, 19:273.1850

Boarders -- 150 -- Sorin Chronicles.

(1850) "There are five professed priest s of the Society, four of whom reside at Notre Dame du Lac: namely, Fathers Sorin, Cointet, Granger, Gouesse. Ten novices, one of whom is a priest, and the other students of theology. There are in the Society (C.S.C.) 22 professed Brothers, 13 Novices, 3 postulants"

-- Catholic Almanac, 1850, p. 111. 1850

(1850: Faculty) "See as above, plus Mr. E. Dussaulx, Professor of Music, Penmanship, and Drawing. Mr. Mc Girac, Professor of Latin, Greek, French and Music. Mr. Fox Byerley, Professor of Mathematics and English ... students 55 plus 13 in Theology."

1851-52: Brothers' Schools; Provincial Archives) "Brothers' school opened at Hessel Cassel. Fort Wayne closed. At New Orleans, 1 priest, 7 Brothers, 12 Sisters; at Notre Dame, 9 professed ecclesiastics, 9 ecclesiastic postulants, 30 Brothers, 8 postulants, 30 Sisters."

1851: Students 61. States represented: Indiana, Michigan, Louisiana, Ohio, New York. One from Mexico.

1851: 60 boarders; 15 Brother postulants; 8 priests' postulant.

1852: 60 boarders at Notre Dame. 15 Brother postulants; Boarder at University, 80; boarders at Bertrand, 30. Postulant in the 3 novitiates, 45. (Sorin -- Drouelle, Oct. 26, 1852.

(1852; Sorin to Bishop Purcell) "We have 80 boarders and our three novitiates (Priests, Brothers, Sisters) are doing well. Our income exceeds our debts.... You will know that you are our best friend in this New World."Oct. 16, 1852.

(1853-4) 18 (Priests, Brothers, Sisters) at New Orleans. Same as last year. At Notre Dame, 13 professed ecclesiastics, 15 (?) novices, 26 professed Brothers. 8 novices, 5 postulants, 140 professed Sisters, 21 novices, 19 postulants.

1855: New missions at Louisville, Toledo, Michigan City, Laporte, New Lowell, New York, Milwaukee.

(1853; Faculty and enrollment) six priests -- among them Father N.H. Gillespie, relative of James Gill Blaine and Mother Angela of St. Mary's. Six Brothers -- among whom noted professor of Music and Organist, Brother Basil. Few lay members. Enrollment during last session -- 140.

(1853; advertisement in the "Catholic Almanac" for 1854, p. 127) "extensive additions have been made to the college, capable of affording accommodations to 300."

(1854; Brothers' Schools) 1) Manual Labor School and Orphanage at Notre Dame. 2) St. John's Cincinnati, Bro. Bernard, Director. 400 pupils. 3) St. Mary's Male Orphan Asylum, New Orleans, 200 children -- Gouesse, Director. 4) St. Aloysius Orphan Asylum, Cincinnati; 75 children -- Fr. Force, Director.1854

(1854; Granger to Rome) "Notre Dame about 80 students: Americans 59; French 12; German 6; Belgians 3. 1 manual Labor School under the direction of Brothers of St. Joseph -- 30 boys. 1 School near South Bend under the direction of the College of Notre Dame du Lac; established 1853 for boys and girls about 30 scholars, half of them French from Canada; the rest Irish. Catholics in town and district about 370. French 200; Irish 100; German 60; Indians 10. 1854

"Catholics at Notre Dame du Lac (coming to college and the Community -- about 200.

"Such is the account I forward you according to the demand of the Holy See concerning our Mission in the Diocese of Vincennes." Rev. A. Granger. csc.

(1855)

  1. New Orleans Orphan Asylum
  2. Cincinnati Brothers' School
  3. Louisville Brothers' School
  4. Toledo Brothers' School and Postulate
  5. Hamilton, O. Brothers' School
  6. Milwaukee, Brothers' School
  7. New York - (Manual Labor)

(1856) Foundation at Chicago; 3 Brothers schools at Philadelphia, and a school of industry (manual labor). St. Paul's Washington. St. Joseph's, Susquehanna, Penna.; Buffalo, Columbus.

School at Zanesville, Ohio in 1861.

(Free Schools -- See "Bishop Hailandiere to Moreau" 32)

(1856) Number of professed Brothers 31
Novices 16
Postulants 9
Manual Labor School 56

The following missions are dependent on the Mother House at Notre Dame.

Enrollment -- up to 140 in 1856.
" up to 200 in 1857; better class
" up to 187 in 1858-9; Depression.
" up to 178 in 1860.
" jumped to 360 in 1864.

Sorin's Visit in 1870: Statistics -- Religious 112, Boarders 240; apprentices 50; Franciscans 15; Professors 13; Sisters 30; domestic girls 20 480 in all.

(1856)

 Professed priests  8     Professed Brothers  31 Novices           10     Novices             16                          Postulants           9      

Students manual labor School  56 

(1856)

MembersHouses
Salvatorists 72Schools 86
Josephites 322Boarding School and Colleges 8
Marianites 254Missions 4
-Other Houses 16
[Total] 648Total 114

Students: 10,000

(1857)
Professed Brothers 37
Novices 31

Catholic Directory, p. 234. 1856-7

(1857) "After the dedication of the Conventual Church in 1857, the Father Founder assembled the General Chapter for the reading of the newly approved Constitutions and the description of the administrative organization of the Institute according to them. Eight Vicarates were formed of the 102 establishments then directed by the Congregation: ...of Fort Wayne, 2; of Vincennes, 1; of Baltimore, 2; of Chicago, 1; of Cleveland, 1; of Philadelphia, 1; of Cincinnati, 1; of Columbus, 1; of New Orleans, 2;..."

-- On the King's Highway: Mother Eleanore. 1857

(1857)

 The Priests of Holy Cross                  6 The Brothers of Holy Cross - Professed    37                               Novices      31                                            68

(1857) Deaf and Dumb Asylum at Notre Dame. 37 professed Brothers, 31 Novices, 12 Postulants. 1857

(1865) 75 Professed Lay Brothers, 55 Novices, and 10 Postulants.

Catholic Directory 1865.

(1850) "...There are in the society 22 professed Brothers, 13 Novices and 3 postulants.:" -- Catholic Directory. 1850

1851: 21 professed, 12 novices, 7 postulants.
1852: 25 professed, 12 novices, 5 postulants.
1853: 25 professed, 12 novices, 9 postulants.
1854: 21 professed, 12 novices, 9 postulants.
1855: 21 professed, 12 novices, 9 postulants.
1856: 21 professed, 12 novices, 9 postulants, 30 boys in Man. Lab. Sch.
1865: 75 professed, 55 novices, 10 postulants.(11 priests, 14 novices, and scholastics.)
1867: Brothers ditto. (apprentices, 62)
1869: 91 professed, 53 novices, 10 postulants.

(1858) "There are just now 127 members in their (Brothers') Community. In 12 establishments they teach 1400 children. (In these figures we do not include their first foundation in Louisiana, which has just been made into a separate province, and which would considerably increase the above figures.) We do not speak here of the Brothers of the Christian Schools, who belong to Canada, and who from the beginning found resources there which are not in our Community.

"Would it not be fairer to acknowledge that the clergy in general have taken but little interest in the matter of vocations, and just as little in making them useful after they have been secured? We remember that the good Bishop of Vincennes (de la H.) himself would have only one Brother, and could provide him with no other refectory but his kitchen among the servant girls; and as for the school, it was a miserable little cabin in which it was a mockery to attempt teaching. And yet such are the conditions in which this good Brother was left until a certain feeling of pity caused his superior to recall him regardless of the consequences. It is hardly necessary to add that this was the end of our schools in the diocese. Sympathy was to be sought for elsewhere."

-- Sorin Chronicles. 1858

(1858) Brothers 127. houses of Brothers, 12. Pupils 2400 (Exclusive of the Louisiana Vicariate.) 1858

(1859) (Provincial Archives) "Our establishments number 12." -- Sorin. 1859

(Jan.. 29, 1859) "Number of students same as last year, 140-150 boarders, but payment so slow we can only live, can't pay debts."

-- Sorin. Jan. 29, 1859

(Sept. 28, 1863) "The neighbors' sons within two miles of the college on this side of the river shall be received as boarders at the rate of $80.00 a year."

-- Local Council.Sept. 28, 1863

(Canvasser) "John McNamara, former student, canvassed Michigan for students in August, 1863, for Notre Dame and St. Mary's -- 21 signed up." 1863

(Nov. 3, 1864) "About 400 students at Notre Dame. Every day more come ...many colleges close because of the War and lack of students."Nov. 3, 1864)

(1859) (Sorin)
"Priests 11 professed, 4 novices.
Brothers 107 members -- professed, novices, postulants.
Students, 187 enrolled."

(1859) Priests 12
Seminarians. 9
Professed Bros. 67
Novices 38
Postulants 11

(1860) Brothers 107
Establishments 12
Pupils 2400

(1860) August

 320 Religious and Religious in teaching  36 schools, 5323 children.   2 universities or colleges,      Notre Dame with 213 boarders.      St. Mary's of the Lake, Chicago, 125 day pupils.  16 primary schools of the Brothers, 3,000 children.   3 industrial schools with 85 boarders.  12 churches built for the Society.

-- N.D. Archives. 1859-60

(1860) "Recapitulation: (Sorin)
Foundations 11
Schools 17
Teachers 37
Salaries $9,000

"Of this amount one fourth might be considered as clear profit, did not Chicago turn over its surplus to the support of the College. The balance goes in rent, vacations, and in some cases for board."

-- Sorin's Chronicles. 1860

(Notre Dame University)
1860: 224 students 1864: 360 students 1866: 350 students.

(1861) "There are at present in the Community the following number of members available for teaching:

7 professed Brothers, of which 4 are for German and 3 for English Schools.

31 novices (Brothers) of which 2 are for German and 1 English -- making in all 12 German teachers, 29 English teachers. Of this number Brother Basil and Bro. Ambrose are reserved for the College."

-- Minutes of Provincial Chapter, 1861.

(1864) 115 Brothers

7 Priests

8 seminarians.

-- Local Minutes. 1864

(1864) Teacher Brothers 28
Prefect Brothers 5
Office Brothers 3
Student Brothers 6
Schools of Brothers 7
(Ft. Wayne; La Porte; Alton; Cincinnati -- 2: Holy Trinity and St. Philomena's; Springfield; New Dublin (Sorinville) at South Bend.)

(1866)
Priests 11
Professed Brothers 75
Novices and Scholastics 14
Novice Brothers 55
Postulants 10

-- Catholic Almanac, p. 225. 1866

(Notre Dame -- 1867 -- Alumni, Instructors) Number of Instructors: 45; Number of alumni: 112; Number of students: 500; Number of books: 7,000.Rev. L. L'Etourneau, Master of Novices for the Josephites.

-- Catholic Directory, p. 199.1867

(Schools; 1867) Ft. Wayne, 5 Brothers, Bro. Ephrem, superior, Lafayette (Indiana), Bro. Bernard, St. Francis, Holy Trinity, St. Philomena's (Cincinnati), 14 Brothers engaged, Bro. Boniface, superior; Cathedral School, Alton (Illinois), 4 Brothers, Brother Adolphus, Superior; Immaculate Conception School (Springfield, Illinois), 2 Brothers, Bro Gregory, superior; Holy Cross School, Blairstown -- Keyston -- (Benton County, Iowa), 4 Brothers, Rev. S. Gillen, C.S.C. Superior.

(Brothers at Notre Dame; 1868) Francis de Sales, Florentius, Paul of the Cross, Alban, Camillus, John Chrysostom, Benoit, Adolphus, Hyacinth, Isidore (lampist), Felix, Bonaventure, Peter, Cornelius, Ildefonse, F. Assisi, Luke Macarius, Anacletus, Antoninus, Polycarp, Simeon, Victor -- 23.

(1868)
Priests 11
Professed Brothers 87
Scholastics 4 Novices 46
Novices 6
Postulants 12

-- Catholic Directory, 1868.

(1868) Very Rev. E. Sorin, Provincial.
Members, 95
Nine branches (establishments), numbering in all about 46 members.

-- Ave Maria, 4:21 1868

(1868) Brothers, 87; Novices, 46; 12 postulants.

(Brothers' Schools, Diocese of Fort Wayne; 1868) Manual Labor School, Notre Dame -- apprentices, 49. Brother Constantine, Director. Lafayette - Brother Bernard, Director. Fort Wayne - Catholic School for boys, 5 Brothers; Brother Ephrem, Superior.

(Brothers' School outside Diocese of Ft. Wayne) Archdiocese of Cincinnati: St. Francis, Holy Trinity, St. Philomena; 14 Brothers, Brother Boniface, Superior. Alton Diocese: Catholic School for Boys, 4 Brothers; Brother Adolphus, superior. Parochial School, Springfield, Illinois, 2 Brothers, Brother Gregory, Superior. Dubuque Diocese: Holy Cross, Blairstown, Benton County, Iowa, 4 Brothers, Rev. S. Gillen, C.S.C., Superior.

(1869)
80 religious
302 boarders
12 professors
53 apprentices
30 Sisters (kitchen, laundry, infirmary)
30 domestics (girls)
8 St. Aloysius Novitiate -- (seminarians)
30 St. Joseph's Novitiate -- (Brothers)

Total: 558

-- Rev. A. Granger, Visit. 1869

(Students at Notre Dame 1868-69)

Illinois 126
Penna. 8
Colorado 1
Indiana 95
Tennessee 5
Miss. 1
Michigan 51
Mass 3
D.C. 1
Ohio 37
New Jersey 2
New Mexico 1
Missouri 31
Louisiana 2
Canada 1
Iowa 27
California 2
Latin America 1
Kentucky 26
Kansas 2
New York 16
Arkansas 1
Wisconsin 14 Oregon 1
Manual Labor School: 50

Total: 455

(Notre Dame University; 1869) Personnel of the House is as follows:
Religious 80
Sisters 30
Boarders 302
Domestics30
Professors 12
St. Aloysius Novitiate 8
Apprentices 53 St. Joseph's Novitiate 30
Franciscans 14 (Novices and Postulants)
Total 558

-- A. Granger, Provincial, C.S.C., Visitor. May 21, 1869

(1870; Sorin Visit, Notre Dame)
Religious 112
Professors 13
Boarders 240
Sisters 30
Apprentices 50
Domestic girls 20
Franciscan (Old Men's Home) [15]
Total 480

1870: 91 professed Brothers; 52 novices; 10 postulants.
12 priests; 6 scholastics.
1871: 79 professed Brothers
1872: 79 professed Brothers,19 priests; 6 scholastics)
1873: 112 professed Brothers; 30 novices; 27 postulants.
1874: 121 professed Brothers; 42 novices; 34 postulants.
1875: 150 professed Brothers; 52 novices; 17 postulants.
1880: 169 professed Brothers; 28 novices; 17 postulants.
1881: 160 professed Brothers; 28 novices; 17 postulants.
1878: 141 professed Brothers; 60 novices; 12 postulants.
1877:
1885: 160 professed Brothers; 19 novices
1884: 160 professed Brothers; 19 novices
1889: Priests and Brothers 220; novices 55; Postulants 44; Total 319
1888: 169 professed Brothers; 39 novices; (priests 49)
1890: 236 professed Brothers; 71 novices; 43 postulants.
1892: 241 professed Brothers; 89 novices; 92 postulants. Total 422.
1893: 243 professed Brothers; 99 novices and postulants.

(1872-78) (See folder "Province Houses")

(Notre Dame teachers: 1872) 30 all told. 10 priests, 2 seminarians, 10 Brothers, 8 laymen. 1872

(1872-78; Brothers) Eight establishments in Indiana: St. Mary's and Lowell, South Bend, Ft. Wayne, Lafayette; St. Joseph Asylum, Vincennes, and St. Vincent's Mission.

"Lowell, South Bend (now St. Joseph Church). The present church occupies the second floor of a brick building erected on a beautiful hill, commanding the town of South Bend. On the ground floor is the residence of the priest and the school room. The school is taught by one Brother, and attended by 50 boys; 30 more should frequent it."

"St. Patrick's, South Bend: On the west side of the church is a school which is a good substantial frame building, 2 stories high. It is taught by one Brother for a portion of the year, but an assistant Brother is needed during the winter. 75 boys attend the school."

"Fort Wayne. The school in Ft. Wayne is one of the first opened by our Congregation. This school is well patronized by the Bishop and the people -- 350 boys attend it under the direction of 6 Brothers. Superior is Brother Ephrem. It is in every respect a model school for order and regularity. The dwelling of the Brothers is the house formerly occupied by the Rector of the Parish and the Bishop. The school is old and might be better."

(Congregation of Holy Cross, August 27, 1872.

Figures furnished by the General Chapter of 1872, held at Notre Dame.)

 

France:    Ecclesiastics professed   20      Bros. Professed   94                   "      novices      3        "   novices    113                   "      postulant    1            postulants   0                                    _____                     _____  

                                     24                       207                                     207                                    _____ 

                                    231 total __________________________________________________________________ 

Indiana:   Ecclesiastics professed   23      Bros. Professed  112                   "      novices      6        "   novices     24                   "      postulants   3        "   postulants  11                                    _____                     _____ 

                                     32                       147 __________________________________________________________________ 

Canada:    Ecclesiastics professed   20       Bros. Professed  22                   "      novices      2         "   novices    16                   "      postulants   3         "   postulants  3                                    _____                     _____ 

                                     25                        41 __________________________________________________________________ 

Louisiana: Ecclesiastics professed    3       Bros. Professed  16                   "      novices      1         "   novices     1                   "      postulant    0         "   postulants  0                                    _____                     _____ 

                                      4                        17 __________________________________________________________________ 

Rome:      Ecclesiastics professed    1       Bros. Professed   1                   "      novices      0         "   novices     0                   "      postulants   0         "   postulants  0                                    _____                     _____ 

                                      4                         1 __________________________________________________________________ 

Bengal:    Ecclesiastics professed    8       Bros. Professed   0                   "      novices      0         "   novices     0                   "      postulant    0         "   postulants  0                                    _____                     _____ 

                                      8                         0 

-- 1872 Scholastic, 6:5

France - HousesIndiana - HousesLouisiana -Houses
Common Schools 51Common Schools 9Common Schools 1
Colleges 1Colleges 4Colleges 2
Orphanages 3Orphanages 0Orphanages 1
Ind. Schools 0Ind. Schools 1Ind. Schools 0
Missions 0Missions 5Missions 0
55194

 

Canada - HousesRome - HousesBengal - Houses
Common Schools 3--
Colleges 3--
Orphanages 0--
Ind. Schools 0--
Missions 5Missions 1Missions 7
11 1 7

 

FRANCE:

Ecclesiastics:
1872: Professed 20, Novices 3, Postulants 1, Total 24
1880: Professed 20, Novices 6, Postulants 6, Total 22
1884: Professed 16, Novices 3, Postulants 3, Total 19

Brothers:
1872: Professed 94, Novices 113, Postulants 0, Total 207
1880: Professed 77, Novices 87, Postulants 3, Total 167
1884: Professed 74, Novices 65, Postulants 12, Total 151

INDIANA:

Ecclesiastics:
1872: Professed 23, Novices 6, Postulants 3, Total 32
1880: Professed 46, Novices 20, Postulants 2, Total 68
1884: Professed 51, Novices 12, Postulants 20, Total 83

Brothers:
1872: Professed 112, Novices 24, Postulants 11, Total 147
1880: Professed 147, Novices 66, Postulants 3, Total 216
1884: Professed 167, Novices 36, Postulants 4, Total 207

CANADA:

Ecclesiastics:
1872: Professed 20, Novices 2, Postulants 3, Total 25
1880: Professed 37, Novices 18, Postulants 2, Total 27
1884: Professed 42, Novices 12, Postulants 7, Total 61

Brothers:
1872: Professed 22 Novices 16, Postulants 3, Total 38
1880: Professed 39 Novices 45, Postulants 3, Total 87
1884: Professed 49 Novices 72, Postulants 3, Total 124

1884: France 170 Religious; 35 Houses
United States 290 Religious; 44 Houses
Canada 187 Religious; 21 Houses
100 Houses, 21 parishes, 27,650 pupils.

(Province ... Houses, 1872-78) Houses in Illinois: 3. Houses in Wisconsin: 3. House in Iowa: 1. Houses in Ohio: 5. House in Kentucky: 1.

112 members (20 priests or ecclesiastics and 92 Brothers) -- 3,572 pupils in all.

"From 1872-78, 18 new schools opened: La Salle, Illinois; Milwaukee, St.. Johns, 1874. Covington, Kentucky; Trenton, New Jersey, 1875. Orphan Asylum, Lafayette, Indiana, 1876. Sandusky, Ohio; St.. Philomena's, Cincinnati, 1878. St.. Vincent's Mission, Indiana; 1878. Two closed: Galveston, Texas and Sandusky, Ohio."

(Students at Notre Dame; May, 1872)
("With the exception of 10 or 12 all are born Americans.")
Italian 1
English 1
Scotch 2
Spanish 3
French 21
German 75
American 155
Irish 183
[Total] 441

(1873: Sisters, etc.) "In Notre Dame are 700 persons, and at St. Mary's, 400, all well and variously occupied. The Postulants for the Sisters and the novices do the printing and publication of 12,000 copies of the "Ave Maria" to say nothing of the "Scholastic" and other minor labors of the printing office, without neglecting the laundry, the refectory, and the wardrobes, which would otherwise require an outlay of $5,000. 'Viva Notre Dame!"

-- Cincinnati Catholic Telegraph, 1873

(1873 Numbers in classes; Provincial Archives)

St. Joseph's College
Bro. Boniface 26 pupils
Bro. Hubert 23 pupils
Bro. Marcian 16 pupils
Bro. Germanus 20 pupils
Bro. Remigius 22 pupils
Bro. V. de Paul 19 pupils

Trinity School Cincinnati
Bro. Dominic 55 pupils
Bro. Modestus 74 pupils
Bro. Anthony 76 pupils
Bro. Adolph 103 pupils

Fort Wayne, Ind.
Bro. Ephrem 45 pupils
Bro. James 45 pupils
Bro. Jerome 71 pupils
Bro. Aemilius 60 pupils
Bro. Marcellus 68 pupils
Bro. Bernadine 75 pupils

(1876: Students in Schools: Provincial Archives)
St. Joseph's College, Cincinnati 126
Trinity School, Cincinnati 308
Covington School, Kentucky 221
St. Mary's, Lafayette, Ind. 241
Fort Wayne 319
Lafayette Orphanage, Indiana 45 Total 1,393

(1876)
Priests 15
Professed Brothers 121
Scholastics 14
Novice Bros. 42
Postulants, (Bros.) 34

St. Joseph Novitiate, Father Louage, Master of Novices.

-- Catholic Directory, 1876.

(Schools; 1876)
Cincinnati, Ind.
Springfield, Ill.
Fort Wayne, Ind.
Covington, Ken.
Milwaukee, Wisc.
Hamilton, Ohio
La Salle, Ill.
Lowell (South Bend) Ind.
Alton, Ill.
Lafayette, Ind.

(Notre Dame Faculty -- 1878) Thirty professors and three general officers -- of these 23 religious and seven lay professors at a general salary of $7,000 a year. Besides: 7 prefects (all Brothers) and 18 Brothers in charge of dormitories, refectories, washrooms, steam house, infirmary, lamp room, meat room, splitting wood, gardening, porter, ushers. Total: 14 ecclesiastics and 44 Brothers.

(South Bend, St. Patrick's School, 1878-79) "Enrollment: 85. Not at school, between ages of 6 and 16, 45. No. of children in parish between 6 and 21: 380. Brothers of Holy Cross..1."Diocesan School Board Report. 1778

(St. Joseph's school for Boys, 1879) "Enrollment: 54. Tuition, yearly, $5.00. Brother of Holy Cross, teacher."

-- Report Diocesan School Board. 1879

(1879) Priests: 30. Seminarians: 12. Professed Brothers: 141. Novices: (Brothers) 60. Postulants: (Brothers) 12. 1879

(Schools: 1877)
Fort Wayne, Ind.
Alton, Ill.
Hamilton, Ohio
La Salle, Ill.
Lafayette, Ind.
 Orphanage, (Lafayette)
Milwaukee, Wisc.
Covington, Kentucky
South Bend, Ind.
Springfield, Ill.
Trenton, New Jersey
Cincinnati, Ohio
Sandusky, Ohio
St. Joseph's (new)
New Orleans, La.

(Schools; 1879 -- Local Councils)
Cincinnati, Ohio 2
Milwaukee, Wisc.
Bay City, Mich.
Holy Trinity School
Covington, Kentucky
Alton, Ill.
St. Philomena's
Trenton, New Jersey
Lafayette, Ind.
Ft. Wayne, Ind.
Vincennes, Ind.
Lafayette Orphanage, Ind.
Springfield, Ill. Washington, Ind.

(South Bend, St. Joseph's Boys' School, 1880-81) "Enrollment, 186.

Average daily attendance: 60. Not at school between ages of six and fourteen: 14. Months in school year: 10. Days in school year: 200. Monthly tuition: fifty cents. Cash receipts, tuition: $180.00. Average paid per pupil: $2.25."

-- Report of Diocesan School Board. 1880

(South Bend, St. Patrick's School, 1880-81) "Enrollment, 70.

Average attendance: 50. Not at school between ages of six and fourteen: 150. Total children of such age as would attend school: 400. Brothers of Holy Cross: 1. Tuition monthly, fifty cents."

-- Report of Diocesan School Board.1880

(South Bend, St. Hedwig's School, 1883-84) "Pupils, 315. Male, 162, Female, 153. Teachers, 1 Brother, 2 Male teachers, and 1 female secular. Teaching Catechism: five days in school, one hour each day, and one hour on Sunday. Terms in the school year: 2. Days in each term: 102. Mass attended six days a week. May services attended three days a week."

-- Report of Diocesan School Board. 1883

(South Bend, St. Hedwig's School), 1889-90: "3 Brothers, 240 boys. 1888-89: 1 Brother, 4 Sisters; 260 boys. 1887-88: 1 Brother, 4 Sisters, 2 seculars (male; boys 244. 1885-86: 1 Brother, 2 Sisters; Boys 215; Grades 2. 1884-5: Brother 1; 2 male seculars; pupils: 180. Free days (exclusive of Saturday and holy days): Oct. 17."

-- Report of Diocesan School Board. 1889

(South Bend; St. Joseph's School and Academy) 1884-5 -- 1 Brother, 5 Sisters, Grades 4. Pupils (boys) 80. Free days (exclusive of Saturdays and holy days); Thanksgiving, Feb. 22, March 17.

-- Report of Diocesan School Board. 1884

(South Bend, St. Hedwig's) 1890-91: 3 Brothers; 4 Sisters; Pupils: 350 boys, 320 girls. Total 670. Received from tuition: $2,157.24. Received from church fund: $597.76. Total: $2755.00. Tuition: 50 cents a month. 1890

(June 7, 1888; statistics as submitted to the Superior (Council) General): "In the province there are 14 parishes and missions with 196 families and 6,860 souls. Colleges and schools: 23. Pupils: 4,380. Total number of 11,240 souls." -- Rev. W. Corby. 1888

(Schools, 1889; Provincial Chapter minutes. Complete:???)
St. Pius, Chicago,
St. Columbkille's, Chicago,
St. Mary's Camden, N.J.,
Cathedral School, Milwaukee,
St. Stephen's, Hamilton, O.,
Holy Trinity, Cincinnati,
St. Patrick's South Bend,
Cathedral School, Ft. Wayne.

(1895) Priests 55
Pr. Seminarians 6
Pr. Novices 11
Total: 72

Professed Brothers 102
Novices 61
[Total:] 163

Grand Total: 235.

(Students; 1897-98 -- Latin America) 675. Notre Dame issued catalog in Spanish in July, 1899. Foreign students double those in any other college in the United States: 1899. Mexicans, Cubans, Porte Ricans, Peruvians -- 75. Brother Paul the Hermit canvassed for students in Cuba. 1899-1900: enrollment, 811, an increase of 15%. 1901-02: nearly 888. 1903: 850 -- Sept. 8th.

(Students, Decrees, 1898) "In the case of young religious who have completed the regular course in the House of Studies and have shown special talent for some particular branch or branches, it is recommended that the Provincial consult with the Superior of the House of Studies in order to place them so that they may be useful to the Community and at the same time advance themselves along the lines of their special aptitudes."

-- Circular Letters, p. 145-147..Francais.1898

(See also "Bro. Leopold, 1927")

(Brother's School, 1907.) All Grade Schools:

Cathedral School, Ft. Wayne St. Mary's, Austin, Texas Holy Trinity, Chicago.

(U.S. Catholic High School Teachers, 1915-24) 1915: 1,276, 1924: 2,181. A 19% increase. Rev. Sylvester Schmitz, O.S.B.

(1911-1919)

1911: Professed Brothers..149 Novices..48 Postulants..18
1912: Professed Brothers..148 Novices..42 Postulants..20
1919: Professed Brothers..134 Novices..57 Postulants..29

1922: Professed Brothers..134 Novices..57 Postulants..29

1867: Professed Brothers..87 Novices..46 Postulants..12

45 apprentices in Manual Labor School with Brother Constantine as Director.

(October, 1939) "United States Province, teaching Brothers: 136. (5 are assigned to advanced study: 3 at Notre Dame, 2 at Catholic University.) 7 teach in our Juniorates. 6 teach in Homes for Boys. 14 are Missionaries -- 11 in India; 2 preparing to go), 2 in Poland) 98 teach in our high school and preparatory schools. 6 teach in colleges. 1939

"of the above, 2 are general supervisors; 12 principals and head masters; 16 train and direct musical organizations; 10 are directors of athletics; 8 supervise school publications. Housekeeping Management: 8. Canvassing: 11. Postmaster: 1. Postal clerks: 4. Infirmarians and Nurses: 6. Stewards: 6 full time, 12 part time. Engineering (electrical, heating, construction, maintenance), 26."

-- Associate of St. Joseph. October, 1939

(1939) "In our House of Studies, Dujarie Hall, Notre Dame, there are 60 Brother Scholastics pursuing college courses leading to bachelor and advanced degrees and qualifying for teaching licenses. Here, too, are offered opportunities in engineering, printing, manual training, accounting, business administration, and office work to Coadjutor Brothers.

"Among the Coadjutors: 3 Brothers are engaged in clerical and Guidance Work involved in contacting perspective candidates for the Brotherhood. 16 are 'Rectors or prefects in colleges and high schools. 23 are part-time sacristans and one is a full-time sacristan. 5 are part-time librarians, and one is a full-time librarian. 2 are Guest Masters, in the tradition of the great and humble Brother Andre of St. Joseph's Shrine, Montreal. At the Mother house of the Congregation, a spiritual and professional heir of the holy Brother Columba, known to many as the "Miracle Man of Notre Dame," is managing the Community Shoe Repair shop. 13 are engaged at the Ave Maria Press at Notre Dame in Office Management. The following brief tabulation indicates the percentage of Coadjutor Brothers engaged in numerous other occupations: secretarial work, 6; Bookstore management, 2; Landscaping and gardening, 3; Farming and Farm management, 25; Animal Husbandry, 1; Auditing, 1; Bookkeeping and Accounting, 8; Treasurers, 4; Cooking, 15." 1939

Establishments at end of 1855:
New Orleans, St. Mary's Orphan Asylum
Cincinnati, Brothers' School
Louisville, Brothers' School
Toledo, Brothers' School
Hamilton, Ohio, Brothers' School
Milwaukee, Brothers' School
New York City, Workshop
Mishawaka, Postulate.

-- Sorin's Chronicles. 1855

"Josephite Brothers of Holy Cross directed by the Salvatorist Fathers of Holy Cross, Rev. P. J. Reze, Superior (Canadian); Rev. Fathers Veniard, Desprez, Legoree. Thirty-seven Brothers in six houses of the dioceses."

-- Catholic Almanac, N.Y. 1859.

Statistics, 1860

Foundations 11
Schools 17
Teachers 37
Salaries $8,000

Of this amount, one fourth might be considered as clear profit, did not Chicago turn over its surplus to the support of the college. The balance goes in rent, vacations, and in some cases, for board.

-- Sorin Chronicles. 1860

See also under the following:
St. Mary's Island (ND.)
"Sorin -- Archbishop Purcell".
"N.D. -- the Site."
Advertising
Novitiate
"Sorin on Brothers' Schools"
"Early N.D. Finances.

STEPHEN, BROTHER (Fintan Moore, Died Feb. 2, 1869)

June 28, 1847; Cointet) "I, undersigned Priest of Notre Dame du Lac, certify that the bearers, Brother Vincent and Brother Stephen, members of our Institution, are duly authorized to make a collection for the orphans' educated in the said Institution; and we recommend them to the generosity of the pious Catholics and the liberality of those who like to succor their fellow creatures. (signed) F. Cointet." 1847

"Brother Stephen, 37, novice-student, observes the Rules most faithfully; deeply religious and worthy of confidence. May be sent into a parish."

-- Sorin Memo. 1846.

(November 20, 1849) (Sorin) "The public is already informed that on Sunday morning a destructive fire has totally consumed a new building, 130 feet in length and chiefly occupied by the Orphans or Apprentices of the Institution; so violent was the conflagration that it was impossible to save nearly anything of the various shops, dormitory and study-room, their very best clothes, with their beds became a prey to the flames. Brother Stephen, the bearer of the present will humbly solicit the assistance of the friends of humanity, and whatever will be offered towards repairing this heavy loss, shall be received in this pitiful predicament with the most heartfelt gratitude. E. Sorin, Superior. 'Authorized by Bishop Van de Velde, Chicago. Authorized by Bishop de St. Palais, Vincennes.'" 1849

(Collected 1849 in Chicago -- presumably for the orphanage)
Bridget Jeffers (poor woman) $2.00
John Cannon (very poor) 25 cents
Captain Parker (convert) $5.00
Rev. P. O. Donahue (all he had and paid board) $4.60
H. Henderson (Orangemen) 50 cents
M. McEvoy family (Mother washed for me) $3.75
M. Lentry (assisted by his introduction) $1.00
Patrick Kelly boarded me at his house (Lockport, Grundy Co.)
Nicholas Rafferty introduced me. (Lockport)
Rev. Thos. O'Donnell boarded me all the time. $2.00 (Ottawa, Lafayette Co.)
(Peru and La Salle) B. Gerame ( a wealthy Frenchman) $2.00
Mr. Halligan, an old miser, rich. 25 cents
Michael Burke, kept me and introduced me, 50 cents
Galena Boarded me and did my washing, $2.50
Rev. Mr. R. Raphael board and (Peoria) laundry. $2.50
Springfield -- Harry Corrigan, boarded me and kept me, $3.00
Quincy -- Mr. Redmond boarded me in his house.
Evansville -- Robert Fergus (a Scotchman) $2.00
Mrs. Hughes -- went with me herself. 50 cents
New Albany -- Rev.. Mr. Nayron, $1.20
Patrick Laydon (apostate) $1.00
Logansport -- I spent four months Travelling in severe weather."
(November -- March, 1849)

(Visitor to Cincinnati in 1850) "We went from there (Louisville) to Cincinnati, in accordance to the same letter of obedience, and arrived on February 1 or 2 at night. found Brother Bernard in good health and Brother Boniface, but Brother Bartholomew was in bed and Bro. Amedie also sick, delivered all the letters sent by Rev. Father Superior and after leaving the state of affairs in a satisfactory way, I delivered next morning, an obedience sent by me to Brother Bartholomew to go to attend with the Director, Brother Ambrose, the German Boys' School at Louisville; and when permitted, to play and take charge of the organ. And we assisted him to depart in good will on the same day. After visiting the good Franciscan Fathers in Cincinnati and find what...."1850

"Brother Stephen, Fintan Moore; died February 2nd, 1869. This Brother was in the community for many years and fulfilled offices of importance as secretary, and steward, and postmaster. He was somewhat original in his ways but could be trusted at all times and remained to the end a good religious. He died of a cancer, in the present infirmary, aged 60, on the day of Purification."

-- Granger Memo. February 2nd, 1869

see also under "Niles" (1849).

(Brother Stephen to Sorin. Chicago, Nov. 21, 1849) "The good Bishop and priests of Chicago received me very kindly, but have no money. But what none other ever got I have permission etc., to collect where and when I please." Nov. 21, 1849

(Bro. Stephen to Sorin; Peoria City, Jan. 25, 1850) "I hope you received the check for $40.00 from Ottawa. Please pray for Edward Kehoe and his wife who kept me in their house. His wife laundered my clothes. They ask for prayers."

"The good priest here is very kind. He subscribed $5.00 and promised to do all he could with his people for my mission. I took his horse and buggy all through the city. He wants a Brother about Easter to teach. He will pay the stipulated sum of $100.00 and board and keep him respectfully until the school can do better. He would prefer to have two Brothers if possible, as it is safest to have two together." (On this trip he collected $125.00) Sorin Chronicles. Jan. 25, 1850)

(St. Mary's College, Chicago, June 15, 1860) "I am at a loss to know how or what to do to the Trustees of the German Church (St. Joseph's) as they asked for the key to lock it up.... Father Superior left this morning without saying a word to me. The Brother sacristan holds the key. Just as I closed I saw four men at the Church and the Brother arguing with them. I went over and ascertained that they want no more to do with your congregation. They will lock the Church and give the key to the Bishop and let him supply a priest." Stephen to Sorin) Provincial Archives. June 15, 1860

(Bro. Stephen to Sorin -- Ottawa, Ill., Dec. 20, 1849) (Provincial Archives) "We need scarcely say the many difficulties to be met with in this wild region and the infamous language we must listen to in our travels....

"We are at present requested by the Rev. Mr. O'Donnell to spend Christmas with him, and he will assist me as far as his influence goes. It's good for me to have such an opportunity to celebrate this holy time in peace and recollection after listening so such follies and wickedness. Not being aware of the manner by which collections may be profitable made, it is necessary for me to remain two or three days in one village and be introduced by some person of influence, otherwise we may travel with very small benefit. Indeed, as yet we cannot boast of much remaining in our hands, ninety-seven dollars, 42/100. We intend to remit $100 when able. We hope (you) received the draft on New York for $100 payable to the order of E. Sorin.

"The Rev. Mr. John Ingoldsby of Joliet has directed a man by the name of Lamb as a postulant for the Brothers.... We have many things to vindicate and prejudices to remove that have been lodged against us..."Dec. 20, 1849

(Chicago...Notre Dame) "I send the profits of my time to you.... The good Bishop of Milwaukee assisted me and we received $100 for the orphans...."

(Galena, Jan.. 22, 1850) "After a stay of eight days and not being able to collect we leave tomorrow for Peoria on our way to Indiana...this is an unchristian and uncharitable place. It's been so to me at least. Rev. Mr. McGarisk said monks that come here should be thrown into the Mississippi. In the meantime, I expect to remain for a week...."Jan.. 22, 1850

I should like to be able to collect at least $100.00.... I shall make a more pressing demand on the priests of Indiana and the people.... I hope you received the $40.00 check I sent you. I beg the prayers of the Community for my spiritual and temporal benefit and that I may not spend my time unprofitably nor do anything disorderly. I suffer from cold and inconveniences, but worst of all when badly treated by priests.

(St. Mary's University, Chicago, April 20, 1859) "As I understand you have the Rules and Directory in English, but not so as you wish to use or give them. Well, I have the French, I think you might let me have the English copies also to keep privately and by this means I could learn many things to assist me. Such parts as you do not like to use you could easily mark for me...." April 20, 1859

"Born, Ireland, 1811; entered 1844; habit, December 25, 1844; professed , August 30, 1846; Commissioner; 1859, steward and secretary, 1853, secretary and postmaster; Director of St. Mary's (Chicago). Somewhat original, but trustworthy at all times; died of cancer, Feb. 2, 1869." (Brother Stephen Fintan Moore)Feb. 2, 1869

(Father Granger to Sorin.) Brother Stephen (Fintan Moore) "The good Brother Stephen died after a long and painful illness, which he endured with a truly edifying patience, fortified by all the Sacraments of the Church he consummated his 'sacrifice' on the beautiful day of the Purification of the Blessed Virgin Mary, and his soul present to God by the hands of Mary, did not delay, I hope, to enter into the temple of the celestial Jerusalem." Feb. 2, 1869

"Dear Brother Stephen was during fifteen years my first assistant in the Post Office at Notre Dame, in which employment he always acquitted himself with as much integrity as zeal and punctuality. He was one of the first professed in America, and one with whom I have had the most intimate relations. He was one of those men of faith and devotedness upon whom I always felt I could rely.... I recommend him in a special manner to the prayers of the Congregation." Sorin's Circular Letter.


‹— Brother Aidan's Extracts —›